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Assaults reported in library By Drew Teague news@kykernel.com

The UK Police Department issued a crime bulletin Wednesday, warning students of fourth-degree assaults that have occurred on campus early this week. In the bulletin, UKPD stated that the assaults occurred Monday evening in the basement of the William T. Young Library. The bulletin said, “In both incidents the victims reported that the suspect crawled under the study desk and used an unknown object to puncture their feet.” UK spokeswoman Kathy Johnson said in an email to the Kernel that both victims were females wearing sandals. Johnson said that UKPD is looking into cameras from the Young Library to see if they can view the suspect. One victim was able to get a description of the suspect, Johnson said. The suspect is described as a white male, 5 feet 8 inches to 6 feet tall, short hair (possible buzz hair cut), with a hat and bright orange shorts or shoes, the bulletin said. He was last seen walking toward vending machines in the library basement. Both victims sought medical attention on their own after the event, and the extent of their injuries is unknown to UKPD, Johnson said. UKPD did not issue a UK Alert Monday because the occurrence did not fit the description of an event needing such an alert, Johnson said, citing the Office of Emergency Management’s Timely Warning Policy. “Campus Crime Bulletins will be issued when a crime has occurred that represents a potential threat or ongoing danger to the safety of the campus community that may not require immediate action but is still deemed important,” the policy said.

PHOTO BY GENEVIEVE ADAMS | STAFF

Students visit Panda Express on its opening day Wednesday. The new campus restaurant saw steady lines throughout the day and stayed open late.

The Great Line of China By Eva McEnrue news@kykernel.com

Panda Express opened its first location in the state Wednesday at the UK Student Center. Students eagerly waited in a line extending through the Student Center’s first floor and into the Cats Den for a taste of the Asian cuisine. UK is the restaurant’s 10th franchise partner.

Panda Express offers a variety of Chinese dishes presented on a steam table for customers to observe. “Each dish is prepared daily in small batches so it is guaranteed to be fresh,” Panda Express Field Marketing Manager Melissa Martinez said. “Customers may also sample dishes before they order.” The eatery offers sushi as well as Wok Smart dishes, which contain 250 calories or less per single serving.

By Aaron Smith asmith@kykernel.com

After a likely 6 percent tuition increase announced Tuesday by President Lee Todd, students share their thoughts on the roughly $259 more per semester they will have to pay (which is the increase for resident lower-division undergraduates).

CDL junior

“We have to pay for everything on the campus. ... I just don’t understand why they are trying to make it go up 6 percent. Some people aren’t getting the teaching ethic they need.”

“I think there has to be a point that they have to be realistic as to how much they are charging us. There are some teachers that deserve the pay.”

ASHLEY JOHNSON Comm. junior

PHOTO BY LATARA APPLEBY | STAFF

Brandon Knight shoots in the Final Four game against UConn.

HANA ATEEQ Accounting and finance freshman

Changes for Rupp? Students were asked their feelings on potential changes to or a replacement for Rupp Arena. Newsroom: 257-1915 Advertising: 257-2872 First issue free. Subsequent issues 25 cents.

Terrence Jones, Brandon Knight and DeAndre Liggins each declared for the NBA Draft. None of the three have hired or have announced plans to hire an agent, according to a UK release. May 8 is the deadline for underclassmen to withdraw from the draft, provided an agent is not hired. “I support the decision these three have made to take advantage of the process of putting their names in the draft,” UK head coach John Calipari said in the release. “They were a joy to coach this year and I would love the opportunity to continue to coach them again next season. I will always support my players in weighing their options and doing what is personally best for them and their families.”

Knight, a projected lottery pick and ranked No. 5 by Draft Express, averaged 17.3 points and 4.2 assists per game. He set the UK freshman scoring record, scoring 657 points, and was named a Freshman AllAmerican and the NCAA East Regional Most Outstanding Player. Calipari told Mike DeCourcy of Sporting News that the return of Jared Sullinger, Harrison Barnes and Perry Jones — who all were projected to go in the the top 10, if not the top 5 — pushed Knight firmly into the top-10 range. Calipari said he was finished gathering information on Knight, and a top-10 selection looked certain. “How can I say no to that?” Calipari said. “Playing in the NBA has always been a dream of mine See NBA on page 2

Student Center design plans begin in May By Drew Teague

“I don’t feel like the university is trying to rip students off. I believe that the Board (has) a tough decision to make with the state budget cut ... If this helps keep UK remaining the excellent university that it is, then that increase is fine by me.”

See PANDA on page 2

Trio of Cats declare for draft

Students speak out on proposed tuition increase

HARRISON MARTIN

An attached room allows for students to dine in or take out. “Panda Express offers students great meals, great values and a great destination to hang out with friends,” Jenny Yau, Panda Express national license operations manager, said. “This opening is an important milestone for Panda Express,” the restaurant’s Regional

news@kykernel.com

The Student Center will be revamped for the first time since 1982 with improvements beginning shortly after the semester ends. The Board of Trustees recently approved $23 million worth of renovations to the UK Student Center, focusing on the infrastructure of the building. John Herbst, director of the Student Center, said that the work on its

infrastructure will help the building be better for students. “We’ll be embarking in $23 million renovation, much of which will go to the repair, maintenance and upgrading of the infrastructure itself,” Herbst said. “That includes things like electrical, air handling, heating ventilation and air conditioning, sanitary and plumping supply lines — our communications infrastructure.” With the work on the infrastructure, Herbst said they are going to take

“I think they are just doing it to try to compete with the Yum! Center. ... We should do it; it’s worth it.”

“I think it’s kind of unnecessary. Lots of other storied programs have older arenas that work just fine for them.”

opportunities to make the building more aesthetically pleasing. “But what we are hoping to do is, as we go into each of those, hopefully be able to capture opportunities to significantly improve the appearance of the building also,” Herbst said. “For example, when we go into replacing or repairing sanitary and plumbing, it only makes sense that we would totally redo the public restrooms within the facility.” See CENTER on page 2

“While Rupp has served its purpose and it’s been a great venue, it doesn’t mean we shouldn’t continue improving the facility.”

KARRAH BOTTOMS

KELSAE WILLETT

EMILY WILLETT

Kinesiology freshmen

Finance senior

Management freshmen

index

Classifieds.............7 Features.................5 Horoscope.............2

Opinions.............6 Sports..................4 Sudoku................2


PAGE

2 | Thursday, April 21, 2011

NBA Continued from page 1 and this is the next step,” Knight said. “All season long coach has been tutoring me on the fine points of being a point guard, and now I have an opportunity to put my game on display in front of NBA scouts as a result of my hard work.” Jones averaged 15.7 points, 8.8 rebounds and 1.9 blocks, and was named Southeastern Conference Freshman of the Year by

PANDA Continued from page 1 Director of Operations Mavis Orr said. “It provides more growth and more opportunity.” The family-owned franchise opened in 1983 and now has 1,300 U.S. locations. Panda Express’s vision is to have more than 2,300 locations worldwide by 2015, Orr said. The California-based chain

conference coaches. He is a projected lottery pick. “Coach Cal and the rest of the staff pushed us all year long and helped us develop every part of our game to help prepare us for this point in our lives,” Jones said. “This will be a great chance for me to measure my skills against some of the best in the country and receive additional information on where I fit into this year’s draft.” Liggins averaged 8.6 points and 4.0 rebounds and was named to the SEC All-Defensive Team.

He is looking to play his way into the first round at the NBA Combine. “I’m excited about the opportunity to enter my name into the draft, putting me one step closer to realizing my dream,” Liggins said. “Growing up in a tough environment in Chicago, it’s a pleasure to have an opportunity to do something special. This is another challenge I’m looking forward to, to have my game evaluated by pro scouts and see how I rank against some of the top players in the world.”

expanded to several college campuses as a new marketing outlet and has been received positively. “We hope that students will become fans of Panda Express,” Orr said. “It is a growing company with plenty of leadership opportunities for recent graduates.” The eatery employs a combination of full-time staff and students. The new restaurant is just one more step toward UK reaching its goal to become a Top 20 university, UK Provost Kumble Sub-

baswamy said during a speech. “Top 20 means being the best at everything we do: providing the best in-class experience to our students, the best out-of-class experience and the best dining experience,” he said. “Because, let’s be honest about it, a lot of out-ofclass socialization takes place around meals and drinks, so having the absolute best possible is really what we are all about.” Panda Express will be open 10:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. weekdays on the Student Center first floor.

