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Innovating the water cycle KWR Watercycle Research Institute dedicates its services to a well functioning water cycle, or, expressed in terms of research themes; to achieving healthy, sustainable, advanced and efficient water through optimal water management. These themes are echoed in many of the institute’s activities. They are central to the research vision of the joint research programme BTO and to KWR’s own Basic Research Programme. We strive for concrete societal innovation in and around the water cycle. This involves developing knowledge in collaboration with all relevant partners and effectively implementing this knowledge in the practice of water management. The result; healthy, sustainable, advanced and efficient water for everyone.

Contact Would you like to learn more about KWR Watercycle Research Institute? Then contact us:

Postal address KWR Watercycle Research Institute PO Box 1072 3430 BB Nieuwegein The Netherlands

T +31 (0)30 60 69 511 F +31 (0)30 60 61 165 E info@kwrwater.nl I www.kwrwater.nl Chamber of Commerce 27279653

Bridging science to practice in the water cycle


KWR Watercycle Research Institute:

• creates knowledge through first-rate research; • builds bridges between science, business and society; • promotes societal innovation by applying the best knowledge available.

Advanced Water The Advanced Water theme focuses on promising technological developments, with a view to making them usable for the water sector. This includes research into the development of new materials in fine chemicals and nanotechnology, ceramic membranes, resins for ion exchange, adsorption products, antiscalants, and developments in fluid dynamics, chemistry and physics, in addition to measurement techniques and sensoring (for example, for water quality or the condition of the infrastructure).

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Efficient Water KWR Watercycle Research offers its services to public and business clients in the water-use cycle throughout the world, but focuses on Europe as its home market. Formerly known as Kiwa Water Research, part of KIWA NV, KWR has been an independent entity since 2007. KWR’s shareholders are the publicly owned Dutch drinking water companies.

The Efficient Water theme is concerned with the efficient design of the water-use cycle, water & energy, and the effectiveness of knowledge productivity. This involves effective drinking water collection, production and distribution, and maximising efficiency in the production and attribution of all resources, from energy to knowledge.


Innovating the water cycle Water and the global hydrological cycle are essential for all life on earth. Too much water, or too little water of suitable quality, can have a drastic impact on people and the environ­ment. We need the appropriate knowledge and ability to organise and manage our use of water — the water cycle — optimally and provide two of life’s most basic needs: healthy and safe drinking water, and a pollution free environment. KWR Watercycle Research Institute assists society in meeting this challenge in three ways. First, we create outstanding knowledge and understanding through goal-oriented research, and we integrate it with the knowledge and experience that we draw from our extensive network. Second, we build bridges between science, business and society, thus bringing public and private organisations together. In close dialogue with these parties, we develop targeted, practically applicable solutions to water issues and, in so doing,

play our third role: contributing to concrete, social innovations in and around the water cycle. A business-like, cost-conscious approach is of primary importance to our clients. That is why we are constantly engaged in bringing parties together to develop an approach to water-related problems which focuses on the water-use cycle, while always considering the wider water system.

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A strong knowledge base 4

Among the 170 employees at KWR Watercycle Research Institute are specialists in a wide variety of aspects of the water cycle and water systems. These specialists are organised into three research groups: Water Systems, Water Technology and Water Quality & Health. Together, they create integrated solutions whenever possible – solutions that transcend individual fields of expertise. This integration is realised with the help of two teams that operate throughout all three research groups.

The Knowledge & Programme Manage­ment team provides program­­me management for a variety of collective research programmes, and offers the water world knowledge management advice, ranging from the formulation of visions and research questions, to the optimisation of knowledge development and application, and the anchoring of the acquired knowledge. The team also examines relevant social developments and their consequences for the water sector, conducts horizon scanning, and develops expertise on knowledge implementation and science system assessment. Contact: Jos Frijns jos.frijns@kwrwater.nl

The EU team sets up EU knowledgeintegrating research contracts for the whole of KWR, and also provides support for capacity development in new EU member states. The team shapes the organisational and connecting role that KWR plays within Europe. Contact: Theo van den Hoven theo.van.den.hoven@kwrwater.nl

Knowledge is a key factor in dealing successfully with our complex world


Water Systems Research Group The Water Systems Research Group focuses on the sustainable management of groundwater and surface water, as well as the natural environment. The scientists’ research range includes the impact of climate change and the feasibility of Nature Targets as formulated in European laws. The work is founded on a vision to harmonise water-use and the water-use cycle as sustainably as possible with the natural environment. The scientists work in four teams in the following areas:

