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BOB AND ROBERTA SMITH


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BOB & ROBERTA SMITH

Kusseneers Gallery – rue de Menin / Menenstraat 10, 1080 Brussels, Belgium – www.kusseneers.com

© Bob & roberta smith, Kusseneers gallery © all rights reserved. no part of this book may be reproduced in any form by any electronic or mechanical means (including photocopying) without permission in writing from the publisher.


Bob and roberta smith is the pseudonym of the artist Patrick Brill. Born in london, he studied at the university of reading from (1981-1985) and Goldsmiths College (1991). He trained as a sign painter in new york and uses text as an art form, creating colourful slogans on banners and placards that challenge elitism and advocate the importance of creativity in politics and education. His best known works are Make Art Not War (1997) and Letter to Michael Gove (2011), a letter to the uK secretary of state for education reprimanding him for the “destruction of Britain’s ability to draw, design and sing”. His curatorial projects include Art U Need: An Outdoor Revolution, which transformed public spaces in the Thames Gateway (20052006), and Peace Camp at The Brick lane Gallery (2006), an exploration of artists’ perceptions of peace. a regular speaker at conferences and symposia, he initiated the arts’ Party Conference 2013, a forum for artists and organisations to debate the role of art and design in schools. as well as hosting a radio show called Make your Own Damn Music on resonance FM, Bob and roberta smith is a writer and musician, often performing with the Ken Brasley Playboy band. In 2009, he was appointed as a Tate Trustee and he is currently associate Professor at the sir John Cass Faculty of art, architecture and Design at london Metropolitan university.

Bob and roberta smith on the booth of Kusseneers gallery at The solo Project, art fair in Basel, 2008

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Bob and roberta smith’s work cannot be reduced to one genre, he is an artist, activist and teacher. His work often takes the shape of hobbies; music, cooking or DIy which is then combined with a subversive humor. One aspect of humor in his work is quite serious, like most humor it has to do with humiliation, with things that go a little bit wrong. Bob and roberta smith attempt to demolish established values and respected authorities and like most humor it is to do with humiliation. Much of the work manifests itself in performance, with strong ideas of participation or of the participatory positions similar to those used by the Fluxus in the 1960’s. He sees art as an important element in democratic life. His work exposes the British underbelly, the man on the street, the woman ignored, the angry, the mute and misunderstood. In Bob’s work art and life are blurred, he believes in art and Democracy and provokes the Public.

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Bob and roberta smit, sitting in his sculpture The Live Forever Windmill For Eternal Life on the booth of Kusseneers gallery at The solo Project, art fair in Basel, 2008


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The Captains Journal of the Voyage of the Human Being, 2007, signwriters paint on recycled wood, dimensions variable


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installing the sculpture The Captains Journal of the Voyage of the Human Being, 2007, signwriters paint on recycled wood, dimensions variable, at Kusseneers gallery, antwerp


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The Captains Journal of the Voyage of the Human Being, detail

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The Captains Journal of the Voyage of the Human Being, detail


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performance with Clarina at the opening of The Captains Journal of the Voyage of the Human Being at Kusseneers gallery, antwerp


Bob and Clarina, preparing the performance on the occasion of the opening of the exhibition at Kusseneers gallery, antwerp, 2007

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installation view of the show The Captains Journal of the Voyage of the Human Being, 2007, at Kusseneers gallery, antwerp


installation view of the sculpture The Captains Journal of the Voyage of the Human Being, 2007, signwriters paint on recycled wood, dimensions variable, at Kusseneers gallery, antwerp

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I Believe in Martin Luther King, 2003, enamel on panel and lightbulbs, 124 x 124 x 5,5 cm / 48.8 x 48.8 x 2.2 in


I go to the Dimentia - Day Center, 2007, enamel on recylcled wood, dimensions variable, 7 parts

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installation view at Kusseneers gallery antwerp, 2007


Lunchtime, 2006, 2 deckchairs and a concrete bowl, installation view at Kusseneers gallery antwerp, 2007

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British contemporary artist Bob and roberta smith (b. 1963, london), one artist despite the dual identity - aka Patrick Brill, is famous for his political, often humorous and empowering artworks. smith graduated with an MFa from Goldsmith College, london, in 1993 and shortly thereafter chose his pseudonym. smith works with different media including collage, installation and performance, but he is mostly famous for his sign paintings that involve comic yet thoughtful and politically provocative texts. The artist self professed his interest in the idea of 'green-ink letters', (an english expression referring to supposed letters expressing eccentric views, sometimes considered inspired by paranoia or hallucination), and he explores the notion of short anonymous tongue-in-cheek sentences that he paints on wood, cardboard, canvas and various other materials. His writings explore the relationship between art, politics, society and humour in order to constantly question the viewer's approach to everyday things. Most importantly, however, smith attempts to empower the spectator. surrounding his signature pieces that feature his own or quoted fragments of various text is a large body of work that allows anyone to participate: a temporary art school teaching tonality and expression, an opportunity to dress up as Hannah arendt – a great influence on smith’s thinking – an invitation to copy, paste and resend his open letter to the British education secretary Michael Gove.