4puz.com

Uranium mining a new issue The theme of this year’s National Park Week, April 16-24, “Healthy Parks, Healthy People,” frames the annual opportunity for lawmakers to invoke the name of President Theodore Roosevelt and issue proclamations championing what filmmaker Ken Burns has branded as “America’s Best Idea.” The message seems particularly apt this year, as President Obama prepares to render a decision that will determine the future wellbeing of a crown jewel of America’s parks, the Grand Canyon. At issue is whether to extend the current moratorium on new mining claims around the park or allow what the administration admits will be expanded uranium mining at the doorstep of this national icon. The mining industry has coveted the Grand Canyon for a long time. Fortunately for the public, some of our most visionary presidents protected the landmark. Fearing development from mining and other industrial interests, in 1908 Roosevelt used his authority under the Antiquities Act to protect what he called “one of the great sights which every American ... should see.” Roughly a decade later, Woodrow Wilson rebuffed efforts by mining companies, signing a law that established the Grand Canyon as a national park. John F. Kennedy, at the urging of his legendary Secretary of the Interior Stewart Udall — after whom the Department of the Interior headquarters is named

Horoscope Aries (March 21-April 19) — Today is a 7 — Move quickly to get a good deal. Devise a plan with your partner or mate. By now you should know how much you can spend. Accept a gift. Follow a strong recommendation. You're learning fast. Taurus (April 20-May 20) — Today is a 9 — You have no trouble getting your message across. Keep team communication channels open. Accept a pearl of wisdom from a friend who can guide past fears that have detained you. Gemini (May 21-June 21) — Today is a 9 — It's a good time to ask for money, whether it be a raise, an invoice or a donation for a fundraiser. Use some of what you personally earn to feather your nest. Cancer (June 22-July 22) — Today is a 9 — You're entering a highly creative, artistic phase, which advances your career over

— struck a deal with a mining company to halt construction of a massive hotel on its claimed land near the canyon’s South Rim. But the industry has not been deterred. A recent analysis of federal data by the Pew Environment Group found that since 2004, more than 8,000 claims for uranium and other hardrock minerals have been staked in public land around the park — representing a 2,000 percent increase. Yet the Grand Canyon is not the only natural landmark at risk from new mining claims. National parks like Yosemite, Arches, Joshua Tree and Mount Rushmore National Memorial are threatened by a deluge of new mining claims staked within miles of their boundaries. This rush to dig around national parks, monuments and other special places stems from the 1872 Mining Law, a frontier-era statute, which allows anyone “free and open access” to nearly 350 million acres of public land. The law includes the ability to take what is now more than $1 billion annually in precious metals from federal holdings without paying a royalty to U.S. taxpayers, according to the Congressional Budget Office. Under the Federal Land Policy and Management Act, the president has until July to deliver his final recommendation on whether to extend that ban for the next 20 years or to open part or all of the area to new uranium and other metal mining.

the next month. Work out a plan for the future you want, and share it with loved ones. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) — Today is a 7 — Stick to the old rules. Good manners get you forward faster. Selfdiscipline's the best kind, but don't let guilt get out of hand. Send support to someone on the leading edge. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Today is an 8 — Create something beautiful. For the next month, your assets gain value. Helping someone else with their finances is actually fun. Offer advice when asked. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) — Today is a 9 — Romance is brewing. Friends help you understand. It may require a compromise or use of your hidden resources. There's plenty of good work ahead. Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) — Today is an 8 — It's easy to get distracted by financial obligations and forget about loved ones. Find a way to balance it all. Take a walk and give thanks for what you've got.

MCT

Sagittarius (Nov. 22Dec. 21) — Today is a 7 — Art and creativity take over. Work/play with a loved one and you'll get more satisfaction. Replace something volatile with something secure. Capricorn (Dec. 22Jan. 19) — Today is a 7 — The next four weeks are good for wrapping yourself in arms of sweet romance. Discuss esoteric subjects with a friend. Loving words come back multiplied. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) — Today is a 7 — The following four weeks are perfect to fall in love with a research project. Find satisfaction with cost-effective solutions for routines. The work is challenging, but profitable. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) — Today is a 7 — Your words have great power now. Accept well-earned compliments. Study and learn with a partner. Business is good and travel is better. Try a new perspective.

tectural consultant, when hired, will be willing to listen to the students so they will be involved in many aspects Continued from page 1 of the renovations. The remodel of the Student CenThis is the first time since 1982 that the Student Center will be under- ter will add aesthetic and practical improvements to benefit student life going major construction, on campus, said Herbst said. Herbst. Since then, minor “I want to make “I specifically renovations have been have written in the made to the building, sure that our consultant request for proposincluding in places als that we want an concentrates on the like the Cats Den and architect who will Center for Student In‘student.’” word listen respectfully, volvement, he said. analyze and be According to the JOHN HERBST able to synthesize tentative and prelimiStudent Center director students needs, nary schedule that the wants and desires Board of Trustees into this entire was given as part of process,” Herbst said. the request for proposal document, construction on the renovations is to “I want to make sure that our consultbegin on Dec. 6, 2011, and will last ant concentrates on the word ‘student’ when we talk about the Student Cenuntil early October 2012. The design phase of the renova- ter.” Herbst wants the project to be tions will begin on May 9, 2011, the completed quickly, but he doesn’t Monday after classes end. Some dates have already been want to compromise the quality. “We want to make sure we do it pushed back, Herbst said. He has made sure the contractor and archi- right,” Herbst said.

CENTER

www.kykernel.com


Thursday, April 21, 2011 | PAGE 3

Chain coffee dominates local cafes By Ally Rogers news@kykernel.com

Starbucks is everywhere. With four locations on campus and three more within a mile of Funkhouser, it’s hard to deny that Starbucks has taken over as the convenient coffee stop. “We try to have a store where our customers expect there to be a store,” said Klint Arnold, the regional manager of Starbucks. And yet with the continual growth by the corporate coffee shop, locally owned stores like Coffea and Common Grounds are still standing strong. So, how do they compete for a piece of the coffee cake? The simple answer is that they don’t. “I don’t think we try to compete,” said Jay Stevenson, a barista at Coffea. “We focus on the quality of our coffee and the quality of our drinks.” There are many similarities among the local coffee shops, such as available teas and flavored

syrups, but perhaps most important is the cost. Chelsea Martin, a junior at UK, explained that if she didn’t work at Starbucks, she wouldn’t drink its coffee because “it’s so expensive.” When comparing a latte, cup of coffee, tea, or other beverages from Common Grounds, Coffea and Starbucks, prices are fairly similar. For a simple, nothing-to-it cup of coffee, the price starts at around $1.25. For specialty drinks, like flavored lattes, the price begins at around $3. Add a shot of expresso at 50 cents or a pump of more syrup or another drop of chocolate, and the price continues to rise. “When it comes to pricing, we are competitive,” Arnold said, adding that Starbucks gauges its prices based on a premium paid for origin coffee and the fact the company pays health benefits for all employees, part-time and full-time alike. Café Mezzo, located in Patterson Office Tower, may seem like a cheaper option, but it’s not really.