Geohydrology, which concentrates on groundwater and soil quality, quantity, dynamics and technique. The researchers work to understand the effects of natural processes and human interventions in the underground water system on groundwater levels and quality. They build tools that help water managers to explain and predict these effects. Ecology, which centres on the relationship between environmental factors and the quality of the natural environment. The researchers develop models to explain and predict the effects of environmetal changes on biodiversity — particularly of plant communities. In this way, they make an important contribution to sustainable water management, promoting nature conservation and the restoration of the natural environment.

Integrated water management, which focuses on aquatic ecology and biological measurement methods, developments in groundwater and surface water quality, and the impact of climate change on water systems and their use. The team employs and develops geo-information and offers guidance and advice on the European Water Framework Directive. The aforementioned Knowledge & Programme Management team (p.4) is also part of the Water Systems Research Group. Contact: Michiel Hootsmans Head Water Systems Research Group michiel.hootsmans@kwrwater.nl

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KWR assisted partner Evides Industriewater, the company that realised the Demi Water Plant Botlek in Rotterdam.


Water Technology Research Group 7

In addition to water treatment and transport — of water, energy and substances — water reuse is becoming an increasingly important research subject for the Water Technology Research Group. The group’s activities vary from comparative studies and the optimisation of existing techniques, to the development of new and innovative techniques. The research group consists of four teams: Drinking water treatment, which focuses on themes such as removing ‘emerging contaminants’ (medicines, hormones etc), groundwater salinisation, and on objectives related to sustainability and efficiency. The team is experienced in a variety of areas, from membrane filtration to advanced oxidation, water softening, activated charcoal filtration and ion exchange. New research paths include modelling of the performance of treatment processes, and desalination of brackish water and seawater.

Water reuse is becoming increasingly important

Water infrastructure, which concentrates primarily on the drinking water distri­bu­ tion networks, including their design, suitability of materials, water quality during distribution, data recording — e.g. failure logging — modelling of demand patterns, and GIS techniques. Considering the high level of capital invested in infra­ structure, a great deal of attention is also paid to asset management. Moreover, the team works together with other research centres on sewer systems. Industry and Water and Wastewater and Reuse, which focuses on other parts of the water-use cycle. The team’s research and consultation assignments encompass applications such as demineralised water production, cooling water, steam boilers and wastewater. A central theme for the team concerns the profitable reuse of (waste)water — that is, both the reuse of the water itself in addition to the recovery of energy and valuable components, such as phosphate. Contact: Jos Boere Head Water Technology Research Group jos.boere@kwrwater.nl


Water Quality & Health Research Group The three teams and the two laboratories in this research group are concerned with the microbiological and chemical quality of water and its consequences for human health. They develop extremely sensitive measurement techniques for organisms and substances, which they employ to understand the fate of pathogens and so-called ‘emerging contaminants’ in the water cycle. The group also researches the effectiveness of efforts to improve water quality, and explores the risk represented to human health by the presence of pathogens and emerging contaminants in water. The teams in this research group comprise of:

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Chemical Water Quality and Health, which develops analytical-chemical methods, bioassays and sensors with the objective of broadly screening which substances are present in water, and in what quantity, and detecting the presence of specific substances. Team members develop their understanding of chemical processes in aquatic environments, and carry out health and hygiene assessments. They also work in close cooperation with our Materials Research and Chemical Analysis Laboratory.

Focus on human health

Microbiological Water Quality and Health, which conducts research into the risks of faecal contamination, the biological stability of water, and the prevention of micro-organism re-growth. Its research subjects include investigating emerging or opportunistic pathogens, (preventing) the spread of pathogens, risk assessments and analyzing data on the actual occurrence of illness. The team also works closely with the Microbiology Laboratory on DNA techniques and molecular methods. The Materials Research and Chemical Analysis Laboratory and the Microbiology Laboratory play an important role in research, metho­ do­logy development and implementation of methods at other water laboratories. In addition, they organise laboratoryevaluating collaborative studies as a quality assurance for Dutch water labora­ tories and perform materials research which is required for certification. The aforementioned EU team (p.4) is also part of the Water Systems Research Group. Contact: Annemarie van Wezel Head Water Quality & Health Research Group annemarie.van.wezel@kwrwater.nl


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Smart research for powerful practical solutions

Collective research programmes DPW, focussed on specific research requirements of the Dutch dune water companies Dunea, PWN and Waternet;

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KWR assists organisations and companies in the water cycle to get the most out of their research and their research investments. In carefully developed and thoroughly conducted research projects, we employ our own outstanding expertise and experience in conjunction with resources from our extensive, global knowledge network. From start to finish, KWR’s research projects benefit from solid knowledge management; from the formulation of the exact questions our research should answer to practical applications of the research results we obtain.

