Page 1

THETUGISTHEDRUG.COM FEEL THE RUSH!

SPECIAL FEATURE:

NEW YORK’S

SALMON RIVER

FISHING JIGS STEELHEAD

SPEY

PRESENTATION

$2.95 US - $3.95 CAN

HOW VOLUME 1, ISSUE 4, 2009

TO

CATCH TROUT

CONSISTENTLY


Trip Booking Service Photo by Dake Schmidt

The sky is the limit Kype Magazine VOLUME 1, ISSUE 4, 2009 Kype Magazine Castle Douglas Productions.LLC PO Box 2024 Anacortes, WA 98221 360.299.2266 Streamside@kype.net

www.Kype.net Kype Staff

Kype will plan your trip to any destination, FREE ! 360.299.2266 www.kype.net Streamside@kype.net

CONTENTS OF KYPE Publisher’s Cast........... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..4 Jig Fishing Series........... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...............6 The Release Experience........ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..8

Publisher: George Douglas Editors: Kristen Bailey Lem James Staff Writers: Eric Stroup Sidney Snow David Gantman Christopher Lessway

Catching Trout Consistently........................................10

COPYRIGHT

October Dreaming..... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20

Kype Magazine Copyright © 2009 Castle Douglas Productions LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. May no part of this publication or DVD be copied or reproduced in any way without written p e rmission from the publisher.

Spey Casting & Presentation......................................12 The Pukaskawa Experience. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . ..14 The Salmon River, NY........... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..............16

A Guide’s Guide to Fishing Guides... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..22 The Kype Vise...........................................................24 An Angler’s Journey...................................................26 Centerpin, Join the Revolution....................................28 fter looking at hundreds of photos from our Kype Photo Contest, this one comes across our e-mail two days before the contest closed. With a one hand filled with metal, Devan Ence of Northern Colorado, takes down the photo contest! This picture had the right balance of fall colors, river background, and a unique way of displaying a beautiful steelhead. Devan will have his choice of a Kype Noodle rod or some Kype w a t e r p roof clothing made from Amphibian Skin.

A Suggestions for your next fishing adventure... Alaska River Adventures Lodge & Guide Service Upper Kenai River & Kasilof River alaskariveradventures.com 1-888-836-9027 The Complete Fly Fisher Wise River,MT 866.832.3175 www.completeflyfisher.com Spotted Bear Ranch in Whitefish Montana (800) 223-4333 Screaming Reels Guide Service "Steelhead Alley” in Ohio, PA & NY 216-491-9543 www.screamingreels.net

Freestone Fly Fishing 717-337-0734 717-855-8057 South Central & North Central PA Streams Wet Fly Waterguides Central & North Central Pennsylvania Wetflywaterguides.com 814-341-0946 814-322-4755 Bob Toman Guide Service Clackamus & Deschutes Oregon 503-658-6493 www.bobtoman.com Bert's Guide Service & McKenzie River Inn 503-579-8236 www.bertsguideservice.com

Steelhead Lodge & Empire State Outfitters Salmon River, Pulaski, NY (866) 948 4371 Angler's Lodge Salmon River Altmar, NY (315) 298-6028 Cast River Guide Service Northern California & Southern Oregon (707) 487-CAST (2278) www.smithriverfishing.com Sierra Drifters Guide Service Eastern Sierra, Ca (760) 935-4250 www.sierradrifters.com

Steeldreams Guide Service Snake & Grand Ronde Clarkston, Wa. 509-869-9694 www.SteelDreamsFishing.com Steve's Guided Adventures Washougal, WA 360-835-7995 stevesguidedadventures.com Boggan's Oasis Where Washington, Oregon and Idaho meet (509) 256-3372 www.boggans.com

Devan explained that the photo was taken by Jon Harp while they were fishing in upstate New York. He said it was an outrageous day on the water catching some big browns and steelhead. He was nymphing a black flashback hares ear, when this fish pounded it and shot downriver like a rocket. There was no turning back, they followed the fish down and was able to put her in the net. A nice “henrietta.” Devan was fishing a 9' 6wt with 4x tippet. Be sure to check out the awesome brown and steelhead runs right in our backyard, the Great Lake tributaries. The article on page 16 provides some information on one of the best rivers in New York, the Salmon River.


Trip Booking Service Photo by Dake Schmidt

The sky is the limit Kype Magazine VOLUME 1, ISSUE 4, 2009 Kype Magazine Castle Douglas Productions.LLC PO Box 2024 Anacortes, WA 98221 360.299.2266 Streamside@kype.net

www.Kype.net Kype Staff

Kype will plan your trip to any destination, FREE ! 360.299.2266 www.kype.net Streamside@kype.net

CONTENTS OF KYPE Publisher’s Cast........... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..4 Jig Fishing Series........... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...............6 The Release Experience........ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..8

Publisher: George Douglas Editors: Kristen Bailey Lem James Staff Writers: Eric Stroup Sidney Snow David Gantman Christopher Lessway

Catching Trout Consistently........................................10

COPYRIGHT

October Dreaming..... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20

Kype Magazine Copyright © 2009 Castle Douglas Productions LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. May no part of this publication or DVD be copied or reproduced in any way without written p e rmission from the publisher.

Spey Casting & Presentation......................................12 The Pukaskawa Experience. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . ..14 The Salmon River, NY........... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..............16

A Guide’s Guide to Fishing Guides... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..22 The Kype Vise...........................................................24 An Angler’s Journey...................................................26 Centerpin, Join the Revolution....................................28 fter looking at hundreds of photos from our Kype Photo Contest, this one comes across our e-mail two days before the contest closed. With a one hand filled with metal, Devan Ence of Northern Colorado, takes down the photo contest! This picture had the right balance of fall colors, river background, and a unique way of displaying a beautiful steelhead. Devan will have his choice of a Kype Noodle rod or some Kype w a t e r p roof clothing made from Amphibian Skin.

A Suggestions for your next fishing adventure... Alaska River Adventures Lodge & Guide Service Upper Kenai River & Kasilof River alaskariveradventures.com 1-888-836-9027 The Complete Fly Fisher Wise River,MT 866.832.3175 www.completeflyfisher.com Spotted Bear Ranch in Whitefish Montana (800) 223-4333 Screaming Reels Guide Service "Steelhead Alley” in Ohio, PA & NY 216-491-9543 www.screamingreels.net

Freestone Fly Fishing 717-337-0734 717-855-8057 South Central & North Central PA Streams Wet Fly Waterguides Central & North Central Pennsylvania Wetflywaterguides.com 814-341-0946 814-322-4755 Bob Toman Guide Service Clackamus & Deschutes Oregon 503-658-6493 www.bobtoman.com Bert's Guide Service & McKenzie River Inn 503-579-8236 www.bertsguideservice.com

Steelhead Lodge & Empire State Outfitters Salmon River, Pulaski, NY (866) 948 4371 Angler's Lodge Salmon River Altmar, NY (315) 298-6028 Cast River Guide Service Northern California & Southern Oregon (707) 487-CAST (2278) www.smithriverfishing.com Sierra Drifters Guide Service Eastern Sierra, Ca (760) 935-4250 www.sierradrifters.com

Steeldreams Guide Service Snake & Grand Ronde Clarkston, Wa. 509-869-9694 www.SteelDreamsFishing.com Steve's Guided Adventures Washougal, WA 360-835-7995 stevesguidedadventures.com Boggan's Oasis Where Washington, Oregon and Idaho meet (509) 256-3372 www.boggans.com

Devan explained that the photo was taken by Jon Harp while they were fishing in upstate New York. He said it was an outrageous day on the water catching some big browns and steelhead. He was nymphing a black flashback hares ear, when this fish pounded it and shot downriver like a rocket. There was no turning back, they followed the fish down and was able to put her in the net. A nice “henrietta.” Devan was fishing a 9' 6wt with 4x tippet. Be sure to check out the awesome brown and steelhead runs right in our backyard, the Great Lake tributaries. The article on page 16 provides some information on one of the best rivers in New York, the Salmon River.


Publisher’s Cast The TUG is the Drug!

BY

GEORGE DOUGLAS

W

e’ve officially finished our first year—four issues of Kype Magazine and DVDs. It’s a great milestone for us, with hopefully many more to come. We launched our magazine in November of 2008 in the heart of an economic down turn, with all odds against us, but we held our ground and made a big splash out there in the fishing industry. I t ’s been an interesting year! We spent the first part here on the west coast making our first two films. Then we were o ff to the east coast for a seven month trip and coughed out the next two

films, Steelhead A l l e y and this current film from the Salmon River area. That was a very successful trip. Looking back on our travels, I’m most surprised at the fishing in Ohio. I never thought of Ohio as being a powerhouse fishery, but it certainly is. I look forward to getting back there later on this year, and perhaps fishing the Grand and some other tributaries near Cleveland. A special thanks to the great folks who we met along the way who supported us and our film shoots.

N E W D V D DI S T R I B U T I O N Beginning with this issue, Kype magazine will be sold by itself on national newsstands. The only way to get your hands on the magazine/ DVD combo is to purchase a subscription or to find them at select fly and sports shops throughout the USA. Also, there are a number of guides and lodges that have become part of our distribution network, they too will have them available. Most of these distribution vendors can be found in this magazine. If their ad appears in this issue, more than likely, they’ll be carrying Kype magazine

WHAT’S A KYPE? A kype is a hook that forms on the lower jaw of a male tro u t , salmon or steelhead, during spawning periods. This is their badge of power and dominanc e that is unique to only these spe cies. I t's an explanat ion point, similar to the rack of a male deer—a sign of a warrior—a sign of s t rength. Only the brutes, only the stout, only the herculean bucks will display this emblem of pure power. These kype-busting bucks are known to burn out drag systems, shatter graphite, and snap leaders as if they were a strand of hair, and with such a mark of strength, thus—the title of our magazine, KYPE.

4

and DVD’s. Give them a call to purchase a copy, to book a fishing trip or to utilize their services. NE W W E B S I T E We are proud to announce a new and exciting website project. It’s a unique web site with a free social network similar to Facebook. It provides a place for us steelhead, salmon and trout junkies to meet, post, submit photos and all that good stuff. The good thing about this site is that we get to customize it to fishermen’s specs and not be confined to the limitations of pre-existing social networks. With the launching of the new site in mid-August, we plan to have various options for anglers to access our articles, films, sponsors and Colorado STEAMBOAT FLYFISHER 507 Lincoln Avenue Steamboat Springs, CO\ Fly Fishing is our focus 970-879-6552 www.steamboatflyfisher.com Bob's Fly Shop 406 So. Lincoln Ave. Loveland, CO 80537 Contact us at: 970-667-1107 bob@bobsflytying.com

Michigan

Photo by King David’s Guide Service, Pulaski, NY

Great Lakes Fly Fishing Co. 8460 Algoma Ave NE Rockford, MI 49341 616-866-6060 www.troutmoor.net

other content. For example, you will be able to download our films for a 24 hour rental, similar to I-tunes. Also, we’ll have digital subscriptions and more! After August 15th, all of you out there in Kype Nation, go online and visit www.TheTUGistheDrug.com I’ll see you there. NEW STAFF I would like to introduce our new Editors, Kristen Bailey and Lem James. They both live and fish in the heart of Oregon’s steelhead country. They both work on each and every article to ensure our text is crisp and flows nicely. They are a valuable addition to the Kype Team.

press, we begin our second year with momentum and experience from the lessons learned on the road all year long. Our schedule for this second year looks jam packed with some awesome trips planned that will get your fishing adrenaline pumping.

Staff Writers Wanted Fishing Guides who want to share their knowledge and drop us an Streamside@kype.net

.95 79.95

$ $

Includes Shipping to USA-Canada

2009 Volume 1 Issue 1: Articles on jig fishing, bead fishing, trout in Yellowstone, simple techniques for metalheads, and includes Fishing For A Dream DVD. The Publisher trains a new guide, showing the vigors of preparation in guiding, then off to the river for some great steelhead and trout scenes.

expertise through articles,

Dake Schmidt

US Funds Funds US

Make sure you have every issue of Kype Magazine. Each copy will come with a DVD. Order today.

Tight Lines!

email at:

I N CO N C L U S I O N As this issue goes to

KYPE BACK ISSUES

Publisher, George Douglas 20 pound SteelHead

• Includes Waterproofing Wax!!! • Push-button Tie Cord Lock • Available in Sizes M - L - XL • Also Available in Forest Green Order at Kype.net Castle Douglas Productions PO Box 2024 Anacortes, WA 98221

2009 Volume 1 Issue 2: Articles on Spey fishing, Centerpin fishing, Steelhead Alley, Great Lakes vs. West Coast...Includes Miracle Mile DVD. Awesome trout scenes on some beautiful Wyoming rivers. Big Brown and Cutthroat Trout on dry flies and nymph fishing. All around great issue! 2009 Volume 1 Issue 3: Articles on Spey fishing, Centerpin fishing, Steelhead Alley, Great Lakes vs. West Coast...Includes Miracle Mile DVD. Awesome trout scenes on some beautiful Wyoming rivers. Big Brown and Cutthroat Trout on dry flies and nymph fishing. All around great issue! Back copies of Kype are 19.95, includes shipping. Canada 21.95 US funds Place your order at Kype.net Castle Douglas Productions PO Box 2024 • Anacortes, WA 98221

5


Publisher’s Cast The TUG is the Drug!

BY

GEORGE DOUGLAS

W

e’ve officially finished our first year—four issues of Kype Magazine and DVDs. It’s a great milestone for us, with hopefully many more to come. We launched our magazine in November of 2008 in the heart of an economic down turn, with all odds against us, but we held our ground and made a big splash out there in the fishing industry. I t ’s been an interesting year! We spent the first part here on the west coast making our first two films. Then we were o ff to the east coast for a seven month trip and coughed out the next two

films, Steelhead A l l e y and this current film from the Salmon River area. That was a very successful trip. Looking back on our travels, I’m most surprised at the fishing in Ohio. I never thought of Ohio as being a powerhouse fishery, but it certainly is. I look forward to getting back there later on this year, and perhaps fishing the Grand and some other tributaries near Cleveland. A special thanks to the great folks who we met along the way who supported us and our film shoots.

N E W D V D DI S T R I B U T I O N Beginning with this issue, Kype magazine will be sold by itself on national newsstands. The only way to get your hands on the magazine/ DVD combo is to purchase a subscription or to find them at select fly and sports shops throughout the USA. Also, there are a number of guides and lodges that have become part of our distribution network, they too will have them available. Most of these distribution vendors can be found in this magazine. If their ad appears in this issue, more than likely, they’ll be carrying Kype magazine

WHAT’S A KYPE? A kype is a hook that forms on the lower jaw of a male tro u t , salmon or steelhead, during spawning periods. This is their badge of power and dominanc e that is unique to only these spe cies. I t's an explanat ion point, similar to the rack of a male deer—a sign of a warrior—a sign of s t rength. Only the brutes, only the stout, only the herculean bucks will display this emblem of pure power. These kype-busting bucks are known to burn out drag systems, shatter graphite, and snap leaders as if they were a strand of hair, and with such a mark of strength, thus—the title of our magazine, KYPE.

4

and DVD’s. Give them a call to purchase a copy, to book a fishing trip or to utilize their services. NE W W E B S I T E We are proud to announce a new and exciting website project. It’s a unique web site with a free social network similar to Facebook. It provides a place for us steelhead, salmon and trout junkies to meet, post, submit photos and all that good stuff. The good thing about this site is that we get to customize it to fishermen’s specs and not be confined to the limitations of pre-existing social networks. With the launching of the new site in mid-August, we plan to have various options for anglers to access our articles, films, sponsors and Colorado STEAMBOAT FLYFISHER 507 Lincoln Avenue Steamboat Springs, CO\ Fly Fishing is our focus 970-879-6552 www.steamboatflyfisher.com Bob's Fly Shop 406 So. Lincoln Ave. Loveland, CO 80537 Contact us at: 970-667-1107 bob@bobsflytying.com

Michigan

Photo by King David’s Guide Service, Pulaski, NY

Great Lakes Fly Fishing Co. 8460 Algoma Ave NE Rockford, MI 49341 616-866-6060 www.troutmoor.net

other content. For example, you will be able to download our films for a 24 hour rental, similar to I-tunes. Also, we’ll have digital subscriptions and more! After August 15th, all of you out there in Kype Nation, go online and visit www.TheTUGistheDrug.com I’ll see you there. NEW STAFF I would like to introduce our new Editors, Kristen Bailey and Lem James. They both live and fish in the heart of Oregon’s steelhead country. They both work on each and every article to ensure our text is crisp and flows nicely. They are a valuable addition to the Kype Team.

press, we begin our second year with momentum and experience from the lessons learned on the road all year long. Our schedule for this second year looks jam packed with some awesome trips planned that will get your fishing adrenaline pumping.

Staff Writers Wanted Fishing Guides who want to share their knowledge and drop us an Streamside@kype.net

.95 79.95

$ $

Includes Shipping to USA-Canada

2009 Volume 1 Issue 1: Articles on jig fishing, bead fishing, trout in Yellowstone, simple techniques for metalheads, and includes Fishing For A Dream DVD. The Publisher trains a new guide, showing the vigors of preparation in guiding, then off to the river for some great steelhead and trout scenes.

expertise through articles,

Dake Schmidt

US Funds Funds US

Make sure you have every issue of Kype Magazine. Each copy will come with a DVD. Order today.

