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Portfolio Kyle Bogasky


Architectural Position Statement Over the last couple of years during my architectural education I have developed my own language to which I approach my projects. These ideas are a coalition between all the various learning experiences I’ve had from studios, to lectures, to electives, and even to just insightful analysis of architecture or designs that I find appealing. The approach can be broken down into five major themes: INTEGRATION WITH NATURE Architecture is not meant to be separate from nature. There is a dialogue that has to be made between the exterior and the interior. Where that threshold occurs and how it can change is of great importance.

PASSIVE STRATEGIES It is important to compose spaces in a way that fully utilizes the potential of the site. Spaces should take full advantage of natural light, fresh air ventilation, and solar orientation to optimize the space. Natural spaces are always more enjoyable than artificial ones.

COMPOSITION Every part of the building should be in service of the whole. A strong language between stereotomic, planar and tectonic elements is key to a successful composition. Use these elements to influence the perception of the space.

DECISIONS SERVE PARAMETERS Every decision should be made in service of enhancing the response to the project parameters. This drives the project forward and allows for clear communication with clients on how the end result got there and how it will serve them.

UNIFYING FUNCTION & AESTHETICS Aesthetics, on its own, is just art. Function, on its own, is just utility. Function should be optimized and composed in service of aesthetics. Aesthetics should be derived from and in service to the function. It is when these two things truly come and work together that you get architecture.

Together all of these ideas come together help develop to promote a cohesive design that is responding to the needs of the client, the occupants, the site, the systems, and the environment.


Education

Skills

The University of Arizona

Rhinoceros

Bachelor of Architecture

Autodesk Revit

2011 - 2017

Autodesk AutoCad

Hopkinton High School

Autodesk Vasari

2007 - 2011

Visual ARQ Grasshopper Dynamo

KYLE BOGASKY

Experience

Adobe Photoshop

Drachman Design Build Coalition

Adobe In-Design

Designed & Built

Lumion

2016 - 2017

Felix Render

Aspiring Architect 508.439.3831

kyle.bogasky@gmail.com 330 S Calle De Madrid Tucson, AZ 85711

Adobe Illustrator

Microsoft Office Physical Model-making

Links linkedin.com/in/kylebogasky

Laser Cutting 3D Printing Wood Working

issuu.com/kylebogasky

Metal Working

instagram.com/kylebogasky

Concrete Casting


References Michael Kothke

Mary Hardin

Architect & Lecturer | ARC101, 452 | 520.621.6744

Dean & Professor | ARC451A, 451B | 520.621.6751

“To Whom it May Concern, I’ve known Kyle Bogasky since his first semester of architecture school. As his instructor then, and as proven in subsequent years, I immediately recognized a keen interest in Kyle in solving design problems, and in the careful and rigorous communication and exploration of design through drawings models and 3D representations. Kyle is an exceptionally hard worker and would be a committed team member in any endeavor.”

“Kyle Bogasky was a critical asset in my Spring 2016 design-build studio. His energy and enthusiasm for developing a project of the highest design caliber was contagious, and inspired other students to aim higher. Kyle’s work ethic in my studio stood out – he was one who worked steadily, often volunteering to pick up tasks that he recognized as important even though he had plenty to do already. I relied upon him for the excellent renderings he produced for our final review, knowing that his perfectionism would result in a superior project. I recommend Kyle as a hard-working student, committed to excellence.”

Raymond Barnes

Brad Lang

Architect & Lecturer | ARC321, 421, 461R | 520.621.4802

Lecturer | ARC401, 459 | 480.570.5296

“I had the good fortune of having Kyle as a student in three separate classes during the last four years of Kyle’s trek through our five-year program in architecture. Kyle is committed, outgoing, curious, conscientious, intelligent and contented. Kyle is the type of person I would have hired to work in my firm, which was active several years ago (before I committed to teaching full-time). Wherever Kyle goes as he launches his architectural career, success will follow. I highly recommend Kyle for employment in an architecture-related business.”

(Please contact for formal recommendation)


Projects Center for Information & Collaboration

Unitarian Universalist Campus

Mixed Use Library | ARC401 | Fall 2015

Religious Campus | ARC302 | Spring 2014

This library, housing information for the Fine Arts, Photography, and Architecture majors, provides an inviting collaborative working environment for all on the northern end of the University of Arizona campus. Faced with the backsides of the surrounding buildings, this project is organized to provide an open, engaging experience that invites people to linger and participate in this collaborative community.

