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Kyle Reckling Work Samples

Los Angeles, CA 847.347.5932 kr21490@gmail.com


Education/

Architectural Experience/

University of California - Los Angeles (UCLA) Master of Architecture I- 2015 - Present University of Illinois- Urbana Champaign (UIUC) Bachelor’s of Science in Architectural Studies- 2009-2012; Graduated with Honors École Nationale Supérieure d’Architecture de Versailles 2010 - 2011 Study Abroad Program, One Academic Year Bradley University- Peoria, Illinois Mechanical Engineering: 2008 - 2009

March 2015 - January 2016: Architectural Design Team Member Selected Projects: Bosworth Apartments Polonia Triangle Urban Intervention St. Lawrence Residence Responsibilities: -Designed and managed the redesign of a four unit apartment building from schematic design through construction docs.

Skills/ Hand Built Models- Wood, Concrete, Plaster, Cardboard, Foam, etc. Proficiency operating a 3-Axis CNC machine, 3D starch/plastic printer, and laser cutting machine

Proficient Software/ 3D Modeling: Rendering: Graphic: 2D Modeling:

Citizen Architects; Chicago, Illinois

Revit, Rhino 3D, Grasshopper, Rhinocam, Sketch-Up Maxwell, Vray, 3D Studio Max​ Adobe (Photoshop, Illustrator, Indesign) AutoCAD, Revit, VectorWorks

Organizations/ AIAS (UIUC & UCLA): Student Member Ecological Design Consortium (UIUC): Member Freedom by Design(UIUC & UCLA): Student Member

Interests/ Sketching, Photography, Philosophy, Traveling, Triathlon

Languages/ German: Intermediate Working Proficiency Spanish: Basic

Honors & Awards/ Selected to assist with UCLA Fellow Gabriel Fries-Briggs Fellowship Exhibition February 2016 - April 2016 Selected to participate in the 2012 Rotch Travel Grant Studio at UIUC $20,000 for Travel and Research in Tokyo Work Exhibited in the 2012 Manufacturing Landscapes Symposium and exhibition May 2012 - August 2012, Chicago IL

-In charge of building and maintaining the Revit model for all stages of design.

SPARCH (Sheehan Partners Architects); Chicago, Illinois January 2014 - August 2015: Architectural Design Team Member Selected Projects: Equinix SV-5 Data Center; San Jose CA. Equinix SV-1 Data Center; San Jose CA. Equinix NY-6 Data Center; New York, NY. Responsibilities: -Extensively worked with a team during the early conceptual and schematic design phases Equinix data centers. -Aided in issuing bid, permit and construction sets, gathering specs, and researching materials.

Baierbischofberger Architekten; Zurich, Switzerland October 2012- September 2013 (1 Year) : Architektur Praktikant (Intern) Selected Projects: Am Rosenweg; Männedorf, Switzerland Lagerhalle; Uetikon, Switzerland Volkskunstmuseum; Uetikon, Switzerland Responsibilities: - Worked exclusively with the principal architect to develop the design for an artist gallery and warehouse. Produced computer-aided renderings, 3D models, diagrams and 2D Drawings using Rhino, Grasshopper and a tabletop CNC router. -Assisted project manager in developing permit set for a 15 unit apartment complex. Created computer aided and physical models, details, sections and elevations using Rhino, Vray, Vectorworks, and Adobe CS.