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Bob and roberta smith have had numerous solo exhibitions at prestigious institutions including at the Hayward Gallery, london; the Whitechapel Gallery, london; Pierogi, new york; and Galleria Carbone.to, Torino. selected group shows include Tate Britain, london; Hayward Gallery, london; serpentine Gallery, london; Tate liverpool, liverpool; CCaC, san Francisco; national Gallery, Copenhagen; and CIMa Gallery, Calcutta. smith's work can be found in public and private collections including the Tate Collection, uK arts Council Collection and uK British Council Collection. In 2009, a sculpture by Bob and roberta smith was shortlisted for the Fourth Plinth exhibition in london’s Trafalgar square; in 2008, Bob and roberta smith’s Christmas Tree was exhibited in the hall of Tate Britain, london.


installation view at Kusseneers gallery antwerp, 2007

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installation view ‘a Monument for Harry Farr’ at Kusseneers gallery antwerp, 2009

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ever heard of the leytonstone Centre for Contemporary art? It's actually a shed, and it's in the back garden of artist Bob and roberta smith. These days, it's full of cobwebs and

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leytonstone Centre for Contemporary art, uK

intruding tendrils, but we're told that it once had an international reputation, and even went on tour to the serpentine Gallery.


studio view, london, 2008

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left page: Diary Page 1 January 2007. My Grandad George was buried alive in World War1, 2007, signwriters paint on recycled wood + small airplane sculpture 260 x 254 cm (5 parts) right page: detail of the installation

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detail of the installation Diary Page: 1 January 2007. My Grandad George was buried alive in World War1 33


Interview by Sean O'Hagan sunday 23 august 2015 10.45 BsT Patrick Brill, better known as Bob and roberta smith, is a contemporary artist whose ‘slogan’ paintings blend the creative and the political. In 2005 he curated the successful Art U Need project, which brought captivating pieces to the streets of essex, before co-founding The Art Party, a vehicle for promoting art in school and public life. You have curated an exhibition, ‘Art for All’, at Yorkshire Sculpture Park, for which you delved into the National Arts Education Archive. Did you uncover any surprises? Well, it [the archive] starts with sir Joshua reynolds, who set up the royal academy, an enlightenment project that was the first formalised art school in Britain. It was only after the second world war, though, that art education got going. you suddenly have really progressive projects like the ‘Child art Movement’ which had a vision of children’s self-expression as a kind of answer to the destruction of the war. Then, in the 1960s, there’s a rethinking of art education with artists like Victor Pasmore being involved in the creation of the first foundation course. That’s really where the modernisation of art education begins and art finally gains a standing with other subjects. It’s a journey worth retracing, particularly with what is happening right now. Your message is that art education is now threatened, not just by government cuts but by an unspoken ideology that suggests art is not really important to a nation’s economic and social wellbeing? yes, and, this is not a new way of thinking. It started in the 80s with Kenneth Baker [education secretary under Margaret Thatcher, 1986-1989], who didn’t want art in his national curriculum but was persuaded that it could be graded accurately not as a voice for self-expression but as a set of skills. I want us to re-engage with that postwar consensus that we need to expand creativity and who gets involved in it. The Tories think that silly notion is history now. Politicians don’t seem to even understand the basic importance of something like design and how it underpins production. It’s crazy, and, to be honest, labour is not much better. That Tristram Hunt is pretty awful. Is this a particularly English way of thinking about art? I guess so. The deep philistinism and scepticism towards art that I am talking about does seem peculiarly english, and it has come back with a 34