Tight Lines!

email at:

I N CO N C L U S I O N As this issue goes to

KYPE BACK ISSUES

Publisher, George Douglas 20 pound SteelHead

• Includes Waterproofing Wax!!! • Push-button Tie Cord Lock • Available in Sizes M - L - XL • Also Available in Forest Green Order at Kype.net Castle Douglas Productions PO Box 2024 Anacortes, WA 98221

2009 Volume 1 Issue 2: Articles on Spey fishing, Centerpin fishing, Steelhead Alley, Great Lakes vs. West Coast...Includes Miracle Mile DVD. Awesome trout scenes on some beautiful Wyoming rivers. Big Brown and Cutthroat Trout on dry flies and nymph fishing. All around great issue! 2009 Volume 1 Issue 3: Articles on Spey fishing, Centerpin fishing, Steelhead Alley, Great Lakes vs. West Coast...Includes Miracle Mile DVD. Awesome trout scenes on some beautiful Wyoming rivers. Big Brown and Cutthroat Trout on dry flies and nymph fishing. All around great issue! Back copies of Kype are 19.95, includes shipping. Canada 21.95 US funds Place your order at Kype.net Castle Douglas Productions PO Box 2024 • Anacortes, WA 98221

5


Jig Fishing Series Late Summer

DAVE GANTMAN t’s a scorching hot day in September and I have just spent an amazing morning guiding for trout on the Upper McKenzie River east of Eugene, Oregon. Driving back, I c a n ’t stand the thought of spending the afternoon battling the heat in town so back to the water I go. My sister and girlfriend agree to meet me at a boat launch on the Willamette River for an evening cruise. T h e y show up with their swimsuits; I have my jig rod. We enjoy the scenery and hit a couple deep green swimming holes to cool off before the sun is on its way down and shade is on

Part 4

Oregon Fishing Guide Owner, River Rat Jigs Avid Fly Tier

BY

I

the water. Then it’s time to make a few casts. I pull the boat into one of my favorite fishing spots and drop the anchor near the bank. As I tie on a 1/16oz purple jig with a candy pink head, a nice late summer steelhead leaps out of the water 30 feet from the boat! Excited, I adjust my depth to about a foot off the bottom and throw the lightweight float setup above the boil. The bobber drifts over where the fish jumped and disappears into the depths. The battle is on! The fish instantly rockets out of the water with my jig secured firmly

in the roof of its mouth. After a solid 15 minute battle, the fish finally swims close enough for my sister to get a net under it. Dinner is in the bag for a summer night barbecue! W H Y FI S H JI G S ? This experience, and many others, have taught me that fishing jigs in late summer is an extremely productive addition to any steelhead fisherman’s arsenal. Often during this time of year the fish are either visible because of the low clear water, or they jump and let you know where they are. The precise line and depth control of the

float presentation allows for nearly hitting the fish in the face with the jig, and they just can’t resist. The jig rod is precise, and more importantly for this time of year when summer steelhead spook easily, the rod can be setup with an ultra-lightweight presentation. Throwing big flashy spinners or fresh bait can detract rather than attract, so you’ll have much better luck with a presentation that sneaks up on them. It’s not hard to make small modifications to the rigging of your jig rod to allow for these ultralight tactics.

limber so they absorb much of the shock in the rod rather than putting added stress on the line. In the east, it’s not uncommon to fish tippet sizes down to 3-4lbs, while in the west 8lb test is about as small as you’ll ever need. Here a standard float rod of 9-10feet is more commonly used. In late summer I like to use a small adjustable, fixed balsa float or small clear bubble float that w o n ’t make a large disturbance when it hits the water. For leader of any size, always use fluorocarbon when fishing ultralight tackle.. This material’s higher density is less affected by currents, which keeps the jig riding directly below the float. Also, due to its refractive properties,

i t ’s virtually invisible under water. Choose a small jig based on what is most commonly used in your area. I prefer black, purple, or red jigs for fishing late in the summer. These colors tend to sneak up on the fish, rather than alerting them to your presence. To balance your float, evenly spread just enough small BB size split shot along the leader above your jig to keep the float riding at its water mark. You are now ready to fish! Before casting, take the time to stop and look around your fishing spot a minute. If you can spot a fish before you start, it’s much easier to get him to bite. Casting blind can potentially ruin your chances at success. Try to

pitch the jig a good distance above where you think the fish is located, and then let it drift freely down through the strike zone. If you think you are on the right line but don’t get bit, deepen your float 6-8 inches and make another cast. Continue this every cast until you hook a fish or your bobber starts to lean from the jig hitting bottom. When you hit bottom, shorten the depth back up about 6-8 inches and continue working the fishing hole. These tactics also work well in low clear water conditions on creeks in the winter. Fishing in the late summer or early fall for steelhead can be a rewarding experience. There is noth-

ing quite like spot and stalk fishing for these metallic, ocean going fish. If you have the opportunity, take advantage. Using these tactics will give you the tools needed to be successful in the late summer months. Enjoy the extended season! To contact the author visit RiverRatJigs.com Oregon Four Season's Fly Shoppe 10210 Wallowa Lake H.W. La Grande, OR 97850 Specializing in Spey Rods, Reels, and Gear. 541-963-8420/888-819-7299 Bob Toman Guide Service Oregon Sportfishing 503-658-6493 Clackamus & Deschutes Salmon & Steelhead fishing www.bobtoman.com Bert's Guide Service & McKenzie River Inn Float down the world famous McKenzie River 503-579-8236 www.bertsguideservice.com

Subscribe to Kype Subscribe now for one year (four issues) of Kype Fishing Magazine and DVD Combo

ULTRA-LIGHT JIGGING

Dave Gantman

This term means diff e rent things based on your location. On the west coast you rarely see people fish jigs less than 1/16oz unless they’re using a fly rod, yet people in the great lakes region rarely fish jigs over 1/16oz. Be sure to adjust based on what is relevant to your location. I t ’s ideal to have a slightly longer rod. Fishing with “Noodle Rods” is very popular in the great lakes tributaries because the fish are very leader shy. Noodle rods are extremely long and 6

Don't Leave Home Without Your Rat! Tied on Hooks Powder Painted Heads for Durability

541-954-3356 1950 Franklin Blvd., Suite #1 Eugene, OR 97403

FREE ! with a subscription to Kype Magazine

39.79

$

US Funds Includes Shipping Canada: 47.79 US Funds

www.kype.net

www.RiverRatJigs.com w ww.RiverRatJigs.com 7


Jig Fishing Series Late Summer

DAVE GANTMAN t’s a scorching hot day in September and I have just spent an amazing morning guiding for trout on the Upper McKenzie River east of Eugene, Oregon. Driving back, I c a n ’t stand the thought of spending the afternoon battling the heat in town so back to the water I go. My sister and girlfriend agree to meet me at a boat launch on the Willamette River for an evening cruise. T h e y show up with their swimsuits; I have my jig rod. We enjoy the scenery and hit a couple deep green swimming holes to cool off before the sun is on its way down and shade is on

Part 4

Oregon Fishing Guide Owner, River Rat Jigs Avid Fly Tier

BY

I

the water. Then it’s time to make a few casts. I pull the boat into one of my favorite fishing spots and drop the anchor near the bank. As I tie on a 1/16oz purple jig with a candy pink head, a nice late summer steelhead leaps out of the water 30 feet from the boat! Excited, I adjust my depth to about a foot off the bottom and throw the lightweight float setup above the boil. The bobber drifts over where the fish jumped and disappears into the depths. The battle is on! The fish instantly rockets out of the water with my jig secured firmly

in the roof of its mouth. After a solid 15 minute battle, the fish finally swims close enough for my sister to get a net under it. Dinner is in the bag for a summer night barbecue! W H Y FI S H JI G S ? This experience, and many others, have taught me that fishing jigs in late summer is an extremely productive addition to any steelhead fisherman’s arsenal. Often during this time of year the fish are either visible because of the low clear water, or they jump and let you know where they are. The precise line and depth control of the

float presentation allows for nearly hitting the fish in the face with the jig, and they just can’t resist. The jig rod is precise, and more importantly for this time of year when summer steelhead spook easily, the rod can be setup with an ultra-lightweight presentation. Throwing big flashy spinners or fresh bait can detract rather than attract, so you’ll have much better luck with a presentation that sneaks up on them. It’s not hard to make small modifications to the rigging of your jig rod to allow for these ultralight tactics.

limber so they absorb much of the shock in the rod rather than putting added stress on the line. In the east, it’s not uncommon to fish tippet sizes down to 3-4lbs, while in the west 8lb test is about as small as you’ll ever need. Here a standard float rod of 9-10feet is more commonly used. In late summer I like to use a small adjustable, fixed balsa float or small clear bubble float that w o n ’t make a large disturbance when it hits the water. For leader of any size, always use fluorocarbon when fishing ultralight tackle.. This material’s higher density is less affected by currents, which keeps the jig riding directly below the float. Also, due to its refractive properties,

i t ’s virtually invisible under water. Choose a small jig based on what is most commonly used in your area. I prefer black, purple, or red jigs for fishing late in the summer. These colors tend to sneak up on the fish, rather than alerting them to your presence. To balance your float, evenly spread just enough small BB size split shot along the leader above your jig to keep the float riding at its water mark. You are now ready to fish! Before casting, take the time to stop and look around your fishing spot a minute. If you can spot a fish before you start, it’s much easier to get him to bite. Casting blind can potentially ruin your chances at success. Try to

pitch the jig a good distance above where you think the fish is located, and then let it drift freely down through the strike zone. If you think you are on the right line but don’t get bit, deepen your float 6-8 inches and make another cast. Continue this every cast until you hook a fish or your bobber starts to lean from the jig hitting bottom. When you hit bottom, shorten the depth back up about 6-8 inches and continue working the fishing hole. These tactics also work well in low clear water conditions on creeks in the winter. Fishing in the late summer or early fall for steelhead can be a rewarding experience. There is noth-

ing quite like spot and stalk fishing for these metallic, ocean going fish. If you have the opportunity, take advantage. Using these tactics will give you the tools needed to be successful in the late summer months. Enjoy the extended season! To contact the author visit RiverRatJigs.com Oregon Four Season's Fly Shoppe 10210 Wallowa Lake H.W. La Grande, OR 97850 Specializing in Spey Rods, Reels, and Gear. 541-963-8420/888-819-7299 Bob Toman Guide Service Oregon Sportfishing 503-658-6493 Clackamus & Deschutes Salmon & Steelhead fishing www.bobtoman.com Bert's Guide Service & McKenzie River Inn Float down the world famous McKenzie River 503-579-8236 www.bertsguideservice.com

Subscribe to Kype Subscribe now for one year (four issues) of Kype Fishing Magazine and DVD Combo

ULTRA-LIGHT JIGGING

Dave Gantman

This term means diff e rent things based on your location. On the west coast you rarely see people fish jigs less than 1/16oz unless they’re using a fly rod, yet people in the great lakes region rarely fish jigs over 1/16oz. Be sure to adjust based on what is relevant to your location. I t ’s ideal to have a slightly longer rod. Fishing with “Noodle Rods” is very popular in the great lakes tributaries because the fish are very leader shy. Noodle rods are extremely long and 6

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The Release Experience

Fly Tier Outdoor Writer Winter Steelheader

BY SID SNOW

M

ost don’t get it. Maybe your cousin or a friend was recently blown away when you told them that you threw a fish back. “What? Then why do you go fishing if you're not going to eat them?” My neighbor Fred just asked me this question the other day. Some of us are born with nature in our blood

8

while others seem to be born with man-made materials. Some hike nine and a half miles to camp alongside a mountain stream, others won’t be caught dead in a tent. We will awaken at 3:30 a.m., drive a few hours and go to extreme measures to get to the river and not think twice about it. Why? Is it to catch a fish? As you

know, it’s not that simple. We do all this to experience the complete package, from the morning drive to the river, to the afternoon trek back to the car, defeated or victorious. A prime example is my solo trip last winter on the Sauk. I found myself chillin’ in my truck parked next to a six foot snow bank waiting for signs of life and light. I had arrived way early and still had about an hour left of darkness. Yes, you guessed it—a restless night’s sleep. The anxiousness continued as I sat there listening to a static AM station playing some kind of old rag-time. I killed the engine and stepped out into a foot of snow. It was in that instant when the magic began, like I was a little kid in a winter wonderland. I stood there in the complete darkness, sipping my cup of joe, observing the sounds and sights above me. Over and beyond the silhouettes of towering Douglas Firs, hovered the monstrous galaxy full of lights. I took a few steps out into this wild beauty, hearing only the crunching of fresh snow under my boots and

the rushing river in the distance. Standing there, looking up in awe, there was nothing else to do but ask and thank. The stars began to vanish, so it was time to grab the gear and walk down a snowy tunnel created by the branches of firs. At the end of the tunnel was a little honey hole I knew quite well, hopefully holding a steelhead or two once again. Sitting on a big boulder and taking the first casts, I watched the progressive glow of the eight thousand foot, snow-capped peak above me until it dominated half the horizon. What a sight! I continued my drifts in the prime-time of morning, the anticipation built. I was just waiting for that strike, knowing it could be at any second. If it does strike, how big will it be? That is what fishing is all about, it’s the anticipation, it’s the quest, the adventure into the depths of the unknown. It’s about the escape, the experience and the exhilaration only a day on the river can evoke. It wasn’t too many casts later when I set the metal

into a beautiful steelie. The fish fought like a champ, but for a time during the fight, the fish dove down deep and started head shaking. I stood there with my rod bent back, pulsating to the fish’s every move—and it was at that time where it all sunk in and I let out a big “man scream.” Landing the fish in some shallows near the tail-out, I held this fish like Mark Messier was holding the cup in ‘94, with a big ole smile and out of my mind. It was a nice seventeen pound buck sporting a fistlike Kype. Back to my neighbor, “Why go fishing if you're not going to eat them?” After that amazing experience, how could I now kill this fish that had lent his wild essence as my trophy? How could I? There was even more reward in my releasing him back into the wild. To watch him swim out of my bare hands and live another day.

What a rush! The reward of releasing fish is important for us to teach our children, because they are another reason why we catch and release. Let’s make sure we give them the proper instructions on how to release a fish. One of my top pet peeves is fishermen who move the fish back and forth in the water. This will nearly drown the fish as he gets pulled backwards, forcing water into the back of his gills. Simply hold the fish in the current—no need to move him at all. In a slack current, move the fish forward, then lift him

SNOW BUILD-UP

out of the water back towards you, then forward again in the water. This will keep the water flowing into his gills in the same, correct direction through the entire release. Keep an eye on the gills and make sure they are both breathing. There have been times when fishermen put pressure on the gill plate in an attempt to free the hook. The gill plate can get pinched u n d e r, not allowing the fish to breathe. Unless you are freeing a pinched gill plate, always keep your fingers free and clear of the gills. When the fish

feels like he has some power, let him kick out of your hands. While my neighbor, Fred, is taking the day to wax his car and listen to his police scanner, it’s time for me to sit back down on the boulder and embrace that elevated heart beat and the numbing feeling of triumph. “I love the smell of mucoprotein in the morning...It smells like . . . V I C TO RY.” Washington State The Fly Fisher 5622 Pacific Ave SE # 9 Lacey, WA 98503 360-491-0181 For all your Fly Fishing needs, stop in to see us

Boggan's Oasis Anatone, Wa. (509) 256-3372 www.boggans.com Steelhead fish on the Grande Ronde River Steve's Guided Adventures Pro Fishing Guide Washougal, WA Salmon & Steelhead 360-835-7995 Stevesguidedadventures.com Steeldreams Guide Service Steelhead Fishing on the Snake & Grand Ronde Clarkston, Wa. 509-869-9694 SteelDreamsFishing.com

ON

BOOTS

WITH

FELT SOLES

Many of you already know how annoying it is to have snow building up on your boots as you hike along the river. As seen in this issue’s movie, Gary was going to great lengths to avoid snow build-up on his felt soles. He covered the bottom of his boots with duct tape, that obviously did not work. H o w e v e r, what was not shown on the film, Gary made an adjustment. He cut stripes in the duct tape, exposing some stripes of felt. It worked like a charm. The idea is to avoid a completely flat surface of felt. To avoid using duct tape, you may want to try cutting a stripe of felt off the boot ( c a refully). Anything that breaks up the constant surface of felt, will help break up the compiling of snow. You will still get some build-up, but with this technique, the snow will b reak apar t from your body weight making hiking and wading much easier and safer. 9


The Release Experience

Fly Tier Outdoor Writer Winter Steelheader

BY SID SNOW

M

ost don’t get it. Maybe your cousin or a friend was recently blown away when you told them that you threw a fish back. “What? Then why do you go fishing if you're not going to eat them?” My neighbor Fred just asked me this question the other day. Some of us are born with nature in our blood

8

while others seem to be born with man-made materials. Some hike nine and a half miles to camp alongside a mountain stream, others won’t be caught dead in a tent. We will awaken at 3:30 a.m., drive a few hours and go to extreme measures to get to the river and not think twice about it. Why? Is it to catch a fish? As you

know, it’s not that simple. We do all this to experience the complete package, from the morning drive to the river, to the afternoon trek back to the car, defeated or victorious. A prime example is my solo trip last winter on the Sauk. I found myself chillin’ in my truck parked next to a six foot snow bank waiting for signs of life and light. I had arrived way early and still had about an hour left of darkness. Yes, you guessed it—a restless night’s sleep. The anxiousness continued as I sat there listening to a static AM station playing some kind of old rag-time. I killed the engine and stepped out into a foot of snow. It was in that instant when the magic began, like I was a little kid in a winter wonderland. I stood there in the complete darkness, sipping my cup of joe, observing the sounds and sights above me. Over and beyond the silhouettes of towering Douglas Firs, hovered the monstrous galaxy full of lights. I took a few steps out into this wild beauty, hearing only the crunching of fresh snow under my boots and

the rushing river in the distance. Standing there, looking up in awe, there was nothing else to do but ask and thank. The stars began to vanish, so it was time to grab the gear and walk down a snowy tunnel created by the branches of firs. At the end of the tunnel was a little honey hole I knew quite well, hopefully holding a steelhead or two once again. Sitting on a big boulder and taking the first casts, I watched the progressive glow of the eight thousand foot, snow-capped peak above me until it dominated half the horizon. What a sight! I continued my drifts in the prime-time of morning, the anticipation built. I was just waiting for that strike, knowing it could be at any second. If it does strike, how big will it be? That is what fishing is all about, it’s the anticipation, it’s the quest, the adventure into the depths of the unknown. It’s about the escape, the experience and the exhilaration only a day on the river can evoke. It wasn’t too many casts later when I set the metal

into a beautiful steelie. The fish fought like a champ, but for a time during the fight, the fish dove down deep and started head shaking. I stood there with my rod bent back, pulsating to the fish’s every move—and it was at that time where it all sunk in and I let out a big “man scream.” Landing the fish in some shallows near the tail-out, I held this fish like Mark Messier was holding the cup in ‘94, with a big ole smile and out of my mind. It was a nice seventeen pound buck sporting a fistlike Kype. Back to my neighbor, “Why go fishing if you're not going to eat them?” After that amazing experience, how could I now kill this fish that had lent his wild essence as my trophy? How could I? There was even more reward in my releasing him back into the wild. To watch him swim out of my bare hands and live another day.

What a rush! The reward of releasing fish is important for us to teach our children, because they are another reason why we catch and release. Let’s make sure we give them the proper instructions on how to release a fish. One of my top pet peeves is fishermen who move the fish back and forth in the water. This will nearly drown the fish as he gets pulled backwards, forcing water into the back of his gills. Simply hold the fish in the current—no need to move him at all. In a slack current, move the fish forward, then lift him

SNOW BUILD-UP

out of the water back towards you, then forward again in the water. This will keep the water flowing into his gills in the same, correct direction through the entire release. Keep an eye on the gills and make sure they are both breathing. There have been times when fishermen put pressure on the gill plate in an attempt to free the hook. The gill plate can get pinched u n d e r, not allowing the fish to breathe. Unless you are freeing a pinched gill plate, always keep your fingers free and clear of the gills. When the fish

feels like he has some power, let him kick out of your hands. While my neighbor, Fred, is taking the day to wax his car and listen to his police scanner, it’s time for me to sit back down on the boulder and embrace that elevated heart beat and the numbing feeling of triumph. “I love the smell of mucoprotein in the morning...It smells like . . . V I C TO RY.” Washington State The Fly Fisher 5622 Pacific Ave SE # 9 Lacey, WA 98503 360-491-0181 For all your Fly Fishing needs, stop in to see us

Boggan's Oasis Anatone, Wa. (509) 256-3372 www.boggans.com Steelhead fish on the Grande Ronde River Steve's Guided Adventures Pro Fishing Guide Washougal, WA Salmon & Steelhead 360-835-7995 Stevesguidedadventures.com Steeldreams Guide Service Steelhead Fishing on the Snake & Grand Ronde Clarkston, Wa. 509-869-9694 SteelDreamsFishing.com

ON

BOOTS

WITH

FELT SOLES

Many of you already know how annoying it is to have snow building up on your boots as you hike along the river. As seen in this issue’s movie, Gary was going to great lengths to avoid snow build-up on his felt soles. He covered the bottom of his boots with duct tape, that obviously did not work. H o w e v e r, what was not shown on the film, Gary made an adjustment. He cut stripes in the duct tape, exposing some stripes of felt. It worked like a charm. The idea is to avoid a completely flat surface of felt. To avoid using duct tape, you may want to try cutting a stripe of felt off the boot ( c a refully). Anything that breaks up the constant surface of felt, will help break up the compiling of snow. You will still get some build-up, but with this technique, the snow will b reak apar t from your body weight making hiking and wading much easier and safer. 9


Catching Trout

Consistently BY

ERIC STROUP

A

ny one can catch trout when the fishing is good. Let’s face it; even the most novice of anglers can luck into a suicide fish now and then when the conditions are right. If one spends enough time on the water during the season, a bad drift, a poor cast and even the wrong flies will still take the occasional trout. We’ve all been there and experienced this beginner’s luck. But once the techniques and mechanics of fly fishing are achieved, the real game begins. The challenge becomes a chess match

between the angler and the trout. We stand in the river, adorned in gear that costs hundreds and in some cases, thousands of dollars. We match wits with an animal, whose thinking part of its brain would fit neatly, with room to spare, on the sharp end of a pencil. Intellectual advantage and superior equipment not withstanding, we still end most days with more questions than answers. Catching trout consistently throughout the season is a percentage game, akin to America’s past time,

The Guide’s wife, Tracey Stroup, with a nice catch of her own.