Again, prices are comparable to Coffea, Common Ground and Starbucks, but there are limited options for customizing and flavoring. Stevenson said that if it’s more than just a quick caffeine jolt customers are looking for, “people choose what (Lexington coffee shop) they go to because of the atmosphere and the unique qualities and features” each place offers. Coffea, a calm, inviting environment with diverse music selections and a friendly crowd of mostly students, lends itself to local markets. Its single-origin coffee beans come from Cincinnati, Ohio, while its baked goods, pies and snacks are from Lexington shops. Located at the corner of Rose Street and Avenue of Champions, Coffea has added fruit-flavored syrups to its rather lengthy list of customizable options. “We don’t cater to specific groups of people,” said Stevenson, explaining that while other coffee shops have special menu selections like skinnys, Coffea simply cus-

Housing rules could change By Karen Sudol MCT

HACKENSACK, N.J. — Freshman Mark Rivera’s roommate experience at William Paterson University wasn’t exactly what he had envisioned. After informing his roommate before school began that he was gay and sensing an air of tolerance, the student barely spoke to him during the first days and eventually switched rooms. He explained to Rivera by text that he was more homophobic than he realized. “For the rest of the semester, I lived alone and still live alone,” said 19-year-old Rivera, of Paterson, N.J. “No one should be robbed of the full college experience. It starts with a roommate.” It’s a core reason why

Rivera, vice president of Chosen: The Gay-Straight Alliance, said he and others are encouraging the university to join a growing number of colleges that allow students to choose roommates of the opposite sex to live with — identified as gender neutral housing. The college’s Residence Life office is researching the option and plans to speak to campus student groups, said Joseph Caffarelli, director of Residence Life. It currently requires same-sex room assignments. “It would be a university decision once we get all of the information and look at what students think,” he said. Six years ago, only a handful of colleges in the country offered the housing, said Jeffrey Chang, cofounder of the National Stu-

dent Genderblind Campaign, an organization that promotes LGBT-affirmative policies regarding campus housing. Eight schools have implemented the change just since October, he said. Rutgers University became the 60th school and largest university in the nation to have the policy when it approved the option in March, said Chang, a Rutgers law student. “Making the decision not to offer it tells transgender students that they have to be in a system that doesn’t work for them,” said Jenny Kurtz, director of the Center for Social Justice Education and LGBT Communities at Rutgers. The trend gained additional momentum after last September’s suicide of Rutgers freshman Tyler Clementi, Chang said.

tomizes any menu item to fit each customer, and tops off each drink with a chocolate covered coffee bean. Common Grounds, an eclectic dynamic atmosphere with different rooms, which can be reserved for meetings or study sessions, brings in local musicians and artists on a regular basis. Located on the corner of East High Street and Grand Boulevard, Common Grounds gets its coffee from Louisville, Ky., and its food, ranging from breakfast melts to salads and other entrees, is made in house. “We have some really good deals,” said Cassidi Hunker, a Common Grounds barista, naming such bargains as a $3 bottomless coffee — buy a breakfast melt and add a coffee for $1, and a cup of coffee (with a refill) and a muffin for $2. Hunker said what further sets Common Grounds apart from other coffee shops is the customer interaction with the menu. She explained that customized drinks have been

added to the regular menu, while other items have been taken off because people didn’t respond favorably. Starbucks, a fresh and cool atmosphere, also gives back to the local community. While the company doesn’t purchase products from each location’s local markets, it does “try to be a good neighbor,” Arnold said. He explained that the Lexingtonbased shops have employees volunteer at the humane society and community gardens, among other acts of philanthropy. Student Mindy Rice said even with all the options available at Common Grounds and Coffea, she still prefers Starbucks, explaining that she is “addicted” to the ingredients Starbucks puts in her drinks. “Anything you feel strongly about can become addictive,” Arnold said. “People love our products. We set the standard for the coffee shop experience. We respect the independent shops in town. But we truly believe in our (product) and I am proud of what we offer.”

‘Arts for Smarts’ UK group talks art in elementary school By Sam Morrison news@kykernel.com

The UK Chapter of the Kentucky Education Association Student Program will hold its third annual “Arts for Smarts” Day at William Wells Brown Elementary School this Friday at 3 p.m. “Arts for Smarts is an outreach event where we work with elementary school students to emphasize the fun of learning core content subjects through art,” KEA SP President Elizabeth McMahon said. “Students get the opportunity to complete several art projects while learning how they relate to specific subjects.” Rain or shine, the event will be held inside the school, located at 555 E. Fifth Street, which is about five minutes from campus, and will feature hands-on activities between students and volunteers. The event is sponsored by the National Education Association Community Learn-

ing Through America’s Schools Grant, which funds several service projects that target improving public education through community outreach. The event is also funded by the UK Student Government Association. Last year, 80 student volunteers attended the function that was held at Cardinal Valley, “The main goal is to bring attention to the importance of fine arts,” Eli Edwards, College of Education senator, said. “The difference made in the children's lives was a joy to see for all involved.” Along with members of the UK student body, KEA SP is collaborating with KEA Retired and the Fayette County Education Association to host the project for students of William Wells Brown Elementary School. “Volunteers will work at a series of stations” Edwards said, “with the students on activities that specifically address math, science, language arts, social studies and physical education with content through art, music and dance.” All volunteers will be welcomed, but to do so they must contact Eli Edwards at Elijah.edwards@uky.edu.


PAGE

2 | Thursday, April 21, 2011

NBA Continued from page 1 and this is the next step,” Knight said. “All season long coach has been tutoring me on the fine points of being a point guard, and now I have an opportunity to put my game on display in front of NBA scouts as a result of my hard work.” Jones averaged 15.7 points, 8.8 rebounds and 1.9 blocks, and was named Southeastern Conference Freshman of the Year by

PANDA Continued from page 1 Director of Operations Mavis Orr said. “It provides more growth and more opportunity.” The family-owned franchise opened in 1983 and now has 1,300 U.S. locations. Panda Express’s vision is to have more than 2,300 locations worldwide by 2015, Orr said. The California-based chain

conference coaches. He is a projected lottery pick. “Coach Cal and the rest of the staff pushed us all year long and helped us develop every part of our game to help prepare us for this point in our lives,” Jones said. “This will be a great chance for me to measure my skills against some of the best in the country and receive additional information on where I fit into this year’s draft.” Liggins averaged 8.6 points and 4.0 rebounds and was named to the SEC All-Defensive Team.

He is looking to play his way into the first round at the NBA Combine. “I’m excited about the opportunity to enter my name into the draft, putting me one step closer to realizing my dream,” Liggins said. “Growing up in a tough environment in Chicago, it’s a pleasure to have an opportunity to do something special. This is another challenge I’m looking forward to, to have my game evaluated by pro scouts and see how I rank against some of the top players in the world.”

expanded to several college campuses as a new marketing outlet and has been received positively. “We hope that students will become fans of Panda Express,” Orr said. “It is a growing company with plenty of leadership opportunities for recent graduates.” The eatery employs a combination of full-time staff and students. The new restaurant is just one more step toward UK reaching its goal to become a Top 20 university, UK Provost Kumble Sub-

baswamy said during a speech. “Top 20 means being the best at everything we do: providing the best in-class experience to our students, the best out-of-class experience and the best dining experience,” he said. “Because, let’s be honest about it, a lot of out-ofclass socialization takes place around meals and drinks, so having the absolute best possible is really what we are all about.” Panda Express will be open 10:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. weekdays on the Student Center first floor.

4puz.com

Uranium mining a new issue The theme of this year’s National Park Week, April 16-24, “Healthy Parks, Healthy People,” frames the annual opportunity for lawmakers to invoke the name of President Theodore Roosevelt and issue proclamations championing what filmmaker Ken Burns has branded as “America’s Best Idea.” The message seems particularly apt this year, as President Obama prepares to render a decision that will determine the future wellbeing of a crown jewel of America’s parks, the Grand Canyon. At issue is whether to extend the current moratorium on new mining claims around the park or allow what the administration admits will be expanded uranium mining at the doorstep of this national icon. The mining industry has coveted the Grand Canyon for a long time. Fortunately for the public, some of our most visionary presidents protected the landmark. Fearing development from mining and other industrial interests, in 1908 Roosevelt used his authority under the Antiquities Act to protect what he called “one of the great sights which every American ... should see.” Roughly a decade later, Woodrow Wilson rebuffed efforts by mining companies, signing a law that established the Grand Canyon as a national park. John F. Kennedy, at the urging of his legendary Secretary of the Interior Stewart Udall — after whom the Department of the Interior headquarters is named

Horoscope Aries (March 21-April 19) — Today is a 7 — Move quickly to get a good deal. Devise a plan with your partner or mate. By now you should know how much you can spend. Accept a gift. Follow a strong recommendation. You're learning fast. Taurus (April 20-May 20) — Today is a 9 — You have no trouble getting your message across. Keep team communication channels open. Accept a pearl of wisdom from a friend who can guide past fears that have detained you. Gemini (May 21-June 21) — Today is a 9 — It's a good time to ask for money, whether it be a raise, an invoice or a donation for a fundraiser. Use some of what you personally earn to feather your nest. Cancer (June 22-July 22) — Today is a 9 — You're entering a highly creative, artistic phase, which advances your career over

