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PROCESS BOOK KYLA BLAIR REIS FALL/WINTER 2011


PROJECT 1: WATER BRAINSTORMING


BRIEF The Toronto and Greater Toronto Area are in high demand for facilities that cater to hydrotherapy, rehabilitation and physiotherapy. Currently there are few facilities which house pools and other aquatic equipment that is of use to these types of therapies, resulting in long wait lists, shorter therapy sessions, and less time focused on the patient. GoodLife Fitness and Real Canadian Springs Water have begun funding for the construction of a facility that houses all these different therapies: The Sharpe Center for Hydrotherapy and Rehabilitation. It will be located in Mississauga, making it accessible to all those living in the general area. The centre specializes in the rehabilitation, workout, and soothing of the body, as well as the introduction of a water birthing department. The goal of the centre is to create a localized place where people in need of these therapies can go without hassles, by having shorter wait times, and having access to more equipment, fulfilling the needs of this disadvantaged group. Additionally, The Sharpe Centre will create hundreds of jobs for those below the poverty line, through the construction process of the building, maintenance and landscaping. It strives to be green by utilizing the power of the sun with solar panels, as well as reusing water through a filter system. PART ONE Create a logo/visual identity for The Sharpe Centre for Hydrotherapy and Rehabilitation. This logo will be used in part two. During the creative process, keep in mind that the logo must be applicable to promotional items such as: posters, flyers, flags, as well as to signage and everyday objects which can be associated with the centre, such as towels, wet suits, water bottles, etc. PART TWO Choose an expansion option below, which you would like to complete

Expansion Option One: Branding Create the branding for The Sharpe Centre, consisting of three components: A: Front Entrance Signage Create the sign, which would be above the front entrance to the facility. It must have the logo on it as well as work in a horizontal composition. Please create your design to measure 3”x 8”, to be presented on a, 8” x 11” page. B: Membership Card Create a membership card for those who use the facility to have easier access. The dimensions are 2” by 3” and the card must have the included aspects: it must be full colour, be double sided, have the logo visible, member’s name, as well as the member number visible.

C: Object Application Choose a fitness product that is associated with the centre and applies the logo to associate the product with the centre, for example, a water bottle, towels, or water weights.

Expansion Option Two – Fundraiser A: Fundraiser Name & Visual Identity Come up with a name for a one day fundraising event in place to raise money for the construction of the Sharpe Centre for Hydrotherapy & Rehabilitation. In the design of the visual identity both the name of the fundraising event as well as the logo you’ve created for the facility need to be included. B: Fundraiser Posters Two 11 x 17 Portrait Posters, one per sponsor. Please include the following information on your posters:  Date: September 28th 2011  Text for Poster One: “All proceeds from Canadian Springs Products purchased in the GTA will be go towards the construction of the Sharpe Centre for Hydrotherapy & Rehabilitation.”  Text for Poster Two: “All proceeds from GoodLife Fitness retail items in the GTA will go towards the construction of the Sharpe Centre for Hydrotherapy & Rehabilitation.” ‐Each Poster must incorporate the Facility Identity you designed in part one, the Fundraiser Name & Visual Identity, as well as the sponsor logo.

Expansion Option Three – Information Package A: Pamphlet Create a 6 panel pamphlet on a fold out size of 8.5”x11”, informing the benefits of the three categories: Hydrotherapy, Rehabilitation and Underwater Birth. You may reference information from the Internet to use as body copy; however the focus is on the portrayal of theme, hierarchy, and flow of the design elements. Illustrations or images are welcome. B: Website Create a wireframe layout for the Sharpe Centre for Hydrotherapy & Rehabilitation’s personal website. Identify the placements for body copy, graphics and images. Be sure to include headings of: Home, About, Contact, and Benefits. 1024x768 pixels or 11”x7”


PROJECT 2: GO NUTS DESIGN BRIEF “go nuts” You are being hired by a new company called “go nuts” to design their brand identity. The company’s vision is to sell healthy, organic nuts while generating an awareness of the health benefits of nuts in an environmentally friendly manner. “go nuts” also donates a portion of profits to heart and stroke research. TARGET MARKET The target market for this company ranges from young to middle-aged adults who need a quick snack on the run (perhaps while at school or work) that will provide them with energy and keep them healthy. DELIVERABLES Logo: Design a logo that appropriately represents “go nuts.” Think about their goals and target market. Packaging: Choose three different types of nuts and design appropriate packaging for each. The designs should be similar in design to unify the packaging, but also be unique based on the type of nut the package contains. Each nut (i.e. cashews, peanuts, almonds) is unique and therefore provides unique health benefits. This information is something that the company wants to promote on their packaging. In addition, the companies strive for a greener future should be reflected in the choice of materials and design. You may also want to include something about the donation “go nuts” makes to heart and stroke research. Varieties Available- Peanuts, Almonds, Hazelnuts, Cashews, Chestnuts, Pecans, Pine Nuts, Pistachio Nuts, Walnuts and Chestnuts THE HEALTH BENEFITS OF NUTS Almonds  Rich in dietary fiber, vitamins, and minerals  A rich source of energy and nutrients  Help to prevent coronary artery disease and strokes  Gluten free  Rich source of minerals like manganese, potassium, calcium, iron, magnesium, zinc and selenium Chestnuts  Low in calories  Rich in minerals, vitamins and phyto-nutrients that benefit health  A good source of dietary fiber  Help lower blood cholesterol levels  They are exceptionally rich in vitamin-C

