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Portfolio


About this Guide Each of the following proposals was submitted for consideration for Light City 2017. We received 150 submissions through our Call for Entry and the festival’s independent jury was only able to select about 16% of those for inclusion in our original festival. We received many outstanding proposals, but we could not produce them all. The Baltimore Office of Promotion & The Arts (BOPA) has sought the permission of the artists to share these proposals in good faith, to encourage other cultural institutions, partners, and community stakeholders to consider producing these projects in and around the timeframe of Light City 2017. Should you or your organization wish to pursue producing one of these proposals, please email Light City Festival Coordinator, Ashley Molese at amolese@promotionandarts.org. BOPA will facilitate a formal introduction to the artist/s, and begin the process of connecting artists to potential partners. For any further questions, please contact Ashley Molese directly at the email address listed above.


Submitter name: Alward_Dale

Situated on the banks of the Jones Falls River, the multimedia experience consists of projected screens of computergenerated imagery moving against the flow of the river, and ground illuminations that mimic the river flow. As visitors enter and move through the exhibit space, sounds are triggered and animated image sprites appear on screen. The animated sprites are then swept into the flow of the on-screen currents. The sprites will appear relative to the visitor’s position so visitors sense that they are contributing to the animation of the work. The flow of the projection implies that the visitor is on the river and floating downstream. The work will cycle through four narratives, each defined by its own images, color palette, and sounds. The transitions between each scene will be the result of the introduction of new elements and colors that push the previous scene’s elements away. The visual and aural elements that make up each scene are drawn from the selected time periods and the physical geography of Jones Falls River.

Artist: Dale Alward LIGHT CITY 2017

Propsal reprinted with permission by the artist(s).


Submitter name: Ashton_Ross

Artist: The Projection Studio LIGHT CITY 2017

Propsal reprinted with permission by the artist(s).


Submitter name: Baumgartner_Eric

Light City is a uniquely Baltimore event, and as such each installation should be rooted in Baltimore and reflective of its people and place. Drawing inspiration from the nautical roots of the city, the design team created a stage, reminiscent of many nautical forms— sails, hulls, waves and shells—for the public to perform on. Performer / Performance is a modern interpretation of a traditional shadow show, except instead of shadows, the installation harnesses today’s innovative technologies and abstracts the Performer’s movements into a light performance. Using pressure-sensing accelerometers embedded in the floor, the performers physical impact is translated in colored LEDs up the walls of the form. While an individual’s performance is impactful, the collaboration of many performers on the stage simultaneously creates a dynamic performance for the public, illustrating the increased beauty of many people coming together in one place.

Artist: Performer/Performance LIGHT CITY 2017

Propsal reprinted with permission by the artist(s).


Submitter name: Bell_Kelley

Artist: Kelley Bell and Corrie Parks LIGHT CITY 2017

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Submitter name: Benevento_Michael

Adaptive Modular Design The blocks are modular until installed, so the arrangement can be modified to better fit the site conditions. This can include accommodating for site proportions and scale. Arrangement modifications could include altering the stacks and/or separating into multiple clusters of blocks.

Versatile Seating The arrangement of the blocks can accommodate multiple isolated users while simultaneously accommodating groups. Users can sit next to each other, diagonal or across to accommodate different social situations. Physical Attributes Each cube is a standard chair height of 17”x 17”x17”, with a smooth surface. Each block of concrete is nearly 400lbs. Each OSB cube can be anchored to neighboring concrete or wooden cubes, interlocking the layout of blocks. The fluorescent tubes will pierce some of the cubes at a random angle.

Artist: Michael Benevento LIGHT CITY 2017

Propsal reprinted with permission by the artist(s).


Submitter name: Berlin_George

Artist: George Berlin LIGHT CITY 2017

Propsal reprinted with permission by the artist(s).


Submitter name: Biars_Atsuko

Inside Structure Chaudron’s construction team will build a plywood base structure to place the hardware and secure mirrors. Pre-cut mirrors will be placed accordingly to cover the entire floor, side walls and ceiling. All of the mirrors will be safety glazed to prevent damage. Several sections of mirrors will have antique silvering which is their own technique invented by the Chaudron family and passed down for generations. Both container doors will be secured in open position during the LCB operation hours and plywood mock entrances/exits will be used instead of the container doors. A combination of thick black curtains along with several panels of the mirrors will be used at the mock entrances/exits in order to block light and to provide the best reflection. The cat walk with a railing will be constructed down the middle for people to walk along. Please see more information under “The Catwalk” section. Approximately 175 LED lights will hang from the ceiling. Please see more information under “Lighting Structure”.