vengeance under the Tories. In my book, the arts are not just important in themselves but fundamental to democracy. Kids need to think about ideas. If you teach them self-expression, you are adding to democracy. Why do you think oppressive regimes always try to censor art and lock up artists? You stood against Michael Gove in the last general election. Only 273 people voted for you. Was it worth it? yes. I stood against Gove, not because I wanted to demonise him but because I wanted a public conversation with him about the importance of art education. so, in terms of highlighting my cause, it was pretty successful. You met him on the hustings. Was there any spark of chemistry between you? I hate to say this but I rather liked him as a person. as a character, there is something sympathetic about him. He’s pretty human compared to the likes of Osborne. I do think Michael Gove is also stuck with a demeanour which is quite quirky and peculiar. He’s a bit Kenneth Williams, who was funny and eccentric but also very rightwing. On election night everyone was crowing at the Tory victory but I sensed that he seemed rather alone somehow. He may have ruined art education but, as a person, he is not a hateful figure. Has your election experience made you think differently about how you make art? yes. I think of artworks as campaigns, now [laughs]. I’d like to start a campaign to emphasise how important art is, individually and collectively, to the fabric of our lives. Free access to museums and art galleries is important but not the only measure of how we understand and engage with art. People are immersed in the arts whether they understand it or not. you can’t live in a house without encountering some notion of architecture. Your parents were both painters and your father, Frederick Brill, became head of Chelsea School of Art. How much of your commitment to art and art education comes from them? Well, my dad went with Henry Moore to lobby Margaret Thatcher when she was education minister in the 70s. It’s a cliche but I wouldn’t be where I am as an artist if he and my mother had not gone on their journeys into art. That generation belonged to a more democratic time when, if you were good, you were offered the opportunity of an extended education. My parents took that opportunity and thrived on it. now we are fast


approaching a time when there will not be any kids with estuary accents in art schools. It’s bad for art and it’s bad for democracy. You are referred to in the press as a “slogan artist” or a “political artist”. Do you find those terms reductive? I don’t mind them, not least because so few contemporary artists engage with politics on any level. I don’t regard myself as a political activist because I’m not as committed as true activists tend to be. I’m just angry about the constant assault on the arts and the destruction of education. I can be a bore on this issue but think its so incredibly important. you can’t stand back as an artist and not engage with it. Why do you think so many contemporary artists do exactly that? That’s an interesting question. you have the likes of Mark Wallinger and Jeremy Deller, who are politically engaged, and anish Kapoor cancelled a show in China when ai Weiwei was locked up, so there is a desire by some artists to address political issues. But the rise of the art market and the commercial art world in the past few decades seemed to erode political engagement – oligarchs don’t want to buy art that says that they are crap [laughs]. The yBas bought into all that. That lot shifted the democracy of who was making art by embracing wholeheartedly the commerciality of the market. I think we are all a bit sickened by that now.

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You come across as quite a colourful, almost eccentric, character. How much does humour play a part in what you do? Colour and humour go together for me and both are immensely important. They make the work more human and fallible, though some would argue that the humour takes the edge off the work and the political engagement. But I’m not interested in making big, cast-iron statements. For me, it’s all a big, continuous conversation, so you have to have humour in there. like life, really. You used to collaborate with your sister, Roberta, hence your pseudonym. Did she really once say of your art: “All you do is paint the first thing that comes into your head on bits of old floorboard, and you can’t even spell”? alas, yes [laughs]. she defined absolutely what I do in that statement. That said, I think she is sneakily quite supportive of what I do, especially the political stuff. Proud would be going too far, but supportive, yes.

Art for All is at yorkshire sculpture Park, Wakefield until 3 January 2016


installation view of the exhibition ‘the proof of the pudding (is in the eating)’ at Kusseneers gallery, Brussels, april/May 2015

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installation view of the exhibition ‘a Monument for Harry Farr’ at Kusseneers gallery, antwerp, 2009

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Prison Sentences Not Bonuses, 2009, signwriters enamel on found object, 79 x 54 cm


Join The Mexican Wave signwriters enamel on recycled timberwood 2007, 106 x 45 cm

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Don’t Believe in Yourself, signwriters enamel on recycled timberwood, 2009


view of the exhibition A Monument for Harry Farr at Kusseneers gallery, antwerp, 2009

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left page: I Can’t Be Arsed signwriters enamel on recycled timberwood

right page: Because I’m Not Worth It signwriters enamel on recycled timberwood 2009

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installation view of the exhibition ‘a Monument for Harry Farr’ at Kusseneers gallery, antwerp, 2009

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Thought Examination, Mme Lin Ye Qun, 2008, cold painted bronze , 50 x 30 x 24 cm, unique piece

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Thought Examination, Wang Guang-mei (Liu Shaeo-chi’s wife), 2008, cold painted bronze , 39 x 36 x 26 cm, unique piece