 Rich in folates (Folic acid is required for the formation of red blood cells)  Great source of minerals such as iron, calcium, potassium, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus and zinc  A great source of potassium Cashews  Packed with soluble dietary fiber, vitamins  Full of health promoting phyto-chemicals (help to protect against diseases and cancers)  A great source of energy and nutrients  Rich in “heart friendly” monounsaturated fatty acids like oleic and palmitoleic acids, which help lower LDL (bad cholesterol) and increase HDL (good cholesterol)  A rich source of minerals like manganese, potassium, copper, iron, magnesium, zinc and selenium  Help to avoid minerals deficiencies Peanuts  Rich in energy  Contain many health benefiting nutrients, minerals, antioxidants and vitamins that are essential for optimum health  Rich in “heart friendly” monounsaturated fatty acids like oleic, which helps to prevent coronary artery disease and strokes  A good source of dietary proteins with fine quality amino acids that are essential for growth and optimum health  Contain high concentrations of poly-phenolic anti-oxidants, which is believed to reduce the risk of stomach cancer  Also contains resveratrol, which has been found to have protective function against cancers, heart disease, degenerative nerve disease, Alzheimer’s disease, and viral/fungal infections  A hand full of peanuts a day provides enough recommended levels of phenolic anti oxidants, minerals, vitamins, and protein


COMPETITORS Most competitors of “go nuts” do not produce environmentally friendly packaging and do not educate consumers about the health benefits of nuts. Companies that do inform consumers about their health benefits only do so through their website and not directly through their product packaging. In addition, most companies do not donate a portion of their profits to charity or health research. Typically, products are sold in plastic containers or bags and use very colorful, eye-catching colours. The following are a few competitors of “go nuts.”

LIVING NUTZ  Produces organic, raw nut snacks  Their nuts are certified organic  Products are minimally processed

THE GOURMET NUT COMPANY  Specializes in gourmet coated nuts  Nut products include: macadamia nuts, almonds, cashew nuts, pistachio nuts, hazelnuts and pecans  They are valued for their ability to consistently apply a quality coating to their nuts that delivers a “handmade” quality

TROPHY FOODS INC.  Produces edible nuts, dried fruits, confectionery and bulk foods  Organically certified and Kosher certified  An industry leader in product development and packaging innovation  All products are either nitrogen flushed or thermal sealed for added freshness and food safety


PROJECT RESEARCH SUSTAINABILITY RESEARCH  Make packaging with 100% recycled content  Print material with water-based inks  Use a minimal amount of tape for the packaging  Manufacture the product using clean production technologies  Make packaging completely tree-free, using only certified 100% post-consumer waste recycled papers  Use bags made from 100% certified organic cotton  Use biodegradable packaging  Do not exploit any natural resources  Create products and packaging that require minimal energy during production

Cashews: Not only are Cashews rich in minerals like copper, magnesium, zinc, iron, and biotin, they are also a low-fat nut! They also have a high concentration of oleic acid, which is good for your heart as it promotes cardiovascular health. Cashews also have a high concentration of copper, which is a necessary component in many of the body's enzymes, including those that are responsible for antioxidant defences. Maintaining sufficient levels of copper in the body also prevents anemia and joint problems such as rheumatoid arthritis. You can also count on cashews to help you maintain healthy bones since they are rich in magnesium and calcium. Hazelnuts: Extremely rich in Vitamin E and monounsaturated fats, both of which can provide protection against cancer as well as looking after the skin, keeping wrinkles at bay. Rich in fibre, they help the digestive system too. Hazelnuts also contain plenty of Biotin, a B vitamin good for the hair and skin, Vitamin E, copper, magnesium, potassium, selenium and phosphorous, as well as iron, foliate and zinc.

KEEPING NUTS FRESH  Nuts have natural oils and can spoil quickly if exposed to oxygen. Therefore, inadequate packaging allows oxygen to leak inside and can cause nuts to spoil or get stale

Macadamia Nuts: Containing no cholesterol, the oils in the macadamia nuts contain over 75% monounsaturated fats, which can assist in lowering cholesterol levels in the blood. They are a good source of protein, calcium, potassium and fibre and are low in sodium.