The Catwalk An ADA approved size catwalk, a straight path with railings, will be built for allow the audience to walk through the box. The catwalk will be placed in the middle of the box. Both the catwalk and railing will have reflective paint/tape to show clear direction.

Artist: Chaudron Glass & Mirror Co, with Baltimore-Kawasaki Sister City Committee LIGHT CITY 2017

Propsal reprinted with permission by the artist(s).


Submitter name: Bientenhader_Micha

To build a power field between the static of the sculpture and the dynamic movement that has been frozen, we reanimate the LED-tubes (by video and computer control), which represent the static rubble in the moving mass, themselves, defining an installation caught between halt and movement. The animation of the LED-tubes is based on laws of mass movements and their counter movements. The parameter of mass movements is based on our predefined animation and the parameter of counter movements is based on the sensoric interaction by the audience. The project shows on one hand the, often underestimated, power of nature, but also its fragility with respect to human influences, like the pollution of the oceans. On the other hand it shows the influence a few people can have on a society when linked with the laws of mass movements. Interactivity The installation will run on its own, similar to a video installation, as long as no audience interacts with it. As soon as the audience walks through the work it will start reacting to the locations, densities and movements of the audience. The interaction will influence the color flow and provoke fragmentations of the animation. For proof of concept of our sensor system see the video https://vimeo.com/172087093 Construction and Programming The size of the installation depends on the location. Somewhere between 15 and 30 feet high, up to 45 feet broad and up to 90 feet long. This would be the maximum size we could imagine but it can also be smaller. The construction for the LED-tubes will be a steel frame structure combined with a net of steel ropes welded on site by us (or if necessary through security laws, by local professionals). The LED-tubes are our own construction. They are approximately 4-5 foot long, ip68 standard, and will have about 100-150 single addressable LED's built in. This 3-Dimensional matrix of up to 15000 single RGBW-LED's is controlled by a custom tailored micro controller based solution combined with the sensor system. For an idea of the concept in much smaller dimension and with classic fluorescent tubes see the video froelicher_bietenhader_schmidt_02.mov

Artist: frĂ–licher|bietenhader LIGHT CITY 2017

Propsal reprinted with permission by the artist(s).


Submitter name: Blackistone_Kevin

Artist: Kevin Blackistone LIGHT CITY 2017

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Submitter name: Bolygo_Balint

Light Lilly is a floating light-sculpture that uses refracted laser light to produce a changing laser projection on its large circular floating surface. The sculptures resemble giant floating water lilies whose surfaces become changing animated pools of light. Light Lily transforms the water’s surface into a mesmeric animated surface and creates spectacular focal points along the water’s edge. The light effects created by the lasers allude to the natural light phenomena of the Aurora Borealis/Northern Lights. Light Lilly forms a series of illuminated islands on the water that evoke phenomena of the skies above, like giant ephemeral dishes that reflect our connection to the universe.

Artist: Balint Bolygo LIGHT CITY 2017

Propsal reprinted with permission by the artist(s).


Submitter name: Cahoreau_Fabrice

The Bibigloo is a cry for help in the face of global warming. The Bibigloo urgently raises questions in light of the challenge that all countries must confront. The metaphorical language of this igloo of light is based on the following premise: is the red igloo a symbol of prosperity and happiness, or the opposite the ecological catastrophe threatening us? The device ties directly in with Bibi’s previous explorations concerning the modification of our environment. This work summaries the causes of global warming. The Bibigloo is incandescent just like our planet that burns and heats up. The Bibigloo is a ball of fire; the planet is burning. The igloo symbolises the future. The Bibigloo light is like volcanic lava. Red from a distance, it becomes yellow and iridescent when approached.

Artist: BIBI LIGHT CITY 2017

Propsal reprinted with permission by the artist(s).


Submitter name: Canet_Mar_Sola

Artist: Varvara & Mar LIGHT CITY 2017

Propsal reprinted with permission by the artist(s).


Submitter name: Carlson_Dustin

Create an original work of art for Light City Baltimore. The conceptual works embody the form of Financial and consumer environment of the inner harbor but with contrasting content. The idea is to give both visitors and citizens of baltimore a transformative experience by placing a few words in the cultural landscape of the inner harbor. These words serve as a gentile reminder of the baltimore that exists beyond the glass, steel, and bright lights of the inner harbor and gives a moment of contemplation that will help most anyone in a given situation.

Artist: Dustin Carlson LIGHT CITY 2017

Propsal reprinted with permission by the artist(s).