Project List

Academic UCLA/

Library 1

Univ. of Illinois/

Weave 2

Univ. of Illinois/

Connect&Direct 3

UCLA/

Shed 4

Professional

GFB Fellowship/

Tilt Casting 5

Biaerbischofberger Architekten/

Lagerhalle 6

SPARCH/ Biaerbischofberger Architekten/

Flex DC 7

Am Rosenweg 8


UCLA Winter 2016 Graduate Studio 2

Studio Critic Jimenez Lai

Program Branch Library 16,000 ft2 Downtown LA, 4th & Hill

One can read the language of Malevich’s white on white and black box oil painting as a quasi-nolli plan expression of public and private space. In my diagrams the levels of white indicate public and more public areas while the levels of black represent private and more private spaces. An analysis of this concept applied to the Beinecke library at Yale and the TU Delft Library in the Netherlands, links their center cores and how they address public verses private space. The Delft library’s core is open public space for studying and reading, while the Beinecke’s core guards the sacred books behind a glass box. A manifestation of the conservative ideology and privatization of intellectualism, the Beinecke Library directly contrasts the transparency and liberalism of the library on the TU Delft campus in the Netherlands. Learning from the both libraries and without fully applying the ideology of either, this design combines architectural conservativeness with civic space. This library is composed of two buildings – each defined by their programmatic components. Group gathering spaces, a cafe, terraces, and large reading spaces make up the outer civic building – a space meant for people to converse and socialize. The inner private building contains all the library stacks, small reading rooms, computer rooms, and small study spots – a space meant for the individual. Formally, the civic space surrounds the private space, creating a buffer and removing direct connection between the private space and the street. The inner building can be seen protruding the outer building at the top but is cut off by the enclosure of the outer building. The façade becomes an abstraction of the inner form by use of perforated and non-perforated panels. This phenomenal transparency abstractly alludes to the inner building with intent to hint at what is happening at the center.


The Beinecke Library

The TU DelftLibrary

Core Diagram

Structural Autonomy

Socio-Political Implications

Precedent Study


Malevich Inspired Conceptual Diagrams


Top to Bottom: Floor plan iterations, planometric diagrams, conceptual diagrams


Left: Floor Plan Diagrams Right: Iteration Models


Building Elevation Drawing: In elevation the inner building is projected to the outside rain-screen in form of perforation.

Building Elevation Model: The projected form subtly hints at the idea that there is another formal system inside. The perforation is read somewhat continuously in architectural drawings, yet is misregistered as an abstract form in perspective.


Planometric Illustration: This render communicates the circulation of the space and division of program. The inner (dark) building is where the intellect goes to read and study, while the surrounding areas are the civic areas meant for socializing and community events. This is the organizational system on each floor.


Final Model


Left: Interior Model photo Right: Floor Plans


Pulled apart Elevation


Section Model


UIUC Spring 2012 Undergrad Studio 6

Studio Critic Julie Larsen

Program Redesign Tskuiji Fish Market Tokyo, Japan

With over 50% of the world’s population living in cities and two thirds in cities vulnerable to climate change, as architects it is fundamental that we leverage infrastructural and ecological concerns for new architectural prototypes that can reshape the focus of our discourse. Tokyo is one of the largest populations in the world and one of the top 20 port cities most susceptible to flood damage due to high storm surges. It is also home to the largest, most well-known wholesale fish and seafood market in the world – the Tsukiji Market. The Market resides in prime urban real estate along the waterfront of Tokyo Bay and is near major transportation hubs, the central business district and adjacent to the famous Ginza district. With continuous economic growth, there is significant pressure on the market to rethink its location and make way for more lucrative, commercial development. The location and proximity of the market to the water is potentially beneficial as a public space - but also a permanent threat. The opportunity to utilize new ecological strategies for the market and the city at large would signify it as a viable prototype for more public development. The market, as a new manufactured landscape for the city, could combat ecological realities and offer new possibilities for much needed public space. The market is under designed for such rapid growth in daily visitors and tourists and as a result, it is retreating from becoming a tourist destination. The design for Das Weave, while recognizing the cultural influence and significance of the market as a historical public space, investigates the ability to transform the market from a static node on Tokyo Bay to a multi-functional structure which systematically treats the Bay water.


Right: Concept Model


Conceptual Diagrams: The market structure doubles as a water treatment plant for Tokyo Bay. Because of its proximity and direct connection to Tokyo Bay, there is an opportunity for the market to function as more than just a space to buy fish. Using a linear process of treating water through a series of aggitation, skimming, and settling, the market takes the form of a conglomeration of water treatment tubes. Pinching, pulling, dips, and reveals allow for spaces to be programmed with fishmarket and civic functions.

Tsukiji

Direct Connection to Tokyo Bay


Conceptual Process Models: Several models are built to understand the formal qualities of pinching and intersecting tubes. Using these models I was able to determine spaces of void for light and formations of tubes for the water treatment.