HEALTH BENEFITS OF NUTS Almonds: Almonds have as much calcium as milk, and contain magnesium, which decreases stress on blood vessels, promotes oxygen flow and decreases free radical damage to the heart. These nuts can also lower cholesterol and even help prevent cancer. Almonds are nutrient-dense nuts and are a rich source of vitamin E, which promotes healthy aging and protects against Alzheimer's disease. They also contain flavonoids that help to produce antioxidant action. As copper is essential for the body’s metabolic enzymes it too is a valuable nutrient in almonds, along with fiber and protein, which help your digestive system work efficiently. Rich in protein - weight for weight they contain nearly 75% more than eggs. They also have healthy amounts of essential micro-nutrients, including magnesium, potassium, zinc, iron, phosphorous and copper, as well as Vitamin B2, miacin and the anti-oxidant Vitamin E, which can help fight cancer. In addition, they are particularly high in calcium - good for people who are lactose intolerant. Almonds can also help as part of a bone-boosting diet to beat osteoporosis. A 100g portion provides a third of the adult recommended daily requirement. Research in Canada found that people with high cholesterol who ate 25g (1oz) of almonds a day lowered their cholesterol by an average of 4%.

Peanuts: Eating 28g (1oz) of peanuts five or more times a week may help lower the risk of Type 2 diabetes in women, according to studies by the Harvard School of Public Health. Peanuts are high in unsaturated fat and magnesium, which decreases insulin resistance. Being rich in Omega-2 fats, peanuts maintain healthy cells and supple skin, as well as lowering total cholesterol in the blood. A study in the U.S. found a significant drop in heart disease in women aged between 34 to 59 who were eating a variety of nuts - particularly peanuts five times a week. Peanuts are packed with nutrients including iron, zinc, Vitamin E, magnesium, folic acid and resveratrol, which is effective in fighting cancer-causing free radicals.

Walnuts: Walnuts are great for your heart and brain, and contain ellagic acid (a cancer-fighting antioxidant). They are rich in omega-3 fatty acid, which has anti-inflammatory properties and provides cardiovascular protection by helping to reduce blood pressure and plaque buildup. Walnuts are also high in a number of essential vitamins and minerals, such as vitamin B, vitamin E, copper, iron and zinc. All of these are great antioxidants and protect against free radical damage and ensure proper cell functioning.

Pine Nuts: 100g pine nuts contain 31g protein, the highest of the nuts and seeds.

Pecan Nuts: Pecan nuts are 53% fat by weight yet they may reduce low density lipoprotein, a type of cholesterol associated with heart disease. More than half the fat in pecans are monounsaturated, which is believed to help some bad cholesterol levels and may also prevent blood clots, which can cause heart attacks or strokes. Pecans are a good source of fibre, Vitamin E - 100g provide more that the recommended daily allowance - copper and magnesium. They also contact zinc, good for the skin and essential for the reproductive and immune systems.

Pistachio Nuts: Contain iron, folate, potassium, pantothenic acid, niacin, riboflavin and zinc. A 25g (1oz) serving supplies more than 10% of the daily value for dietary fibre, Vitamin B6, Thianin, magnesium, phosphorus and copper. They contain almost 60mg of plant sterols per ounce, which are believed to help reduce the risk of heart disease and some cancers. Pistachios are also an excellent source of monounsaturated fats that help reduce bad cholesterol levels.


PACKAGING RESEARCH

SOURCES

Tin: Tin packaging is a durable and sustainable material. It creates a lasting impression on customers and demonstrates the quality of your company. This material is a recyclable and a reusable form of packaging. By using tin you are letting your customers know that your product is unique, high quality and that your company cares about the environment. Tinplate is a strong, convenient, long-lasting and attractive form of packaging. Because of its durability, customers often keep the container for storage rather than throwing them away. This extends the display of your product and brand. In addition, recycling a tin package uses fewer resources and energy than other materials.

http://www.canadianliving.com/health/nutrition/everything_you_need_to_know_about_nuts_4.php http://www.ehow.com/info_7822968_packaging-styles-food.html#ixzz1b0hVhsv1

Metal: A layer of oil over this material protects against corrosion and protects the container during formation and handling. Metallized films are used in many flexible laminated packages, while most cans are made with aluminum so that they are light, strong and recyclable. Paper Tubes: Paper Tubes are considered one of the greenest packaging options available today. It is a 100% renewable material, as well as compostable, biodegradable and recyclable. However, this is not necessarily the case when it is laminated in plastic or another non-paper substrate. Paper tubes are also lightweight compared to most metal containers and have a high eco obvious consumer rating. This material is actually strong and can be re-used. Glass: Glass protects food and extends the shelf life of the product. Glass can be opaque but when transparent it allows the consumer to see the product inside. Glass is impermeable and can be sterilized for re-use and it is also 100 percent recyclable.