10

PA & MT Fly Fishing Guide Fly Tier, Instructor Outdoor Writer Founder, Spruce Creek Fly Co.

baseball. A player that has a slugging percentage of 300 is considered hugely successful, and a lifetime 300 average would land him in the Hall Of Fame. If we land 3 out of every ten fish we drift our flies over, we’ll be in the Fly Fishing Hall Of Fame. Let’s look at some ways to increase success on the trout stream. KEEP YOUR FLIES IN THE WATER As mentioned above, even the wrong flies will catch trout now and then. The one place they won’t work is out of the water. The best fishermen I know get 2 to 3 times more drifts than the average angler. They d o n ’t spend their time untangling knots, pruning trees or changing flies. Once you’ve chosen the pattern, or patterns you’re going to fish, don’t waste your time second guessing yourself, especially if it takes you a while to switch rigs. Commit to covering the water with your flies and give them an honest shot. I’ve seen too many anglers switch flies after ten casts because they think they must not have the right pattern on. Be patient and fish the water methodically, covering everything you can

reach with a good drift before you move on. If you get a tangle, or get caught in a tree, rip it out and re-tie. Don’t spend your valuable fishing time trying to untie a knot. Chances are, once that happens, your tippet has been weakened anyway, so cut it and move on. If you have an obvious lie that should hold fish and you’re not moving anything in it, be persistent and cover it well. If you’re nymphing a run that you know has fish and you’re not moving them, add weight. I try to get at least three good drifts in every possible place that I think should hold a fish. If I’m nymphing, I’ll make sure I was deep enough before I move on. If the water is particularly fast, I’ll put many more drifts through the same area, to insure that the trout have an opportunity to see my flies. Try to double the amount of time your flies are in the water. It will make a big difference. FISH CLOSE UNDERNEATH AND FAR ON TOP Close Underneath This is a general rule and works well in waters that are easily waded across. The bigger waters don’t

afford an angler the possibility of nymphing close, so it’s nearly impossible to cover the water well with nymphs. In the East, we teach a method of nymphing known as High-sticking or Tight-line nymphing. The angler uses a nine to twelve foot leader and literally bounces the nymphs off the bottom directly under the rod tip. This requires good wading skills and a stalking mentality, and an angler can really dissect a stream under most conditions. We use a colored piece of mono, tied into the leader for a strike indicator and several splitshot to get the flies deep. This is not a casting game and it is rare to have more than ten feet of fly line out of the rod. This method is effectively simple and fool proof, once mastered. It produces very few foul-ups, even with a lot of weight. Once the angler becomes proficient with it, he or she can cover a lot of watervery effectively. Far on Top When fishing dry flies on top, cover all of the water. Stay away from the fish. Setting the hook with a lot of line out is always difficult, but it’s much easier when everything is on the surface. One of the advantages to fly fishing is that we don’t have to reel everything in to make the next cast, so take advantage of it. I tell my clients during the hatches to target a fish, and look to achieve a 3 to 5 foot drift. After the fly is past the fish, pick up and show it to them again. Don’t try to get

20 foot drifts with a dry fly. Unless you are in an unbelievable situation, it’s impossible to do. When prospecting the water with few risers, cover the most likely areas that will hold fish and don’t fish-out bad drifts, you’re wasting time. I know, you can catch trout on caddis patterns skipping across the water, but in most cases, that is the exception, not the norm. If you’re in a caddis hatch and the trout are eating those bugs while they’re fluttering on the surface, then you should be fishing them that way. This discussion is focused more on the non-hatch-type of fishing that we so often find ourselves in. Ta rget the most likely holding areas and cover them well with good drifts, all the while, staying back and away from the fish. If they don’t know you’re there, they are much more likely to eat.

flies. Without knowing any better, I would have to see something in the water to make me change my nymph patterns. Caddis larva and midge pupae would be my next choices and I would use the standard colors of brown, olive, tan, green and cream. In Pennsylvania, we can fish multiple flies. I would begin with a representation of at least a mayfly nymph and a caddis larva, and one would have a bead. If I saw that the trout were all eating the caddis larva, I may change my rig to several stages of caddis. My advise? Start basic with your fly section and allow the trout to dictate a change. FISH WITH CONFIDENCE Have you ever had a fly pattern that you always

seem to do well on? Many of us do. It’s because we believe we’re going to catch a fish with that fly. I tell my clients, expect a fish on every drift. There is nothing more frustrating than when they tell me that the movement in the indicator on that last drift was a rock. I want to say, “Oh well, when you’ve spent as much time on this river as you have, I guess you know the difference.” But I don’t. Instead, my stomach does flips and I remind myself that sometime in the next hour they will get another drift that might produce a take. Then I’ll try to make sure that they set the hook that time. If you want to increase your catch rate, get more drifts, expect to catch fish, and for God’s sake, set the hook!

CHOOSING FLY PATTERNS Obviously, if you have knowledge of the current hatches, pattern selection is not an issue. However, if you are fishing unfamiliar waters or it is a time of year when there’s not much going on, pattern selection can be the diff e r e n c e between catching a lot or a few fish. I tend to stick with the basics. I’m of the belief that any trout on the planet will eat a size 16 Pheasant Tail or Hare’s Ear nymph, any time of year if properly presented. I would be more likely to change my weight or my tactics if I weren’t having success with those

Full Guide Service

Central PA & Southwest Montana

The First in Fly Fishing Wellness Retreats

Fly Fishing Wellness Retreats Women, Couples & Executive Retreats Grant Funded Youth Education In School Fly Fishing Programs Fly Fishing Fitness & Nutrition Customized Programs Phone 814.632.6129 WWW.SPRUCECREEKFLYCO.COM 11


Catching Trout

Consistently BY

ERIC STROUP

A

ny one can catch trout when the fishing is good. Let’s face it; even the most novice of anglers can luck into a suicide fish now and then when the conditions are right. If one spends enough time on the water during the season, a bad drift, a poor cast and even the wrong flies will still take the occasional trout. We’ve all been there and experienced this beginner’s luck. But once the techniques and mechanics of fly fishing are achieved, the real game begins. The challenge becomes a chess match

between the angler and the trout. We stand in the river, adorned in gear that costs hundreds and in some cases, thousands of dollars. We match wits with an animal, whose thinking part of its brain would fit neatly, with room to spare, on the sharp end of a pencil. Intellectual advantage and superior equipment not withstanding, we still end most days with more questions than answers. Catching trout consistently throughout the season is a percentage game, akin to America’s past time,

The Guide’s wife, Tracey Stroup, with a nice catch of her own.

10

PA & MT Fly Fishing Guide Fly Tier, Instructor Outdoor Writer Founder, Spruce Creek Fly Co.

baseball. A player that has a slugging percentage of 300 is considered hugely successful, and a lifetime 300 average would land him in the Hall Of Fame. If we land 3 out of every ten fish we drift our flies over, we’ll be in the Fly Fishing Hall Of Fame. Let’s look at some ways to increase success on the trout stream. KEEP YOUR FLIES IN THE WATER As mentioned above, even the wrong flies will catch trout now and then. The one place they won’t work is out of the water. The best fishermen I know get 2 to 3 times more drifts than the average angler. They d o n ’t spend their time untangling knots, pruning trees or changing flies. Once you’ve chosen the pattern, or patterns you’re going to fish, don’t waste your time second guessing yourself, especially if it takes you a while to switch rigs. Commit to covering the water with your flies and give them an honest shot. I’ve seen too many anglers switch flies after ten casts because they think they must not have the right pattern on. Be patient and fish the water methodically, covering everything you can

reach with a good drift before you move on. If you get a tangle, or get caught in a tree, rip it out and re-tie. Don’t spend your valuable fishing time trying to untie a knot. Chances are, once that happens, your tippet has been weakened anyway, so cut it and move on. If you have an obvious lie that should hold fish and you’re not moving anything in it, be persistent and cover it well. If you’re nymphing a run that you know has fish and you’re not moving them, add weight. I try to get at least three good drifts in every possible place that I think should hold a fish. If I’m nymphing, I’ll make sure I was deep enough before I move on. If the water is particularly fast, I’ll put many more drifts through the same area, to insure that the trout have an opportunity to see my flies. Try to double the amount of time your flies are in the water. It will make a big difference. FISH CLOSE UNDERNEATH AND FAR ON TOP Close Underneath This is a general rule and works well in waters that are easily waded across. The bigger waters don’t

afford an angler the possibility of nymphing close, so it’s nearly impossible to cover the water well with nymphs. In the East, we teach a method of nymphing known as High-sticking or Tight-line nymphing. The angler uses a nine to twelve foot leader and literally bounces the nymphs off the bottom directly under the rod tip. This requires good wading skills and a stalking mentality, and an angler can really dissect a stream under most conditions. We use a colored piece of mono, tied into the leader for a strike indicator and several splitshot to get the flies deep. This is not a casting game and it is rare to have more than ten feet of fly line out of the rod. This method is effectively simple and fool proof, once mastered. It produces very few foul-ups, even with a lot of weight. Once the angler becomes proficient with it, he or she can cover a lot of watervery effectively. Far on Top When fishing dry flies on top, cover all of the water. Stay away from the fish. Setting the hook with a lot of line out is always difficult, but it’s much easier when everything is on the surface. One of the advantages to fly fishing is that we don’t have to reel everything in to make the next cast, so take advantage of it. I tell my clients during the hatches to target a fish, and look to achieve a 3 to 5 foot drift. After the fly is past the fish, pick up and show it to them again. Don’t try to get

20 foot drifts with a dry fly. Unless you are in an unbelievable situation, it’s impossible to do. When prospecting the water with few risers, cover the most likely areas that will hold fish and don’t fish-out bad drifts, you’re wasting time. I know, you can catch trout on caddis patterns skipping across the water, but in most cases, that is the exception, not the norm. If you’re in a caddis hatch and the trout are eating those bugs while they’re fluttering on the surface, then you should be fishing them that way. This discussion is focused more on the non-hatch-type of fishing that we so often find ourselves in. Ta rget the most likely holding areas and cover them well with good drifts, all the while, staying back and away from the fish. If they don’t know you’re there, they are much more likely to eat.

flies. Without knowing any better, I would have to see something in the water to make me change my nymph patterns. Caddis larva and midge pupae would be my next choices and I would use the standard colors of brown, olive, tan, green and cream. In Pennsylvania, we can fish multiple flies. I would begin with a representation of at least a mayfly nymph and a caddis larva, and one would have a bead. If I saw that the trout were all eating the caddis larva, I may change my rig to several stages of caddis. My advise? Start basic with your fly section and allow the trout to dictate a change. FISH WITH CONFIDENCE Have you ever had a fly pattern that you always

seem to do well on? Many of us do. It’s because we believe we’re going to catch a fish with that fly. I tell my clients, expect a fish on every drift. There is nothing more frustrating than when they tell me that the movement in the indicator on that last drift was a rock. I want to say, “Oh well, when you’ve spent as much time on this river as you have, I guess you know the difference.” But I don’t. Instead, my stomach does flips and I remind myself that sometime in the next hour they will get another drift that might produce a take. Then I’ll try to make sure that they set the hook that time. If you want to increase your catch rate, get more drifts, expect to catch fish, and for God’s sake, set the hook!

CHOOSING FLY PATTERNS Obviously, if you have knowledge of the current hatches, pattern selection is not an issue. However, if you are fishing unfamiliar waters or it is a time of year when there’s not much going on, pattern selection can be the diff e r e n c e between catching a lot or a few fish. I tend to stick with the basics. I’m of the belief that any trout on the planet will eat a size 16 Pheasant Tail or Hare’s Ear nymph, any time of year if properly presented. I would be more likely to change my weight or my tactics if I weren’t having success with those

Full Guide Service

Central PA & Southwest Montana

The First in Fly Fishing Wellness Retreats

Fly Fishing Wellness Retreats Women, Couples & Executive Retreats Grant Funded Youth Education In School Fly Fishing Programs Fly Fishing Fitness & Nutrition Customized Programs Phone 814.632.6129 WWW.SPRUCECREEKFLYCO.COM 11


Spey Series Cast & Presentation

BY

Michigan Fishing Guide Fly Fishing Instructor Tube Fly Tier Owner, Lessway Outfitters

CHRISTOPHER LESSWAY

O

ne cold and sodden fall day early in my twohanded learning endeavors, my buddy and I were steelhead fishing the Muskegon River in Michigan. We were both still new to casting the two handed rod and were both looking at this float as a learning experience. Since it was a weekend, there was an enormous amount of boat traffic on the river and we had to wait in line to launch the driftboat. We loaded it up with our gear and headed down to the first run we wanted to fish. Surprisingly, no one else was there. I glanced upstream and could

see more boats coming around the bend, so I jumped out of the drift boat and quickly got into position so I could get one cast out before then next boat came by. My first attempt was a poor execution of a double spey, and I had to mend my line before casting again. Then wham, fish on! First cast! Now that’s the crazy kind of fun I am talking about. As I was fighting the fish, another boat came by. The guy asked, “Was that your first cast? Ahh, you’ve got the gooch fish!” When he saw my confused expression, he explained that whenever he

caught a fish on the first cast of the day, he was unable to catch anything else all day long. Hence, “the gooch fish.” Thankfully, I can tell you this rule did not apply that day. I'm not a numbers guy, but we landed almost a dozen fish that day, not counting the grabs and lost fish. If you have never steelhead fished before, those kind of numbers equal an outstanding day! I'm making two points here. One: Steelhead fishing can be unpredictable. Don’t believe what everyone tells you, especially another fisherman on the river. Two: Beautiful casts are not always vital to success. A fishable cast does not have to be a perfect cast. Go out and have fun while practicing. I was still new to spey casting when I had this amazing day. My casts were at times atrocious, and yet we had colossal success that day. We learned a lot while having a ton of fun and catching some good fish. Though presentation that day didn't make a big difference, I have had other days on the river when I couldn't get a look if my fly wasn't swimming at the needed depth and speed. . What I mean by presentation is the cast, the swing, and getting your fly to swim at the correct depth. Presentation is the

combination of all those coming together. Our main goal is to be able to step out in the river and make a cast without even thinking about it. We want our casting to become second nature so we just have to wait for a tug on the end of the line. I will admit I love to watch a perfectly executed spey cast, as well as break down my own cast and watch how each step helps to set up the next. I want a wellexecuted spey cast that sends a tight loop out over the river to get that grab. The toughest part of spey casting is putting it all together. Each step of the cast is dependent on the other. If your cast starts off bad, it will usually end bad. . My suggestion is to get out and practice. There are some great books and instructional DVDs out there, but there is no better way to learn than time spent on the water, or a lesson or two with a good guide or instructor. Take it slow, feel the line loading and let the rod do the work for you. Don’t become frustrated. Take the time to learn the different casts, as knowing a variety of casts will allow you to present your fly to fish in almost every situation. When you step out in a wide steelhead river for the

first time, it can be challenging to know where to start. The best approach is to break the river down mentally. Follow the different currents and watch how they come together. Eventually you will start to see a smaller river inside the river. Within that smaller river, you want to break the river down even further. Steelhead like structure because it gives them a sense of safety. Look for boulders, wood, slots and even small holes in the bottom of the riverbed, as these are all places where steelhead are likely to hide. Watch for darker and broken water. These are good signs of a submerged structure of some sort. When swinging your fly through these likely steelhead areas, you want your fly to entice, yet swim slowly. Try not to fidget and mend the line too much. You would be surprised to see how much your fly moves from a slight movement of your rod tip.

Give it one mend and let the fly swing. Many anglers feel they need to get their fly as deep as possible. This is good in a few certain situations, but a majority of the time they are getting it too deep. This causes the fly to bounce and roll off the rocks and boulders, thus interrupting the way the

Amphibian Skin

fly swims. I firmly believe that you will have more success if your fly is fished less deep than if it's bouncing and catching boulders on the bottom of the riverbed. When fishing with your two-hander for the first time, relax and try not to become frustrated. Many experienced spey casters

throw a bad cast or two here and there. It takes patience and time to learn, so have fun with it while you're learning. Slow down your casts, cover as much water as possible and just maybe you will end up hooking that “gooch” fish and having an excellent day of fishing on the river!

$129.95 includes shipping

The Cure for Fair-Weather Fishermen

Wa t e r p roof Fishing Shirt s $19.95

Neck Guards

$24.95

Beanies

Place your order Completely Waterproof, at Kype.net Wi n d p roof, Stretchable, C.D.P. Wa rm and Comfortable PO Box 2024 with a Fleece Lining! Anacortes, WA 98221

13


Spey Series Cast & Presentation

BY

Michigan Fishing Guide Fly Fishing Instructor Tube Fly Tier Owner, Lessway Outfitters

CHRISTOPHER LESSWAY

O

ne cold and sodden fall day early in my twohanded learning endeavors, my buddy and I were steelhead fishing the Muskegon River in Michigan. We were both still new to casting the two handed rod and were both looking at this float as a learning experience. Since it was a weekend, there was an enormous amount of boat traffic on the river and we had to wait in line to launch the driftboat. We loaded it up with our gear and headed down to the first run we wanted to fish. Surprisingly, no one else was there. I glanced upstream and could

see more boats coming around the bend, so I jumped out of the drift boat and quickly got into position so I could get one cast out before then next boat came by. My first attempt was a poor execution of a double spey, and I had to mend my line before casting again. Then wham, fish on! First cast! Now that’s the crazy kind of fun I am talking about. As I was fighting the fish, another boat came by. The guy asked, “Was that your first cast? Ahh, you’ve got the gooch fish!” When he saw my confused expression, he explained that whenever he

caught a fish on the first cast of the day, he was unable to catch anything else all day long. Hence, “the gooch fish.” Thankfully, I can tell you this rule did not apply that day. I'm not a numbers guy, but we landed almost a dozen fish that day, not counting the grabs and lost fish. If you have never steelhead fished before, those kind of numbers equal an outstanding day! I'm making two points here. One: Steelhead fishing can be unpredictable. Don’t believe what everyone tells you, especially another fisherman on the river. Two: Beautiful casts are not always vital to success. A fishable cast does not have to be a perfect cast. Go out and have fun while practicing. I was still new to spey casting when I had this amazing day. My casts were at times atrocious, and yet we had colossal success that day. We learned a lot while having a ton of fun and catching some good fish. Though presentation that day didn't make a big difference, I have had other days on the river when I couldn't get a look if my fly wasn't swimming at the needed depth and speed. . What I mean by presentation is the cast, the swing, and getting your fly to swim at the correct depth. Presentation is the

combination of all those coming together. Our main goal is to be able to step out in the river and make a cast without even thinking about it. We want our casting to become second nature so we just have to wait for a tug on the end of the line. I will admit I love to watch a perfectly executed spey cast, as well as break down my own cast and watch how each step helps to set up the next. I want a wellexecuted spey cast that sends a tight loop out over the river to get that grab. The toughest part of spey casting is putting it all together. Each step of the cast is dependent on the other. If your cast starts off bad, it will usually end bad. . My suggestion is to get out and practice. There are some great books and instructional DVDs out there, but there is no better way to learn than time spent on the water, or a lesson or two with a good guide or instructor. Take it slow, feel the line loading and let the rod do the work for you. Don’t become frustrated. Take the time to learn the different casts, as knowing a variety of casts will allow you to present your fly to fish in almost every situation. When you step out in a wide steelhead river for the

first time, it can be challenging to know where to start. The best approach is to break the river down mentally. Follow the different currents and watch how they come together. Eventually you will start to see a smaller river inside the river. Within that smaller river, you want to break the river down even further. Steelhead like structure because it gives them a sense of safety. Look for boulders, wood, slots and even small holes in the bottom of the riverbed, as these are all places where steelhead are likely to hide. Watch for darker and broken water. These are good signs of a submerged structure of some sort. When swinging your fly through these likely steelhead areas, you want your fly to entice, yet swim slowly. Try not to fidget and mend the line too much. You would be surprised to see how much your fly moves from a slight movement of your rod tip.