Submitter name: Chang_Wei_Chung

Most simply described, Big USS Bean Bag is a pair of oversized, glow-in-the-dark bean bags; but it represents and operates as much more. Situated at the end of Pier 1, it is a beacon and an overlook, art and furniture, a reminder of Baltimore’s rich maritime history, and transforms Baltimore’s Living Room into a crash pad. Big USS Bean Bag is a place for all, a platform for dialogue that can begin to mend the social rifts that have been brought to light over the last year. The leather-like PTFE membrane surface provides a relaxing perch from which to see the other Light City installations and the iconic buildings and boats occupying the Inner Harbor. Filled with transparent plastic balls, Big USS Bean Bag is a playground – its ever-changing form an opportunity to imagine, climb, slide, become king of the mountain. Shaped in the form of a historic Baltimore Clipper jib sail and manufactured by a local sail maker, Big USS Bean Bag is an opportunity to climb, sit or sleep on the sails that are so proudly represented on the adjacent USS Constellation. Big USS Bean Bag provides a place to sit, chill out and relax; to witness the grandeur of Baltimore’s Inner Harbor, reminisce on its rich history and foster the healing relationships that will spark the city’s next great evolution.

Artist: Wei-Chung Chang LIGHT CITY 2017

Propsal reprinted with permission by the artist(s).


Submitter name: Christensen_Mads

Mads Christensen's dynamic light-based works explore how we as viewers respond to illumination and color through the neuro-receptors of the human visual analog system. Following in the footsteps of groundbreaking artists exploring this medium like James Turrell, Doug Wheeler, Dan Flavin, Ivan Navarro and Olafur Eliasson, Christensen is interested in the manner by which our brain translates the information gathered by the receptors in the human eye into specific colors, and consequently the emotional experience. Christensen finds the interplay between color and intensity of light in relation to the way we see light fascinating. For example, the human eye senses red and blue light differently. Red-sensitive cones are prominent near the center of the retina, yielding great detail in the perceived image. There are however, relatively few bluesensitive cones which make it difficult to see detail with just blue light. However, when blue and red lights are combined as in What Are You Blinking About, unexpected and fascinating consequences of pattern and multiple colors appear because of the anatomy of the human eye.

Artist: Mads Christensen LIGHT CITY 2017

Propsal reprinted with permission by the artist(s).


Submitter name: Collectif_Coin

Artist: Collectif Coin LIGHT CITY 2017

Propsal reprinted with permission by the artist(s).


Submitter name: Cook_Adam

Artist: Adam Cook LIGHT CITY 2017

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Submitter name: Corbin_Jacob

Posters would illustrate how the colors correspond to different accelerations as well as suggest other learning activities. If a playground-type merry-go-round can be incorporated into the tent, participants could see how the centripetal acceleration is a function of the rotational speed and the distance from the center. How fun to be at the middle of a spinning merry-go-round and hold your Glow Go Ball showing just normal gravity, then moving the Glow Go Ball outwards and see how the pull becomes horizontal, and increases as you move further out. A participant would also be experiencing acceleration on themselves as well, and would gain solid intuition about centripetal forces. I would also include a pendulum that Glow Go Balls can be mounted to, and posters with learning suggestions such as “what happens when you simply drop the ball instead of tossing it up?”, “what happens when you shake the Glow Go Ball?”, and “what happens when you shake and twist the Glow Go Ball?” which, by the way, produces some very cool rainbow trail effects. I would also have a “further learning” poster, for those whose interest is piqued. For instance, acceleration can be describe as a vector, which is a direction and a magnitude. Vectors are an important concept in math and science, and this exhibit may provide a learner with an excellent concrete example which may aide them in further learning. I would also have a small display showing what the inside of the Glow Go Ball looks like, as well as showcasing the accelerometer, the small chip which makes this project possible, which is also present in virtually all phones, which informs the phone which way is up, so your screen rotates correctly.

Artist: Jacob Corbin LIGHT CITY 2017

Propsal reprinted with permission by the artist(s).


Submitter name: Crawley_Luke

Artist: Owens + Crawley LIGHT CITY 2017

Propsal reprinted with permission by the artist(s).


Submitter name: Dan_Archer

In keeping with our participative artistic work in the public domain, we bring you “Street Light Orchestra”. This urban installation allows passers-by to virtually wander amongst orchestra musicians and to (re)discover classical pieces by listening to different families of instruments individually. Imagine you’re facing a philharmonic orchestra… You’re sitting in the audience but dream of being able to get up, get closer to the orchestra, and walk between the musicians to discover each group of sounds. Streetlight Orchestra allows you to do just this right in the city. Artist: Happy City Lab LIGHT CITY 2017

Propsal reprinted with permission by the artist(s).