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right page Diary Page: 24 December 2005, I Phoned Up The Guy At The Gallery, 2007, signwriters enamel on recycled timberwood, 128 x 325 cm left page: Diary Page: 4 February 2007 – Roberta, My Sister Phoned , enamel paint on recycled timberwood, 2008, 220 w 236 cm

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installation view Diary Page: 24 December 2005, I Phoned Up The Guy At The Gallery, 2007, signwriters enamel on recycled timberwood, 128 x 325 cm, at The Temporary Gallery, Cologne


The Images from Picasso’s Mobile Phone, 2008, signwriters enamel and collage on recycled timberwood

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Alphabet Forward & Backward, signwriters enamel on recycled timberwood, 2 pieces, 2009, 149 x 140 cm + 140 x 140 cm

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Grow Lavender, signwriters enamel on recycled timberwood, 2009, 140 x 195 cm


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Laat De Engelse Dartford Crossing De Weg Wijzen, signwriters enamel on recycled timberwood, 2009, 100 x 87 cm


Laat Ons Een Berg Bouwen Voor Antwerpen, signwriters enamel on recycled timberwood, 2009, 91 x 87 cm

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Bad people are demanding, signwriters enamel on recycled timberwood, 36 x 53 cm

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Make Your Own Electricity, signwriters enamel on estate agents board, 2008, 61 x 80 cm


Make Your Own X-mas, , signwriters enamel on estate agents board, 2008, 61 x 80 cm

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Make Your Own Power, , signwriters enamel on estate agents board, 2008, 61 x 80 cm


Make Your Own Pleasure, signwriters enamel on estate agents board, 2008, 61 x 80 cm

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The Live Forever Windmill For Eternal Life, 2008, signwriterspaint on wood + 1 chair, 250 x 102 x 102 cm

Bob and roberta smith, sitting in his sculpture The Live Forever Windmill For Eternal Life on the booth of Kusseneers gallery at The solo Project, art fair in Basel, 2008

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Bob and roberta smith, sitting in his sculpture The Live Forever Windmill For Eternal Life on the booth of Kusseneers gallery at The solo Project, art fair in Basel, 2008

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The Captains Journal of the Voyage of the Human Being, signwriters paint on recycled wood, dimensions variable, performance with leigh Clarke at the Museum of Breda, 2007

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installation view of The Captains Journal of the Voyage of the Human Being, 2007, signwriters paint on recycled wood, dimensions variable, at the Museum of Breda, 2007

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The Captains Journal of the Voyage of the Human Being, signwriters paint on recycled wood, dimensions variable, performance with leigh Clarke at the Museum of Breda, 2007


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The Captains Journal of the Voyage of the Human Being, signwriters paint on recycled wood, dimensions variable, performance with leigh Clarke at the Museum of Breda, 2007


Selected Solo Exhibitions 2016 upcoming (Jan. 14 - Febr. 27) Kusseneers gallery, Brussels 2015-16 Art is your human right, William Morris Gallery, lloyd Park, london Art for All, yorkshire sculpture Park, Wakefiels, uK (until Jan. 3,2016) 2015 Von Bartha, switzerland 2014-15 Art Amnesty, MoMa – Ps1, long Island City, ny 2013 Plymouth arts Centre, Plymouth, uK Bobumenta - Kilkenny arts Festival, uK – aug. 2013 solo at The Butler Gallery / as part of the Kilkenny arts Festival, uK 2012 Hales Gallery, london, uK 2011 The Art Party (Gotham Golem at The Boiler, Pierogi Gallery, new york nov / Dec, 2011 & Jan, 2012 2009 Altermodern, Tate Triennial exhibition, Tate Britain, london 2010 Hales Gallery, london, uK 2008 Tate Christmas Tree, Tate Britain, london, uK Fourth Plint, The national Gallery, london (8) Hales gallery, london, uK royal academy of arts, london, uK 2007 The Captains Journal of the Voyage of the Human Being, Kusseneers gallery, antwerp, Be Peer Gallery, london, uK Cesane Manzo Gallery, rome, IT Peace Camp, The Brick lane Gallery, london 2005/06 The Beautiful Poetry of Bob and Roberta Smith, Hales Gallery, london Should I Stay Or Should I Go? Dilemmas For Margate, Turner Cont., Margate, uK Make Your Own Damn Art, stanley Picker Gallery, Kingston, uK 2004 Help Build The Ruins of Democracy, The Baltic 2003 The Mobile Reality Creator, Compton Verney 2002 Its not easy being a famous Artist, Galerie Praz Delavallade, Paris, France Useless men and Stupid Women, anthony Wilkinson Gallery, london Bunch of Cowards, Collective Gallery, edinburgh, uK The New York Art Amnesty, Pierogi 2000, new york, usa The Art Amnesty, Deptford X, london, uK 2001 Make Me a Sandwich, richard Heller Gallery, l.a. Suburbs Are the New Center - Create your Own reality, Carbone.to, Torino, IT Unfortunate, Bob smith hosts the search for the worst artwork in Britian, Whitechapel art Gallery, london, uK 2000 26 Instructions, Turnaround at the Hayward, Hayward Gallery, london le ecole Burrows & Bob smith, Galerie Praz-Delavallade, Paris, France (David Burrows & Bob and roberta smith Two Person show) 1999 anthony Wilkinson Gallery, london, uK Improve the Cat, Galleria Carbone, Torino, Italy Silent Video, Virgin Mega store, london, uK 1998 Pierogi 2000, new york, usa 1997 Don't Hate Sculpt, Chisenhale Gallery, london, uK 82