Collective research programmes can make an important contribution to the research’s output. It is with this in mind that KWR brings together organisations with similar research interests. Collective research programmes are developed in joint consultations, and KWR ensures their efficient coordination and implementation. This collective approach allows the optimal combination of existing experience and knowledge with new research results, leading to the development of powerful practical solutions. Contact: Gertjan Medema Chief Science Officer and chairperson of KWR’s Scientific Council gertjan.medema@kwrwater.nl

OPIW, the Industry & Water Research Programme for industrial water solutions – for industrial companies; Asellus, focussed on the integrated water cycle and (waste)water reuse for all partners in the water cycle.

Basic Research Programme KWR conducts it’s own Basic Research Programme: innovative, long-range research projects which are initiated and conducted by doctoral students and graduated researchers. The programme constitutes an important seedbed for KWR’s applied research programmes.

Publications In 2009 KWR Watercycle Research Institute issued 155 research reports, and published 80 articles in peerreviewed journals and professional journals, and 35 proceedings and book chapters.


KWR and BTO, the drinking water sector’s institutional memory 11

Research for water companies

BTO results

For more than 30 years KWR has been providing drinking water companies in the Netherlands and Flanders with the Joint Research Programme of the Water Sector (called the ‘BTO’). The companies jointly direct this research programme, which pursues the objectives of Healthy, Sustainable, Advanced and Efficient Water. In 2010, BTO research is made up of five component programmes: Microbiology, Chemical Water Quality, Source Risk Manage­ ment, Water Treatment and Water Distribution, all of which are strongly oriented toward practical applications. Currently, joint BTO research is being conducted at 91 different pilot locations within water companies. The transfer and application of knowledge are integrated into the research as much as possible, so that new knowledge can flow quickly through to water practice. In this way KWR and BTO constitute the drinking water sector’s institutional memory.

 ver the past few years, the Joint Research O Programme of the Water Sector, the BTO, has made significant contributions to: • the identification and removal of undesirable substances and microorganisms for drinking water supply; • the knowledge about possible effects of climate change on drinking water sources; • the development and implementation of new, safe water treatment methods, such as UV treatment and membrane filtration; • the optimal design and maintenance of underground water distribution networks and valves; • understanding the desires and choices of drinking water consumers.


Joining forces to increase strength Europe

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Everything revolves around water. Drinking water provision, sewer systems, and flood or drought protection are fundamental to protecting public health and main足 taining a well-functioning society. Water is essential for business and industry to meet their production and transportation requirements. A water cycle which operates optimally will always require knowledge from a broad range of scientific areas. KWR Watercycle Research Institute has built up an extensive network within the private sector, the public sector and the scientific community. It is this network which enables KWR to build bridges between different water cycle stakeholders. KWR creates platforms and partnerships which bring together the right knowledge and the right organisations in the right place. This is how efficient, integrated solutions to water problems are created, and this is how they are efficiently converted into tangible, practical results.

Water has little respect for national borders; the water cycle embraces the entire planet. KWR therefore does not limit itself to acting only on the Dutch stage, but operates worldwide, with Europe as its home market. Over the past few decades, KWR has acquired a strong position as initiator, coordinator and executor of collaborative research programmes, including several large, long-term research programmes of the European Union. Examples of these are the European projects TECHNEAU (Technology Enabled Universal Access to Safe Water) and PREPARED, which aims at developing innovative adaptive techno足logies and solutions for climate-proof drinking water production and wastewater treatment in urban environments.