Submitter name: Dillin_Lisa

For Ghost Grove I will anchor a floating platform in between two piers of the harbor. A submersible water pump mounted to the platform will feed a manifold with a bank of fog nozzles (fine mist nozzles). These fog nozzles will create a ghostly wall of fog that will be used as a projection screen. Perpendicular to this fog screen will be three exterior gobo projectors, these projectors will be mounted on a pre-existing structure (such as a bridge) or they may be mounted to a purpose-built temporary structure, depending on the site. Each gobo projector will project a sharp white image of a single dead tree silhouette. The three projectors combined will produce a "grove" of trees. This Ghost Grove will appear to hover in the harbor a foot above the water line. It is important to note that projections can be made on fog created by fog machines as well as on mist. Commercial fog screens have been used in a variety of indoor and outdoor public spaces. Ghost Grove however will utilize the harbor water creating a screen from this available resource that will not require additional chemicals such as "fog juice". The goal of Ghost Grove is to raise awareness of global warming and rising sea levels, caused by deforestation and pollution. As water levels rise, we will lose more and more of our waterfront real estate: what was once land will then be water. As humans we are incredible innovators and have made innumerable great achievements, however our future is at risk and uncertain due to the toll we are taking on our natural resources. If we choose to use our innovative capabilities towards green energy, increased green space, and the clean-up of our waterways then we will be able to enjoy a healthy future together while providing a space for non-human life forms to flourish. Ghost Grove warns of what the consequences will be if we do not face our ecological challenges fervently.

Artist: Lisa Dillin LIGHT CITY 2017

Propsal reprinted with permission by the artist(s).


Artist: Zoey Duong LIGHT CITY 2017

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Each Arch is an experience. The sound reactive LED’s light up the internal structure and create a fun interactive meeting place for all ages. Each arch is designed with a 360 degree bench that surrounds the base where people will congregate and interact with each other. Atmospheric music will be playing creating opportunities for people to sit at the benches and watch light dance throughout the surface from the music. Through Collaborating with Baltimore local talent including sculptors, programmers, musicians, and sound engineers the Light Arches will be a visually stunning addition to the BGE boardwalk. Why Arches? Arches are fantastic structures, if you go Arches National Park in Utah and you might as well be on Mars. LED’s shine through the surface of the arches as if they were a glowing mineral from another planet providing an engaging and visual spectacle for everyone. The arches are brilliantly painted so during the day they are fun objects to see and meet at. During the night the LED’s take over for a fun, illuminating and interactive installation.

Artist: Isaac Ewart LIGHT CITY 2017

Propsal reprinted with permission by the artist(s).


Artist: Titia Ex LIGHT CITY 2017

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Layers of Causation gathers together elements that have a causal relationship and anchors them to a shared location. My service with the US Army in Baghdad was a highly volatile time in my life; it changed me from who I was. Working with these images I captured in Bagdad is cathartic for me. I get to take them, rework them, and present them in a more neutral context. Some of these places don’t exist anymore. Some of these people don’t exist anymore. And they definitely don’t exist in the way that they were then. These images have a unique viewpoint, a soldier’s viewpoint. They may show the troops and the guns, but they also show the life, humanity and intimacy present in a combat zone. These aren’t the hard, cropped, idealized images from photojournalists. They show the joy that happened in these places. These aren’t the small images in the news or even the images seen on TV, no matter how big the TV. These are large images, to feel a little bit of what it was like to be there, to feel the weight of it. I’ve placed these black and white images near the 9/11 Memorial because one wouldn’t exist without the other. My hope is that viewers will engage in conversations and reflect on the flow of history, the weight of the decisions that were made, and the real impact on all of the people those decisions effected.

Artist: Aquilina Faginas LIGHT CITY 2017

Propsal reprinted with permission by the artist(s).


Materials/Components: The two individual spatial light installations differ from each other in the way each utilizes the scrim material within the space. The scrim diffuses and filters the alternating colors of light coming from the back of the installation and various forms can vary the lighting effects. The individual experiencing the installation is contained by a plexiglass node, establishing a set relationship/parameter between the body within the space, and light of the installation. For the middle screen, we are using 30208 LED’s mounted on wood panels for the LED light display, covered by a large scrim that is 24’ in length, and about 10’ high. The scrim is one continuous piece of material that weaves throughout the two room spaces, and stretches flat in front of the LED display. The two side installations/rooms will be made from CNC cut wood panels, painted white, with plexiglass elements inside to create the node. The camera will be hooked up to a microcontroller and a computer to livestream the images captures to the LED screen in the center.