Give it one mend and let the fly swing. Many anglers feel they need to get their fly as deep as possible. This is good in a few certain situations, but a majority of the time they are getting it too deep. This causes the fly to bounce and roll off the rocks and boulders, thus interrupting the way the

Amphibian Skin

fly swims. I firmly believe that you will have more success if your fly is fished less deep than if it's bouncing and catching boulders on the bottom of the riverbed. When fishing with your two-hander for the first time, relax and try not to become frustrated. Many experienced spey casters

throw a bad cast or two here and there. It takes patience and time to learn, so have fun with it while you're learning. Slow down your casts, cover as much water as possible and just maybe you will end up hooking that “gooch” fish and having an excellent day of fishing on the river!

$129.95 includes shipping

The Cure for Fair-Weather Fishermen

Wa t e r p roof Fishing Shirt s $19.95

Neck Guards

$24.95

Beanies

Place your order Completely Waterproof, at Kype.net Wi n d p roof, Stretchable, C.D.P. Wa rm and Comfortable PO Box 2024 with a Fleece Lining! Anacortes, WA 98221

13


The Pukaskawa Experience

BY

JIM BAIRD

“W

ill thinks he is actually going to catch some fish, the poor guy.” These pessimistic words were uttered by my brother Ted, a veteran of what we call expedition fishing trips, as day one on our journey along the Pukaskawa River came to an exhausting end. Will, a seasoned trout fisherman and outdoorsman, joined us on this trip with the high hopes of reeling in amazing amounts of fish, but we had yet to wet a line. I hoped my brother’s remark wouldn’t prove to be a glum omen of the days to come. The date was May 19th 2008 and we were on the Pukaskawa River which drains into the north shore of Lake Superior. The small river flows through Pukaskawa National Park and is the most remote watershed of the Great Lakes. Carving its way through rugged and ancient rocks of the Canadian Shield, the Pukaskawa offers glimpses at wild life such as the rare woodland caribou, roving moose, black bear and bald eagles. The Pukaskawa can be accessed by a logging road after a two hour drive from the northern Ontario town of Wawa. The plan was to canoe and fish the river from the logging road to the mouth where we would then 14

Fishing Enthusiast Expedition Leader Founder of : www.canoebeyond.com

paddle 50 miles northwest along the most remote stretch of coastline on the Great Lakes, finishing at the nearest road. Our truck would be waiting at our finishing point as we had previously arranged to have it shuttled there by Naturally Superior Adventures, an outfitter in Wawa. To access the great trout fishing, we planned to tackle expert classed whitewater and camp out for twelve days. A great deal of planning needs to go into an adventure such as this, and when traveling in a remote area, help can often be days away. “Plan for the worst and hope for the best” is the motto to go by. We set out on the river eager to conquer the rapids and catch canoe-loads of fish. Will and I ran into a couple mishaps early on in the trip that left us thinking we were more likely to catch a case of the sniffles than any

fish. We dumped into the c old water twice on day one. The first upset was a good laugh for the other canoe in our party, paddled by Ted and longtime friend Arie, who in the past has been known to quit his job before missing an adventure like this. The second upset of the day was anything but comical. While Ted, Arie and I are no amateurs when it comes to tackling rivers such as this, Will had not paddled rapids before. So the two of us were still meshing as a team. While running a tricky rapid, our canoe plowed sideways into a boulder. Will and I were tossed out of the canoe unharmed but our canoe was not so fortunate. Within seconds it was wrapped around the boulder like a crushed tin can. This could have meant a rapid ending (no pun intended) to a much anticipated trip, not to mention a long

walk home. Amazingly, Arie and I were able to move the boulder just enough to free the boat. Although the damage to the boat included a broken seat, torn cover and smashed carrying yoke, the remarkable durability of the boat’s material, Royalex, proved itself, and the canoe formed back to its original shape. That night we worried about what dangers may lurk around the next corner, with our uneasiness fueled by the absence of trout on our dinner plates. We fixed up our damaged yoke with splints made of saplings tied with rope; used snare wire and duct tape to repair the seat, and sewed our canoe cover up with fishing line. With a near disaster already notched into our belts, we fell asleep listening to the pattering rain on our tents. Day two was a time of redemption for Will and myself. Will learned the skill and maneuvers necessary for whitewater at an exponential rate, most likely driven by sheer terror alone. Yet terror wasn’t the only driving force, as Will began to feel the thrill of running whitewater. Some of the rapids are just plain fun; we felt the surge of adrenaline as our canoe lunged up in the air. We felt the splash of cold water in

our faces. We yelled out with excitement and a strong sense of confidence after a successful run. Then we got to cast into eddies at the base of rapids which seem to always hold trout. Luckily the weather took a turn for the best and remained that way for days. We thoroughly enjoyed the 70 degree plus weather, hoping it would hold for our paddle on Superior, the largest lake in the world. We had all heard tales of peril on the lake, which native Ojibwa call Gitchigumi meaning “big water.” Pushing this out of our minds, we stopped at the base of a rapid for lunch and took some casts. The end of the rapid created the perfect eddy line on the right and the left bank opened into a pool. Casting into the eddy line, Ted hooked the first one, a relief after a day and a half of fishless unrest amongst the crew. Today, the fish were eager to bite, and we ate several delicious trout

dinners during nights that followed. Midway through the trip we spent a day off the river to fish near an old logging dam built some time between 1917 and 1930. Amazingly we ended up catching more fish in the slow deep water at the top of the chute as opposed to eddies in and below the rapid. We fished primarily with #2 Mepps, spinning reels, and four pound test fluorocarbon line. One of the fish Will landed here is now referred to as “The Speckled Trout Incident.” While fishing from the canoe a short distance above the dam, Will hooked a nice one and yelled, “Get the net!” I have to admit the excitement got the best of me. I dove to the other side of the canoe trying to net the fish, and ended up diving a little too far and went head first into the water, shortly followed by Will. Shocked from the cold water, I towed the boat into shore, nervous

that we would be swept over the old dam. I saw Will swimming to shore with a fairly traumatized look on his face. He was holding his rod and reel over his head, keeping his line tight. Somehow Will still managed to land the beautiful trout and we spent a soggy night drying off our clothes around the fire. Unfortunately my rod and reel had found their way to the bottom of the river during the ordeal. Although I had a backup reel, our rod situation had run into some serious bad luck. Three rods had been snapped earlier in the trip so the back up rods were already in use. That meant I had to make a rod out of a stick with snare wire for guides. The rod had a nice rustic appearance but that was about all it had. Being resourceful is definitely an important skill to possess on this kind of a trip. Appropriate tackle is another necessary requirement for expedition fishing. On similar trips, we had used telescoping rods. I’m often asked why. Well, it’s simple. I catch more fish when I use one. On this kind of trip, the accessibility of your rod is the key. A telescoping rod can be bungeed to the bottom of your seat or can be clipped in an accessible place on your canoe. When you see promising spots like tributaries, beaver lodges, pools or eddies, your rod is out in seconds and your fish is on the line. If you don’t get a bite, your rod is put away quickly and you are that much closer to the next fishing hole. Our arsenal of tackle for the Pukaskawa included an array

of spinners, Blue Foxes, Panther Martins and Mepps from numbers one through three. Gold seemed to be the color of choice among the trout. We also carried small E.G.B. spoons, a couple of small minnow lures, hooks, sinkers, wet flies, and bobs for float fishing. Next time I would bring rubber leeches as well. Almost all of the big speckles we caught had a large leech in their mouth or stomach and a couple had good sized minnows in them as well. On day seven Ted caught a beautiful trout using a leech he found in the mouth of a fish he had landed earlier that day. Brook Trout or Speckled CONTINUED

ON PAGE

25

New York Davis Sport Shop, Inc. 120 Route 17 Sloatsburg, NY 10974 845-753-2198 www.DavisSport.com Steelhead & Salmon Gear Urban Angler The Source for Everything Fly Fishing 206 Fifth Ave. 3rd Fl. New York, NY 10010 212-689-6400 Orleans Outdoor Tackle, Lodging, Guiding and Expertise. 1764 Oak Orchard Rd Albion, NY 14411 585-682-4546

New Jersey Efinger Bound Brook, NJ 732-356-0604 Proudly Celebrating A 100 Years of Dedication to Sportsmen & Athletes Tight Lines Fly Fishing & East Coast Spey Pine Brook, NJ 973-244-5990 Spey Classes Available tightlinesflyfishing.com

Georgia Fly Box Outfitters 840 Ernest W Barrett Pkwy NW, Suite 568 Kennesaw, GA 30144 678-594-7330 www.flyboxoutfitters.com

15


The Pukaskawa Experience

BY

JIM BAIRD

“W

ill thinks he is actually going to catch some fish, the poor guy.” These pessimistic words were uttered by my brother Ted, a veteran of what we call expedition fishing trips, as day one on our journey along the Pukaskawa River came to an exhausting end. Will, a seasoned trout fisherman and outdoorsman, joined us on this trip with the high hopes of reeling in amazing amounts of fish, but we had yet to wet a line. I hoped my brother’s remark wouldn’t prove to be a glum omen of the days to come. The date was May 19th 2008 and we were on the Pukaskawa River which drains into the north shore of Lake Superior. The small river flows through Pukaskawa National Park and is the most remote watershed of the Great Lakes. Carving its way through rugged and ancient rocks of the Canadian Shield, the Pukaskawa offers glimpses at wild life such as the rare woodland caribou, roving moose, black bear and bald eagles. The Pukaskawa can be accessed by a logging road after a two hour drive from the northern Ontario town of Wawa. The plan was to canoe and fish the river from the logging road to the mouth where we would then 14

Fishing Enthusiast Expedition Leader Founder of : www.canoebeyond.com

paddle 50 miles northwest along the most remote stretch of coastline on the Great Lakes, finishing at the nearest road. Our truck would be waiting at our finishing point as we had previously arranged to have it shuttled there by Naturally Superior Adventures, an outfitter in Wawa. To access the great trout fishing, we planned to tackle expert classed whitewater and camp out for twelve days. A great deal of planning needs to go into an adventure such as this, and when traveling in a remote area, help can often be days away. “Plan for the worst and hope for the best” is the motto to go by. We set out on the river eager to conquer the rapids and catch canoe-loads of fish. Will and I ran into a couple mishaps early on in the trip that left us thinking we were more likely to catch a case of the sniffles than any

fish. We dumped into the c old water twice on day one. The first upset was a good laugh for the other canoe in our party, paddled by Ted and longtime friend Arie, who in the past has been known to quit his job before missing an adventure like this. The second upset of the day was anything but comical. While Ted, Arie and I are no amateurs when it comes to tackling rivers such as this, Will had not paddled rapids before. So the two of us were still meshing as a team. While running a tricky rapid, our canoe plowed sideways into a boulder. Will and I were tossed out of the canoe unharmed but our canoe was not so fortunate. Within seconds it was wrapped around the boulder like a crushed tin can. This could have meant a rapid ending (no pun intended) to a much anticipated trip, not to mention a long

walk home. Amazingly, Arie and I were able to move the boulder just enough to free the boat. Although the damage to the boat included a broken seat, torn cover and smashed carrying yoke, the remarkable durability of the boat’s material, Royalex, proved itself, and the canoe formed back to its original shape. That night we worried about what dangers may lurk around the next corner, with our uneasiness fueled by the absence of trout on our dinner plates. We fixed up our damaged yoke with splints made of saplings tied with rope; used snare wire and duct tape to repair the seat, and sewed our canoe cover up with fishing line. With a near disaster already notched into our belts, we fell asleep listening to the pattering rain on our tents. Day two was a time of redemption for Will and myself. Will learned the skill and maneuvers necessary for whitewater at an exponential rate, most likely driven by sheer terror alone. Yet terror wasn’t the only driving force, as Will began to feel the thrill of running whitewater. Some of the rapids are just plain fun; we felt the surge of adrenaline as our canoe lunged up in the air. We felt the splash of cold water in

our faces. We yelled out with excitement and a strong sense of confidence after a successful run. Then we got to cast into eddies at the base of rapids which seem to always hold trout. Luckily the weather took a turn for the best and remained that way for days. We thoroughly enjoyed the 70 degree plus weather, hoping it would hold for our paddle on Superior, the largest lake in the world. We had all heard tales of peril on the lake, which native Ojibwa call Gitchigumi meaning “big water.” Pushing this out of our minds, we stopped at the base of a rapid for lunch and took some casts. The end of the rapid created the perfect eddy line on the right and the left bank opened into a pool. Casting into the eddy line, Ted hooked the first one, a relief after a day and a half of fishless unrest amongst the crew. Today, the fish were eager to bite, and we ate several delicious trout

dinners during nights that followed. Midway through the trip we spent a day off the river to fish near an old logging dam built some time between 1917 and 1930. Amazingly we ended up catching more fish in the slow deep water at the top of the chute as opposed to eddies in and below the rapid. We fished primarily with #2 Mepps, spinning reels, and four pound test fluorocarbon line. One of the fish Will landed here is now referred to as “The Speckled Trout Incident.” While fishing from the canoe a short distance above the dam, Will hooked a nice one and yelled, “Get the net!” I have to admit the excitement got the best of me. I dove to the other side of the canoe trying to net the fish, and ended up diving a little too far and went head first into the water, shortly followed by Will. Shocked from the cold water, I towed the boat into shore, nervous

that we would be swept over the old dam. I saw Will swimming to shore with a fairly traumatized look on his face. He was holding his rod and reel over his head, keeping his line tight. Somehow Will still managed to land the beautiful trout and we spent a soggy night drying off our clothes around the fire. Unfortunately my rod and reel had found their way to the bottom of the river during the ordeal. Although I had a backup reel, our rod situation had run into some serious bad luck. Three rods had been snapped earlier in the trip so the back up rods were already in use. That meant I had to make a rod out of a stick with snare wire for guides. The rod had a nice rustic appearance but that was about all it had. Being resourceful is definitely an important skill to possess on this kind of a trip. Appropriate tackle is another necessary requirement for expedition fishing. On similar trips, we had used telescoping rods. I’m often asked why. Well, it’s simple. I catch more fish when I use one. On this kind of trip, the accessibility of your rod is the key. A telescoping rod can be bungeed to the bottom of your seat or can be clipped in an accessible place on your canoe. When you see promising spots like tributaries, beaver lodges, pools or eddies, your rod is out in seconds and your fish is on the line. If you don’t get a bite, your rod is put away quickly and you are that much closer to the next fishing hole. Our arsenal of tackle for the Pukaskawa included an array

of spinners, Blue Foxes, Panther Martins and Mepps from numbers one through three. Gold seemed to be the color of choice among the trout. We also carried small E.G.B. spoons, a couple of small minnow lures, hooks, sinkers, wet flies, and bobs for float fishing. Next time I would bring rubber leeches as well. Almost all of the big speckles we caught had a large leech in their mouth or stomach and a couple had good sized minnows in them as well. On day seven Ted caught a beautiful trout using a leech he found in the mouth of a fish he had landed earlier that day. Brook Trout or Speckled CONTINUED

ON PAGE

25

New York Davis Sport Shop, Inc. 120 Route 17 Sloatsburg, NY 10974 845-753-2198 www.DavisSport.com Steelhead & Salmon Gear Urban Angler The Source for Everything Fly Fishing 206 Fifth Ave. 3rd Fl. New York, NY 10010 212-689-6400 Orleans Outdoor Tackle, Lodging, Guiding and Expertise. 1764 Oak Orchard Rd Albion, NY 14411 585-682-4546

New Jersey Efinger Bound Brook, NJ 732-356-0604 Proudly Celebrating A 100 Years of Dedication to Sportsmen & Athletes Tight Lines Fly Fishing & East Coast Spey Pine Brook, NJ 973-244-5990 Spey Classes Available tightlinesflyfishing.com

Georgia Fly Box Outfitters 840 Ernest W Barrett Pkwy NW, Suite 568 Kennesaw, GA 30144 678-594-7330 www.flyboxoutfitters.com

15


Image ©˙2009 New York GIS © 2009 Tele Atlas

Photo # 1.1

2.1

2.2

3.1

New York’s Salmon River

BY

GEORGE DOUGLAS

T

he Salmon River, in upstate New York, hmmm...so much to say. Before I can get into the schematics of the Salmon River fishery, I’d like to explain how this river aff e c ted my life. Because of it, I am publisher of Kype today. Growing up on the small bass ponds and stocked trout streams of New Jersey, I only dreamed of such fishing where I could fight the mighty salmon runs I read about in magazines. Nine times out of ten, these fisheries were in the Pacific Northwest and Alaska. For the time being, I was

16

content with catching larg emouth on spinning gear and twelve to thirteen inch trout on a small fly rod. As a matter of fact, during 5th and 6th grade, I was so content with them, it was my ritual before school each day to go and rip some lips before homeroom. Perhaps that explains why girls did not take a liking to me for a while. Starting about that time, my father and I would set up an annual fishing trip—probably an effort to repair our relationship after some tough years past, due to a family tragedy. No one’s fault— just circumstances—and these

fishing trips became the glue that brought us together, eventually evolving into a close friendship. Our trips started with canoe journeys to some other bass ponds near the New York border. Purposely or not, the trips progressed further north each and every year. By the time I was in middle school and leading into high school, the trips focused on the famous trout rivers of the Catskill Mountains, the Willowemoc, East Branch of the Delaware, and of course the Beaverkill. This is where I was able to work my fly

rod in a whole new way. Learning hatches, new casts, and drifting techniques kept me occupied for many years. By time I was a senior in high school, my dad sensed that girls and parties had my attention a bit more than paddling down to Fish’s Eddy. He decided to take his co-workers advice and try the tributaries to Lake Ontario. The first year we fished the Oswego River and several area tributaries, we learned quickly that our gear was way too light. I was amazed at how big the fish were, and even more amazed that this caliber of fishing

3.2

was only a five-hour drive from my house. The following fall, 1988, I set foot in the Salmon River for the very first time. I found it fascinating that the entire town of Pulaski was based around fishing. Nearly every business was named after some aspect of fishing. Motels, lodges, sport-shops, outfitters, restaurants, cleaning stations, and even a few smoke houses all lined the streets of Pulaski. Thirtypound king salmon were being paraded through the streets everywhere. As you glanced to the river, you saw a beautiful flow with monster salmon leaping out of the water. The fresh fall air, with a hint of hickorysmoked salmon hovered over the riverbanks and I felt like I was in heaven. For the next two years, my odometer spun out of control until I eventually moved up there in ‘91. That was an exciting time, just knowing

4.1

5.1

4.2

that any day, any time, I could walk down to the river and lock into some pigs. Perhaps due to the trout fishing of my childhood in Jersey, I was especially interested in the area creeks. I wore-out several pairs of wading shoes as I hiked the distance of every worthy creek in the area. I knew each like the back of my hand. Carrying a fly rod, I’d

drift egg patterns and nymphs along undercuts, just waiting for that metalhead to swoop out from under the bank. For me, witnessing that strike was the ultimate rush. Flashes of silver would dictate my dreams and often awake me at 4 a.m.—“Well, I’m up,” I’d reason, “might as well go fishing.” When the creeks were

5.2

low, I did the same to the Salmon River. I hiked every inch of the river, learning every hole, pocket and run. I learned quickly that my fly rod was very effective for salmon fishing, but the noodle rod was the ticket for steelhead. Fishing day in and day out, I began to strengthen my skills to the point where I knew I was ready for