— struck a deal with a mining company to halt construction of a massive hotel on its claimed land near the canyon’s South Rim. But the industry has not been deterred. A recent analysis of federal data by the Pew Environment Group found that since 2004, more than 8,000 claims for uranium and other hardrock minerals have been staked in public land around the park — representing a 2,000 percent increase. Yet the Grand Canyon is not the only natural landmark at risk from new mining claims. National parks like Yosemite, Arches, Joshua Tree and Mount Rushmore National Memorial are threatened by a deluge of new mining claims staked within miles of their boundaries. This rush to dig around national parks, monuments and other special places stems from the 1872 Mining Law, a frontier-era statute, which allows anyone “free and open access” to nearly 350 million acres of public land. The law includes the ability to take what is now more than $1 billion annually in precious metals from federal holdings without paying a royalty to U.S. taxpayers, according to the Congressional Budget Office. Under the Federal Land Policy and Management Act, the president has until July to deliver his final recommendation on whether to extend that ban for the next 20 years or to open part or all of the area to new uranium and other metal mining.

the next month. Work out a plan for the future you want, and share it with loved ones. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) — Today is a 7 — Stick to the old rules. Good manners get you forward faster. Selfdiscipline's the best kind, but don't let guilt get out of hand. Send support to someone on the leading edge. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Today is an 8 — Create something beautiful. For the next month, your assets gain value. Helping someone else with their finances is actually fun. Offer advice when asked. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) — Today is a 9 — Romance is brewing. Friends help you understand. It may require a compromise or use of your hidden resources. There's plenty of good work ahead. Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) — Today is an 8 — It's easy to get distracted by financial obligations and forget about loved ones. Find a way to balance it all. Take a walk and give thanks for what you've got.

MCT

Sagittarius (Nov. 22Dec. 21) — Today is a 7 — Art and creativity take over. Work/play with a loved one and you'll get more satisfaction. Replace something volatile with something secure. Capricorn (Dec. 22Jan. 19) — Today is a 7 — The next four weeks are good for wrapping yourself in arms of sweet romance. Discuss esoteric subjects with a friend. Loving words come back multiplied. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) — Today is a 7 — The following four weeks are perfect to fall in love with a research project. Find satisfaction with cost-effective solutions for routines. The work is challenging, but profitable. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) — Today is a 7 — Your words have great power now. Accept well-earned compliments. Study and learn with a partner. Business is good and travel is better. Try a new perspective.

tectural consultant, when hired, will be willing to listen to the students so they will be involved in many aspects Continued from page 1 of the renovations. The remodel of the Student CenThis is the first time since 1982 that the Student Center will be under- ter will add aesthetic and practical improvements to benefit student life going major construction, on campus, said Herbst said. Herbst. Since then, minor “I want to make “I specifically renovations have been have written in the made to the building, sure that our consultant request for proposincluding in places als that we want an concentrates on the like the Cats Den and architect who will Center for Student In‘student.’” word listen respectfully, volvement, he said. analyze and be According to the JOHN HERBST able to synthesize tentative and prelimiStudent Center director students needs, nary schedule that the wants and desires Board of Trustees into this entire was given as part of process,” Herbst said. the request for proposal document, construction on the renovations is to “I want to make sure that our consultbegin on Dec. 6, 2011, and will last ant concentrates on the word ‘student’ when we talk about the Student Cenuntil early October 2012. The design phase of the renova- ter.” Herbst wants the project to be tions will begin on May 9, 2011, the completed quickly, but he doesn’t Monday after classes end. Some dates have already been want to compromise the quality. “We want to make sure we do it pushed back, Herbst said. He has made sure the contractor and archi- right,” Herbst said.

CENTER

www.kykernel.com


Thursday, April 21, 2011 | PAGE 3

Chain coffee dominates local cafes By Ally Rogers news@kykernel.com

Starbucks is everywhere. With four locations on campus and three more within a mile of Funkhouser, it’s hard to deny that Starbucks has taken over as the convenient coffee stop. “We try to have a store where our customers expect there to be a store,” said Klint Arnold, the regional manager of Starbucks. And yet with the continual growth by the corporate coffee shop, locally owned stores like Coffea and Common Grounds are still standing strong. So, how do they compete for a piece of the coffee cake? The simple answer is that they don’t. “I don’t think we try to compete,” said Jay Stevenson, a barista at Coffea. “We focus on the quality of our coffee and the quality of our drinks.” There are many similarities among the local coffee shops, such as available teas and flavored

syrups, but perhaps most important is the cost. Chelsea Martin, a junior at UK, explained that if she didn’t work at Starbucks, she wouldn’t drink its coffee because “it’s so expensive.” When comparing a latte, cup of coffee, tea, or other beverages from Common Grounds, Coffea and Starbucks, prices are fairly similar. For a simple, nothing-to-it cup of coffee, the price starts at around $1.25. For specialty drinks, like flavored lattes, the price begins at around $3. Add a shot of expresso at 50 cents or a pump of more syrup or another drop of chocolate, and the price continues to rise. “When it comes to pricing, we are competitive,” Arnold said, adding that Starbucks gauges its prices based on a premium paid for origin coffee and the fact the company pays health benefits for all employees, part-time and full-time alike. Café Mezzo, located in Patterson Office Tower, may seem like a cheaper option, but it’s not really.

Again, prices are comparable to Coffea, Common Ground and Starbucks, but there are limited options for customizing and flavoring. Stevenson said that if it’s more than just a quick caffeine jolt customers are looking for, “people choose what (Lexington coffee shop) they go to because of the atmosphere and the unique qualities and features” each place offers. Coffea, a calm, inviting environment with diverse music selections and a friendly crowd of mostly students, lends itself to local markets. Its single-origin coffee beans come from Cincinnati, Ohio, while its baked goods, pies and snacks are from Lexington shops. Located at the corner of Rose Street and Avenue of Champions, Coffea has added fruit-flavored syrups to its rather lengthy list of customizable options. “We don’t cater to specific groups of people,” said Stevenson, explaining that while other coffee shops have special menu selections like skinnys, Coffea simply cus-

Housing rules could change By Karen Sudol MCT

HACKENSACK, N.J. — Freshman Mark Rivera’s roommate experience at William Paterson University wasn’t exactly what he had envisioned. After informing his roommate before school began that he was gay and sensing an air of tolerance, the student barely spoke to him during the first days and eventually switched rooms. He explained to Rivera by text that he was more homophobic than he realized. “For the rest of the semester, I lived alone and still live alone,” said 19-year-old Rivera, of Paterson, N.J. “No one should be robbed of the full college experience. It starts with a roommate.” It’s a core reason why

Rivera, vice president of Chosen: The Gay-Straight Alliance, said he and others are encouraging the university to join a growing number of colleges that allow students to choose roommates of the opposite sex to live with — identified as gender neutral housing. The college’s Residence Life office is researching the option and plans to speak to campus student groups, said Joseph Caffarelli, director of Residence Life. It currently requires same-sex room assignments. “It would be a university decision once we get all of the information and look at what students think,” he said. Six years ago, only a handful of colleges in the country offered the housing, said Jeffrey Chang, cofounder of the National Stu-

dent Genderblind Campaign, an organization that promotes LGBT-affirmative policies regarding campus housing. Eight schools have implemented the change just since October, he said. Rutgers University became the 60th school and largest university in the nation to have the policy when it approved the option in March, said Chang, a Rutgers law student. “Making the decision not to offer it tells transgender students that they have to be in a system that doesn’t work for them,” said Jenny Kurtz, director of the Center for Social Justice Education and LGBT Communities at Rutgers. The trend gained additional momentum after last September’s suicide of Rutgers freshman Tyler Clementi, Chang said.

tomizes any menu item to fit each customer, and tops off each drink with a chocolate covered coffee bean. Common Grounds, an eclectic dynamic atmosphere with different rooms, which can be reserved for meetings or study sessions, brings in local musicians and artists on a regular basis. Located on the corner of East High Street and Grand Boulevard, Common Grounds gets its coffee from Louisville, Ky., and its food, ranging from breakfast melts to salads and other entrees, is made in house. “We have some really good deals,” said Cassidi Hunker, a Common Grounds barista, naming such bargains as a $3 bottomless coffee — buy a breakfast melt and add a coffee for $1, and a cup of coffee (with a refill) and a muffin for $2. Hunker said what further sets Common Grounds apart from other coffee shops is the customer interaction with the menu. She explained that customized drinks have been

added to the regular menu, while other items have been taken off because people didn’t respond favorably. Starbucks, a fresh and cool atmosphere, also gives back to the local community. While the company doesn’t purchase products from each location’s local markets, it does “try to be a good neighbor,” Arnold said. He explained that the Lexingtonbased shops have employees volunteer at the humane society and community gardens, among other acts of philanthropy. Student Mindy Rice said even with all the options available at Common Grounds and Coffea, she still prefers Starbucks, explaining that she is “addicted” to the ingredients Starbucks puts in her drinks. “Anything you feel strongly about can become addictive,” Arnold said. “People love our products. We set the standard for the coffee shop experience. We respect the independent shops in town. But we truly believe in our (product) and I am proud of what we offer.”