Artist: Benjamin Fann LIGHT CITY 2017

Propsal reprinted with permission by the artist(s).


The EQUALIZER: We are one Baltimore. Let’s make some waves! THE EQUALIZER is a large thermal imaging projection of a live video feed of the crowd interacting with each other, artists, and performers. Thermal imaging sees people’s heat as light and color - it does not see race, religious or sexual preference - but equalizes us. We are One Baltimore and need to work together to power social change. Let’s make some waves - and create positive impacts in our city! A large format music equalizer spans the top of the exhibit with LED colored lights moving up and down - changing with the music output of local performers. The equalizer lights turn into the Baltimore City skyline as it passes through the center logo and branding piece which features the distinct shape of our one beautiful City. Performances from local artists will take place every night. The first event will be a dance performance, a yoga class or a drum circle, and the night will end with a musical act. Between sets, the crowd live feed will be interrupted to show global thermal videos connecting the We are One Baltimore theme to - we are also One World.

Artist: Lisa Ferretto LIGHT CITY 2017

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Secchi Fish Observatory is a site-specific, real-time, dynamic data visualization project activated by the aquatic activity within the Harbor that tells a story of the life below the water’s surface. Secchi Fish Observatory is an interspecies collaboration, a submerged dynamic lightscape visualizing the real-time swimming patterns of fish, the current water temperature, and the fluctuation of tides in the Baltimore Harbor using innovative technology and custom programming to illuminate the water with shifting patterns of light. Secchi Fish Observatory highlights the symbiotic relationship between animal life and human activity. The Harbor itself will be dynamically illuminated from within, encouraging viewers to consider the challenges and successes of water quality and necessary interventions for the health of both the public health and the water system.

Artist: Jenn Figg LIGHT CITY 2017

Propsal reprinted with permission by the artist(s).


Artist: Mikael Flores-Amper LIGHT CITY 2017

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THE TECHNOLOGY: The LED screen, combining several open-source designs and constructed by the artist, will allow for the brightest display possible with a minimal energy footprint. The off-the-shelf sound system was chosen for durability, reliability and portability. The audio signal will pass through a mini-computer running a software application designed and written by the artist in the Processing programming language. The program will analyze the rhythm, amplitude and content of delivered dictation and feed unique, procedurally-generated complementary visuals to the LED screen. An early prototype of this software is planned for exhibition as part of the Open Circle event at the 2017 Book Festival. Processing, based on the Java programming language, was developed for coding within the visual arts. For more information, including examples of other artists’ use of the language, visit processing.org CONSULTANTS/SUPPORTERS: Amanda Jane Fiore is a Baltimore-based creative writer and writing instructor who regularly holds public readings featuring local talent. The software utilized in the voxIl project was initially conceived to complement these readings, as they are often accompanied by musicians, performers, or visual artists. Through Fiore I intend to schedule similar creative works for the festival. Through my association with the Feminist Art Project, Baltimore and other local activist networks I intend to contract speakers to share original work illuminating contemporary social themes, including race, gender and economic inequality. Stephanie Joyal is a Baltimore-based stand-up comedian focused on diversity in performance. Through Joyal I intend to contract comedy acts for the voxIl stage. Mollye Bendell is a Baltimore-based new media artist and fabricator. I have budgeted for ten hours of her expertise to assist with the project build. Kyle Judd and Jamie Paulson are Maryland based software and hardware developers. I have budgeted for ten hours of each of their time at reduced, negotiated rates for consultation with the project build. As an instructor and graduate student at University Maryland, Baltimore County, I have access to both the studio space and tool resources required to complete this project. Our facilities in the Intermedia & Digital Arts program are excellent, and the expertise that populates the Visual Arts department will be an essential asset to this project.

Artist: Jeffrey Gangwisch LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: Isaac Garmey LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: Alan Goffinski LIGHT CITY 2017

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A Rippling Cityscape is an interactive light installation featuring a wall of large LED panels in the shape of the Baltimore City skyline, a piezo-tiled walkway, and locally sourced musical inputs to affect the light displayed by the Cityscape walls. By integrating unique content engine software, the installation allows visitors moving through the Cityscape to produce a range of rippling light patterns up the Cityscape walls based on the amount of pressure produced, while a playlist of musical beats from local artists produce rippling light patterns down the Cityscape walls. These ripples are intended to illuminate the impact of individuals vs groups as well as that of local pop culture on the City.

Artist: Elisabeth Goldwasser LIGHT CITY 2017

Propsal reprinted with permission by the artist(s).