1.1

Image ©˙2009 New York GIS © 2009 Tele Atlas

17


Image ©˙2009 New York GIS © 2009 Tele Atlas

Photo # 1.1

2.1

2.2

3.1

New York’s Salmon River

BY

GEORGE DOUGLAS

T

he Salmon River, in upstate New York, hmmm...so much to say. Before I can get into the schematics of the Salmon River fishery, I’d like to explain how this river aff e c ted my life. Because of it, I am publisher of Kype today. Growing up on the small bass ponds and stocked trout streams of New Jersey, I only dreamed of such fishing where I could fight the mighty salmon runs I read about in magazines. Nine times out of ten, these fisheries were in the Pacific Northwest and Alaska. For the time being, I was

16

content with catching larg emouth on spinning gear and twelve to thirteen inch trout on a small fly rod. As a matter of fact, during 5th and 6th grade, I was so content with them, it was my ritual before school each day to go and rip some lips before homeroom. Perhaps that explains why girls did not take a liking to me for a while. Starting about that time, my father and I would set up an annual fishing trip—probably an effort to repair our relationship after some tough years past, due to a family tragedy. No one’s fault— just circumstances—and these

fishing trips became the glue that brought us together, eventually evolving into a close friendship. Our trips started with canoe journeys to some other bass ponds near the New York border. Purposely or not, the trips progressed further north each and every year. By the time I was in middle school and leading into high school, the trips focused on the famous trout rivers of the Catskill Mountains, the Willowemoc, East Branch of the Delaware, and of course the Beaverkill. This is where I was able to work my fly

rod in a whole new way. Learning hatches, new casts, and drifting techniques kept me occupied for many years. By time I was a senior in high school, my dad sensed that girls and parties had my attention a bit more than paddling down to Fish’s Eddy. He decided to take his co-workers advice and try the tributaries to Lake Ontario. The first year we fished the Oswego River and several area tributaries, we learned quickly that our gear was way too light. I was amazed at how big the fish were, and even more amazed that this caliber of fishing

3.2

was only a five-hour drive from my house. The following fall, 1988, I set foot in the Salmon River for the very first time. I found it fascinating that the entire town of Pulaski was based around fishing. Nearly every business was named after some aspect of fishing. Motels, lodges, sport-shops, outfitters, restaurants, cleaning stations, and even a few smoke houses all lined the streets of Pulaski. Thirtypound king salmon were being paraded through the streets everywhere. As you glanced to the river, you saw a beautiful flow with monster salmon leaping out of the water. The fresh fall air, with a hint of hickorysmoked salmon hovered over the riverbanks and I felt like I was in heaven. For the next two years, my odometer spun out of control until I eventually moved up there in ‘91. That was an exciting time, just knowing

4.1

5.1

4.2

that any day, any time, I could walk down to the river and lock into some pigs. Perhaps due to the trout fishing of my childhood in Jersey, I was especially interested in the area creeks. I wore-out several pairs of wading shoes as I hiked the distance of every worthy creek in the area. I knew each like the back of my hand. Carrying a fly rod, I’d

drift egg patterns and nymphs along undercuts, just waiting for that metalhead to swoop out from under the bank. For me, witnessing that strike was the ultimate rush. Flashes of silver would dictate my dreams and often awake me at 4 a.m.—“Well, I’m up,” I’d reason, “might as well go fishing.” When the creeks were

5.2

low, I did the same to the Salmon River. I hiked every inch of the river, learning every hole, pocket and run. I learned quickly that my fly rod was very effective for salmon fishing, but the noodle rod was the ticket for steelhead. Fishing day in and day out, I began to strengthen my skills to the point where I knew I was ready for

1.1

Image ©˙2009 New York GIS © 2009 Tele Atlas

17


g u i ding. There was only one problem. How would I market my guide service? With that in mind, I started my first publishing endeavor— an eight-page newsletter called SRS, which stood for Salmon River Success. The monthly publication eventually became a magazine filled with local advertisers. In 1993, I compiled all my data, research and note taking from my river experiences and published my first book, “The Complete Guide to the Salmon River.” This original book

has been sold out of print for a while and is extremely difficult to obtain. For those of you who’ve tried getting a hold of a copy, I’ll be selling one autographed copy via an auction on eBay, beginning November 15th. It will be a ten-day auction, be sure to check it out. To make a long story short, I eventually sold the magazine and headed west to storm-troop uncharted territory. Those years on the Salmon River were priceless, bringing to fruition my

lifelong dream of becoming the fishermen and guide I had always wanted to be. These many additional years experience under my fishing hat evolved into publishing Kype in 2008. Now to the river and how to fish it... ON THE FILM There are a few things I’d like to explain about the film and the techniques used. Be sure to pay close attention to the section with Salmon River Guide, Tom Burke. First of all, notice the type of

2.1

water Tom chooses to fish. Most guides and fishermen only have confidence in fishing the major holes throughout the river. Tom knows the river well and puts his clients into the pocket water in between the holes. This in itself is a valuable lesson, especially when the river has high pressure. The fish are migratory, and during their travels upriver or downriver for dropbacks, they will often hold in the pocket water. Of course not all pocket water holds fish, but by reading the water, an angler can often find some sweet spots that will provide seclusion and drifts to fish that are not spooked whatsoever. The set-up Tom uses is about as simple as it gets, and that is a good thing. He starts with a ten-pound, high-viz mainline. He claims he is a little paranoid that the fish can see the florescent Salmon River, NY All Season’s Sports

Image ©˙2009 New York GIS © 2009 Tele Atlas

3733 RT. 13 Pulaski, NY 13142 Salmon and Steelhead Gear. NY Fishing Licenses. 315-298-6433

Fat Nancy's Tackle Shop 3750 RT. 13 Pulaski, NY 13142 Right off the Pulaski Exit. Everything you’ll need. 315-298-4051

Malinda's Fly & Tackle Shop 3 Pulaski St. Altmar, NY 13302 Full line of Spin, Fly, Spey Rods and Reels. 315-298-2993

Salmon River Sport Shop

4826 Salina St. Pulaski, NY 13142 On Salmon River’s “Town Pool” 315-298-4343 Salmonriversportsshop.com

Whitaker's Sport Shop and Motel

2.2 18

Image ©˙2009 New York GIS © 2009 Tele Atlas

3707 Rt.13 Pulaski, NY 315-298-6162 Check out our web site at: www.whitakers.com

green line, so he will run a few feet of low-viz mainline before the leader. The highviz and the low-viz lines are connected with a double uni knot. Now he drops down to six or eight-pound fluorocarbon leader, a couple feet in length. The two lines are connected by a barrel swivel, with a couple of split-shot above the swivel. Of course, the amount of split shot used will vary depending on depth and water speed. One tip on split-shot: It is now illegal for shops to sell lead in the state of New York, so show up with your own. It’s kind of like Amsterdam; you can use it, but you can’t buy it. The shops sell Gremlin Green shots, which are so light you’ll never get down. Be sure to check the regulations on this subject. The drift is fairly simple too. Cast slightly upriver— enough to where your weight starts to hit bottom directly in front of you. If you cast upriver too much, you’ll get snagged. If you don’t cast upriver enough, you won’t create a long enough drift—so this is very important to get right. After your cast, reel in a little slack, click the bail and immediately put your finger on the line. The finger on the line is imperative when using long, limber noodle rods that provide very little feel. You want to have just the right amount of weight on so you are tapping bottom every couple of seconds. Don’t drag along, but tap just enough to where you know you are down along the bottom while providing a natural presenta-

tion all the way through the to the end of the drift. You can use your rod to help it along and to lift the drift over places where you’ve previously snagged bottom. Now the main question arises: Can you distinguish the difference between a rock and a fish? That’s key! Trust me, after some time, you’ll know—especially fishing with egg sacs that often provide a decent thump when struck by a fish. When a fish strikes, give a strong hook set! These noodle rods are sometimes hard

to bury the hook, as the rod bends so much. This is one more reason I prefer smaller egg hooks. They tend to zip right into the fish as opposed to a larger hook that takes that much more pressure to bury the barb. Lately I’ve been using Mustad Signatures, C49S, size 8 and 10. It’s a great hook used for tying egg patterns, but works great for egg sacs too. The next technique to focus on is the rod level during the fight. This is a very critical aspect in attempting to land these majestic fish on

light gear. When you were young, your fishing mentor CONTINUED

ON PAGE

30

Salmon River, NY Steelhead Lodge & Empire State Outfitters 3178 Rt. 13 Pulaski, NY (866) 948 4371 The Steelhead Lodge overlooks the Salmon River

Angler's Lodge

For Those Who Enjoy A Secluded Natural Setting. 155 Sloperville Rd Altmar, NY 13302 (315) 298-6028 Brenda's Motel & Campground 644 County Rt. 48 Altmar, NY 13302 1 mile from Pinneville Br (315) 298-2268

3.1

Image ©˙2009 New York GIS © 2009 Tele Atlas

3.2

Image ©˙2009 New York GIS © 2009 Tele Atlas

19


g u i ding. There was only one problem. How would I market my guide service? With that in mind, I started my first publishing endeavor— an eight-page newsletter called SRS, which stood for Salmon River Success. The monthly publication eventually became a magazine filled with local advertisers. In 1993, I compiled all my data, research and note taking from my river experiences and published my first book, “The Complete Guide to the Salmon River.” This original book

has been sold out of print for a while and is extremely difficult to obtain. For those of you who’ve tried getting a hold of a copy, I’ll be selling one autographed copy via an auction on eBay, beginning November 15th. It will be a ten-day auction, be sure to check it out. To make a long story short, I eventually sold the magazine and headed west to storm-troop uncharted territory. Those years on the Salmon River were priceless, bringing to fruition my

lifelong dream of becoming the fishermen and guide I had always wanted to be. These many additional years experience under my fishing hat evolved into publishing Kype in 2008. Now to the river and how to fish it... ON THE FILM There are a few things I’d like to explain about the film and the techniques used. Be sure to pay close attention to the section with Salmon River Guide, Tom Burke. First of all, notice the type of

2.1

water Tom chooses to fish. Most guides and fishermen only have confidence in fishing the major holes throughout the river. Tom knows the river well and puts his clients into the pocket water in between the holes. This in itself is a valuable lesson, especially when the river has high pressure. The fish are migratory, and during their travels upriver or downriver for dropbacks, they will often hold in the pocket water. Of course not all pocket water holds fish, but by reading the water, an angler can often find some sweet spots that will provide seclusion and drifts to fish that are not spooked whatsoever. The set-up Tom uses is about as simple as it gets, and that is a good thing. He starts with a ten-pound, high-viz mainline. He claims he is a little paranoid that the fish can see the florescent Salmon River, NY All Season’s Sports

Image ©˙2009 New York GIS © 2009 Tele Atlas

3733 RT. 13 Pulaski, NY 13142 Salmon and Steelhead Gear. NY Fishing Licenses. 315-298-6433

Fat Nancy's Tackle Shop 3750 RT. 13 Pulaski, NY 13142 Right off the Pulaski Exit. Everything you’ll need. 315-298-4051

Malinda's Fly & Tackle Shop 3 Pulaski St. Altmar, NY 13302 Full line of Spin, Fly, Spey Rods and Reels. 315-298-2993

Salmon River Sport Shop

4826 Salina St. Pulaski, NY 13142 On Salmon River’s “Town Pool” 315-298-4343 Salmonriversportsshop.com

Whitaker's Sport Shop and Motel

2.2 18

Image ©˙2009 New York GIS © 2009 Tele Atlas

3707 Rt.13 Pulaski, NY 315-298-6162 Check out our web site at: www.whitakers.com

green line, so he will run a few feet of low-viz mainline before the leader. The highviz and the low-viz lines are connected with a double uni knot. Now he drops down to six or eight-pound fluorocarbon leader, a couple feet in length. The two lines are connected by a barrel swivel, with a couple of split-shot above the swivel. Of course, the amount of split shot used will vary depending on depth and water speed. One tip on split-shot: It is now illegal for shops to sell lead in the state of New York, so show up with your own. It’s kind of like Amsterdam; you can use it, but you can’t buy it. The shops sell Gremlin Green shots, which are so light you’ll never get down. Be sure to check the regulations on this subject. The drift is fairly simple too. Cast slightly upriver— enough to where your weight starts to hit bottom directly in front of you. If you cast upriver too much, you’ll get snagged. If you don’t cast upriver enough, you won’t create a long enough drift—so this is very important to get right. After your cast, reel in a little slack, click the bail and immediately put your finger on the line. The finger on the line is imperative when using long, limber noodle rods that provide very little feel. You want to have just the right amount of weight on so you are tapping bottom every couple of seconds. Don’t drag along, but tap just enough to where you know you are down along the bottom while providing a natural presenta-

tion all the way through the to the end of the drift. You can use your rod to help it along and to lift the drift over places where you’ve previously snagged bottom. Now the main question arises: Can you distinguish the difference between a rock and a fish? That’s key! Trust me, after some time, you’ll know—especially fishing with egg sacs that often provide a decent thump when struck by a fish. When a fish strikes, give a strong hook set! These noodle rods are sometimes hard

to bury the hook, as the rod bends so much. This is one more reason I prefer smaller egg hooks. They tend to zip right into the fish as opposed to a larger hook that takes that much more pressure to bury the barb. Lately I’ve been using Mustad Signatures, C49S, size 8 and 10. It’s a great hook used for tying egg patterns, but works great for egg sacs too. The next technique to focus on is the rod level during the fight. This is a very critical aspect in attempting to land these majestic fish on

light gear. When you were young, your fishing mentor CONTINUED

ON PAGE

30

Salmon River, NY Steelhead Lodge & Empire State Outfitters 3178 Rt. 13 Pulaski, NY (866) 948 4371 The Steelhead Lodge overlooks the Salmon River

Angler's Lodge

For Those Who Enjoy A Secluded Natural Setting. 155 Sloperville Rd Altmar, NY 13302 (315) 298-6028 Brenda's Motel & Campground 644 County Rt. 48 Altmar, NY 13302 1 mile from Pinneville Br (315) 298-2268

3.1

Image ©˙2009 New York GIS © 2009 Tele Atlas

3.2

Image ©˙2009 New York GIS © 2009 Tele Atlas

19


October Dreaming

Yo Ho! The Coho BY

NOEL GYGER

Y

o Ho!...that’s the battle cry in the fall when the coho arrive in northwest British Columbia. October is the time to angle for both migrating steelhead and coho salmon, as well as resident cutthroat, rainbow trout and dolly varden char. Let’s talk about the coho salmon first. Yo Ho!... The Coho They jump. They roll. They tumble. They wrap themselves up in your line like a pretty package. The rolling and tumbling is a coho characteristic. The Skeena river and its many

tributaries have large runs of these Silvers, as Americans call them. The first migrating coho, in August, are average size, but larger fish appear later in October. These “northerns” are bigger and have a distinctively large hooked nose, the northern nose. Even the females have the hooked nose, although not as prominently as the males. The northerns average between 12 and 20 pounds, with the odd fish weighing more than 25pounds. Our lodge record fish was caught by Jack

Baikowitz and weighed an amazing 27 pounds. “... A thousand tiny waterfalls skitter down the rock faces...” This is the most noncombat angling area you’ll find anywhere, especially in the fall. Many times you will be the only person in the pool. The isolated coastal rivers near Terrace are only accessible by jetboat. My favorite river is the Kasiks where, for 8 miles, you wind your way upstream through mountain flanks that touch the river on both sides. Slate gray

Rob and Jerry with a monster coho caught on the Kitimat River, BC.

20

rock faces confine the river to a narrow slot. One basic rule applies when fishing for coho: if you can’t see them rolling, don’t fish. Presentation is everything. Coho like just about any terminal tackle if it’s properly presented in silver, blue or green. I love using the fly rod in a weight 8 or 9 or a light spinning rod and reel filled with 12pound test and a jig as terminal tackle. The jig works well in very clean water, calm or slow moving deep pools where you know fish are holding and you cannot see them, except for the odd roll or rise now and then. In shallow, clear water, your terminal tackle choice should the Lure Jensen Krocodile or a light thin spoon weighed with split shot. Use something thin that glides through the water. It should be designed to represent small fish that the coho think are a threat to their spawning “reds” or area. Sometimes a spinner such as the Blue Fox #4 or 5 is the correct bait. The spinner blades cause it to be retrieved slowly, letting the fish have a good look at it. Many people retrieve them too quickly. Slow down your retrieve. I know this will cause you

to lose a few lures, but you need to be down deep with a slow moving lure to give the fish a chance to react. Float fishing or bottom bouncing works best when the water is higher. Many types of terminal tackle will work but I think the best bait is dime-size egg bags fished on number 2 hooks. After awhile, no matter what you’re using or how you present it, the fish will spook or develop “lock jaw” and stop biting—time to find another, unspooked, pool. October is also a prime time for wild British Columbia steelhead - there are no hatchery steelhead in the whole Skeena river and it’s tributaries. Both con-

ventional and fly tackle users will be in heaven. At this time of year the lake is full of spawning Sockeye Salmon, and the fishing for dolly varden char is fantastic. These are big dollys that weigh up to 6-pounds. You can also catch rainbow trout up to 5 pounds. At the end of the lake, where the lake turns into river, it’s jammed with fish. No matter how bad the weather, this river remains fishable all year. Bring that October dream to reality in northern British Coloumbia. The opportunities are endless. With coho, steelhead, trout and char along with the rugged beauty of remote British Columbia, you can be certain it will be a trip of a lifetime.

SIMPLE TO USE STRIKE INDICATORS THAT WON'T LEAVE A KINK IN YOUR LEADER In the photo, Float Master Products owner Steven Vorkapich puts his own creation to good use as he lands this big, winter steelhead. His unique strike indicators are made from high-density polystyrene and attaches to your line in seconds using a piece of natural rubber tubing. The rubber tube acts as a retaining device to prevent the indicator from flying off of your line and acts an extra shock absorber while fighting a fish. It also keeps the indicator in place where you set it on your line. To adjust your preferred depth of presentation just slide the indicator up or down your line. This takes little effort, especially when the line is wet. You can also apply these indicators to a pre-existing rig without breaking down your setup, because it’s not necessary to cut anything off of your line. The simplicity remains the same when it comes time to remove it from your leader. Easy instructions are included with each package. They are a perfect match with Knotless Tapered Leaders or hand tied leaders and also work well with most brands of Braided Furled Tapered Leaders. There are five different sizes in the round shape and five in the teardrop shape to choose from. They are as follows, (3/8”, 1/2 “, 5/8”, 3/4" & 1”. Float Master currently offer 17 different color combinations. Visit www.floatmasterco.net for ordering information. Made in U.S.A. 21


October Dreaming

Yo Ho! The Coho BY

NOEL GYGER

Y

o Ho!...that’s the battle cry in the fall when the coho arrive in northwest British Columbia. October is the time to angle for both migrating steelhead and coho salmon, as well as resident cutthroat, rainbow trout and dolly varden char. Let’s talk about the coho salmon first. Yo Ho!... The Coho They jump. They roll. They tumble. They wrap themselves up in your line like a pretty package. The rolling and tumbling is a coho characteristic. The Skeena river and its many

tributaries have large runs of these Silvers, as Americans call them. The first migrating coho, in August, are average size, but larger fish appear later in October. These “northerns” are bigger and have a distinctively large hooked nose, the northern nose. Even the females have the hooked nose, although not as prominently as the males. The northerns average between 12 and 20 pounds, with the odd fish weighing more than 25pounds. Our lodge record fish was caught by Jack

Baikowitz and weighed an amazing 27 pounds. “... A thousand tiny waterfalls skitter down the rock faces...” This is the most noncombat angling area you’ll find anywhere, especially in the fall. Many times you will be the only person in the pool. The isolated coastal rivers near Terrace are only accessible by jetboat. My favorite river is the Kasiks where, for 8 miles, you wind your way upstream through mountain flanks that touch the river on both sides. Slate gray

Rob and Jerry with a monster coho caught on the Kitimat River, BC.