‘Arts for Smarts’ UK group talks art in elementary school By Sam Morrison news@kykernel.com

The UK Chapter of the Kentucky Education Association Student Program will hold its third annual “Arts for Smarts” Day at William Wells Brown Elementary School this Friday at 3 p.m. “Arts for Smarts is an outreach event where we work with elementary school students to emphasize the fun of learning core content subjects through art,” KEA SP President Elizabeth McMahon said. “Students get the opportunity to complete several art projects while learning how they relate to specific subjects.” Rain or shine, the event will be held inside the school, located at 555 E. Fifth Street, which is about five minutes from campus, and will feature hands-on activities between students and volunteers. The event is sponsored by the National Education Association Community Learn-

ing Through America’s Schools Grant, which funds several service projects that target improving public education through community outreach. The event is also funded by the UK Student Government Association. Last year, 80 student volunteers attended the function that was held at Cardinal Valley, “The main goal is to bring attention to the importance of fine arts,” Eli Edwards, College of Education senator, said. “The difference made in the children's lives was a joy to see for all involved.” Along with members of the UK student body, KEA SP is collaborating with KEA Retired and the Fayette County Education Association to host the project for students of William Wells Brown Elementary School. “Volunteers will work at a series of stations” Edwards said, “with the students on activities that specifically address math, science, language arts, social studies and physical education with content through art, music and dance.” All volunteers will be welcomed, but to do so they must contact Eli Edwards at Elijah.edwards@uky.edu.


PAGE

4 | Thursday, April 21, 2011 sports

New-look defense progresses through spring Begins to adjust to Minter’s strategies, schemes By Ethan Levine sports@kykernel.com

When the UK football program brought in new codefensive coordinator Rick Minter this offseason to lead a defense that struggled at times last season — especially in conference play — it knew there would be growing pains. Over the last couple of months in spring practice, the defensive group was presented with its first opportunity to learn Minter’s new schemes and apply them against the offense of UK head coach Joker Phillips and offensive coordinator Randy Sanders. “The first part of the spring I felt really good,” Phillips said. “After the second scrimmage the guys knew what was going on, what we had put in. “Then we installed some more packages, and once we installed those packages I don’t think we got a good grasp of the packages we installed in the second part of the spring. And then I thought we lost some of the first part of what we had put in.” With a defense filled with guys recruited to play in a 4-3 scheme, inexperienced underclassmen and battle-tested veterans alike have found themselves playing in new spots on the field and learning new positions. Safety Winston Guy played in co-defensive coordinator Steve Brown’s scheme for three years at UK, and will now have to learn a new position that brings him closer to the line of scrimmage as a senior. For linebacker Ronnie Sneed, he too will have to

PHOTO BY SCOTT HANNIGAN | STAFF

Safety Winston Guy Jr. looks at the scoreboard in disappointment after allowing a 100-yard scoring kick return against the University of Georgia at Commonwealth Stadium on Saturday, Oct. 23, 2010. learn a new position that will line him up as a hybrid defensive end in some packages after playing only linebacker under Brown in his first three seasons at UK. “There’s a lot of pressure on us,” Guy said. “Some people have moved into new roles, such as myself, and there’s just a lot of things that are different.” Sneed said the adjustment process to any new scheme begins long before anyone steps out onto the field. “We’re in (the film room) a couple hours every day, at least a couple hours watching film,” Sneed said, “and that’s not even including when we are out on the practice field. We are putting in a lot of hours trying to get this thing perfect.” Phillips said Minter was prepared to not hold anything back early on when taking over the defense, and that the team hopes any learning curves would work themselves out before play in the fall.

“Everybody has experienced the brain cramps,” Sneed said. “(Minter) has thrown a lot at us, more than we have ever had to learn at one time, but everybody is handling it pretty good for the most part. We’ve still had some guys who have to continue to learn and come up with it, but we are going to continue to learn.” The consensus from the players and the coaching staff as spring practice nears its ending is that the defense has made strides in learning Minter’s defense, but still has plenty of work to do. This Saturday’s annual Blue vs. White scrimmage at Commonwealth Stadium will be the defense’s first chance to show what they can do in front of fans in the Big Blue Nation. Sneed has big expectations for his defense come Saturday. “I expect to kill ‘em,” Sneed said about facing the offense on Saturday. “As long as we all come out and everybody is sharp mentally, we’ll shut them down.”

Go Green. Recycle this Kernel.


Thursday, April 21, 2011 Page 5

Big

E U BLTreat!

POP

!

by Joy Priest The whole Big Blue Nation can now be taste-tested with the introduction of the Big Blue Sucker by Team Candy Suckers. The Big Blue Sucker, retailing for $3.95 at www.teamcandysucker.com, is a Collegiate Licensing Company officially licensed product depicting the UK logo. The sucker was created by Mandy Von See and Mark Lenhart, owners of Team Candy Suckers. Von See said the college team suckers were not a premeditated business plan for them. “(Lenhart) found me in the phone book,” Von See said. “I owned a candy company; I was making candy. He’s a huge sports fan and I am a candy maker, so the two have married and out came sports candy.” Team Candy Suckers produces hand-crafted confections in the form of a molded mascot to commemorate favorite college teams. Von See has a printing and packaging degree from Clemson University and described herself as a “self-taught candy maker.” “Mark (Lenhart) called me with the idea for the lollipop for the South Carolina Gamecocks,” Von See said. “The more we talked about it and realized all the schools wanted suckers, we realized it was much bigger than what we thought.” About 20 schools and their mascots have been poured and crafted into a sweet, tasty treat. Von See said the plan is to have all Southeastern Conference and Atlantic Coast Conference schools, as well as some larger universities, in the Team Candy Suckers family soon. “Kentucky was important for us because it has a huge fan base,” Von See said. “The Kentucky sucker has one of my favorite names; I love the Big Blue sucker… that sucker is Big Blue Berry, which I think makes for a very cool product.” When Team Candy Suckers was approved with the Collegiate Licensin Company, it received rights to use the actual university approved logo. “We’re not just printing something on top of a generic item,” Von See said. “We thought that it was important that fans get to enjoy a candy sucker that was in the shape of their beloved mascot.” Sarah Andreotta, the front-end manager who makes the candy orders for Kennedy’s Bookstore, expressed excitement about the arrival of the Big Blue Sucker. “I would love to get that in here,” Andreotta said. “I’m not too fond of the name, but I think it’s a great product. I think it’d be a great thing to get that in the store. Anything UK sells.” Andreotta said Big Blue candy is always a success. “I was carrying UK PEZ dispensers, and we sold out,” Andreotta said. “We sold 374 in a month. That’s how fast UK candy goes.” Von See said the target season for their sucker sales would be football season. Andreotta and UK Bookstore director Sally Wiatrowski disagreed with that business plan. “Oh no, it’d be a year-round season with us,” Andreotta said, mentioning Easter and Valentine’s Day baskets. Wiatrowski said purchase preparations for football season have already begun. “Most of those things hit the store mid-June through the fall season,” Wiatrowski said. “I would anticipate this as a type of product that can be sold year-round.” Wiatrowski, who is actually a part of the licensing committee for UK, said she was aware when Team Candy Suckers applied to retail their product. She said the product is a great addition. “I think it’s a really unique idea,” she said. “There’s another company that makes chewing gum … Wildcat gum. We’ve carried jelly beans before … blue and white. The (sucker) is a unique product category. There’s not a lot of competition.” The only problem with the Big Blue sucker is the price reflects the size of the nation — it’s big. “Fans aren’t going to pay that price,” Andreotta said of the $3.95 suggested retail. “I’m definitely going to contact them and see what I can do.” The suckers can also be purchased six to a pack for $19.95. “We like to sell them in 6packs and you can get them on website,” Von See said. “Hopefully they will be at local retailers around Kentucky in the next few weeks.”