Illuminatus Flying Laser Squad :: Dancing On Water A proposal for Light City Baltimore 2017 BGE Light Art Walk Laser artist Mike Gould and his troupe, Illuminatus Lasers, propose a mobile, interactive, videocontrolled portable laser display that combines elements of luminance, graphics, and video. Called Dancing On Water, this piece projects onto an inner harbor building wall a wispy, blue and green luminous laser image called “lumia” that represents the interaction of coherent light on water. A video camera captures the dancing movements of a participant, and projects an outline of their movements atop the lumia described above. The Flying Laser Squad aspect of this is the team of artists and technicians who man the equipment and direct the action. Collaboration We are making this as flexible and collaborative as possible: we would love to work with a local dance troupe, and it would be great if we could work with local musicians to provide a sound track for this. We don’t need a professional dancer; any passer-by that would like to control the laser imagery with their body is welcome. Equipment All of the equipment needed for this fits into a two-wheeled cart that can be quickly moved into position, operated for a period, then packed up and wheeled to another location. This distills the laser lightshow into a pop-up event that can move from place to place. The equipment is battery powered, so no electrical connections are needed. This is a self-contained laser art piece which needs only a dancer and a wall/screen to make complete. Accessibility Anyone who can move any part of their body can participate; people who use wheelchairs or other assistive technology are welcome. As long as our venue itself is accessible, all can have a part in the art. Audio There is a small sound system in place that provides music for dancing, and a broad range of styles are possible from a library loaded into an iPod. Venues We would leave this to the festival’s discretion – we are totally flexible. All we need is a blank wall of around 20’ square with no windows. White surfaces work the best, but we have projected onto brick and other surfaces. We can travel (“flying!”) from site to site, or are happy to stay the night in one place. The area needs to be as dark as possible to maximize the impact of the lasers on whatever surface we are projecting. We have darkened public spaces by putting plastic bags on street lights, for instance. If the festival would like to provide us a screen over an other-wise unsuitable surface, or suspended on poles, we can work with that.

Artist: Mike Gould LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: Justin Graham LIGHT CITY 2017

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Interactive trees generating lights and sounds Phonofolium Tetraedre is an interactive artwork with 3 living trees reacting to the human touch by sounds and lights. Several sound and light characters are revealed when the audience is touching or stroking lightly them. The intensity of light’s variations evolves according to the intensity of the human contact with the trees. The interactions of people with the trees illuminate and highlight a tetraedre light structure in front of the trees. Each face of the structure is connected to a tree. The intensity and color of the light of each face evolves according to the interaction with the tree. Phonofolium lets us know about their existence by a scream, a melody and a lighting vibration. Sound characters and lights generate various feelings and influence feedbacks of audience. Artist: Gregory Lasserre & Anais met den Ancxt

LIGHT CITY 2017

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As humans our lives are inextricably linked with the sea; as an essential part of our ecosystem and an invaluable resource, we can cull knowledge and inspiration from its depths. Art Forms from the Harbor will celebrate this salient relationship, offering insight into the diversity of life within water and the creative catalyst the sea is to humanity. Our inspiration and title for this project comes from Ernst Haeckel’s (German biologist and artist 1834-1919) illustrations of marine organisms, many of which are featured in his book Art Forms from the Ocean1. Water is a constant in all our lives and to appreciate the profundity of our connection to it and the planet’s waterways, one must look to both the macrocosm and the microcosm. There is a correspondence between the very large and the very small within our universe, where the same principles apply to planets as they do to atoms. When we speak about the natural environment, there is a continuum between the local and the global, as well as, microorganisms to macroscopic ones. Every level affects each other. From Inner Harbor to the Patapsco river through the Chesapeake Bay and onto the Atlantic Ocean, there is interdependence. When looking to the vastness of the seas, it is easy for one to forget the complexity that the smallest elements bring to the balance of life. Haeckel’s work found beauty and intricacy at the microscopic level within our oceans, specifically focusing on Radiolaria, protozoa whose fossils make up a large part of our ocean floors. Radiolarians, which have existed for millions of years, are often perfect geometric forms whose symmetry evoke sacred geometry, complex chemical latticework, and mathematical patterns that can be found throughout the natural world

Artist: Erinn Hagerty LIGHT CITY 2017

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The proposed exhibit will combine sculpture, performance, and technology/lighting to provide a truly unique multisensory experience for the audience. This presentation will involve the use of custom-made sculptural lighting elements which will be activated by the sounds made by musicians as well as the public in general; creating a rhythmic light show in concert with the musical performance. The Zero Gravity Creations team will design and construct a completely unique set of lights for this project. The result promises to be both aurally and visually exhilarating. The sculptural illuminated blown glass lights floating like a wetland in the Inner Harbor will transform the atmosphere at this end of the Light Art Walk.