Public: Circulation Space

Structural Tie

Sun Well

Structural Element

WTD’s Private: Space Created from Deformation Public: Park

Light into Marketplace

Landscape Transportation of Goods

Connection to the Bay

Inner Private Market


Formal Process Models: Understanding the form as a means of circultating water as well as people was important in this design. The structure needed to efficiently pump water through a series of treatment tubes while also allowing people to move vertically through the building. This interlocking structure moves water primarily horizontally while jogging vertical to provide stairs for pedestrians.

Section Model Adjacent Tubes Separated

Connecting

Weave Connection


Interior Perspective: The form pinches together to create large light well openings in the voids and programmable area in the pinch. Light can protrude deep into the building.


2.

In Section, the water treatment system becomes apparent. Water is collected from the Bay (left side of section) cycled through a the water treatment tubes and returned to the bay .


The 3D print of the entire form, a blow up CNC routed model, and roof perspective help understand the monumental scale of this structure. THe models demonstrate how the pinching and pulling of treatment tubes have the ability to create flat programmable space as they simultaneously open the structure up for light.


Site Model: Front Right, Project Boards and Models: Middle Left

Work Exhibited in Manufacturing Landscapes Exhibition, Chicago IL


UIUC Fall 2011 Undergrad Studio 5

Studio Critic

Program

Roger Hubeli

Airplane Hangar Savoye, IL

Architects such as Le Corbusier and Jean Prouve have seen the plane as a symbol for what modern architecture should strive for - a single purposed machine in perfect unity between function and form. The process of manufacturing aircrafts provides immense potential for a revised understanding of the fabrication of buildings. Willard Airport in Champaign, Illinois is a regional airport serving the students and faculty at the University as well as an aviation school for the nearby community college. Its location within a landscape completely overwhelmed with cornfields allows many opportunities for an architectural intervention. I decided to focus this project on re-thinking the derelict airplane hangar and mechanical shop used by the school. Connect and Direct examines the use of various tectonic construction methods in architecture. Through experimentation with modules and connections, the roof effectively responds to the spatial requirements of the hangar as well as the desires of those working inside. Early models show numerous tests of shape and form to understand how structural form affects the natural light quality of the working space.


Human Scale

Building Scale

Site Scale


Systems Diagram


Section Perspective


Approach Render


Light Study Roof Model


Final Model


UCLA Fall 2015 Graduate Studio 1

Studio Critic Gabriel Fries-Briggs

Program Formal Analysis Backyard Shed Siteless

I am interested in the articulation of a scaled concealment system that emerges through the interpolation of two conflicting geometries. In this case, a simple wall system with the complex roof. In the gothic analysis, I studied how joints articulate areas of material and structural contact between parts and systems. In particular, the irregular vault that that formally connects a radial and rectilinear grid. The roof systems of oversized suburban homes are enlarged to suggest vast and complex interiors. They often barely fit their supporting wall systems and rely on this roof-wall connection to resolve the gaps. Instead of minimizing and attempting to hide this space, this shed enlarges it to a size where it is noticed as an integral connector piece. Because these two systems do not geometrically fit, they rely on a multiplicity of parts to function in concert to resolve their differences. In order to maintain a continuous envelope, this resolution is typically the product of a vastly complex system of joining parts. As the differentiation between the roof and wall expands, the tectonics of their connection contort, becoming more obvious and requiring the build up of obscure parts and pieces. This project celebrates the mediation - creating a system of enlarged concealment pieces whiling transforming this space into the main body of the structure. Through concealment, the tectonics of this ever growing system become hidden to emphasizing the this space as an object, instead of a network of different parts and pieces. Typical roof-wall connection pieces, like the fascia extend in both vertical directions creating an unusual enlarged space between parts. Upon entering the shed, one is immediately confronted by this medial space, as they are interposed between the roof and walls. Dependant on the contortion of the roof, the concealment system must react to create space that productively connects to the walls. Though the joint is not entirely defined as the wall or the roof, it accentuates and organizes areas of material and geometric difference creating a better connection.


