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LANGUAGE OF VISION KYLE S. SHEPPARD


CONTENTS ELEVATION

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NARRATIVE

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PERSPECTIVE

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SPECULATIVE

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SITE MAP

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SECTION

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CONCLUSION

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BIBLIOGRAPHY

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ELEVATION

Sketching context is understanding context. Elevations can be fairly stale when compared to other architectural drawings; however, this does not mean that there is nothing to be learned. The elevation plays the role in understanding scale and the relationships of scales in context (environment, both built and natural).

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Broken down, this elevation consists of layers that form a final product. The importance of the assignment is to learn the role of each layer in order to choreograph a final product. These layers are arbitrary, lacking a personal touch and reason aside from the reason of completing an assignment. By understanding the ideas of Paul Klee, in the book PEDAGOGICAL SKETCHBOOK, comparison of product and theory can effect future productions in a more meaningful way. The theory of Paul Klee, when analyzing lines, gives purpose to lines and the forms created. These elevations are flat, however, forms are created by the active lines that form the perimeter. As described by Klee, “An active line, limited in its movement by fixed points� tells that story the boundaries of a sketched elevation. The fixed points shift the perimeter and create form that begins the story of an elevation.

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As all layered elements collide in a final orchistra of product, texture is an additional layer, informing the viewer. As Wassily Kandinsky stated in POINT AND LINE TO PLANE, “texture is a means to an end and it must be looked upon and as such so used.” Texture must become it’’s own end while serving in the overall composition. Every layer plays a role in the composition, just as every instrument in an orchistra.

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NARRATIVE

In the narrative sketches, texture and line collide in a battle for attention. The bold fill of the texture overwhelms the product in an attempt to frame the path. Caution must be taken in the future to ensure the narrative is balanced.

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PERSPECTIVE

The perspective sketch can be considered a specific narrative sketch. In this case, the beginning thoughts of a building are set to a sheet of paper where ideas can become physical manifestations

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“The term “Basic Plane” is understood to mean the material plane which is called to receive the content of the work of art.” -Wassily Kandinsky

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SPECULATIVE

The speculative narrative includes many layers of other assignments, compiled to produce a single work. The success is weighed by how the speculative sketch speaks within the layers of context. The three speculative sketches to the left are light in nature and speak to the color tones of the context. In the future, the speculative sketch must read slightly louder than the context. This can be accomplished while continuing a visual relationship to the context.

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SITE MAP

The site map is an example of how texture and color can produce basic planes that speak towards a larger idea. The contrast between the canopy and built figures was an important idea that may have gone to far. The figures begin to distract the viewer which hides the main idea.

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This revision of the site map depicts a more successful collaboration of texture and color that portrays a big idea. It is the absence of color that produces the texture of the canopy which can become must more than just a canopy. In an absence comes a viewers sense of wonder. The absence must be framed or balanced to not discourage the observer from placing their own sense of worth to the work.

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SECTION The section drawing as a communication tool focus’ on the relationship of context and the ground plane. Textures are used to show the relationship of spaces as adjacencies in the intervention section. The contextual section uses more line work to show the relationship of scale to the intervention along the ground plane. To much texture and color in the adjacency section can diffuses the success by overwhelming the main idea of how spaces are working in conjunction to one-another. This is different from the contextual section where more line work can generally mean more detail which, under normal circumstances, helps the section drawing tell a more detailed story.

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Texture, line, plane, color, and point can all be utilized to produce a successful sketch. The success of the sketch is in how the elements are used as tools to tell the story. With practice and failure, lessons are learned that eventually overcome and produce sketches that succeed in telling a proper narrative based on an overall idea. Although it is important to have an overall big idea when sketching, it is never a bad circumstance to arrive at a new idea. As long as the idea is understood through the sketch, success has been made.

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BIBLIOGRAPHY

Klee, Paul. Pedagogical Sketchbook. London: Faber and Faber, 1968. Print. Pedagogical Sketchbook� is an investigation into the dynamic principles of visual arts. The book is considered an excellent exercise in modern art thinking, relating objects to physical and intellectual space concepts. The narrative of the book is composed in order of main ideas: Line and Structure, Dimension and Ballance, Gravitational Curve, followed by Kinetic and Chromatic Energy and finishing with drawings related to chromatic and thermo-dynamic. The book will allow me to begin to think beyond the physical realm, while sketching, into a world of metaphysical and spiritual. Kandinsky, Wassily, and Hilla Rebay. Point and Line to Plane. New York: Dover Publications, 1979. Print. The point isthe most concise form; it is extension, form and color. A line is the product of force applied in a given direction. A plane is the material surface on which the artist draws or paints; called the basic plane. The book is an analysis of the geometric elements that make up every painting - the point and the line. Kandinsky analyzed art to be from the point of view of their inner effect on the observer. Tonality plays a major role in communicating the inner effects of the observer through simple geometric elements.

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Dean, Andrea Oppenheimer., and Timothy Hursley. Rural Studio: Samuel Mockbee and an Architecture of Decency. New York: Princeton Architectural, 2002. Print.

During a time of overwhelming prosperity and attention towards archtiecture and the starchitects that pave paths for the profession, the Rural Studio is an educational experiment acting towards an alternative substance. The idea of hands-on experience in designing and building real objects using scavenged and reusable materials. The ideas at play are also strong in the realm of sketches. Substance can exist as materials can be scavenged from the memory or created as necessary.

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LANGUAGE OF VISION  

Sketches and lessons of sketching.

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