This religious campus placed an emphasis on land ethic. The campus had to be integrated with a highly topographical site challenging the design to be both ethical to the land and ADA compliant. The program consisted of a sanctuary, learning center, social hall, information center, and a nature chapel. The Unitarians wished for the three main buildings to be seen as equal but separate entities.


Trellis Tower Vertical Farm

Reggio Emelia Elementary School

Vertical Farm | ARC301 | Fall 2013

Elementary School | ARC202 | Spring 2013

Located just north of The Embarcadero Center in San Francisco, the challenge of designing a vertical farm in an urban environment was increased by the massive shadow cast upon the site throughout the day. This project consisted of a farmers market, health center, and museum tours of the vertical farms, making it a true center for health and wellness.

The Reggio Emalia approach to learning has a much more interactive approach with a focus on one’s environment being its teacher and allowing the children to have some control over what they are learning. Following these principles, the school design had to be an interactive environment that encouraged learning for children in preschool up to the 6th grade.


CENTER FOR INFORMATION AND COLLABORATION CL A S S S EME ST E R PR OG R A M LOCAT I O N

ARC401 Fall 2015 Mixed Use Library Lot 3039 The University Of Arizona Tu c s o n , A Z 8 5 7 2 1

This library, housing information for the Fine Arts, Photography, and Architecture majors, provides an inviting collaborative working environment for all on the northern end of the University of Arizona campus. Faced with the backsides of the surrounding buildings, this project is organized to provide an open, engaging experience that invites people to linger and participate in this collaborative community.


When you have a library with collaboration paces intertwined with their stacks, people will ongregate at those spaces closest to their easources. Thus by separating this collaborative rogram into another space, it no longer feels as it belongs to any one major freeing the space be used by everyone equally.

This project looks at integration in the form of the wide variety of social and academic groups on campus with an effort to bring them together in a space that welcomes them unanimously. Pathways crisscross and wined through the public programs located on the ground level to immediately break the boundaries between the private nature of a building and public realm of the campus. Public green-space is carved into the site to invite people to linger within this collaborative community. This public green-space continues on the roof drawing people up through the building. The program is broken up into three separate buildings, collaboration, information,and administration. Collaboration, a space intended for all, takes its place in the main building from which all public members enter. The information building to the south houses all of the reading materials. The west building houses the administration who are slightly more closed off from the rest of the project due to the private nature of the program. Ultimately these three separate spaces are pulled back together by a central collaborative space creating a cohesive whole. In order to break the collaboration space from being influenced by contents of the collections, the collaborative spaces were pulled into their own building which is linked with the others. This separation frees the spaces from an association to any major making it an inviting space for all students regardless of the program they are in. The mechanical spaces find themselves at the far ends of each wing.

To invite the public into the community of the space the bottom floor is completely open to them showcasing programs meant to draw them into the space. To then draw them up there is a realm of public space that takes over the upper levels, sandwhiching the library program inbetween. A system of ramps along the exterior is meant to draw them into these library spaces.


ARCHITECTURE EAST ARCHITECTURE WEST Sanitary Sewer

ELECTRICAL & COMPUTER ENGINEERING

CREATIVE PHOTOGRAPHY

HARVILL

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SPEECH & HEARING SCI


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Cant Strip

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LVL 5| 65’ 0” Active Louver Motor

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Raised Floor Support LVL 3| 35’ 0”

LVL 3| 35’ 0” Radiant Concrete Slab

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UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST CAMPUS CL A S S S EME ST E R PR OG R A M LOCAT I O N

ARC302 Spring 2014 Religious Campus 10330 N Oracle Rd Oro Valley, AZ 85704

This religious campus placed an emphasis on land ethic. The campus had to be integrated with a highly topographical site challenging the design to be both ethical to the land and ADA compliant. The program consisted of a sanctuary, learning center, social hall, information center, and a nature chapel. The Unitarians wished for the three main buildings to be seen as equal but separate entities.


The concept was to anchor the project into the hillside of the southern cliff face and extend outward into the valley in order to engage the topography of the site in a way that is accessible and ethical. Not only did this allow the project to be partially shaded by the natural formations of the hills but it also allowed for the buildings to be geothermally cooled by the earth during the hot summers. Terracing opens up the dynamic landscape to be experienced by all regardless of your mobility. The terracing also is perfect for channeling water to vegetation eliminating the need to waste city water on the landscaping. Also integrated within these terraces is a system of bioswales that cleanse the gray and black water from the site. This simultaneously reduces the flooding problem in the local area as the water is held on the site much longer. All the excavated material is recycled in the creation of the retaining walls and terracing fill.