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arnolfini Gallery, Bristol, uK Flawed, anthony Wilkinson Fine art, london, uK Another Disappointment, anthony Wilkinson Fine art, london The Man Whose Head Expanded, Cooper union school of arts & science, new york, usa Damn The Begrudgers, Center 181, london, uK

Selected Group Shows 2012 The Crisis Commission, somerset House, london Fourth Plinth: Contemporary Monument, Institute of Contemporary art (ICa), london, uK Paul Thek, ZKM/Museum of Contemporary art, Karlsruhe, Germany Prinzip Baustelle / Men at Work, Gabriele senn Galerie, Vienna 2010 State Your Business, lokaal 01 Breda, The netherlands 2009-10 Niet Normaal, Beurs van Berlage, amsterdam, The netherlands 2006 Centre of the Creative Universe: Liverpool and the Avant-Garde, Tate liverpool Peace Camp, Brick lane Gallery, london, uK Hearing Voices, Seeing Things, serpentine Gallery, london, uK 2005 Brit Povera, Gallery Krinzinger, austria Only a minute to live, Temporary Contemporary, curated by Klega Cell Project Space Show, curated by richard Priestley Comedy, touring around the usa Recent Developments in Sound Art, Touring Summer Daze, south london Gallery Chronic Epoch, Beaconsfield To and From, Metropole Gallery, Folkstone 2004 Plazasuite, union Gallery, london, uK Tonight, studio Voltaire Master Blaster, Ode to anti social aethetics, BarD Collage, ny Time on Your Hands, standpoint Gallery, london Voodoo Shit, Hales Gallery, london, uK 2003 Chocker Fucking Blocked, Jeffery Charles Gallery, london. Thatcher, Blue Gallery, london, uK The Breman Conference, in association with GaK, Bremen, Germany Independence, south london Gallery, london, uK Kick it till it hurts, VTO Gallery, Manchester, uK Bag Lady, Cell Project space, london, uK Franz West and Friends, austrian Cultural Forum, london. The souls of men that God made different, Comme Ca Gallery, Manchester, uK 2002 Sidewinder, CIMa Gallery, Calcutta, India Sitting Tenants, lotta Hammer Gallery, london, uK Air Guitar, Milton Keynes Gallery of Contemporary art, london, uK The Music In Me, GaK, Bremen, Germany Art after Art, neues Museum Weserburg, Bremen, Germany 2001 Artists World, CCaC, san Francisco The Other Britain, Tecla sala, Hospitalat, Barcelona, spain