Aqua Research Coalition (ARC) Many European research programmes and projects are carried out by consortia, within which companies, social organisations and scientific institutions collaborate for a period of time. This experience stimulated a desire for a more structured collaborative relationship. KWR therefore took the initiative to set up a European collaboration involving five leading research institutes working on the water-use cycle: SINTEF/NTU (Norway), IWW (Germany), CETAQUA (Spain), LNEC (Portugal) and KWR itself. These institutes dedicate themselves, within ARC, to the development of European research into the water-use cycle. Their aim is to collectively strengthen the knowledge basis for all water cycle stakeholders by facilitating research, supporting the implementation of knowledge, and making information available for the construction of the knowledge infrastructure in other member states.


The International Water Association (IWA) — The worldwide network of water sector professionals.

The Water Supply and Sanitation Technology Platform (WSSTP) —

HeliXeR — A (Dutch) collaboration directed at the development of innovative consumer products in the area of water and lifestyle.

Which was established by the EU to strengthen coordination and collaboration in the European water industry, and to set the strategic research agenda.

In addition to ARC, KWR Watercycle Research Institute is connected, amongst others, to: The Global Water Research Coalition (GWRC) —

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Dutch Water Sector Intelligence (DWSI) — A network within which a variety of water sector organisations in the Netherlands combine forces to identify and analyse trends in the water market and the water cycle. KWR is moreover responsible for the coordination of DWSI and compiling and disseminating trend alerts.

A global collaboration involving 14 water research institutes.

Wetsus — The (Dutch) Centre of Excellence for Sustainable Water Technology. KWR and BTO conduct joint research with Wetsus on advanced cleanwater technology, sensoring, water distribution and risk management of water sources.


Research themes KWR’s long-term research policy is governed by four core themes: Healthy, Sustainable, Advanced and Efficient Water. Healthy Water The Healthy Water theme centres on the relationship between human health and water quality; in (drinking) water sources, in treatment processes, in the distribu­ tion network, at the customers tap, or in natural bathing water. This involves paying close attention to pathogens and to emerging contaminants such as medicines and industrial pollution in the aqueous environment. The research is directed at studying the effectiveness of barriers against such pollution in the water cycle. 14

Sustainable Water The Sustainable Water theme concentrates on production, distribution and waste treatment processes which are developed to use raw materials and energy more sustainably, as a response to climate change, growing energy use and urbanisation. This encompasses research into the use of brackish groundwater or seawater as alternative drinking water sources, water reuse or a more decentralised wateruse cycle, cold-heat storage and ways of dealing with extremely low water levels in large rivers.


KWR Watercycle Research Institute:

• creates knowledge through first-rate research; • builds bridges between science, business and society; • promotes societal innovation by applying the best knowledge available.

Advanced Water The Advanced Water theme focuses on promising technological developments, with a view to making them usable for the water sector. This includes research into the development of new materials in fine chemicals and nanotechnology, ceramic membranes, resins for ion exchange, adsorption products, antiscalants, and developments in fluid dynamics, chemistry and physics, in addition to measurement techniques and sensoring (for example, for water quality or the condition of the infrastructure).

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Efficient Water KWR Watercycle Research offers its services to public and business clients in the water-use cycle throughout the world, but focuses on Europe as its home market. Formerly known as Kiwa Water Research, part of KIWA NV, KWR has been an independent entity since 2007. KWR’s shareholders are the publicly owned Dutch drinking water companies.

The Efficient Water theme is concerned with the efficient design of the water-use cycle, water & energy, and the effectiveness of knowledge productivity. This involves effective drinking water collection, production and distribution, and maximising efficiency in the production and attribution of all resources, from energy to knowledge.


Innovating the water cycle KWR Watercycle Research Institute dedicates its services to a well functioning water cycle, or, expressed in terms of research themes; to achieving healthy, sustainable, advanced and efficient water through optimal water management. These themes are echoed in many of the institute’s activities. They are central to the research vision of the joint research programme BTO and to KWR’s own Basic Research Programme. We strive for concrete societal innovation in and around the water cycle. This involves developing knowledge in collaboration with all relevant partners and effectively implementing this knowledge in the practice of water management. The result; healthy, sustainable, advanced and efficient water for everyone.

Contact Would you like to learn more about KWR Watercycle Research Institute? Then contact us:

Postal address KWR Watercycle Research Institute PO Box 1072 3430 BB Nieuwegein The Netherlands

T +31 (0)30 60 69 511 F +31 (0)30 60 61 165 E info@kwrwater.nl I www.kwrwater.nl Chamber of Commerce 27279653

Bridging science to practice in the water cycle


KWR Water - Corporate brochure 2010