20

rock faces confine the river to a narrow slot. One basic rule applies when fishing for coho: if you can’t see them rolling, don’t fish. Presentation is everything. Coho like just about any terminal tackle if it’s properly presented in silver, blue or green. I love using the fly rod in a weight 8 or 9 or a light spinning rod and reel filled with 12pound test and a jig as terminal tackle. The jig works well in very clean water, calm or slow moving deep pools where you know fish are holding and you cannot see them, except for the odd roll or rise now and then. In shallow, clear water, your terminal tackle choice should the Lure Jensen Krocodile or a light thin spoon weighed with split shot. Use something thin that glides through the water. It should be designed to represent small fish that the coho think are a threat to their spawning “reds” or area. Sometimes a spinner such as the Blue Fox #4 or 5 is the correct bait. The spinner blades cause it to be retrieved slowly, letting the fish have a good look at it. Many people retrieve them too quickly. Slow down your retrieve. I know this will cause you

to lose a few lures, but you need to be down deep with a slow moving lure to give the fish a chance to react. Float fishing or bottom bouncing works best when the water is higher. Many types of terminal tackle will work but I think the best bait is dime-size egg bags fished on number 2 hooks. After awhile, no matter what you’re using or how you present it, the fish will spook or develop “lock jaw” and stop biting—time to find another, unspooked, pool. October is also a prime time for wild British Columbia steelhead - there are no hatchery steelhead in the whole Skeena river and it’s tributaries. Both con-

ventional and fly tackle users will be in heaven. At this time of year the lake is full of spawning Sockeye Salmon, and the fishing for dolly varden char is fantastic. These are big dollys that weigh up to 6-pounds. You can also catch rainbow trout up to 5 pounds. At the end of the lake, where the lake turns into river, it’s jammed with fish. No matter how bad the weather, this river remains fishable all year. Bring that October dream to reality in northern British Coloumbia. The opportunities are endless. With coho, steelhead, trout and char along with the rugged beauty of remote British Columbia, you can be certain it will be a trip of a lifetime.

SIMPLE TO USE STRIKE INDICATORS THAT WON'T LEAVE A KINK IN YOUR LEADER In the photo, Float Master Products owner Steven Vorkapich puts his own creation to good use as he lands this big, winter steelhead. His unique strike indicators are made from high-density polystyrene and attaches to your line in seconds using a piece of natural rubber tubing. The rubber tube acts as a retaining device to prevent the indicator from flying off of your line and acts an extra shock absorber while fighting a fish. It also keeps the indicator in place where you set it on your line. To adjust your preferred depth of presentation just slide the indicator up or down your line. This takes little effort, especially when the line is wet. You can also apply these indicators to a pre-existing rig without breaking down your setup, because it’s not necessary to cut anything off of your line. The simplicity remains the same when it comes time to remove it from your leader. Easy instructions are included with each package. They are a perfect match with Knotless Tapered Leaders or hand tied leaders and also work well with most brands of Braided Furled Tapered Leaders. There are five different sizes in the round shape and five in the teardrop shape to choose from. They are as follows, (3/8”, 1/2 “, 5/8”, 3/4" & 1”. Float Master currently offer 17 different color combinations. Visit www.floatmasterco.net for ordering information. Made in U.S.A. 21


A Guide’s Guide to Fishing Guides

BY

T

MATT PAYNE

he last time you went on a guided fishing trip, how did you pick your guide? Was it a referral from a friend or co-worker? Was he the only guide that was available on the day you wanted to fish? We spend a lot of thought on choosing our dentist, and we should spend some research and thought on choosing how to spend our vacation. With the previous methods, we could be lending our hard earned money and vacation to chance. When you ask your friend why he liked his guide, a common answer is, “He put us on the fish.” Or, “The guide’s website had a bunch

22

CA Fly Fishing Guide Production Fly Tier Outdoor Writer

of big fish pictures.” These are both good reasons, but how was his stream side manor? Did he go beyond expectations? Do you know what are your expectations? I’ve heard of missm a t c hed personalities and guides ending the trip short because they’re at their wit’s end. “Pushing through” and pulling out two hours early does happen from time to time. Luckily, almost all popular fishing destinations have several guide outfits serving the local waters, and this gives you a choice of where to spend your four hundred dollars. With the advent of the internet, we have at our fin-

gers tips, a resource that allows shopping around for outfitters that provide guide trips and price ranges. But don’t stop there. When looking for a guide, I try to avoid giving into the hype. A website plastered with big fish pictures doesn’t do anything for me. If you fish long enough, you’ll eventually get that big fish photo opp. A website is most importantly a reference to names and phone numbers. Let’s take a moment and discuss some Q&A on research. When making arrangements to hire a guide for a day, I try to gather three outfitters and start the phone

calls from there. If you are booking through a shop, I would highly recommend speaking directly with the guide and not just the sales person. As a former sales person, I have taken many phone calls to book a guiding trip from a destination shop and sometimes had to speak for the guide. This is a common practice with shops, and should be approached with apprehension. When calling an outfitter, ask to speak with the guide that is going to be assigned to you. If he’s unavailable, ask the shop to have the guide call you. When speaking with a guide, their level of enthusiasm is the most important item. A guide should be motivated to book you while not promising the world or a boat full of Godzilla fish. During your conversation, there are key elements that any guide worth his salt should ask in preparation and to determine if he is a good fit. First, what is your skill level? This will clue your guide into types of gear to bring. If you are new to fly fishing, and not the most comfortable caster, your guide may want to bring specific lines and rods actions, which may make

your day much easier. Your guide may even want to consider floating a specific section of river to accommodate your skill level or avoid wind-prone canyons. Second, your guide should ask you what your fishing preferences are. These could be to fish strictly dry fly, nymph, or you may want to make it an all streamer day. This information helps prepare for your arrival, decides what sections to float, may adjust your float time and adjust your start time to allow for catching that late evening caddis hatch.. You may even want to target a certain species of fish. This is of great importance because some rivers may only allow a certain amount of an outfitter boats on a river stretch at one time. Getting on the books early for a river stretch will guarantee a spot before it gets filled. If you are a new fly fish-

er, the most important question to ask you guide is if he considers himself a “teaching guide.” A guide who claims to be a teaching guide should have traits such as patience and an ability to maximize your time on the water through efficient teaching methods. A good guide will integrate instruction and tactics on how to fish the chosen water. I have witnessed a few of my colleagues (who will remain nameless) string a rod up and hand it to a client, without even an explanation of leader lengths, knots or why the given fly will work. At this point, the guide is just a tour guide stopping at local fishing spots of interest. This may be perfect for experienced fishers but would not be suitable for beginners. You may want to inquire how long your guide has been working the river. A

first year guide will be on the bottom of the pecking order, and seniority rules inside a shop. If your shop has one spot open for the day you may be getting the newbie. This should not be a deterrent, but be aware that this guide may not have some of the qualities previously discussed. Giving a new guide your nod will give him the experience he wants and he’ll be stoked to run you, but he may lack some of the qualities a newer fisher needs. Whether you’re looking for just a push down the river or a total fly fishing 101 experience, “Knowing is half the battle.” (G.I. Joe) A little back and fourth discussion between yourself and the guide will ensure both parties will have a day to remember, and you may even end up in one of those pictures on the website holding up a hog of a fish.

Pennsylvania Freestone Fly Fishing 717-337-0734/717-855-8057 Fly Fishing for Steelhead Salmon and Trout. South Central & North Central PA Streams Wet Fly Waterguides Central & North Central Fly Fishing Trips. Old School with Modern Twist Wetflywaterguides.com 814-341-0946/814-322-4755

Steelhead Alley- PA OH NY Elk Creek Sports Store Lake City, PA 814-774-8755 Cast a line from our shop & grab the hottest Flies on Steelhead Alley!

Lake Erie Ultimate Angler 3737 West 12th St. Erie, PA 16505 814-833-4040 Fishing is our Passion! We want it to be Yours! Kames Sporting Goods 8516 Cleveland Ave. N. North Canton, Ohio 44720 Catch it, climb it, hunt it, or ride it, we have it! 800-446-4906 Screaming Reels Guide Service Guiding "Steelhead Alley” in Ohio, New York & PA! Call 216-491-9543 www.screamingreels.net

TheTugistheDrug.com

KYPE WATERPROOF FISHING GEAR EXCERPT FROM ISSUE 1 Most rain jackets can weigh you down and can be very restrictive, hindering free motion, which is especially needed for fly casting, not to mention the annoying sounds the material makes with each move, and can be very hot and uncomfortable Furthermore, when an angler places a rain hood upon their head, it blocks his or her ability to utilize valuable senses. In an attempt to find a solution, I searched diligently for material that would live up to my standards and would be part of my everyday fishing attire, whether it is raining or not. It had to be completely waterp roof, stretchable, warm, comfortable, soft, quiet, yet tough enough to endure brush and abrasions. Finally I was able to create Amphibian Skin which met all of these qualifications and more. That is why I am proud to manufacture and offer this product to our readers.

See the ad on page 13 23


A Guide’s Guide to Fishing Guides

BY

T

MATT PAYNE

he last time you went on a guided fishing trip, how did you pick your guide? Was it a referral from a friend or co-worker? Was he the only guide that was available on the day you wanted to fish? We spend a lot of thought on choosing our dentist, and we should spend some research and thought on choosing how to spend our vacation. With the previous methods, we could be lending our hard earned money and vacation to chance. When you ask your friend why he liked his guide, a common answer is, “He put us on the fish.” Or, “The guide’s website had a bunch

22

CA Fly Fishing Guide Production Fly Tier Outdoor Writer

of big fish pictures.” These are both good reasons, but how was his stream side manor? Did he go beyond expectations? Do you know what are your expectations? I’ve heard of missm a t c hed personalities and guides ending the trip short because they’re at their wit’s end. “Pushing through” and pulling out two hours early does happen from time to time. Luckily, almost all popular fishing destinations have several guide outfits serving the local waters, and this gives you a choice of where to spend your four hundred dollars. With the advent of the internet, we have at our fin-

gers tips, a resource that allows shopping around for outfitters that provide guide trips and price ranges. But don’t stop there. When looking for a guide, I try to avoid giving into the hype. A website plastered with big fish pictures doesn’t do anything for me. If you fish long enough, you’ll eventually get that big fish photo opp. A website is most importantly a reference to names and phone numbers. Let’s take a moment and discuss some Q&A on research. When making arrangements to hire a guide for a day, I try to gather three outfitters and start the phone

calls from there. If you are booking through a shop, I would highly recommend speaking directly with the guide and not just the sales person. As a former sales person, I have taken many phone calls to book a guiding trip from a destination shop and sometimes had to speak for the guide. This is a common practice with shops, and should be approached with apprehension. When calling an outfitter, ask to speak with the guide that is going to be assigned to you. If he’s unavailable, ask the shop to have the guide call you. When speaking with a guide, their level of enthusiasm is the most important item. A guide should be motivated to book you while not promising the world or a boat full of Godzilla fish. During your conversation, there are key elements that any guide worth his salt should ask in preparation and to determine if he is a good fit. First, what is your skill level? This will clue your guide into types of gear to bring. If you are new to fly fishing, and not the most comfortable caster, your guide may want to bring specific lines and rods actions, which may make

your day much easier. Your guide may even want to consider floating a specific section of river to accommodate your skill level or avoid wind-prone canyons. Second, your guide should ask you what your fishing preferences are. These could be to fish strictly dry fly, nymph, or you may want to make it an all streamer day. This information helps prepare for your arrival, decides what sections to float, may adjust your float time and adjust your start time to allow for catching that late evening caddis hatch.. You may even want to target a certain species of fish. This is of great importance because some rivers may only allow a certain amount of an outfitter boats on a river stretch at one time. Getting on the books early for a river stretch will guarantee a spot before it gets filled. If you are a new fly fish-

er, the most important question to ask you guide is if he considers himself a “teaching guide.” A guide who claims to be a teaching guide should have traits such as patience and an ability to maximize your time on the water through efficient teaching methods. A good guide will integrate instruction and tactics on how to fish the chosen water. I have witnessed a few of my colleagues (who will remain nameless) string a rod up and hand it to a client, without even an explanation of leader lengths, knots or why the given fly will work. At this point, the guide is just a tour guide stopping at local fishing spots of interest. This may be perfect for experienced fishers but would not be suitable for beginners. You may want to inquire how long your guide has been working the river. A

first year guide will be on the bottom of the pecking order, and seniority rules inside a shop. If your shop has one spot open for the day you may be getting the newbie. This should not be a deterrent, but be aware that this guide may not have some of the qualities previously discussed. Giving a new guide your nod will give him the experience he wants and he’ll be stoked to run you, but he may lack some of the qualities a newer fisher needs. Whether you’re looking for just a push down the river or a total fly fishing 101 experience, “Knowing is half the battle.” (G.I. Joe) A little back and fourth discussion between yourself and the guide will ensure both parties will have a day to remember, and you may even end up in one of those pictures on the website holding up a hog of a fish.

Pennsylvania Freestone Fly Fishing 717-337-0734/717-855-8057 Fly Fishing for Steelhead Salmon and Trout. South Central & North Central PA Streams Wet Fly Waterguides Central & North Central Fly Fishing Trips. Old School with Modern Twist Wetflywaterguides.com 814-341-0946/814-322-4755

Steelhead Alley- PA OH NY Elk Creek Sports Store Lake City, PA 814-774-8755 Cast a line from our shop & grab the hottest Flies on Steelhead Alley!

Lake Erie Ultimate Angler 3737 West 12th St. Erie, PA 16505 814-833-4040 Fishing is our Passion! We want it to be Yours! Kames Sporting Goods 8516 Cleveland Ave. N. North Canton, Ohio 44720 Catch it, climb it, hunt it, or ride it, we have it! 800-446-4906 Screaming Reels Guide Service Guiding "Steelhead Alley” in Ohio, New York & PA! Call 216-491-9543 www.screamingreels.net

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KYPE WATERPROOF FISHING GEAR EXCERPT FROM ISSUE 1 Most rain jackets can weigh you down and can be very restrictive, hindering free motion, which is especially needed for fly casting, not to mention the annoying sounds the material makes with each move, and can be very hot and uncomfortable Furthermore, when an angler places a rain hood upon their head, it blocks his or her ability to utilize valuable senses. In an attempt to find a solution, I searched diligently for material that would live up to my standards and would be part of my everyday fishing attire, whether it is raining or not. It had to be completely waterp roof, stretchable, warm, comfortable, soft, quiet, yet tough enough to endure brush and abrasions. Finally I was able to create Amphibian Skin which met all of these qualifications and more. That is why I am proud to manufacture and offer this product to our readers.

See the ad on page 13 23


The Kype Vise Missing Link Stone

NJ Fishing Guide Professional Fly Tier Creator “Missing Link Fly Series”

DAVID FRASSINELLI

T

he Stonefly is one of the most common hatches to accommodate nymph fishermen. They are present much of the year on Great Lake tributaries, including some winter months. You will find some stone fly hatches out west, but not as predominantly as in the east. Many times fly fishermen must go to great lengths to discover which aquatic insects are crawling the river’s bottom. Sifting the river with a mesh net will capture these underwater allies, tipping off the angler about what the fish are feeding on. Unlike many other hatches, the presence of stone flies is fairly obvious. Simply pick up some larger, course rocks sitting in an inch of water, and observe the bugs under the rock. Before picking up your tenth rock, you should see some stone flies crawling around. There is no mistaking the stonefly. The fork like tail is a dead give-away. Notice the size and color of the

24

Tying Instructions Start with seven links of medium bead chain. Remove one bead. This is done by crushing and opening the seam in the ball link, and pulling away from the connecting post. Flush cut pliers work well for this task.

stoneflies, this is equally important. Once size and color are established,your job is to present that fly to the steelhead or trout you are pursuing. One of the fly tier’s main goal is to make these flies appear crunchy! Many times a wing burner or a larva lace body will provide such appearance, but look no further than the Missing Link Stone Fly, the crunchiest imitation fish will ever see. Not only crunchy, the chain will give your fly that extra bit of weight needed to get down in the water column. Be sure to tie different sizes from size 14 to 8, and also a variety of color combinations, mostly brown and black stones with white, black, tan, and red biots.

The biot tails are to be flared by building up thread to a cone shape. Draw the sides of the biot against the last link. Be sure you don’t tighten the vise too much. Start with a long tag of thread, use light pressure as you start your wraps until you know the post is tight and won’t spin. Tie in the biots side by side, then use the appropriate links of the chain. Behind the first link add a small amount of dubbing, then tie in turkey quill for a wing case and the goose biot on each side. Add a little more dubbing, fold over wing case, and tie them back. To form the second wing pad, add more dubbing and one more biot on each side. Tie in palmer soft hackle or add a 3rd biot to each side. Pull over wing case, tie down, and trim. Add a peacock collar. Tie off. Bead chain comes in 4 common sizes and finishes silver, bronze, gold, and black. Any short shank hook will do. A n egg hook or scud hook is fine. Sizes 8-14. Use dubbing colors to suite your needs.