Artist: Eric Hanson LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: Chris Harvey LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: John Hastings LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: Ela Hawes LIGHT CITY 2017

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Sweep is comprised of one hundred, four meter tall, Acrylic stems propped up on a custom fitted base. Each stem has three sections of light implanted inside (all LED controllable) and the base is equipped with speakers playing carefully selected sound effects and music. Sway is designed to slowly move with the breeze like a curtain in the wind. When viewed from a distance, Sway provides the optical illusions of suspended light rods bobby softly and gracefully from side to side like a school of fish in a deep current. When viewed up close the sculpture has an opposite effect: as the sculpture is so tall, while walking through Sway you will feel the intimidation of the large individual lights moving ominously above and around you, you will feel confusion as each stem beams different colors and makes a different noise. Sway symbolizes how society wants everyone to move together harmoniously, whereas the reality is that although it may appear so (at a glance), each person has his or her own ideas (represented through light) and feelings (represented by sound) and moves slightly differently (represented by the angle of each stem).

Artist: Alexandra Heaney LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: Sean Hennessey LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: Artemis Herber LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: Elizabeth Hines LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: Andy Holtin LIGHT CITY 2017

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Inspired by this vision art duo Tijdmakers wants to create a light art sculpture as universal symbol of interconnectivity and install it at a square at the inner harbor in Baltimore. The attracting light patterns interact with people standing on it and will encourage people to connect with each other. We will install 19 circles – diameter around 3 to 5 meter - of LED-light in milled rubber mats at a big square. The LED will be programmed using DMX to show the different elements of the Flower of Life and the Seed of Life and to interact with the public.

Artist: Saskia Hoogendoorn LIGHT CITY 2017

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Lighting design elements will be controlled by a rotation of the best of Baltimore’s light designers.

A giant wheel of DMX controlled lights programmed to a multitude of light movements and design.

Artist: Chris Hooper LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: Meghan Howell LIGHT CITY 2017

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About Luke Jerram Luke Jerram's multidisciplinary practice involves the creation of sculptures, installations and live arts projects. Living in Bristol, UK but working internationally, Jerram has created a number of extraordinary art projects over the last 18 years which have excited and inspired people around the globe. www.lukejerram.com. Jerram Jerram is known worldwide for his large scale public engagement artworks. ‘Park and Slide’ a giant 90m water slide presented on Park Street in Bristol in May 2014. With 96,573 requests for a 'ticket to slide', more than 65,000 people came to watch on the day. It generated 350 news articles reaching more than 600 million people around the globe. The project has now been copied with commercial urban slide companies popping up around the world. His celebrated street pianos installation 'Play Me, I'm Yours' has been presented in over 50 cities so far, reaching an audience to date of over 10 million people around the world. Over 1500 street pianos have been installed in cities across the world for the public to play.

Artist: Luke Jerram LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: Bob Kaputof LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: Sean Kenny LIGHT CITY 2017

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The “Tent” element is to invoke a feeling of being underneath the water. The honeycomb like organic structural shape is inspired both by underwater geology and coral reef textures. It will be constructed by aluminum, one of the most highly recyclable metal. The surface structure coming of the honeycomb for the wave design to go on will be made of fiberglass or epoxy. The wave like surface will be fabricated curved shape of various sized casted with acrylic resin mixed with glow sand. The mixture will also include coloring agent to give a blue hue. Detailed will be added by airbrushing then coated with high gloss enamel paint. The surfaces inside the “Tent” will be covered with mirror stainless steel to visually elongate the silhouette of the tents. The design of Coral Reef Gate also references the National Aquarium’s building.

Artist: Riki Kim LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: Chris Kojzar LIGHT CITY 2017

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I would like to work with communities in Baltimore and the surrounding areas to collect sea glass to create a living digital artwork to be presented at Light City. The artwork will integrate self addressable LED technology and genuine pieces of sea glass in a circular matrix to play out animated patterns and graphics relevant to the people of Baltimore. A wrought iron frame referencing the area’s industrial heritage created by Baltimore based metal workers G Krug and Son will join a central graph of 815 LEDs and sea glass and a digitally programmed array of illuminated animations to captivate audiences during the event. The enchanting story of sea glass will be brought to life via volunteer participation, the power of the sea, electronic wizardry and hundreds of pieces of locally collected sea glass borne from the area’s historic industrial glass production and use.