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LOGO DESIGN PROCESS


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BRANDING

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LOGO TYPEFACES

Lobster ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 78 9 Spatha web # 6D6E71 c0 m0 y0 k 70 r 109 g 110 b 113

web # A7A9AC c0 m0 y0 k 172 r 167 g 169 b 113

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NUT LABELS

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NUT LABEL TYPEFACES

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PACKAGING DESIGN PROCESS


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FINAL PRODUCT


RATIONALE

PACKAGING Colour: The colours of the packaging were selected for several reasons. This bold and bright red, orange and yellow all communicate "energy" and "excitement." In addition, the colour of nuts are usually variations of these colours. Finally, I wanted to select colours that would were so powerful and bold that they could stand alone. By limiting each tin to one colour I am reducing the number of the colours of ink used to produce the packaging and these tins will stand out from the large array of colours on the competitors packaging.

LOGO The word "nuts" in the logo I have designed has a very playful look. This portrays the excitement of the health benefits that nuts provide. It also communicates energy (something nuts are known to provide) and effectively communicates the expression in ones voice when saying "go nuts!" The word "go" written in a cursive typeface gives the company apppear more professional, mature. It still maintains the fun look I am striving for, but it keeps the logo from looking too childish (since this company is targeting young to middle aged adults and not children). Both typefaces work together in a manner communicates the idea of an organic and eco-friendly product. This idea stems from the typeface combinations often seen on farmers market

Graphics: I also simplified the graphics on the tin by using simple organic shapes and simple illustrations of the nuts. Rather than competing with other products on the shelf by jam packing the label with graphics, I have used simplicity to make the product unique. The organic shapes around the nuts stem from the: spread nuts are often made into, the shell remnants of nuts and the textured lines found on most nuts. Furthermore, the subtlety of the graphics are used to intrigue the customer by making them take a closer look at the tin so that they can recognize that the small graphics are illustrations of the nut contained in the tin. While viewing the package closer the customer is also enticed to read the information on the tin.

The Circle: The circle contains the important information customers will want to find instantly when they look at the packaging; the brand name and the type of nut inside the tin. The circle was also design to look like a "medallion" or "medal" to communicate reliability, high quality, and a "seal of approval." It even looks like a sun which relates to the idea of nature (organic), happiness and energy.

Tin: I selected a tin can for the packaging because my research revealed that this material is both durable and sustainable (very important for the brand identity). It is recyclable, reusable and demonstrates the high quality of the company. Because tin cans can be reused, my goal was to create such an aesthetically pleasing design that the customer will want to keep the tin and use it over and over again.


PROJECT 3: DINING THROUGH TIME RESEARCH 1900s  1901 Satori Kato invents instant coffee (However, it only becomes popular after the Nescafé brand of freeze-dried crystals is introduced in 1938)  1902 Horn & Hardart opens the first Automat in Philadelphia. For a couple of coins, patrons can open a slot and grab a freshly made hot meal.  1902 cornflakes are invented  1905 Eleven-year-old Frank Epperson leaves a stick in a cup of soda outside overnight, accidentally inventing the Popsicle  1918 Having gone from 200 pounds to 150, Lulu Peters writes the first diet book to endorse calorie counting and sells 2 million copies. 1910 - 1919  Immigration was at an all-time high during these years, bringing new flavors to the kitchen. Italian, German, Jewish, Chinese and Eastern  Food descriptors such as Italian-American, Chinese-American and Jewish-American began popping up.  Spaghetti and meatballs, chop suey, chow mein, sweedish meatballs and goulashes became popular items on restaurant menus  The 1910’s saw the beginning of the proliferation of processed foods  Hellmann’s mayonnaise, Oreo cookies, Crisco, Quaker Puffed Wheat and Puffed Rice, Marshmallow Fluff and Nathan’s hot dogs were introduced  Aunt Jemima’s smile became popular with the introduction of the syrup as were the Kellogg’s and C.W. Post’s brand names  The self-service market was born (rather than handing a clerk a list of items and waiting for him to collect them, customers could browse the store and select items themselves.  A&P offered up to a thousand items (29,000 fewer than today’s supermarkets)  Restaurant menus remained full of meats, shellfish, pâtés and mousses  A popular dish of the day was Vichyssoise (chilled soup of puréed leeks, onions, potatoes and cream created by Louis Diat in 1917) INVENTIONS 1900  Chiclets Gum  Cotton Candy  Hershey’s Chocolate Bar 1901  Instant Coffee

1902  Barnum’s Animal Crackers  Karo Corn Syrup 1903  Pepsi  Canned Tuna 1904  Banana Split  Campbell's Kids  Peanut Butter  Popcorn 1905  Royal Crown Cola 1906  Kellogg’s Corn Flakes 1907  Hershey’s Kisses 1908  Electric Toaster 1909  Melitta Drip Coffee maker 1910  Tea Bag 1911  Crisco 1912  Cracker Jack  Hamburger Buns

   