2595

Unitarian Universalist Campus 2605

The concept was to anchor the project into the hil


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Green/Brides Room

Arrival Space Storeage Restroom Restroom

Stage Choir


The nature chapel, being the ďŹ rst piece of the project designed became the conceptual driver for the rest of the project. The design revolved around a little known fact that 90% of the life in the desert exists within the ďŹ rst two inches. The intention was to bring the eye level down to that plane to highlight the desert life that we may constantly be missing. This was done by digging out the earth and placing up retaining walls made from the local rocks found in the excavation. From this mass base a tectonic structure would be lofted above to provide shading in this harsh desert climate halfway along the nature path. This shade persuades one to linger and becomes a space for contemplation. Located at the top of the most prominent hill from the street, the chapel also acts as a beacon for the campus, particually at night when it is illuminated from within.


The nature chapel, being the first piece of the project designed became the conceptual driver for the rest of the project. The design revolved around a little known fact that 90% of the life in the desert exists within the first two inches. The intention was to bring the eye level down to that plane to highlight the desert life that we may constantly be missing. This was done by digging out the earth and placing up retaining walls made from the local rocks found in the excavation. From this mass base a tectonic structure would be lofted above to provide shading in this harsh desert climate halfway along the nature path. This shade persuades one to linger and becomes a space for contemplation. Located at the top of the most prominent hill from the street, the chapel also acts as a beacon for the campus, particularly at night when it is illuminated from within.


TRELLIS TOWER VERTICAL FARM CL A S S S EME ST E R PR OG R A M LOCAT I O N

ARC301 Fall 2013 Vertical Farm 370 Drumm St San Francisco, CA 94111

Located just north of The Embarcadero Center in San Francisco, the challenge of designing a vertical farm in an urban environment was increased by the massive shadow cast upon the site throughout the day. This project consisted of a farmers market, health center, and museum tours of the vertical farms, making it a true center for health and wellness.


l i a t e R & t e k r a M

The site just so happened to b zoning distric The site was located at the intersection of three separate zoning districts.three Thus separate the program commercial and business d worked to combine elements from all three into he space. The ground floor of the project took The ground oor of the on most of the public program featuring a farmers market, selling produce grown within the program featuring a fa within the tow tower, a fitness center promoting a healthy lifestyle and of course all shipping andgrown receiving healthy lifestyle an facilities. On the backside of the project where there was little to no solar gain to be utilized recieving faciliti the space took on some other programs. The bottom two pods became commercial office space, where there w bringing a lot of life and daily activity to the space. The top two pods became penthouse apart-utilized the ments, providing gorgeous views out onto the city scape of San Francisco. Finally transitioning programs comme between each of the pods exists a public green space open to all visitors of the tower. life a top a

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be located at the interesection of cts, a marketUnlike and retail district, the a design of a vertical farm revolved around capturing the most solar exposure as posmost projects, district and a residentail district. sible, and also unlike most projects, the site had the problem of being fully shaded throughout most of the project took on most of the public day due to theproduce scale of The Embarcadero Center located just to the south of the site. In order to maximize the armers market, selling wer, a ďŹ tness center promoting a solar exposure on the bottom levels the facade had to be facing to the east and the south to capture the most nd of course all shipping and sunlight possible in the early morning before the shadow of the Embarcadero center and the rest of the city ies. On the backside of the project acrossgain the site. As the building rose out of that shadow it shifted to a more south-east, south-west facade was little to cast no solar to be space tookorientation on some in other order to get the maximum amount of sunlight throughout the day. This twisting of the vegetas. The bottom pods became tiontwo up though the building required a complex twisting structure to support it and provide seismic stability. ercial ofďŹ ce space, bringing a lot of This resulted in a sortThe of twisting trellis, supporting the vegetation up though the building. and daily activity to the space. p two pods became penthouse appartments, providing gorgeous views out onto the cityscape of San Francisco. Finally transitioning between each of the pods exists a public green space open to all visitors of the tower.


APARTMENT LEVEL

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appened to be located at the interesection of zoning districts, a market and retail district, a and business district and a residentail district. d floor of the project took on most of the public featuring a farmers market, selling produce within the tower, a fitness center promoting a thy lifestyle and of course all shipping and cieving facilities. On the backside of the project where there was little to no solar gain to be utilized the space took on some other programs. The bottom two pods became commercial office space, bringing a lot of life and daily activity to the space. The top two pods became penthouse appartments, providing gorgeous views out onto the cityscape of San Francisco. Finally transitioning between each of the pods exists a public green space open to all visitors of the tower.