Making tracks: UK team leads shoe drive By J.P. Lepping features@kykernel.com

The UK track and field team has decided to give back. Two members of the team, Luis Orta and Josh Nadzam, have started a shoe drive on campus after recognizing how many individuals worldwide are in need of footwear. Since the shoe drive began, the team has collected

nearly 300 pairs of shoes and hopes to double that number by the time the drive concludes on May 6. When the drive is over, Orta, Nadzam and the track and field team are going to donate all of the shoes they collected to Soles4Souls, an organization that finds new homes for the used shoes. “We started the shoe drive because we realized how many pairs of shoes we were throwing away and how

many people could use our old shoes,” Orta said. Soles4Souls is a charity organization that is based out of Nashville, Tenn. More than 13 million pairs of gently used shoes have been given out within the past six years, and Soles4Souls is currently giving a pair of shoes to someone in need every seven seconds. Wayne Elsey started Soles4Souls in 2004 after a tsunami hit Southeast Asia and he felt compelled to

make a difference. Since then, Soles4Souls has donated shoes to people in 125 different countries around the world. “It opens your eyes when you realize how many people need shoes and, sometimes, how much you take for granted,” sociology senior Kelley Price said. Orta and Nadzam said they hope that this shoe drive is just the beginning of athletes giving back to the com-

munity. They hope more teams on campus will recognize the impact they can have on people and how much they can benefit not only the people of Lexington but also people all around the world. “We are always looking for ways to give back to our community because they provide so much support for us,” Nadzam said. Those interested in donating a pair of shoes can contact Orta or Nadzam at or-

taluis15@hotmail.com and jmnadz2@uky.edu to set up a pickup date for the shoes. Shoes can also be dropped off at the academic tutoring facility (C.A.T.S.) in Memorial Coliseum. “If we could start doing some sort of donation with shoes and clothing on an annual basis, it would help benefit the school and athletic association as a whole,” Orta said.


thursday

04.21.11 page 6

kernelopinions

shannon frazer | opinions editor | sfrazer@kykernel.com

SARA NELLE MURPHY, Kernel cartoonist

Stand up for affordable college tuition Before I begin, I offer a few disclaimers: I am aware that I have never had to balance a budget in the midst of a financial crisis, whether it be for an office or a large public institution. I am aware that as a 21-year-old woman, my outlook on how to impact or be actively involved in a university is limited to the perspective of a student. ANNIE Lastly, I am aware HUGHES that as I pursue my education and new experiences, Contributing columnist I do not have every viewpoint to consider. Now, let me get to the point of this piece. UK students: You should be upset. And not, “I’m going to write a scathing Facebook status up-

date” upset, but “I’m going to sit in the middle of the Main Building’s lobby in protest for 10 days” upset. Those of you who are lucky enough to be graduating (lucky, of course, being dependent on how much debt you have graduating with you) will not have to experience the joy of a 6 percent hike. Those of us still pursuing a higher education? Welcome to the re-affirmation of policies. In an email sent out Tuesday, outgoing university President Lee Todd Jr. announced that the increase was due to a “$3.1 million reduction in state support, $21 million in increases in fixed costs and other operating expenses (including scholarships, implementing general education reform and utilities).” Overall, he went on to state “with all of these expenses and reduced income, the hole we face for 2011-12 approaches $35 million.” I do not see this as a “rock and a hard

place” situation, but as the perfect opportunity to make change. We can no longer sit by and accept that because we are in difficult times, we are expected to accept difficult circumstances. As students we are encouraged to debate, question and develop a thorough understanding of how our education is to be formed, yet we refuse to do so in other matters. The tuition increase is a $259 increase per semester for lower-division resident undergraduate students and will generate $14.8 million, but in times when our basketball coach receives a $31,650,000, eight-year contract, something is amiss. Students everywhere are speaking up and demanding that making the choice of pursuing higher education should not be met with the punishment of lifelong debt, and we should be doing the same. There is a budget forum Monday at 8:30 a.m. in the Center Theater of the Student

Center. Go. Not because you should; not because some opinionated person in a paper said so, but because your education, and the change you can bring to this state because of it, is the thing in most need of protection in a time when athletics, technology and self-involvement reign supreme. I hope that I will get heated responses to this article. Agree, disagree — it doesn’t matter. As long as you show yourself and the university that you are taking the education you worked hard for and using it for something worthwhile, I can handle a few critiques, and I’m sure the administration can as well. An increase of 6 percent is small in numbers, but huge in significance. Fellow students, you have a voice and an opportunity to use it. Please allow yourselves to see that for the incredible gift it is. Annie Hughes is a journalism junior. Email opinions@kykernel.com.

Records and reality: timeless or obsolete?

Replace Facebook chat with face-to-face talk

Saturday was Record Store Day, and Lexington's own CD Central participated. Did you go? What do you think about the digitization of music to MP3? Are records and cassettes a lost art? The technology hot topic these days centers on the advent of social networking and smart phones, and how they have re-characterized everything in society JOY from research to raw huPRIEST man interaction. However, I think there Kernel is another major societal columnist necessity being affected by technology’s constant evolution: music. On Record Store Day, stores containing everything from vinyl to cassettes to compact disks celebrated a day where their oncethriving, now nose-diving businesses could be in the spotlight once again. Technology has resulted in the digitization of music to its currently popular MP3 form. In the past, when music mediums have evolved into the next big thing (record play-

Go to Willy T, look around at all the students hunched over their laptops. All of these individuals are at the library to “study,” right? No, of course not. These students turn on their computer and immediately log onto Facebook. No one needs a summary on what Facebook is. Why? Because almost every single student on this campus has one. Facebook has become SARA NELLE a part of us. We basically MURPHY live two lives, a real life and a virtual life on the Kernel Internet. columnist In real life, we’re not as quick, clever or witty as we would be in the world of our online persona. In real life, we’re not always seen in the most flattering light or angle while we’re always approvingly tagged with a photo on our online world. It once was less likely for individuals to have online personas. I can remember back in 2004 when kids would ask each other: “Can I Myspace you?”

ers to tape decks). It has meant, essentially, the previous medium’s demise. Or has it? Will compact discs become obsolete? Have they already? I think this argument misses the true result of our evolving technology on music. Although, in the past, new mediums of music have rendered former mediums unpopular, I wouldn’t necessarily use the term “obsolete.” Today, one can still walk into a record store and purchase vinyl. In fact, it is required for disc jockeys and vinyl enthusiasts, like myself, who enjoy that sound characteristic of an old-time record player. My prediction is that record companies will one day become antiquated, not record stores. Artists are earning record deals based on their status of fame previous to being signed to a major label. Two major examples that come to mind are Drake and Wiz Khalifa. As new technology allows music artists to record and distribute their music autonomously, record companies are becoming no more than the middlemen, mooching off of artists and their God-given talents. Joy Priest is a journalism senior. Email opinions@kykernel.com.

Ask any young adult if he or she has a Myspace and you’re now more likely to encounter a “What?” Facebook is the main addiction of our generation. It takes energy out of our living life and puts it into a false, imaginary world of the Facebook realm. I’m not trying to blast Facebook. I know what it feels like to compulsively check your notifications on an hourly basis, hoping to see that someone commented on your oh-soclever status or wrote on your wall. It is also a fact that Facebook does have societal value as a tool to utilize, like longdistance friends to correspond over thousands of miles. What I believe is that Facebook has shown to cause problems with socialization in real life. We “friend” people, “chat” with them for hours on end and then feel the obvious awkwardness when you meeting in person. If we can learn to focus primarily on real life, we can perhaps have a healthier relationship with our Facebook page. And of course, I will be posting a link to this online as soon as I’m done. Sara Nelle Murphy is a communications sophomore. Email opinions@kykernel.com.

Submissions

Cartoonists needed

Please limit letters to 350 words or fewer. Guest columns should be no more than 600 words. Be sure to include your full name, class, major and telephone number with all submissions. Telephone numbers will only be used to verify identity.

The Kernel is looking for a cartoonist to draw pieces for the opinions page on a regular basis. Those who have an interest in campus and local issues will be given special attention, although cartoonists of all interests will be considered.