Hellman’s Mayonnaise Life Savers Ocean Spray Cranberry Sauce Oreos

1915  Processed Cheese 1916  Fortune Cookies  Kellogg’s All-Bran Cereal  Orange Crush


1920s CHARACTERISTICS  The sanitation-conscious 1920s  People had a sweet tooth  People had a lot of money and were willing to spend it APPLIANCES  Electric Blender Invented by Stephen Poplawski in 1922  Stove (Early 1920s) Hotpoint developed a white porcelain finish for their stoves, which was quite a change from the black cast iron used until then. By the end of the decade porcelain-finished stoves were available in a variety of colors or with a pastel trim. Although electric ranges made an appearance in the 1920s, many households were without electricity or had limited electric power.  Electric Kettle Arthur Leslie Large invented the electric kettle in 1922.  Fridge General Electric introduced their Monitor Top refrigerator in 1927. One of their advertisements stated “Now Comes Simplified Electric Refrigeration.” Further improvements included a refrigerator designed with a separate freezer compartment (1929).  Toaster The following improvements were made to toasters: timers, heat regulators, and turning knobs. There was also a “swing basket” which was popular. They were made to swing out to the side and around to turn the toast, or they pulled down and swung around (Patented 1917 by Fred Collier).  Coffee Pot The following improvements were made to coffee pots: timers and heat regulators. Percolator sets and breakfast sets were popular concepts during the 1920s and many companies marketed their coffee pots this way. The Silex Company of New York introduced their Silex coffeepot in the 1910s.  Blender Stephen Poplawski is credited with inventing the blender in 1922. He was the first to put spinning blades at the bottom of a container.

KITCHEN TOOLS  Electric Roaster  Electric Mixers  Graters POPULAR FOOD  Canned Goods  Fruit Cocktails  Tea Sandwiches

 Corn Poppers  Mincers  Knife Sharpeners

 Egg Cookers  Flour Sifters  Can Openers

 Quick Cooking Rolled Oats  Pineapple Cake

 Caesar Salad  Jell-O Molds

INNOVATIVE IDEAS  Invention and popularization of canned and easy to prepare food  The Star Can Opener Company produced the thumbscrew opener in 1920 and by the late 1920s, mounted openers were being sold that could open a can without leaving a jagged edge.

INVENTIONS 1920  La Choy Food Products  Wonder Bread 1921  White Castle 1922  Electric Kettle  Ginger Ale 1923  Welch's Grape Jelly 1924  Wheaties  Caesar Salad 1925  Green Giant Canned Peas  Donuts (19 Cents A Dozen)

1926  Pop-Up Electric Toasters 1927  Gerber Baby Food  Kool-Aid  Stainless Steel Cutlery  Fruit Canners Agree Upon A Single “Recipe” For Canned Fruit Cocktail  Automatic Toaster  General Electric Introduces Their Fridge 1928  Rice Krispies 1929  Oscar Meyer Wiener  Fridge With A Separate Freezer Compartment


1930s CHARACTERISTICS  People add colour and style to the kitchen  The Depression forced people to make do with less. People had to be thrifty and use every bit of food, and every ounce of ingenuity to stretch meals  This was a decade of cutting back not starvation APPLIANCES  Forgettable Kettle General Electric was the first company to invent an electric kettle that would turn off after boiling the water in 1930. They called it the 'Forgettable Kettle' since you could turn it on and not have to worry about turning it off.  Stove The stoves eventually gained popularity in the 1930s. The 1930s ushered in the streamlined stove. No longer did the stove sit on high legs – the new tabletop ranges fit flush with counters and sinks. The cooking now was done on the top of the stove with a single oven below, available in gas or electric. Hotpoint introduced their cabinet model stove in 1934. Other manufacturers did the same, including Magic Chef, Westinghouse, Tappan, and Norge.  Icebox Before the invention of the icebox in the 19th century, shopping for provisions was a daily chore. Then someone figured out how to keep meat, butter, and milk fresh by putting it into an insulated box with a block of ice. By the 1930s, every kitchen had an icebox.  Blender The electric blenders were mainly used on a commercial basis by restaurants and other establishments for mixing drinks until the John Oster Manufacturing Company began making blenders in the 1930s. They were also used for pureeing fruits and vegetables and were promoted as a household item that was convenient for cooking as well as for mixing drinks. POPULAR FOOD  Instant Coffee (Nescafé)  Oxtail Soup  Vegetables  Del Monte Peaches  Kraft Mayonnaise

INVENTIONS 1930  Jiffy Biscuit Mix  Lime Jell-O  Mott's Apple Sauce  Birdseye Introduces Frozen Food  Paper Milk Cartons 1931  Canned Biscuits  Bisquick 1932  Fritos  Bagels  Skippy Peanut Butter 1933  Lithiated Lemon (Later Renamed 7-Up)  V8 Juice 1934  Campbell's Chicken Noodle Soup  Campbell's Cream Of Mushroom Soup  Ritz Crackers 1935  Sloppy Joes

 Macaroni And Cheese  Casseroles  Spam  Ballared Pancake Flour  Crisco

 Chilli  Meatloaf  Ovaltine  Pillsbury's Pancake Flour  Franco-American Spaghetti

1936  First Drive-In Restaurant Opens In California

1937  Kraft Macaroni & Cheese  Ragú Spaghetti Sauce  Spam  Krispy Krème  The Shopping Cart 1938  Mott's Apple Juice  First Instant Coffee (by Nescafé) 1939  Pressure Cooker