Record Collection, VTO Gallery and International 3, Manchester, uK 12 Internet Projects, commisioned by the BBC, The lux Center, london, uK Death, The round House, Camden, london, uK Duo's Transmission, Glasgow, uK Big Blue at Century City, Tate Modern, london, uK City Racing: A Partial View, london, uK.2001 2000-01 Landscape, British Council, aCC Galerie, Weimar, Germany; Centro Cultural del Conde Duque, Madrid, spain 2000 British Art-Installation, Diehl Vorderwuelbecke Galerie, Berlin, Germany Waiting, curated by lotta Hammer, Mjellby Konstgard, sweden Intelligence - New British Art 2000, Tate Gallery, Millbank, london, uK Cheated, a22 Projects, london, uK Insanity Benefit, Vilma Gold, london, uK 3 Rooms - Outside Project, left is the new right, anthony Wilkinson Gallery, london, uK 1999 My Old Man Said Follow the Van, rosemary Branch, london. East Wing Collection, Courtauld Institute, london, uK Limitless, Galerie Krinzinger, Vienna, austria My Eye Hurts, Thread Waxing space, new york & Green room, Manchester, uK Museum Magogo, Glasgow Project space, uK PeaCe, Migros Museum, Zurich, CH ÂŁ4.99 Sculptures, Museum of Installation at Deptford X, Deptford, uK Stop it write now, Museum of Modern art, Oslo, norway 1998 Beige & Sneakers, Buro Freidrich, Berlin, Germany. Host, Tramway Gallery, Glasgow, uK 1998 Some English Aristocracy, Collective Gallery, edinburgh, uK W139 Gallery, amsterdam, Holland A to Z, The approach, london, uK Camouflage 2000, Galerie Praz-Delavallade, Paris, France Mise En Scene, Grazer Kunstverein, Graz, austria Do All Oceans Have Walls, Kunstlerhaus, Bremen, Germany 1997 Bring Your Own Walkman, W139, amsterdam, Holland Gym 97, Conductors Hallway, london, uK lotta Hammer Gallery, london, uK Shit Sculptures, Gramercy art Fair, new york, usa Urban Legends, staatliche Kunsthalle, Baden Baden, Germany One Night Stands, The Gallery, norwich school of art, norwich, uK 1996 experiment GB, Trier & Hannover, Germany Escape Attempts, Christiania, Copenhagen, Denmark Electronic Undercurrents - art & Video in europe, national Gallery, Copenhagen, Denmark atopic site, Tokyo Big site, Tokyo, Japan Bank TV, Bank, london, uK Try, royal College of art, london, uK unpop, anthony Wilkinson Fine art, london, uK 84

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Hit & Run, The Ministry of sound, london, uK Hard Work, union street Gallery, london, uK Couldn't Get Ahead, Independent art space, london, uK Gang Warfare, Independent art space, london, uK Sarah Staton's Supastore, Middlesborough, uK Lost Property, W139 amsterdam, Holland; Great Western studios, london, uK Karaoke, south london art Gallery, london, uK Potato, Transmission Gallery, Glasgow, uK Wish You Were Here, Burbage House, Curtain road, london Whitechapel Open, Whitechapel art Gallery, london, uK New Contemporaries, Camden arts Centre, london, uK Candyman II, Tower Bridge Business Complex, london Somethings Wrong, The Tannery, london, uK Imprint, City racing, london, uK The Pet Show, union street Gallery, london, uK BISK, The Jam Factory, Bermondsey, london, uK Whitechapel Open, Whitechapel art Gallery, london, uK Young Contemporaries, ICa, london, uK Northern Young Contemporaries, london, uK

Projects 2015 installation art for all at the yorkshire sculpture Park 2005 included in the Me Generation, C4 TV programme about portraiture presented by Matthew Collings Gigs with the Ken ardley Playboys at The Baltic, the serpentine and MIMa 2004 Make your own damn art, book published by Black Dog Press Help Build the ruins of Democracy, DVD produced by the Baltic 2001 a is for Book, Book Project published by Imprint Gallery, london, uK The Ken ardley Playboys second album City of Westminster, released 1996 The Ken ardley Playboy's, We've got Ken, CD, lucky Garage record. The Ken ardley Playboy's, eni Fing to be Faumus, released 1995 Zapp Magazine The Ken ardley Playboy's single Thats it, released Curated unpop, anthony Wilkinson Fine art, london, uK 1994 Featured a real Work of art, Matthew Collings Film The late show BBC2 Curated somethings Wrong, The Tannery, london, uK Formed Ken ardley Playboys with Victor Mount

Education 2011 Honorary Fellows of arts university College Bournemouth 1991-93 Ma Fine art, Goldsmith’s College, london 1981-85 university of reading, Ba (First Class Hons) Fine art


Bob & roberta smith was born on Februari 3rd, 1963 in london he lives and works in london and ramsgate Bob and roberta smith is actually one man. Before studying Fine art at Goldsmiths in the early 1990’s, Bob lived in rome, new york and Wensleydale, and now lives between leytonstone in east london and ramsgate. He was an artist Trustee of Tate between 2009 and 2013, and he is currently a trustee for the national Campaign for the arts, and a patron of the nseaD. He has recently been elected to be a royal academician.

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Bob & Roberta Smith  
Bob & Roberta Smith  

Kusseneers gallery - Brussels

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