Radial to Rectilinear: Diagramming the Transition Joint Analysis

Borrowed Element Analysis

Pier Analysis

Connection Analysis

1/

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Rectilinear Grid

Separation of Grids

3/ 2/

Radial Grid

RegularityRegularity in Form in Form Regularity in Form

Joint

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3/ Repeating Form: Ch 3/ Repeating Form: Chevet 3/ Re

Single Form: Irregular Fo 2/ Single 2/ Irregular Transi 2/ Sin

1/ Repeating Form: Na 1/ Repeating Form: Nave 1/ Re


System 2

Joint

System 1

Borrowed Element Inform the Joint

Isometric Joint

Left: Joint Analysis, Right: Transitional Joint Model


Conceptual Development Diagrams and Models: Iterrogating the joint between shapes or systems. How can contrasting geometries fit together and create a cohesive form. line joint

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1

2

2

space joint

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1

2

2

offset space joint

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joint between systems

line joint

space joint


Top to Bottom: McMansion Roof Joint Study, Shed Elevations, Shed Plans: Tracing the white joint

Intersection Study

Intersection Study Intersection Study

Intersection Study


Rendered Detail: Each component of the joint is highly functional while coordinating formally with its adjacent pieces

Glass Panel Area of Connection; Enlarged Gasket

Hardwood Window Frame Gutter Hardwood Soffit Panel Hardwood Fascia Boards Area of Connection; Enlarged Gasket

Shingle Corner Guard Asphalt Shingles Shingle Flashing

Exterior Cladding Cement Board Corner Guard

Gasket Detail


Exploded Axonometric: Dissecting the joint components demonstrates the intricacy and volume of parts that must simultaneously work together to successfully connect the roof and wall system


Material Palette: Using a consistent material palette to differentiate joint from the systems it connected was important with the visual clarity of this project. Show here, the Joint is always in white, while the exterior systems are dark materials and the interior is a gray. In the model photo on the right, the joint is clearly visible as the formal connection between parts


Final Model


Project List

Academic UCLA/

Library 1

Univ. of Illinois/

Weave 2

Univ. of Illinois/

Connect&Direct 3

UCLA/

Shed 4

Professional

GFB Fellowship/

Tilt Casting 5

Biaerbischofberger Architekten/

Lagerhalle 6

SPARCH/ Biaerbischofberger Architekten/

Flex DC 7

Am Rosenweg 8


UCLA Feb-Apr 2016

Team Kyle Reckling Aubry Baur Ben Gourley

Designer

Program

Gabriel Fries-Briggs Plumbing Standards Tilt Casting Material Research

Location 2426 Washington Los Angeles

Dates Exhibition: April 11, 2016April 24, 2016

The exhibition presents the back-side of the wall as a site of coordinated labor, loose material formation, and the internet of concrete. It displays work done in conjunction with the UCLA Architecture and Urban Design Teaching Fellowship program. The idea was to explore the material properties of concrete while interrogating the standard method of pouring on a flat surface. By tilting the casts, and pouring on an oblique surface, we were able to experiment with the slump and coagulation of concrete around plumbing fixtures. Controlling the viscosity and timing the pours were crucial in the success of this project. The axonometric drawing shows the final walls that connects between each concrete stud, with the piping in dark black behind. Plan Drawings (left to right): The exhibition space floor plan. Flat casts, the formwork as it is slightly tilted ready for the pours. Piping plan, the intertwining of the pipes Final Placement of wall with concrete studs.


Left: Diagonal Tilted Casts, Right: Vertical Tilt, Far Right: Plumbing Connections


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Left: Final Cast Placement Right: Section drawing through exhibition space


Baierbischofberger Architekten 2013 - Professional Work

Program Artist Gallery Warehouse

Site Uetikon, Switzerland

Principal Florian Baier

Lagerhalle (“warehouse” in English) is the design for the larger of two rare art warehouses and galleries in Uetikon, Switzerland, a city just south of Zürich. While I was in Zürich, the principal architect, Florian Baier, and I conceptually developed the articulation of the concrete modules as the shell of the building. The visual language of the stacking module becomes an insight into its programmatic functions. The warehouse is for Bruno Bischofberger, a well-known art dealer credited for introducing American pop artists like Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein to the Europeans. Over the past few years Bruno has been moving his main exhibition gallery from downtown Zürich to the nearby neighboring town of Uetikon. Here, he has plans to build several smaller galleries (two of which have been built), along with warehouses to store art that is not being displayed. The interior of the building has a simple layout comprised of a central circulation core surrounded by storage units. The entrance is a double height space large enough to host a small party or art viewing. While developing this project, we began to create interior courtyards with an embellishment of greenery allowing it to not only function as a warehouse, but as an escape for those working. The serene atmosphere in the green courtyards surrounded by thousands of pieces of artwork becomes a place where anyone can revitalize themselves. -I produced all images and models shown, with periodic design reviews from Florian Baier, while working at Baierbischofberger Architekten