1940s CHARACTERISTICS  Mass distribution of processed foods  The rise of McDonalds and other hamburger chains  Frozen dinners in front of TV sets nationwide  The kitchen had been transformed by new materials, a plethora of gadgetry and the growth of electricity  The average housewife worked a 75-hour week ­spending about a quarter of her time in the kitchen  Rationing ended completely in 1954

 The Drive-In The drive-in restaurant concept, where customers are served food in their vehicles, dates back to pre-World War II. It reached its height of popularity in the early 1950's.  Saran Wrap Invented in 1952

 Mixers Ken Wood produced his famous Kenwood Chef food mixer in 1950. Taking the best features of existing machines, and adding some of his own, Wood, popularized the appliance all over the world.

INVENTIONS 1950  Sugar Pops Cereal (later Corn Pops)  Prepared Cake Mixes (Introduced by Pillsbury and General Mills)  Frozen Pizza  Dunkin’ Donuts

 Microwave Oven The first microwave oven was invented in 1956 and cost about $1,200

1951  Tropicana Juice

POPULAR FOOD  Tuna Noodle Casserole  Grasshopper Pie  Canned Vegetables

1952  Mrs. Paul’s Introduces Frozen Fish Sticks  Kellogg's Frosted Flakes  Lipton Onion Soup Mix  Saran Wrap

APPLIANCES  Coffee Pot The first automatic coffee pot was invented in 1952

 Sloppy Joes  Canned Meats  Casseroles

 Frozen Fish Sticks  Canned Soups  Barbecued Meat

INNOVATIVE IDEAS  The Barbecue  TV Dinners In 1954 Swanson marries a postwar demand for timesaving devices to the country's newest obsession, and thus the TV dinner is born.  McDonald's Happy Meals Ray Kroc was the pioneer of the fast-food industry with his worldwide McDonald's enterprise (1954). "The founder and builder of McDonald's Corporation, proved himself an industrial pioneer no less capable than Henry Ford. He revolutionized the American restaurant industry by imposing discipline on the production of hamburgers, french fries, and milk shakes."

 Trix Cereal 1955  Instant Oatmeal (By The Quaker Oats Company)  Del Monte Stewed Tomatoes  Special K Cereal  First Home Microwave Ovens Are Manufactured 1956  Imperial Margarine 1957  Sweet'n Low  Tang Beverage Crystals

1958  Cocoa Krispies 1953  Cocoa Puffs (45.9% sugar)  Cheez Whiz (introduced as  Green Giant Canned Beans a shortcut for homemakers)  Lipton Instant Tea  White Rose Redi-Tea  Rice-a-Roni (world’s first instant iced tea)  Diet Rite cola  Eggo Frozen Waffles  Pizza Hut 1954  TV Dinners  Burger King  Butterball Turkey

1959  Haagen-Dazs Ice Cream  Frosty O's  Little Caesars


1950s CHARACTERISTICS  World War II  Forced men into war and women out of the kitchens into factories  Every family had to ration their food APPLIANCES  Stove Stoves during the 1940s included such features as picture window ovens, oven lights, utensil storage compartments, automatic timers, electric clocks, an outlet plug, warming drawers and range or condiment sets. “Speed cooking” and “automatic” were important selling points in the 1940s. A 1947 General Electric advertisement stated “New, Improved Speed Cooking in this Sparkling General Electric Range.” This particular stove included a built-in pressure cooker and improved Calrod units for fast, even stovetop heat.  Blender By the 1940s, several companies were making blenders, and added features made them a popular kitchenware item.

INVENTIONS 1940  Dairy Queen  McDonalds 1942  Dannon yogurt  Kellogg's Raisin Bran 1945  Tupperware  Cheerioats 1946  Minute Maid Frozen O. J.  Mrs. Paul's Frozen Food

POPULAR FOOD  Chiffon Cake

1947  Aluminum Foil  Kraft Singles  Betty Crocker's Cake Mix

INNOVATIVE IDEAS  Tupperware Invented by Earl Silas Tupper in the mid-1940s, he developed his liquid proof, airtight plastic containers by mimicking the lids of paint cans. After Tupperware was created families were able to save their excess food and keep it in the refrigerator. As a result, less food was wasted in the already scarce food situation.

1948  Frozen French Fries  Baskin Robins

 Diners Diners began in the form of wagons (similar to ice cream trucks), which were parked and allowed people to sit at a bar stool and have a meal.  Aluminum Foil In 1947, Reynolds Metals Co. uses surplus aluminum from World War II to make Reynolds Wrap aluminum foil.  Preserving Food During the wartime, everyone had to make sacrifices. In addition to victory gardens, homemakers began preserving food like jam in jars.