FARM


Single Pane Glass

Laminated Glass Pane

Double Pane Glass

Steel Single Pane Glass

Joint

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Raised Flooring

Double Pane Glass

Steel Joint

Risers

Insulation Raised Flooring Risers

Steel Wide Flange

Insulation

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Grated Walkway

Grated Walkway

Steel Joist

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Steel Track

Plywood Decking

Steel Track

Plaster Casing

Plywood Decking

Plaster Casing


Starting Form

Base Height

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Using the Base Height slider,

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Computer Modeling

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This 3d printed piece was designed to be a test of my studio design’s main structural core. Having previously modeled this design using the Grassshopper plugin for Rhino, there was only a few more plates to the spiraling structure. I had previously modeled these in Rhino as as blocks in order to give them the mass they needed to 3d print. After Booleaning the objects together, I converted it all to a closed mesh and brought it to the 3d printer.

First Iteration x 1” x 4”. The 3d printer has a tolerance of 1/32” so the scale of this model was determined by the smallest elements fell over halfway through the print leavAfter removing the support material I was left with a very frail and broken piece. This piece eventually completely fell appart. Although this piece was a failure I learned what changes to make

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REGGIO EMELIA ELEMENTARY SCHOOL CL A S S S EME ST E R PR OG R A M LOCAT I O N

ARC202 Spring 2013 Elementary School 432 S Convent Ave Tu c s o n , A Z 8 5 7 0 1

The Reggio Emelia approach to learning has a much more interactive approach with a focus on one’s environment being its teacher and allowing the children to have some control over what they are learning. Following these principles, the school design had to be an interactive environment that encouraged learning for children in preschool up to the 6th grade.


The Reggio Emelia Philosophy revolves around the idea that children learn from their surroundings through investigation and personal research. There are three teachers in a child’s life that help them advance their research, the first being the parents, the second being the teachers and the community, and the third being the environment. So when designing a school for this style of learning it is important to consider the environment you are setting. In order to allow the children to explore and learn through their environment, it must be engaging to all the senses. The environment chosen for the school took on the form of the sandstone canyons of Arizona, which is a major landmark of this desert region. It is appropriate because of the many layers of materials that the canyons expose, which create a great learning resource for the desert. Students walk in between these canyons to get to the various classes and activities they engage in. In order to accommodate the space needed for the farmers market, access to the tops the canyon is provided. This allows students to have room to grow their garden and play, while also giving them the opportunity to explore the world from a different point of view.


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Office Director

Office/ Storage

Office Princible

Storage Reception

Classroom (Preschool)

Young Child’s Restroom

Classroom (3rd & 4th)

Meeting room

Kitchen

Cafeteria

Boy’s Restroom

Office/ Storage

Atelier Studio

Girl’s Restroom

Classroom (1st & 2nd)

Classroom (5th & 6th) Office/ Storage

Office/ Storage

Young Child’s Restroom

Office/ Storage

Classroom (Kindergarden)

Girl’s Restroom

Boy’s Restroom

Office/ Storage

Storage

Music Studio


Ciculation Parti: Ciculation Ciculation Parti: Parti:

Ciculation Parti: Ciculation Parti:

Ciculation Parti:

Structuaral Parti:

Structuaral Parti: Structuaral Parti: Structuaral Parti: Structuaral Parti:

Structuaral Parti:

Roof Plan:

Roof Plan: Cacti Garden/

Multipurpose Space

Roof Plan:

Roof Plan:

Cacti Garden/ Multipurpose Space

Roof Plan:

Picnic Area/ Multipurpose Space

Roof Plan: Cacti Garden/

Multipurpose Space

Cacti Garden/ Multipurpose Space

Cacti Garden/ Multipurpose Space

Play Area/ CactiSpace Garden/ Multipurpose Multipurpose Space

Picnic Area/ Multipurpose Space

Picnic Area/ Multipurpose GardenSpace

Play Area/ Multipurpose Space

Picnic Area/ Multipurpose Space

Play Area/ Multipurpose Space

Play Area/ Multipurpose Play Space Area/

Picnic Area/ Multipurpose Space

Picnic Area/ Multipurpose Space

Garden

Play Area/

Garden

Multipurpose Space Multipurpose Space

Garden

Garden

Garden


Solar Panel - Shading System:

Skin - Shading System:


Thank You For Your Consideration kyle.bogasky@gmail.com 508.439.3831



Portfolio | Kyle Bogasky