Email opinions@kykernel.com

Email opinions@kykernel.com


Thursday, April 21, 2011 | PAGE 7

Deadly storms move across US David Zucchino and Richard Fausset MCT

RALEIGH, N.C. — At the treelined entrance to the Stony Brook mobile home park in Raleigh, N.C., Maria Angelica Alvarez stood behind yellow police tape, clutching two bouquets of flowers and weeping on a friend’s shoulder. Alvarez lost her three young sons in a three-day, 14-state maelstrom that killed at least 44 people and could prove to be one of the largest convulsions of tornado activity in U.S. history. The boys, ages 6, 8 and 9, were

killed inside a bedroom, crushed by a tree that demolished their trailer. Alvarez’s 6-month-old niece was hospitalized in critical condition, friends said. “It’s a catastrophe — she lost everything,” said Consuelo Kwee, center director for Catholic Charities of the Diocese of Raleigh, as she tried to console Alvarez. The vicious storm system has whipped up a reported 241 tornados since Thursday, according to state officials and AccuWeather.com. In all, more than 60 twisters touched down in eastern North Carolina, wreaking

havoc among peanut farms and chicken houses of rural Bertie County, where 11 people died — as well as in Raleigh, the state’s capital and second-largest city. At least 22 people were killed across North Carolina late Saturday, and another five in Virginia. Earlier, the storm system killed seven in Arkansas, seven in Alabama, two in Oklahoma and at least one in Mississippi. In Bertie County, N.C., a twister apparently ripped a course of destruction a half-mile wide and five to seven miles long as it moved northeast from the town of

Askewville, said County Manager Zee Lamb. Lamb said 75 homes appeared to be destroyed — although in some places, he noted, “you can’t tell where there was a house and where there wasn’t a house.” “Where there were homes, there’s nothing underneath it now,” he said. “You’ve got trucks blown across the street. You just don’t realize how powerful these storms are until you experience them.” Justin Dunlow of Askewville tried to shield his 3-year-old daughter and 5-year-old son as the double-wide mobile home where

they had taken shelter was torn to shreds. “I just started praying, and the wall fell on top of us, and that’s what kept us there,” he told the Associated Press. “I can replace the house, but I can’t replace my babies. And that’s what I thought about. I’m alive. My babies are alive.” North Carolina Gov. Bev Purdue declared a state of emergency and suspended restrictions on work hours for truck drivers — to allow for the delivery of goods to affected areas — and for utility workers, because tens of thousands of customers remained without power.

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3BR Apartment with Central Air, W/D, off-street parking. Walking distance to UK. $945/month plus utilities. 502-558-9665

5BR/2&3BA Houses. Walk to campus. Several to choose from. State, Waller, University area. Porches, W/D included. D/W, Parking. Very nice! Lease 8/01/11.Sign now for best available! 859-539-5502.

WALK TO CAMPUS. Campus Downs 3BR/2BA. All appliances, including W/D. 3rd floor, Cathedral ceilings. 859-433-5966

6 Bedroom

3BR/3BA, UK/Woodland Park. Liv-Rm, W/D, A/C. $1,155/month. Classic Real

6BR/3BA NEW HOME! By Campus! Huge rooms. Awesome yards/decks. Parking. All Appliances. All electric. $350/mo. kampusproperties@gmail.com. 859-333-1388

Estate, 313-5231 3BR/2.5BA luxury townnhome/private development close to campus. Richmond Road. all electric, 2-car garage, Hardwood, large bedrooms, security systems, custom kitchen, dish, W/D, August lease $1,100-$1,200/month. www.mprentals.com or (859) 288-5601 3BR/2BA Condos. Newly remodeled. Conveniently located to campus. All appliances, including W/D. $1,000/month. 859-619-5341 or john@hsdevelopment.pro

Now Pre-Leasing for Fall Semester, 2, 3 and 5 BedRoom Houses, www.waynemichaelproperties.com or 859-513-1206

Beautiful Tates Creek Duplex, 3BR/2BA, Garage, All electric, $895/mo. 263-3740 4 Bedroom

1BR in Four-Plex, near stadium – UK bus line, garage, large yard. $450/month. Call 859-748-9677.

Awesome 1-6 Bedroom houses on campus. Going Fast. Call 859-433-0956

3BR/1BA Houses. Walk to campus. 3 to choose from. State, Waller, University area. Nice! Lease begins 8/01/11. 859-539-5502

1 Bedroom

Woodland Ave. Studios. All Electric. 3 Minutes from UK. $475/month. Call 859-523-8508 or 562woodland@gmail.com.

!!!WALK TO CAMPUS!!! $3000/month. Large house, Remodeled, 11x12 bedrooms, Washer/Dryer, Off-street parking. Call 227-1302.

6 Bedroom house near campus. Available May or August. 859-983-0726 www.sillbrothers.com. 6BR/ 2 & 3 BA Houses. Walk to campus. Yards. W/D. Porches. Parking. Great Selection! Nice! Waller, State, Univ. area. 859-539-5502 1-9 Bedroom Listings 2-3BR Houses/ Apartments available in August. Very nice. W/D. Dennis 859-983-0726. www.sillsbrothers.com

Now Pre-Leasing for Fall Semester, 3BR Houses. www.waynemichaelproperties.com or 859-513-1206

1 BLOCK FROM CAMPUS: 1 & 2BR, AC, parking. $395-up. 269-4129, 576-2761

Deluxe 3BR/2BA, 250 Lexington Ave. Short walk to campus. All electric, deluxe appliances and laundry.

Newly Remodeled! 1 to 3 Bedrooms starting at $260 per bed. 859-258-9600 ext. 704

Houses for rent. All sizes. Walk to campus. Porches, parking, W/D, D/W. Very nice! Waller, State, University area. Choose early for best selection. Lease begins 8/01/11. 859-539-5502

Help Wanted Cariino’s Italian Restaurant is now hiring servers. Apply in person. 135 Rojay Drive. Need Part-Time Web Designer/Website Maintenance. Send resume’ to drzavos@gmail.com

Eligible volunteers will be paid for their participation. You may be reimbursed for travel. Studies involve completion of one to 40 testing sessions depending on studies for which you may be eligible. Meals, snacks, movies, video games and reading materials will be provided. For more information and a confidential interview, please call 859-257-5388 or 1-866232-0038. Research Opportunities for Users of Stimulants for Non-Medical Reasons. Researchers with the University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Department of Behavioral Science are conducting research to examine the effects of medications. All information will be kept confidential. You may be eligible if you: are between 18 and 50 years of age, are using stimulants for non-medical reasons (for example, Adderall®, Ritalin®, Amphetamine, or Ephedrine). Eligible volunteers will be paid for their participation. You may be reimbursed for travel. Studies involve completion of one to 46 testing sessions depending on studies for which you may be eligible. Meals, snacks, movies, video games and reading materials will be provided. For more information and a confidential interview, please call 859257-5388 or 1-866-232-0038. Part-Time Cashier Needed. Flexible hours. Chevy Chase Hardware. Call 269-9611. Seeking: Female Student to care for two children over the summer. 5 days/week needed. Must have own transportation/clean driving record. Candidate must truly enjoy children and have the energy level to work with children! Previous experience a plus. I am willing to work around planned vacations/needed days off. Candidate will be asked to provide references and copy of transcript. If interested please call 232-2703 or send emails to halcin@lexmark.com. Idle Hour Country Club Staffing Full and Part Time Seasonal Positions. AM/PM, Weekends, Holidays Required. Servers, Bussers, Snack Bar, Receptionists, Housekeeping. Competitive Wages, Uniforms and Meals. Apply in Person TuesdaySunday. Immediate Interviews, 10am-9pm. No Phone Calls Please. 1815 Richmond Road, Lexington, KY 40502

NOW HIRING Greenbrier Country Club: Servers, Snack Bar, Bartenders & Cooks, call 293-6058 for info.

LEE WEBER GROUP, INC. Executive Healthcare Recruiting Firm. www.leewebergroup.com. Now hiring Part-time position: Internet Data Entry. Preferred Master’s Prepared, must be proficient on MS OFFICE (Do not apply if not proficient with MS Office), 15-20 hrs/wk. If interested please contact Lee Weber at: Email: lee@leewebergroup.com, Phone: 859-296-1112

Research Opportunities for Occasional (less than 4 to 5 times per month) Recreational Users of Opioids for Non-Medical Reasons. Researchers with the University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Department of Behavioral Science are conducting research to examine the effects of medications. All information obtained will be kept confidential. You may be eligible if you: are between 18 and 50 years of age; and have recreationally used opioids for non-medical reasons occasionally (less than 4 to 5 times per month) in the past year (for example OxyContin®, Lortab®, Vicodin® or morphine).