1960s

1970s

CHARACTERISTICS  Eating out was for special occasions and ordering take-out was unusual  Everyone wanted something different in the kitchen (sleek, space age) *Laminate was everywhere in the kitchen  The growing middle class had money they were willing to spend it

CHARACTERISTICS  Avocado, golden harvest or burnt orange appliances are popular  The popular kitchen style was dark woods  We indulged our tastes and developed a ravenous and eclectic appetite  The Immigration Act of 1965 opened our doors to millions of Asians and was responsible for the exotic restaurants that were springing up

APPLIANCES  Stove The self-cleaning oven was introduced

APPLIANCES  Food Processor In 1971 the home food processor, Le Magi-Mix, was introduced in Paris by Pierre Verdon.

POPULAR FOOD  Meat  Potatoes INVENTIONS 1960  Sprite  Single Serve Packages of Ketchup  Domino’s Pizza 1961  Boiling Bags (frozen plastic packages of food that could be boiled in water)  Mrs. Butterworth's Syrup  Total (breakfast cereal)  Charlie The Tuna (StarKist)  LIFE Cereal

1964  Kellogg's Pop-Tarts  Arby’s 1965  Cool Whip  Gatorade  Spaghetti Os  Pillsbury Introduces Poppin' Fresh, the Pillsbury Doughboy  Shake 'n' Bake 1966  Fresca

1962  Pull Tab for Beverage Cans  Taco Bell

1967  Bugles  Plastic Milk Bottles

1963  Chips Ahoy! Cookies  Fruit Loops

1968  The Big Mac (49 cents)  Red Lobster

1969  Pringles Potato Chips  Wendy's (started by Dave Thomas in Columbus, Ohio. Wendy's is named for his daughter)

INVENTIONS 1970  Hamburger Helper  Re-sealable Plastic Bags 1971  Jell-O Pudding Treat  Smoked Spam  McDonalds Introduces The Quarter Pounder (53 cents)  McCormick’s 'Roast In A Bag' Kit  Starbucks  Home Food Processor 1972  Stove Top Stuffing  Tuna Helper 1973  Cup O’ Noodles

 McDonald's Introduces The Egg McMuffin (the first fast -food breakfast item) 1974  Poprocks (by General Foods)  Mrs. Field's Cookies  Subway 1975  Pasta Primavera  Chili’s 1976  Maxwell Coffee Makers 1977  Yoplait yogurt

1978  Ben and Jerry's  Chuck E. Cheese


1980s

1990s

CHARACTERISTICS  The average meal took one hour to prepare

CHARACTERISTICS  The average meal took one 20 minutes to prepare  We began dieting and exercising a lot more than before  Manufacturer’s found ways to make everything reduced fat, low fat or fat-free  Soda consumption continues to grow and reaches and estimated annual rate of 56 gallons per person at the end of the decade. A 1997 study showed that consumers spent $54 billion dollars on soda that year (an average of two and a half cans each day)  By the end of the 1990s, Americans were spending about $110 billion dollars on fast food  Frozen diet foods saw a surge in popularity  A notable increase in the popularity of energy drinks  There was a contradictory movement in nutrition as there was a greater interest in healthy eating (with low fat, low calorie goods and diet books and video) and also a decade with an increase in nutrition related health risks and growing obesity

INNOVATIVE IDEAS  Dieting Jenny Craig Inc., a weight-loss program, is founded by Sid Craig and his wife, Jenny in 1982

INVENTIONS 1980  Applebees 1981  Prego Spaghetti Sauce  Stouffer's Lean Cuisine  The Yukon Gold Potato 1982  Diet Coke  Jenny Craig Diet 1983  Caffeine Free Coca-Cola  Quizno’s  Hooters 1984  Sugar Free Jell-O

1986  Soy Milk 1987  Snapple Bottled Iced Tea (creating a new soft drink category)  Red Bull 1988  Oscar Mayer Lunchables  Nonstick Cookware (invented by T-Fal)

POPULAR FOOD  Oscar Mayer Lunchables (for many parents these were a quick substitute for the traditional lunch sent off to school with kids) INNOVATIVE IDEAS  The Compact Indoor Grill Invented by George Foreman in 1994, this machines made it simply for anyone to whip up a delicious meal in a matter of minutes INVENTIONS 1990  Dolphin-Safe Tuna  Jamba Juice  Campbell's Cream of Broccoli Soup