Artist: Stuart Langley LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: Nicholas Lavella LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: Lameesa Mahood LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: Darcy Meeker LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: Kyle Miller LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: Bill Mitchell LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: Phillipp Mohr LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: Lisa Moren LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: Quentin Moseley LIGHT CITY 2017

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We are excited and proud to formally acknowledge our interest in the City Lights festival in Baltimore. It is a project that has grabbed the attention of the whole team and has stimulated some very interesting dialogue and ideas thus far. Towering to a height of 4 meters, Mountain of Light is a monolithic installation, brought to life by a dramatic repertoire of lighting effects that begin with subtle changes in colour and culminate in a simulated eruption of shooting flames and molten lava. The installation is constructed from a series of modular extruded columns that are assembled into the abstract shape of a volcanic mountain. The mountain is designed to be viewed and approached from all sides, offering a full 360-degree experience. Each column is packed with computerized graphics that can be controlled by visitors to create effects of superb accuracy and realism. The entire mountain is controllable, so participants can direct colour patterns to run from one side, across, around, down and up the mountain. Surround sound installed within the structure adds drama to the atmosphere.

Artist: Angus Muir LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: Wil Natzel LIGHT CITY 2017

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Floating circular mirror sculptures transform into endless light tunnels at Baltimore Inner Harbor, like portals in time and space that are revealed only in the evenings. The multi-coloured Innity lights vary in size and will be placed around the harbor with the dramatic e-ect of appearing to descend deep into the water. The light tunnels appear and disappear using sequenced dimming controls, giving the appearance of holes in time and space slowly opening up and closing around you as you pass through them.

Artist: Stephen Newby LIGHT CITY 2017

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Wall and Response Our proposal is a play on “call and response”, a musical dialog of two distinct phrases usually played by different musicians, where the second phrase is heard as a direct commentary on or response to the first. Much of contemporary cultural discourse is reduced to false dichotomies and this proposal seeks to spatially engage a back and forth dialog while providing space to play between and reinterpret what is or is not. A wall is often a mechanism for the delineation of one condition from another, but we would like to take the position that the wall itself can play a more inclusive role in space. Our proposal would seek to foster passive awareness and active engagement on site through the use of motion activated fins that communicate activity from one side to the other. One side of the wall presents playful “fins” that can be touched and in so doing would trigger changes in the lighting condition on the other side of the wall. Activity on one side would anticipate a response from the other and in so doing, create a dialog that would encourage users to find new ways of communicating and understanding each other through light and space. This wall learns from the Billy Jean music video, dueling banjos, haka dances, and the FAO Schwarz piano. We think delight can play a key role in enlightenment. The wall inflects based on points of interest on site and provides several perspectives through which one might see or engage others. As a system, the wall can be flexible in where those inflection points may be, taking into consideration that the visual, vocal, and spatial conversation varies by context. The installation consists of two halves of the same whole but is not simply mirror images of one another. It is through engagement and dialog that understanding and balance is achieved.

Artist: Brandon Newcomer LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: Christian Parks LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: Jess Pfohl LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: Rebecca Pierson LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: Marco Pinter LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: Andrea Polli LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: Christopher Poole LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: New American Public Art—Dan Beyer

LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: Samantha Rausch LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: Diana Reichenbach LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: Joseph Reinsel LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: Scott Reynolds LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: Alan Rhody LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: Ethan Rose LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: Jose Rosero LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: Jonathan Scelsa LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: Yvonne Senouf LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: Daniel Shebzukhov LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: Lynn Silverman LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: Gaetan Spurgin LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: Tracy Stevens LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: Michael Stevenson LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: Meagan Streader LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: Miroslaw Struzik LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: Mid-Ocean Studio LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: Carlos Torrijos LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: The Dandy Vagabonds—Elliot Mittens

LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: Luuk Van Laake LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: Michael Verdon LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: George Vidas LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: Juliet Whelan LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: Daniel Wickerham LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: Avrabou Xenakis LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: Noa Younse LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: Anrong Tang (applied through Marie Hoo)

LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: Pengcheng Miao (applied through Marie Hoo)

LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: Xiaolong Mao (applied through Marie Hoo)

LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: Wenhua Song (applied through Marie Hoo)

LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: Zhengrong You (applied through Marie Hoo)

LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: Jianbo Ma (applied through Marie Hoo)

LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: Lynn Cazabon LIGHT CITY 2017

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Artist: Merav Eitan LIGHT CITY 2017

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Light City Baltimore Portfolio  

About this Guide Each of the following proposals was submitted for consideration for Light City 2017. We received 150 submissions through o...

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