Pukaskawa 15 Trout, as they are often called, are a cold water species and are actually part of the char family along with lake trout. They will stay in streams when water temperatures raise but only if they can remain near a cool spring entering the creek. The water temperature in Superior’s north shore rivers stay cool all season and the fish can be found in small tributaries even at the warmest times of summer. Rare and giant “coaster bookies” (brook trout that live in the lake and spawn in the river) lie short distances from river mouths in the ice cold water of Superior, waiting to run up river come fall. As we progressed toward the lake we came to a conundrum called Ringham’s Gorge. This long and deep canyon is filled with nasty rapids that can be run by skilled paddlers at some FROM PAGE

water levels, but it demands extensive scouting. The safest and most practical thing to do here would be portage. The only problem is that the portage follows what appears to be no more than a game trail stretching on for over two miles through rugged and muddy terrain. One might almost be inclined to think it would be better to die running the gorge than tackle the dreaded “two pants portage.” We decided to go the safest route and portage. After the first exhausting trip double packing we went back for our eighty pound canoes. Will went ahead with the remaining gear as I dragged my canoe using a

tumpline (a strap that goes across your forehead). Ted and Arie handled the other boat. About halfway through the second trip an exhausted Ted asked “Why do you think it’s called Two Pants Portage?” Arie, looking surly with sweat poring down his face, said, “Maybe it’s because it’s so hard you soil your pants out of exhaustion.” On completion, the portage took a total of six hours. We were starting to realize why more people don’t take advantage of the “wonders” this river has to offer. Paddling out on to Lake Superior, we were greeted by the spectacular rock cliffs, coves and caves along the north shore. We had given ourselves four days to complete the 50 mile paddle back to our truck. Stopping at Cascade Falls, which pours directly into the lake, we saw multiple species of fish. I caught a big Pike at the falls using my wooden rod and Will hooked a rainbow that got off at the last second. On this day the lake was so calm, it seemed surreal as we stared across its seemingly endless reaches to the horizon. So far, we had been fortunate to experience high temperatures. Now however, as our journey came to an

end, the weather and our food supply both took a downward turn. On the second to last day of our adventure the weather shifted; it was cold and windy. When we stopped on a beach for lunch, we also realized that our food supply was dwindling. What we had CONTINUED

ON PAGE

29

California Tahoe Fly Fishing Outfitters 2705 Lake Tahoe Blvd South Lake Tahoe, CA Reserve a Fly Trip Today! 530-541-8208

Nevada City Anglers 417 Broad St # C Nevada City, CA 95959 Guided Float Trips on Feather & Yuba Rivers 530-478-9301 Cast River Guide Service Steelhead*Salmon*Trout Fishing N Cali & S Oregon (707) 487-CAST (2278) www.smithriverfishing.com I fish From Dusk’till Dawn Sierra Drifters Guide Service Year round drift boats Guiding Eastern Sierra (760) 935-4250 www.sierradrifters.com Montana, Idaho, Wyoming The Traditional Sportsman 814 Main St. Lewiston, ID 208-746-6688 thetraditionalsportsman.com

The Humble Fly 1183 Sheridan Ave. Cody, WY "home to thousands of lonely trout" 307-587-2757 CrossCurrents 326 N. Jackson Street Helena, Montana 59601 406-449-2292 The Friendly Fly Fishing Experts The Complete Fly Fisher Wise River,MT 866.832.3175 Five star dining Private riverside lodging Great Montana fly fishing! www.completeflyfisher.com Spotted Bear Ranch in Whitefish Montana Where the Adventure Begins (800) 223-4333 Orvis Endorsed Fly Fishing Lodge & Expedition

25


The Kype Vise Missing Link Stone

NJ Fishing Guide Professional Fly Tier Creator “Missing Link Fly Series”

DAVID FRASSINELLI

T

he Stonefly is one of the most common hatches to accommodate nymph fishermen. They are present much of the year on Great Lake tributaries, including some winter months. You will find some stone fly hatches out west, but not as predominantly as in the east. Many times fly fishermen must go to great lengths to discover which aquatic insects are crawling the river’s bottom. Sifting the river with a mesh net will capture these underwater allies, tipping off the angler about what the fish are feeding on. Unlike many other hatches, the presence of stone flies is fairly obvious. Simply pick up some larger, course rocks sitting in an inch of water, and observe the bugs under the rock. Before picking up your tenth rock, you should see some stone flies crawling around. There is no mistaking the stonefly. The fork like tail is a dead give-away. Notice the size and color of the

24

Tying Instructions Start with seven links of medium bead chain. Remove one bead. This is done by crushing and opening the seam in the ball link, and pulling away from the connecting post. Flush cut pliers work well for this task.

stoneflies, this is equally important. Once size and color are established,your job is to present that fly to the steelhead or trout you are pursuing. One of the fly tier’s main goal is to make these flies appear crunchy! Many times a wing burner or a larva lace body will provide such appearance, but look no further than the Missing Link Stone Fly, the crunchiest imitation fish will ever see. Not only crunchy, the chain will give your fly that extra bit of weight needed to get down in the water column. Be sure to tie different sizes from size 14 to 8, and also a variety of color combinations, mostly brown and black stones with white, black, tan, and red biots.

The biot tails are to be flared by building up thread to a cone shape. Draw the sides of the biot against the last link. Be sure you don’t tighten the vise too much. Start with a long tag of thread, use light pressure as you start your wraps until you know the post is tight and won’t spin. Tie in the biots side by side, then use the appropriate links of the chain. Behind the first link add a small amount of dubbing, then tie in turkey quill for a wing case and the goose biot on each side. Add a little more dubbing, fold over wing case, and tie them back. To form the second wing pad, add more dubbing and one more biot on each side. Tie in palmer soft hackle or add a 3rd biot to each side. Pull over wing case, tie down, and trim. Add a peacock collar. Tie off. Bead chain comes in 4 common sizes and finishes silver, bronze, gold, and black. Any short shank hook will do. A n egg hook or scud hook is fine. Sizes 8-14. Use dubbing colors to suite your needs.

Pukaskawa 15 Trout, as they are often called, are a cold water species and are actually part of the char family along with lake trout. They will stay in streams when water temperatures raise but only if they can remain near a cool spring entering the creek. The water temperature in Superior’s north shore rivers stay cool all season and the fish can be found in small tributaries even at the warmest times of summer. Rare and giant “coaster bookies” (brook trout that live in the lake and spawn in the river) lie short distances from river mouths in the ice cold water of Superior, waiting to run up river come fall. As we progressed toward the lake we came to a conundrum called Ringham’s Gorge. This long and deep canyon is filled with nasty rapids that can be run by skilled paddlers at some FROM PAGE

water levels, but it demands extensive scouting. The safest and most practical thing to do here would be portage. The only problem is that the portage follows what appears to be no more than a game trail stretching on for over two miles through rugged and muddy terrain. One might almost be inclined to think it would be better to die running the gorge than tackle the dreaded “two pants portage.” We decided to go the safest route and portage. After the first exhausting trip double packing we went back for our eighty pound canoes. Will went ahead with the remaining gear as I dragged my canoe using a

tumpline (a strap that goes across your forehead). Ted and Arie handled the other boat. About halfway through the second trip an exhausted Ted asked “Why do you think it’s called Two Pants Portage?” Arie, looking surly with sweat poring down his face, said, “Maybe it’s because it’s so hard you soil your pants out of exhaustion.” On completion, the portage took a total of six hours. We were starting to realize why more people don’t take advantage of the “wonders” this river has to offer. Paddling out on to Lake Superior, we were greeted by the spectacular rock cliffs, coves and caves along the north shore. We had given ourselves four days to complete the 50 mile paddle back to our truck. Stopping at Cascade Falls, which pours directly into the lake, we saw multiple species of fish. I caught a big Pike at the falls using my wooden rod and Will hooked a rainbow that got off at the last second. On this day the lake was so calm, it seemed surreal as we stared across its seemingly endless reaches to the horizon. So far, we had been fortunate to experience high temperatures. Now however, as our journey came to an

end, the weather and our food supply both took a downward turn. On the second to last day of our adventure the weather shifted; it was cold and windy. When we stopped on a beach for lunch, we also realized that our food supply was dwindling. What we had CONTINUED

ON PAGE

29

California Tahoe Fly Fishing Outfitters 2705 Lake Tahoe Blvd South Lake Tahoe, CA Reserve a Fly Trip Today! 530-541-8208

Nevada City Anglers 417 Broad St # C Nevada City, CA 95959 Guided Float Trips on Feather & Yuba Rivers 530-478-9301 Cast River Guide Service Steelhead*Salmon*Trout Fishing N Cali & S Oregon (707) 487-CAST (2278) www.smithriverfishing.com I fish From Dusk’till Dawn Sierra Drifters Guide Service Year round drift boats Guiding Eastern Sierra (760) 935-4250 www.sierradrifters.com Montana, Idaho, Wyoming The Traditional Sportsman 814 Main St. Lewiston, ID 208-746-6688 thetraditionalsportsman.com

The Humble Fly 1183 Sheridan Ave. Cody, WY "home to thousands of lonely trout" 307-587-2757 CrossCurrents 326 N. Jackson Street Helena, Montana 59601 406-449-2292 The Friendly Fly Fishing Experts The Complete Fly Fisher Wise River,MT 866.832.3175 Five star dining Private riverside lodging Great Montana fly fishing! www.completeflyfisher.com Spotted Bear Ranch in Whitefish Montana Where the Adventure Begins (800) 223-4333 Orvis Endorsed Fly Fishing Lodge & Expedition

25


Alaska Bound Anglers Journey, Part 2

BY

DAKE SCHMIDT

M

y hopes for a new life in Kodiak ran high with the thoughts of new rivers to fish, new people to meet and close encounters of the brown furry kind. As I unloaded my truck from the Alaska Marine Highway System ferry, I felt inspired by a new kind of wildness in the air. Ocean views were everywhere and the salty air filled my lungs. Anxious for adventure, I decided that the island life was the life for me. I first drove around to get a feel for the area. Kodiak’s road system is comprised of

less than 100 miles of pavement but this crosses over 15 fishable rivers and creeks running with gin clear water. As in Homer, I quickly found a restaurant job that would keep me fed and then a secret spot tucked away by the Buskin River to call home—that is until a visit from the US Coast Guard Military Police and talk of illegal camping. Maybe respect for the military prompted me to comply, or the threat of losing my privileges to fish the Buskin River, or anywhere else owned by the Coast Guard. I

could tell my free camping days were drawing to an end and I had to get a camper. I knew only one way to calm my nerves and brain after that. Fish on! Late May meant the return of sockeye in the Buskin River and a brand new chapter in my fishing journal. I was ready for a victory! Armed with my Alaskan-ized fishing techniques, I marched through the trees until I reached what the locals call the “pump house hole.” I arrived ready for anything - anything, that is, except three solid days of

Dake Schmidt

Dake and girlfriend, Kadie Walsh with a day to remember.

26

Alaskan Fishing Guide Outdoor Photographer Owner, Memory Makers Tour and Guide Serv i c e

defeat with no fish blood on my hands and no fillets in my cooler. I drove into town and enlisted the help of the fishin’ fools at Mack’s Sport Shop. Feeling better prepared with my new pair of polarized glasses and a bag full of other munitions, I headed back to the Buskin to finish what I started. On the river, an unexpected strike almost pulled my weapon right out of my hand. The fish proceeded to rip straight down the swollen river and into risky rapids. I was determined to not break off my first fish on Kodiak, so I threw caution and safety into the quickly moving water and followed downstream. Fighting the current felt like performing ballet; my toes were the only thing tapping across unfamiliar moss covered rock. The swift current twisted my body in contorted positions. All the while, the fish kept steady pressure on my line with 75 feet of backing stripped off my reel. I crossed the battleground and closed the distance quickly, recovering my bright orange backing. I even had most of my fly line in sight. It took fifteen minutes of back and forth action before I reigned victorious. Sweet sockeye victory.

With that feat under my belt, I decided to bust out the big guns and camera to begin looking for what Kodiak is known for: big brown bears. I drove out to the American River and walked along the river’s edge. A few miles into my adventure, I happened upon a strange and out-of-place large clump of brown dirt in the midst of dry river beds and dense alders. I looked down while stepping over a fallen tree. When I looked up again, I’m sure my eyes grew to the size of pie plates while my body and brain immediately went into shock. An impressive creative, that I awoke from his nap, stood a short 30 feet from me! At that point I didn’t know to do; grab my camera, gun or my heart. The large boar made a huff and snort, which pushed me into action. I slowly backed up over the fallen cottonwood, trying to stand tall but feeling like the size of an ant. After quickly collecting my nerves, I brought my camera to my eye and started tapping on the shutter release until the roll was empty. Later, I was ecstatic when I picked up the developed film, but when I opened the photos I had to squint at each picture to decipher the bear in all the blurriness. I had been shaking so violently while taking the shots that not one of them came out well. After developing a few more blurry rolls, I decided to purchase a new lens with a solid image sta-

bilizer. Since then it’s helped me conquer many nerveracking situations and even a few mornings when I had one too many cups of coffee. I knew someday that my single lifestyle comprised of fish, cup-o-noodles, and my camper would come to an end, and it came to a refreshing one when I met my girlfriend and the new found freedom of a house with all the amenities that my home on wheels had lacked. (Kadie, by the way, can set a fly under any overhanging bush.) After fishing my way through two years, I noticed that no one was guiding. I knew that this was my opportunity. With over 25 years of fly fishing experience and a knack for getting along with all kinds of people, I launched Memory Makers. My tour and guide service provides flexibility, comfortable transportation and everything needed for a full day of excitement. Now I get to share what I love with others. Now entering my fourth

year of business, I’ve hit my stride. I take pleasure in watching my clients hook & land fish day after day, while keeping a watchful eye over my shoulder for the ever present brown furry fisherman. Many of my clients h a v e n ’t fished before so every fish landed can be their first, biggest, and most exciting. With such easy access to so many rivers packed with pinks, dollies and silvers, sometimes even a novice can land 30 fish in a day! Watching my clients takes me back to the days of vacationing fishing the beaver ponds of Wyoming with my dad. Catching big brook trout with fat night crawlers and bobbers began a lifetime centered on fishing. I tried for the occasional pan fish and bass in Colorado but always returned to the trout I loved most. My first fly rod came in 1984 and opened up a whole new world of fishing bliss at high mountain lakes for cutthroat and at rivers for monster trout in blue ribbon

and gold medal waters. I’d cultivated my style over the years and drifting nymphs became my specialty. I have landed a 15lb. rainbow on 4 lb test and caught dozens of wild trout deep in the heart of the Black Canyon. I was the second person in the county to own a single man pontoon/poach boat. All of this stemmed from those vacations with my dad, and the electrical charge sparked by a fish on the other end of the line. Now I can help ignite a similar passion for fishing and the outdoors in my clients. Four years into the business and over 3500 fish landed, my move to Alaska and Kodiak has turned out to be the best decision I’ve ever made. The island life is the life for me. Alaska Mack's Sport Shop

212 Lower Mill Bay Rd. Kodiak, Alaska 99615 907-486-4276 SHOP ONLINE! www.mackssportshop.com Alaska River Adventures Lodge & Guide Service Alaska’s Upper Kenai River & Kasilof River alaskariveradventures.com

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27


Alaska Bound Anglers Journey, Part 2

BY

DAKE SCHMIDT

M

y hopes for a new life in Kodiak ran high with the thoughts of new rivers to fish, new people to meet and close encounters of the brown furry kind. As I unloaded my truck from the Alaska Marine Highway System ferry, I felt inspired by a new kind of wildness in the air. Ocean views were everywhere and the salty air filled my lungs. Anxious for adventure, I decided that the island life was the life for me. I first drove around to get a feel for the area. Kodiak’s road system is comprised of

less than 100 miles of pavement but this crosses over 15 fishable rivers and creeks running with gin clear water. As in Homer, I quickly found a restaurant job that would keep me fed and then a secret spot tucked away by the Buskin River to call home—that is until a visit from the US Coast Guard Military Police and talk of illegal camping. Maybe respect for the military prompted me to comply, or the threat of losing my privileges to fish the Buskin River, or anywhere else owned by the Coast Guard. I

could tell my free camping days were drawing to an end and I had to get a camper. I knew only one way to calm my nerves and brain after that. Fish on! Late May meant the return of sockeye in the Buskin River and a brand new chapter in my fishing journal. I was ready for a victory! Armed with my Alaskan-ized fishing techniques, I marched through the trees until I reached what the locals call the “pump house hole.” I arrived ready for anything - anything, that is, except three solid days of

Dake Schmidt

Dake and girlfriend, Kadie Walsh with a day to remember.

26

Alaskan Fishing Guide Outdoor Photographer Owner, Memory Makers Tour and Guide Serv i c e

defeat with no fish blood on my hands and no fillets in my cooler. I drove into town and enlisted the help of the fishin’ fools at Mack’s Sport Shop. Feeling better prepared with my new pair of polarized glasses and a bag full of other munitions, I headed back to the Buskin to finish what I started. On the river, an unexpected strike almost pulled my weapon right out of my hand. The fish proceeded to rip straight down the swollen river and into risky rapids. I was determined to not break off my first fish on Kodiak, so I threw caution and safety into the quickly moving water and followed downstream. Fighting the current felt like performing ballet; my toes were the only thing tapping across unfamiliar moss covered rock. The swift current twisted my body in contorted positions. All the while, the fish kept steady pressure on my line with 75 feet of backing stripped off my reel. I crossed the battleground and closed the distance quickly, recovering my bright orange backing. I even had most of my fly line in sight. It took fifteen minutes of back and forth action before I reigned victorious. Sweet sockeye victory.

With that feat under my belt, I decided to bust out the big guns and camera to begin looking for what Kodiak is known for: big brown bears. I drove out to the American River and walked along the river’s edge. A few miles into my adventure, I happened upon a strange and out-of-place large clump of brown dirt in the midst of dry river beds and dense alders. I looked down while stepping over a fallen tree. When I looked up again, I’m sure my eyes grew to the size of pie plates while my body and brain immediately went into shock. An impressive creative, that I awoke from his nap, stood a short 30 feet from me! At that point I didn’t know to do; grab my camera, gun or my heart. The large boar made a huff and snort, which pushed me into action. I slowly backed up over the fallen cottonwood, trying to stand tall but feeling like the size of an ant. After quickly collecting my nerves, I brought my camera to my eye and started tapping on the shutter release until the roll was empty. Later, I was ecstatic when I picked up the developed film, but when I opened the photos I had to squint at each picture to decipher the bear in all the blurriness. I had been shaking so violently while taking the shots that not one of them came out well. After developing a few more blurry rolls, I decided to purchase a new lens with a solid image sta-

bilizer. Since then it’s helped me conquer many nerveracking situations and even a few mornings when I had one too many cups of coffee. I knew someday that my single lifestyle comprised of fish, cup-o-noodles, and my camper would come to an end, and it came to a refreshing one when I met my girlfriend and the new found freedom of a house with all the amenities that my home on wheels had lacked. (Kadie, by the way, can set a fly under any overhanging bush.) After fishing my way through two years, I noticed that no one was guiding. I knew that this was my opportunity. With over 25 years of fly fishing experience and a knack for getting along with all kinds of people, I launched Memory Makers. My tour and guide service provides flexibility, comfortable transportation and everything needed for a full day of excitement. Now I get to share what I love with others. Now entering my fourth

year of business, I’ve hit my stride. I take pleasure in watching my clients hook & land fish day after day, while keeping a watchful eye over my shoulder for the ever present brown furry fisherman. Many of my clients h a v e n ’t fished before so every fish landed can be their first, biggest, and most exciting. With such easy access to so many rivers packed with pinks, dollies and silvers, sometimes even a novice can land 30 fish in a day! Watching my clients takes me back to the days of vacationing fishing the beaver ponds of Wyoming with my dad. Catching big brook trout with fat night crawlers and bobbers began a lifetime centered on fishing. I tried for the occasional pan fish and bass in Colorado but always returned to the trout I loved most. My first fly rod came in 1984 and opened up a whole new world of fishing bliss at high mountain lakes for cutthroat and at rivers for monster trout in blue ribbon

and gold medal waters. I’d cultivated my style over the years and drifting nymphs became my specialty. I have landed a 15lb. rainbow on 4 lb test and caught dozens of wild trout deep in the heart of the Black Canyon. I was the second person in the county to own a single man pontoon/poach boat. All of this stemmed from those vacations with my dad, and the electrical charge sparked by a fish on the other end of the line. Now I can help ignite a similar passion for fishing and the outdoors in my clients. Four years into the business and over 3500 fish landed, my move to Alaska and Kodiak has turned out to be the best decision I’ve ever made. The island life is the life for me. Alaska Mack's Sport Shop

212 Lower Mill Bay Rd. Kodiak, Alaska 99615 907-486-4276 SHOP ONLINE! www.mackssportshop.com Alaska River Adventures Lodge & Guide Service Alaska’s Upper Kenai River & Kasilof River alaskariveradventures.com

1-888-836-9027

ERUPTING SCENT FORMULA

12.95

$ $ Castle Douglas Productions PO Box 2024 Anacortes, WA 98221

Order at Kype.net

US Funds Funds US

Includes shipping to USA-Canada

27


Centerpinning Join the Revolution

BY

JIM PARK

C

all them whatever you want—centerpin reels, float reels, palm reels or even free spool reels—they all serve the same purpose. They help you catch fish, lots and lots of fish. These reels were an instant hit around the Great Lakes tributaries back in the early eighties, like mtv and cd players. A new revolution for catching steelhead was born, but the “centrepin” reel has been around and used in England for over a hundred years. In the eight-

ies there were only a few models around the great lake tributaries the stream master, Clough, Kiss, Stanton, and the Drifter. Today there are well over a hundred different models of centerpin reels in the market place ranging anywhere from one hundred dollars to a thousand dollars. WHY CENTERPIN? One early December day in 2008 on Elk Creek, in Pennsylvania, an older angler watched me land

the best in polarized vision

Color: Black Clear Fade Lens: Gray

Color: Tortoise Shell Lens: Bronze

Color: Black Gloss Lens: Gray

Color: Tri-Tone Bronze Lens: Bronze

Color: Black Gloss Lens: Bronze

$ 119.95

Sale $69.95 !!!