1985  Pop Secret Microwave Popcorn  Cherry Coca-Cola

1992  Crystal Pepsi

1986 Soy Milk

1993.  Snack Well’s ReducedFat Cookies  Hershey's Hugs

1994  Fruitopia  The Compact Indoor Grill 1995  Blue M&Ms 1998  Wow Potato Chips  Pepsi One 1999  Hershey's Bites


1980s

SOURCES

CHARACTERISTICS  Families were eating out or taking out food more than ever before in order to save time  With a Pizza Pizza and McDonalds on every corner, many indulge in fast-food dining and develop poor eating habits. Many even become obese. Others battle to stay healthy and fight these temptations and opt instead for diets, vegetarianism, become vegan, eat organic etc  Many young people strive to look like their favorite celebrity or fashion models and some even develop eating disorders  People are encouraged to eat locally grown food and opt for food items that are: organic, whole grain, glucose free, all-natural etc.  Stainless steel kitchen appliances are very popular  Many people today strive to go green and as environmental threats grow every day it is out with Styrofoam and paper-goods and in with recycled, compostable bowls, plates and utensils

http://www.ideafinder.com/history/inventions/blender.htm

INVENTIONS 2000  Heinz EZ Squirt Regular and Green Ketchup

http://www.greatachievements.org/?id=3768

2002  Vanilla Coke 2005  Coca-Cola Zero  Coca-Cola With Lime 2006  Coca-Cola Black Cherry Vanilla 2008  David’s Tea

http://www.makingthemodernworld.org.uk/stories/the_rise_of_consumerism inventors.about.com/library/inventors/blmicrowave.htm/02.ST.03/?scene=4 http://www.lhj.com/style/covers/125-years-of-ladies-home-journal-kitchen-inventions-through-theyears/?page=6 http://books.google.ca/books?id=9feBCLNhcFQC&pg=PA108&lpg=PA108&dq=eggo+waffles+1970s&source=b l&ots=2EEFel5fIQ&sig=yEPpwGiQ7LCX8f9jfh7Kn4W5WVE&hl=en&ei=IZjSTtQLhOjRAarCsAY&sa=X&oi=book_re sult&ct=result&resnum=4&ved=0CDEQ6AEwAw#v=onepage&q=eggo%20waffles%201970s&f=false http://books.google.ca/books?id=vCgM4VYsph8C&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0 #v=onepage&q&f=false

http://www.thenibble.com/fun/more/facts/history4.asp http://library.spike-jamie.com/food-history.html http://www.delish.com/food-fun/food-trends-decade-12 http://leitesculinaria.com/10348/writings-dining-through-the-decades-american-food-history. html#ixzz1ddaymReV


1990s CHARACTERISTICS  Mass distribution of processed foods  The rise of McDonalds and other hamburger chains  Frozen dinners in front of TV sets nationwide  The kitchen had been transformed by new materials, a plethora of gadgetry and the growth of electricity  The average housewife worked a 75-hour week ­spending about a quarter of her time in the kitchen  Rationing ended completely in 1954

 The Drive-In The drive-in restaurant concept, where customers are served food in their vehicles, dates back to pre-World War II. It reached its height of popularity in the early 1950's.  Saran Wrap Invented in 1952

 Mixers Ken Wood produced his famous Kenwood Chef food mixer in 1950. Taking the best features of existing machines, and adding some of his own, Wood, popularized the appliance all over the world.

INVENTIONS 1950  Sugar Pops Cereal (later Corn Pops)  Prepared Cake Mixes (Introduced by Pillsbury and General Mills)  Frozen pizza  Dunkin’ Donuts

 Microwave Oven The first microwave oven was invented in 1956 and cost about $1,200

1951  Tropicana Juice

POPULAR FOOD  Tuna noodle casserole  Grasshopper Pie  Canned Vegetables

1952  Mrs. Paul’s Introduces Frozen Fish Sticks  Kellogg's Frosted Flakes  Lipton Onion Soup Mix  Seran Wrap

APPLIANCES  Coffee Pot The first automatic coffee pot was invented in 1952

 Sloppy Joes  Canned Meats  Casseroles

 Frozen Fish Sticks  Canned Soups  Barbecued Meat

INNOVATIVE IDEAS  The Barbecue  TV Dinners In 1954 Swanson marries a postwar demand for timesaving devices to the country's newest obsession, and thus the TV dinner is born.  McDonald's Happy Meals Ray Kroc was the pioneer of the fast-food industry with his worldwide McDonald's enterprise (1954). "The founder and builder of McDonald's Corporation, proved himself an industrial pioneer no less capable than Henry Ford. He revolutionized the American restaurant industry by imposing discipline on the production of hamburgers, french fries, and milk shakes."

 Trix Cereal 1955  Instant Oatmeal (By The Quaker Oats Company)  Del Monte Stewed Tomatoes  Special K Cereal  First Home Microwave Ovens Are Manufactured 1956  Imperial Margarine 1957  Sweet'n Low  Tang Beverage Crystals

1958  Cocoa Krispies 1953  Cocoa Puffs (45.9% sugar)  Cheez Whiz (introduced as  Green Giant Canned Beans a shortcut for homemakers)  Lipton Instant Tea  White Rose Redi-Tea  Rice-a-Roni (world’s first instant iced tea)  Diet Rite cola  Eggo Frozen Waffles  Pizza Hut 1954  TV Dinners  Burger King  Butterball Turkey

1959  Haagen-Dazs Ice Cream  Frosty O's  Little Caesars


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