Iterative Facade Study


1

2

4

5 3

6

Concrete Roof Concrete Plates Skin Beams Center Core Handicap Access

1 2 3 4 5 6


Module

Storage

Module Connection Tab Rebar Column

Storage

Storage

Storage

Storage

Storage

Storage

Garden Space

Concrete Deck Beam (Steel or Concrete) Drop Ceiling

Meeting Area

Floor Slab Earth Foundation

Open to Below


Left Wall Section: Insulate concrete panels become the exterior enclosure . Plans: The floor plan is broken into storage spaces and artist galleries CNC Routed Foam model studying the geometry of a single concrete panel


SPARCH (Sheehan Partners Architects) Jan. 2014 - Aug. 2015 Professional Work

Program Flexible Data Center

Site Not Site Specific

Principal Neil Sheehan

This building is designed around prototypical planning modules that consist of a one-story colocation computer room, a two story electrical equipment bar and a office component. Generators are located in a screened outdoor yard. The building is designed to complement the existing data center on the site and can be easily expanded. The project has been awarded LEED GOLD certification. I specifically worked with the project architect to develop several facade treatment schemes that could be traced through the elevations of each side. Each scheme focused on a different method of using a shading device or material to distort, shade, or reflect light while sustaining a bright atmospheric interior


SPARCH provided comprehensive design services for this 264,000 square foot colocation facility. Three phases of single-story computer rooms are designed around prototypical planning modules and are powered from an electrical mezzanine above. They are flanked by a 37,000 square foot, three-story office and flex space which features a glass enclosed stairwell and work area. The project has been awarded LEED Silver certification. I was in charge of creating a material palette for the exterior of the building. Because of the lack of fenestration, the building worked best as a monolithic structure. Utilizing the intrisic qualities of concrete and corten steel, the building reads as a stark industrial warehouse, almost disguising the fact that it is a highly secure data center.


In addition to developing the facade, I worked with the mechanical and electrical engineers to coordinate the design of all the conduit and trays which carry the fiber lines to the computer servers


Baierbischofberger Architekten 2013 - Professional Work

Program 20 Unit Apt Complex

Site Männedorf, Switzerland

Principal Florian Baier

In a lecture at Illinois Institute of Technology, Winy Maas poses the question of “what [small buildings] can contribute, in their way, to a larger phenomenon?” Small buildings have the ability to test new innovative building systems and therefore possess the potential to become a productive catalyst as a stronger integration of ecological design develops. Rosenweg is an apartment complex in which the formal language of each building is derived from the movements of the surrounding topography. It is designed to strengthen the relationship between those living within the complex and the natural environment in which it is surrounded. Viewpoints within each separate unit intentionally frame different aspects of nature aiding in the notion that we live in conjunction with our environment. Each model communicates a step in the design progression, focusing on individual units with a main kopf (“head” in German) framing a view. Shown in the aerial and section, the kopf of the second and third buildings overlook the front apartments because of the natural slope of the site. Instead of the view being disrupted with a traditional built-up roof, one’s view is of an elaborate roof garden creating a seamless transition between building and nature. Am Rosenweg responds to the human desire for nature by providing gardens atop each building. This allows for less of a visual disruption between the natural and built environments for the inhabitants. Theoretically, the architecture uses strong geometric shapes and lines to frame interior space and create viewpoints which naturally stitch together interior living with the outside environment.


Iterative Massing Model Study


I was specifically responsible for developing the form in terms of framing views on the interior outward, as well as interior views from the exterior. Site conditions and restrictions allow the building to only reach a certain height, yet being situated on a hill provided a greater ability for this project to frame views of lake Zurich. Working with the height restrictions given by the city, I worked through foam massing models, section drawings and composite analytical renderings to develop the heights and formal massing for this project

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Framing Views: Bedroom Perspective


Framing Views: Courtyard Perspective


Kyle Reckling

KR21490@gmail.com 847.347.5932

Kyle Reckling Portfolio_April 2016  
Kyle Reckling Portfolio_April 2016  
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