US Funds, shipping Included to US & Canada

Order at Kype.net 28

Avid angler, Jim Park re p resents our Facebook Community with this Centerpin Art i c l e .

over a dozen steelhead in an hour. Instead of the usual “What are you using for bait?” he asked me, “What kind of a fly reel is that?” I explained what centerpinning is in the simplest terms. He was slightly overwhelmed and amazed to say the least. Later that same morning, after catching a few more steelies, to my amusement I heard another fisherman telling his friend, “That centerpin guy has another one!” Keep in mind that the centerpin reel is only one of many elements required to catching many fish. These reels are primarily used for float fishing in tributaries with a flow and sometimes in water with no current. The million dollar question is why use a centerpin reel? The number one reason or benefit is simply “CONTROL!” When you’re drifting your bait in a moving pool under a float, you want to have the absolute minimal amount of slack line or belly in your line on the water. Less belly means that when your float goes down there is a tighter connection with the fish, this improves your hook set and your hook up ratio. With a traditional spinning or fly reel, you don't get free spool line coming off effortlessly.

Center pin reel allows a longer and cleaner drift to cover more water which will also equate to hooking more fish. HOW TO USE A CENTERPIN Like anything in life practice makes perfect and with these reels it's no different. The more you use it, the more you will get used to it and learn to use it with m a s t e r y.. Once you’ve mastered it, it’s like riding a bike or swimming in the deep end of a pool, you’ll never forget. At first it can be intimidating, the thought of not casting far enough or getting a messy birds nest tangle just eats you up inside. I can certainly remember the very first time I used a centerpin and for that matter a baitcasting reel. It was not fun sorting through all the tangled line. Once you get used to it, these reels will be your best friend. There are two primary ways to cast. The first is to simply spin the reel with the line peeling off and cast towards your desired area. The second way is to spin the reel with the line g off , hold the line with either your left or right index finer, aim and cast your float towards your desired area. Casting against the

“The Islander” Centerpin Reel

wind is a real challenge for pinners, as anyone that pins will tell you.. If you don’t want to spend a lot of money, I would recommend going on-line, even ebay for a used centerpin reel which could cost anywhere from a hundred to a few hundred dollars. If you want to spend a little bit more and get a new

Pukaskawa FROM PAGE

25

left to eat was unappetizing, if there was even enough to go around. Food planning had been my job, and I had planned fish for dinner a few nights. Seeing that the crew was a bit surly and morale was low, I decided to take matters into my own hands. With determination, I grabbed my wooden rod and headed for the water. On the second cast using a red #5 spinner, I felt a strong hit and then a hard consistent pull. I yelled “Get the net! Get the net!” as I reappeared around the corner with my rod bent and my drag running out. The beautiful lake trout was visible in the clear water as I brought it into the shallows of the white sand beach. What a gorgeous sight it was! Ted ran in with the bro-

centerpin reel, I would recommend the Islander listed at $385.00 because it's light weight & spins eff o r tlessly. I don't know how many steelhead, browns and kings I have caught on a center pin reel in the last decade, it's ken net, scooped it up and threw it onto the beach. The fish wasn’t huge for a Superior lake trout, but it was a good eating size. The wooden rod had come through, and what a morale booster for us all! It may also have saved us from resorting to cannibalism. On our last night we enjoyed healthy portions of delicious lake trout while anticipating an easy paddle the next day. Our truck was waiting for us four miles up the coast at our finishing point in Hattie Cove. We had little doubt that this paddle would be relaxing and trouble free. However Gitchigumi had diff e r e n t plans for us. That last morning, winds blew up big swells as whitecaps broke to the horizon. Waves crashed against the rocky shoreline and splashed fifteen feet in

the air. Paddling would have been life threatening to say the least. Fortunately I had a trick up my sleeve. Taking three logs and a lot of rope, we transformed our canoes into a catamaran, attached our canoe covers and headed out. It was a wild ride traveling way up and then way back down in the big waves. We had to be careful not to take in too much water, bailing as we went, but as far as endings went, this one was epic. There is a calming feeling that comes over me when I spend long periods of time immersed in a place, still in its natural state. The

in the thousands. I’m extremely grateful to whoever brought center pins to Toronto in the seventies. I can't imagine drifting a river without one. It's like having coffee in the morning, you need it! For those avid steelheaders out there that have never experienced using a centerpin reel, all I can say is give it a good try! You can't beat center pin reels for longer controlled, drag free drifts. When you take the time to learn these reels you will add to your effectiveness as a steelheader. Pukaskawa experience was rewarding, it had just the right amount of everything to make our trip unforgettable. As we loaded the truck and drove away from Lake Superior, I became aware of a deep calming feeling, which I believe is our natural state.

29


Centerpinning Join the Revolution

BY

JIM PARK

C

all them whatever you want—centerpin reels, float reels, palm reels or even free spool reels—they all serve the same purpose. They help you catch fish, lots and lots of fish. These reels were an instant hit around the Great Lakes tributaries back in the early eighties, like mtv and cd players. A new revolution for catching steelhead was born, but the “centrepin” reel has been around and used in England for over a hundred years. In the eight-

ies there were only a few models around the great lake tributaries the stream master, Clough, Kiss, Stanton, and the Drifter. Today there are well over a hundred different models of centerpin reels in the market place ranging anywhere from one hundred dollars to a thousand dollars. WHY CENTERPIN? One early December day in 2008 on Elk Creek, in Pennsylvania, an older angler watched me land

the best in polarized vision

Color: Black Clear Fade Lens: Gray

Color: Tortoise Shell Lens: Bronze

Color: Black Gloss Lens: Gray

Color: Tri-Tone Bronze Lens: Bronze

Color: Black Gloss Lens: Bronze

$ 119.95

Sale $69.95 !!!

US Funds, shipping Included to US & Canada

Order at Kype.net 28

Avid angler, Jim Park re p resents our Facebook Community with this Centerpin Art i c l e .

over a dozen steelhead in an hour. Instead of the usual “What are you using for bait?” he asked me, “What kind of a fly reel is that?” I explained what centerpinning is in the simplest terms. He was slightly overwhelmed and amazed to say the least. Later that same morning, after catching a few more steelies, to my amusement I heard another fisherman telling his friend, “That centerpin guy has another one!” Keep in mind that the centerpin reel is only one of many elements required to catching many fish. These reels are primarily used for float fishing in tributaries with a flow and sometimes in water with no current. The million dollar question is why use a centerpin reel? The number one reason or benefit is simply “CONTROL!” When you’re drifting your bait in a moving pool under a float, you want to have the absolute minimal amount of slack line or belly in your line on the water. Less belly means that when your float goes down there is a tighter connection with the fish, this improves your hook set and your hook up ratio. With a traditional spinning or fly reel, you don't get free spool line coming off effortlessly.

Center pin reel allows a longer and cleaner drift to cover more water which will also equate to hooking more fish. HOW TO USE A CENTERPIN Like anything in life practice makes perfect and with these reels it's no different. The more you use it, the more you will get used to it and learn to use it with m a s t e r y.. Once you’ve mastered it, it’s like riding a bike or swimming in the deep end of a pool, you’ll never forget. At first it can be intimidating, the thought of not casting far enough or getting a messy birds nest tangle just eats you up inside. I can certainly remember the very first time I used a centerpin and for that matter a baitcasting reel. It was not fun sorting through all the tangled line. Once you get used to it, these reels will be your best friend. There are two primary ways to cast. The first is to simply spin the reel with the line peeling off and cast towards your desired area. The second way is to spin the reel with the line g off , hold the line with either your left or right index finer, aim and cast your float towards your desired area. Casting against the

“The Islander” Centerpin Reel

wind is a real challenge for pinners, as anyone that pins will tell you.. If you don’t want to spend a lot of money, I would recommend going on-line, even ebay for a used centerpin reel which could cost anywhere from a hundred to a few hundred dollars. If you want to spend a little bit more and get a new

Pukaskawa FROM PAGE

25

left to eat was unappetizing, if there was even enough to go around. Food planning had been my job, and I had planned fish for dinner a few nights. Seeing that the crew was a bit surly and morale was low, I decided to take matters into my own hands. With determination, I grabbed my wooden rod and headed for the water. On the second cast using a red #5 spinner, I felt a strong hit and then a hard consistent pull. I yelled “Get the net! Get the net!” as I reappeared around the corner with my rod bent and my drag running out. The beautiful lake trout was visible in the clear water as I brought it into the shallows of the white sand beach. What a gorgeous sight it was! Ted ran in with the bro-

centerpin reel, I would recommend the Islander listed at $385.00 because it's light weight & spins eff o r tlessly. I don't know how many steelhead, browns and kings I have caught on a center pin reel in the last decade, it's ken net, scooped it up and threw it onto the beach. The fish wasn’t huge for a Superior lake trout, but it was a good eating size. The wooden rod had come through, and what a morale booster for us all! It may also have saved us from resorting to cannibalism. On our last night we enjoyed healthy portions of delicious lake trout while anticipating an easy paddle the next day. Our truck was waiting for us four miles up the coast at our finishing point in Hattie Cove. We had little doubt that this paddle would be relaxing and trouble free. However Gitchigumi had diff e r e n t plans for us. That last morning, winds blew up big swells as whitecaps broke to the horizon. Waves crashed against the rocky shoreline and splashed fifteen feet in

the air. Paddling would have been life threatening to say the least. Fortunately I had a trick up my sleeve. Taking three logs and a lot of rope, we transformed our canoes into a catamaran, attached our canoe covers and headed out. It was a wild ride traveling way up and then way back down in the big waves. We had to be careful not to take in too much water, bailing as we went, but as far as endings went, this one was epic. There is a calming feeling that comes over me when I spend long periods of time immersed in a place, still in its natural state. The

in the thousands. I’m extremely grateful to whoever brought center pins to Toronto in the seventies. I can't imagine drifting a river without one. It's like having coffee in the morning, you need it! For those avid steelheaders out there that have never experienced using a centerpin reel, all I can say is give it a good try! You can't beat center pin reels for longer controlled, drag free drifts. When you take the time to learn these reels you will add to your effectiveness as a steelheader. Pukaskawa experience was rewarding, it had just the right amount of everything to make our trip unforgettable. As we loaded the truck and drove away from Lake Superior, I became aware of a deep calming feeling, which I believe is our natural state.

29


Salmon R. FROM PAGE

19

constantly reminded you “keep your rod tip up!” Right? However, when river fishing, this is not the case. You have to consider current and pressure. Fish naturally have the tendency to turn away from resistance, so you cannot make it easy for them to do so. Try releasing a fish in a strong current...You’ll notice that when the head of the fish is perfectly facing upriver, he holds there nice, doesn’t he?

when his head turns slightly to the right or left, his entire body will want to turn. When fighting the fish, chances are he will be downriver from your position. The angler must try to keep his head facing directly upriver. When the rod tip is lifted up, the head of the fish will lift and the current will push against his body, and the fish will turn downriver. The ONLY way to bring a fish back to you with light gear is to keep his head facing upriver, therefore it’s a must to have your rod tip down close to the river’s sur-

face. If the fish begins to leap out of the water, the rod tip can now come up momentarily. WHERE TO? Where you fish on the river will depend on the time of year and current water conditions. When salmon fishing in September and October, there is usually a high pressure of anglers lined up in the big pools. This is a great time to fish some pocket water or to choose holes that require a decent hike. Keep in mind, salmon will enter the river in

4.1

Image ©˙2009 New York GIS © 2009 Tele Atlas

But

4.2 30

Image ©˙2009 New York GIS © 2009 Tele Atlas

droves. Continuously check the Douglaston Salmon Run reports. When you hear a run of kings has entered the lower river, attempt to cut o ff the run upriver. For example, if the run enters the river on Sunday and it was gangbusters all day long at the D.S.R., don’t return there the the following day. During normal water flows, I would head up above the 2A bridge the next day to fish to that same pod of fish. Tracking coho salmon is nearly impossible, as they have been known to run the entire distance of the river in twelve hours time. It’s usually one day per year where the mother load of Coho enter the river. The ticket is to be in the DSR that day! So, when will it happen? Who knows? It’s all about water level and temperature and the one mysterious trigger. Perhaps a good rain or a drop in the barometer, but every year something triggers this run of Coho and they enter the river with fire in their eyes. The gun has sounded and they will blaze through the strongest of currents as if it were a swimming pool. If you’re lucky enough to catch this run, be ready to lose nine out of ten hook-ups. Don’t be foolish enough to think that fifty-pound test is the answer. All that really does is create a louder “crack” when that fish spanks you. Even though you are getting torn up, this will be an experience of a lifetime. The cart wheeling, tail-walking aerial display is something you’ll never forget, and is something only a fresh run of Coho can provide.

All you can do is try to be there when it happens. I will go out on a limb here and predict October 6th for the 2009 season. Wish me luck on that one. Steelhead is an entirely different story. Unlike salmon, they’re not entering the river in the fall for spawning, but to feed on spawn. The eggs and rotting carcasses from salmon will draw loads of steelhead into the river system—and they will spread throughout the river pretty good. WHERE TO STEELHEAD FISH? For those of you who pursue true chrome, obviously you belong in the lower river, fishing the DSR for the late fall and spring runs of fresh steelhead. Use eggs and egg patterns! During the colder winter months, get into the deeper pools upriver near Altmar. Be sure to drop down to lighter leaders and smaller presentations. The fish can be lethargic, but will often turn off and on throughout the day. For prime steelheading such as November, December, March and April, anglers typically choose where to fish based on the type of water they prefer. There are beautiful runs, pockets and holes throughout the middle section of the river. The last part of April to mid May is the time for drop-backs. The steelhead are done spawning and now dropping back to Lake Ontario. They start to change from their spawning colors to bright silver once again. They feed aggressively, striking everything in sight

5.1

Image ©˙2009 New York GIS © 2009 Tele Atlas

5.2

Image ©˙2009 New York GIS © 2009 Tele Atlas

in an attempt to gain back their strength after a long winter and enduring the vigor of spawning. SALMON RIVER SAFETY Be very careful in this river because the footing is a bit tricky and the currents are strong. Many fishermen have lost their lives on the Salmon River. The stretch below the Black Hole is one of the most dangerous and treacherous locations. GUIDES Do yourself a favor and

hire a reputable guide to take you down the river and teach you how to be successful for salmon and steelhead, especially for you newbies. As far as experienced anglers, a guide trip can only make you better and will provide you with a greater knowledge of the river as the drift boat allows you to fish various holes in a day’s time. Furthermore, it could be that one little tip or trick you learn from a guide that you can take home and stash in your memory bank for future successes.

FISHERY UPDATE Over the last few years, the Salmon River has been blessed with runs of steelhead and brown trout of epic proportion. The river is really turning on. Back in the ‘90’s, my fellow guides and I were considered heroes if we landed a few steelhead a day. Now, the bar has been raised. The Salmon River has single handily changed my life and created too many memories to count. It’s one of the top fisheries of the Great Lakes and worth the trip.

31


Salmon R. FROM PAGE

19

constantly reminded you “keep your rod tip up!” Right? However, when river fishing, this is not the case. You have to consider current and pressure. Fish naturally have the tendency to turn away from resistance, so you cannot make it easy for them to do so. Try releasing a fish in a strong current...You’ll notice that when the head of the fish is perfectly facing upriver, he holds there nice, doesn’t he?

when his head turns slightly to the right or left, his entire body will want to turn. When fighting the fish, chances are he will be downriver from your position. The angler must try to keep his head facing directly upriver. When the rod tip is lifted up, the head of the fish will lift and the current will push against his body, and the fish will turn downriver. The ONLY way to bring a fish back to you with light gear is to keep his head facing upriver, therefore it’s a must to have your rod tip down close to the river’s sur-

face. If the fish begins to leap out of the water, the rod tip can now come up momentarily. WHERE TO? Where you fish on the river will depend on the time of year and current water conditions. When salmon fishing in September and October, there is usually a high pressure of anglers lined up in the big pools. This is a great time to fish some pocket water or to choose holes that require a decent hike. Keep in mind, salmon will enter the river in

4.1

Image ©˙2009 New York GIS © 2009 Tele Atlas

But

4.2 30

Image ©˙2009 New York GIS © 2009 Tele Atlas

droves. Continuously check the Douglaston Salmon Run reports. When you hear a run of kings has entered the lower river, attempt to cut o ff the run upriver. For example, if the run enters the river on Sunday and it was gangbusters all day long at the D.S.R., don’t return there the the following day. During normal water flows, I would head up above the 2A bridge the next day to fish to that same pod of fish. Tracking coho salmon is nearly impossible, as they have been known to run the entire distance of the river in twelve hours time. It’s usually one day per year where the mother load of Coho enter the river. The ticket is to be in the DSR that day! So, when will it happen? Who knows? It’s all about water level and temperature and the one mysterious trigger. Perhaps a good rain or a drop in the barometer, but every year something triggers this run of Coho and they enter the river with fire in their eyes. The gun has sounded and they will blaze through the strongest of currents as if it were a swimming pool. If you’re lucky enough to catch this run, be ready to lose nine out of ten hook-ups. Don’t be foolish enough to think that fifty-pound test is the answer. All that really does is create a louder “crack” when that fish spanks you. Even though you are getting torn up, this will be an experience of a lifetime. The cart wheeling, tail-walking aerial display is something you’ll never forget, and is something only a fresh run of Coho can provide.

All you can do is try to be there when it happens. I will go out on a limb here and predict October 6th for the 2009 season. Wish me luck on that one. Steelhead is an entirely different story. Unlike salmon, they’re not entering the river in the fall for spawning, but to feed on spawn. The eggs and rotting carcasses from salmon will draw loads of steelhead into the river system—and they will spread throughout the river pretty good. WHERE TO STEELHEAD FISH? For those of you who pursue true chrome, obviously you belong in the lower river, fishing the DSR for the late fall and spring runs of fresh steelhead. Use eggs and egg patterns! During the colder winter months, get into the deeper pools upriver near Altmar. Be sure to drop down to lighter leaders and smaller presentations. The fish can be lethargic, but will often turn off and on throughout the day. For prime steelheading such as November, December, March and April, anglers typically choose where to fish based on the type of water they prefer. There are beautiful runs, pockets and holes throughout the middle section of the river. The last part of April to mid May is the time for drop-backs. The steelhead are done spawning and now dropping back to Lake Ontario. They start to change from their spawning colors to bright silver once again. They feed aggressively, striking everything in sight

5.1

Image ©˙2009 New York GIS © 2009 Tele Atlas

5.2

Image ©˙2009 New York GIS © 2009 Tele Atlas

in an attempt to gain back their strength after a long winter and enduring the vigor of spawning. SALMON RIVER SAFETY Be very careful in this river because the footing is a bit tricky and the currents are strong. Many fishermen have lost their lives on the Salmon River. The stretch below the Black Hole is one of the most dangerous and treacherous locations. GUIDES Do yourself a favor and

hire a reputable guide to take you down the river and teach you how to be successful for salmon and steelhead, especially for you newbies. As far as experienced anglers, a guide trip can only make you better and will provide you with a greater knowledge of the river as the drift boat allows you to fish various holes in a day’s time. Furthermore, it could be that one little tip or trick you learn from a guide that you can take home and stash in your memory bank for future successes.

FISHERY UPDATE Over the last few years, the Salmon River has been blessed with runs of steelhead and brown trout of epic proportion. The river is really turning on. Back in the ‘90’s, my fellow guides and I were considered heroes if we landed a few steelhead a day. Now, the bar has been raised. The Salmon River has single handily changed my life and created too many memories to count. It’s one of the top fisheries of the Great Lakes and worth the trip.

31


Kype Fishing Magazine, Volume 1, Issue 4  

George Douglas' Kype Fishing Magazine. The Best in steelhead, salmon and trout fishing.