Electrical/Software Engineers needed! BS needed, but open to upcoming graduates. C/C++ & P.L.C. a must. Prefer industrial programming and microcontroller experience. Position requires occasional travel. Submit resumes to cris@forcedpotato.com.

BARTENDING! UP TO $250 a day. No exp. Necessary. Training provided. 800-965-6520 x-132

Professional Services Clean-Cut Movers! $25/HOUR! We make it EASY! www.WILDCATMOVING.com 859-948-3553 HONDA SERVICE AND REPAIR, ALPINE IMPORTS, SINCE 1980, NEXT TO WOODHILL MOVIES 10, CHECK US OUT AT CARTALK.COM UNDER FIND A GREAT MECHANIC 269-4411

Wanted

Wilson Landscape Supply is looking for Sales & Nursery people with plant interest. Flexible full- and part-time hours available. 2700 Palumbo Drive, 2695795 Still looking for summer work? Make over $2,600/month with FasTrac Training. Locations available in Nashville, Atlanta and Knoxville. For more information call Jeff @ 615-579-4513. Office/personal assistant for small company. Work 9-5 @ $9/hour. Occasional house sitting/animals. Send resume to 1707 Nicholasville Rd. Lexington, 40503 Columbia Steakhouse, 201 N. Limestone, now hiring servers for summer. Call 859-253-3135 Camp Counselors, male/female, needed for great overnight camps in the mountains of PA. Have fun while working with children outdoors. Positions still available – Unit Leaders, Director of Arts & Crafts, Tennis Instructor, Waterski Instructor, Office Asst. Apply on-line at www.pineforestcamp.com. Lex. Lawn & Landscape is looking for PT/Seasonal help. Go to www.lexlawnky.com to see job, requirements and apply.

Cash Paid for bad or unwanted laptops. Lexington area. Call 606-392-1399 or email csalister@yahoo.com Researchers are recruiting social drinkers with or without ADHD for studies concerning the effects of alcohol. Looking for Male and Female participants between 21-35 years of age. All participants are compensated for their time. Please call 257-5794.

Roommates Wanted Female Roommate needed! The Lex Apts for summer. Pool, workout room, media center, walk to UK. Rent Negotiable. Call 859-717-8231 $520/4BR. Need Roommate. All inclusive. 859-4558208 $619/2BR. Need Roommate. All inclusive. 859-4558208 Roommates wanted. Brand new. Student housing complex. 859-455-8208 1-2 Roommates Wanted for House in center of campus. garymiel@aol.com or 859-433-2692

Servers!!!! Ramsey's Diners now hiring for servers at all locations. Please apply in person. Earn Cash Today! Donate Plasma and earn up to $50 today and $300 in a month! www.cslplasma.com 1840 Oxford Circle, 859-2548047 or 817 Winchester Road, 859-233-9296. New or 6 month Inactive Donors bring this ad for $5 Extra!

Roommate Needed. Extremely nice. All utilities, Cable TV & Highspeed Internet included. Dennis @ 859-983-0726. www.sillsbrothers.com Female Roommate Wanted: Female Student a Must. 1BR for sub-lease, near UK. $375/month + utilities. Available immediately. 859-588-5757

Lost & Found

Part-time warehouse help close to campus. Great job for reliable college student with flexible schedule. Apply in person at 573 Angliana Ave. M-F 9-5.

Club Scientific Bluegrass is looking for Camp Counselors to work this summer. More info and applications on-line at www.clubscientificbluegrass.com.

Child Care Center is in need of Teaching Assistants to work afternoons this summer, 15-20 hours per week. Call 859-253-2273 for more information.

"Monkey Joe's”, Lexington's premier children's indoor entertainment center, is seeking FUN HIGHENERGY employees. Apply in person at 1850 Bryant Rd. Suite 120. Email kelly.vanmetre@monkeyjoes.com or call 264-0405 for more info.

Lord’s Legacy Ministries, a nonprofit that supports adults/children with disabilities, is hiring staff to work with our clients as mentors, $10/hour pay rate. Email resume to denise@lordslegacyministries.org.

Childcare/Nanny: Summer Help needed for 3 kids in our home. $9.00/hour. Good driving record and references required. 859-232-7944

Part-Time Operator Needed Immediately for Glenn Auto Mall. Computer experience needed (Word, Excel). Hours are Monday-Friday, 4:30-7:30, Saturday, 1:30-7:00 (summer hours may be extended). Please apply in person Monday - Friday at Glenn Nissan, 3360 Richmond Rd., Lexington, ask for Mischelle.

SUMMER INTERSHIPS available at the University Health Service in the health education department. For more information email Fadyia.Lowe@uky.edu or follow us on Twitter@UHSPAWS and Facebook!

Landscaping help needed. $8.50 to start. Immediate availability. P/T 8-12 or 12-4. Exprience preferred but not necessary. Must be available to work during summer. Please email resume and work history to: lawnshark04@aol.com. NO PHONE CALLS ! P/T Tutors and Instructors who can teach English language and school homework (math, science, history, etc.) to Japanese people whose ages range from pre-school to adults. Degrees required. Send resume to: Obunsha Bluegrass Academy, 2417 Regency Rd., Suite F, Lexington, KY 40503 or E-mail: KKuroki@aol.com Receptionist Needed, Part-Time. Flexible Hours. Apply at 860 S. Broadway. Wayne Michael Salon. Growing Together Preschool is hiring Full-Time and Part-Time Teachers’ Aides. Send resume’ to growingtp@aol.com Part-Time Sales Clerk Needed. Chevy Chase Hardware. 269-9611

Healthy Marijuana Users Needed for Behavioral Study. Researchers with the University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Department of Behavioral Science are recruiting healthy volunteers ages 1840 to participate in a research study to evaluate the behavioral effects of marijuana. Qualified volunteers will be paid for their participation. The study involves completion of 8 to 16 testing sessions and are run in a pleasant setting during daytime hours. Snacks, movies, video games and reading materials will be provided. Please call (859) 277-3799. Investigators will return your call to discuss eligibility. Or visit our website at http://rrf.research.uky.edu Lifeguards and Pool managers needed. PPM is hiring for clubs and waterparks in Lex, Lou and Richmond. $7.50 – $13.00/hour. Email brad40965@aol.com for application. PartTime-Front Office-Plastic Surgery, Tues-Thurs Only 8am-5pm, Mon-Weds-Fri Only 8am-5pm, Marketing or Communications majors preferred. Email résumé to info@multi-specialty.org STUDENTPAYOUTS.COM. Paid survey takers needed in Lexington. 100% FREE to join. Click on surveys. Work/Study & Earn at the same time. If you have a class schedule that permits & reliable transportation, you could work for Lifeline escorting our elderly clients to dr. visits, shopping, etc. CALL: Lifeline Homecare, Inc. 859-273-2708 or email: lhbadd@qx.net.

White Iphone 3 lost on campus. Reward if found. Contact Brad O'Neal at 636-399-2958 if found please. KEY LOST, March 26-27. Key is on a blue lanyard. Please call 502-876-4780. FOUND! Apartment Key on a lanyard, on campus. Please call 257-2871. Lost: Black & Green Flip Phone, Sony Ericsson. Email nro225@uky.edu Found: Beautiful silver and pearl earring on the sidewalk between Mines & Minerals and Hilary J. Boone Center. Call 859 229 7256 to describe and claim. FOUND- TI-84 plus calculator in room CB 207. Contact the Math department, 257-6802, to claim.

Travel Want to Learn to SKYDIVE?? Jumpingforfunskydiving.com or call 502-648-3464 BAHAMAS SPRING BREAK: $189 – 5 days or $239 – 7 days. All prices include round trip luxury cruise with food, accommodations on the island at your choice of thirteen resorts. Appalachia Travel 1-800867-5018, www.BahamaSun.com

The Kentucky Kernel is not responsible for information given to fraudulent parties. We encourage you not to participate in anything for which you have to pay an up-front fee or give out credit card or other personal information, and to report the company to us immediately.


110421 Kernel in Print  

The pages of the Kentucky Kernel for April 21, 2011

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