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VOLUME TWO // ISSUE TWO

IN CUE KICKIN’ OUT THE JAMS SINCE 1945

APRIL TEN, TWENTY-TWELVE

APRIL TENTH, TWENTY-TWELVE

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What a hell of a ride, right?

STAFF Anthony Saia, Station Manager Kentaro Murai, Program Director Ethan Arave, Music Director Nick McGarvey, Production Director Dylan Brown, News Director

CONTRIBUTORS Nae Hakala Brian Hakala Ted Kelchner Andria Marcussen Ethan Arave Anthony Saia

PHOTOGRAPHER Kentaro Murai

DESIGNER Anthony Saia

It has been an honor and a pleasure to practically eat, sleep, breathe and live KUOI 89.3 FM for the past couple of years. As I head out the door and another station manager comes through those doors, I hope that all of those that have participated, volunteered and listened have enjoyed everything that KUOI has to offer. It has been our mission to provide the University community with a wide array of music that doesn’t typically get played on commercial radio. That being said, it has also been a pleasure to bring Vandal sports broadcasts back to KUOI, as we have covered Vandal football as well as men and women’s basketball. In addition, we’ve re-established a relationship with the student newspaper The Argonaut to bring you continuous news coverage every Monday, Wednesday and Friday, a feat some of us weren’t sure was possible, only to take it further, including a new bi-weekly sports show 4th & Downtown. For me it is over – to some of you, it’s just the beginning of your journey at UI. If I had to imbue any words of advice, it’d be this: Turn on, Tune in and stay in school kids. See you around.

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WHAT’S INSIDE PHOTO BY ANTHONY SAIA

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AND AND AND: AN INTERVIEW WITH NAE of COMMON PEOPLE

THROUGH THE LENS: KENTARO MURAI’S PHOTOS FROM TREEFORT FESTIVAL

DOUBLE THE ALBUMS, DOUBLE THE HEARTACHE: HOW THE HORSE THIEVES CAME TO BE

WITCH MOUNTAIN: PORTLAND’S ORIGINAL DOOM BAND An Interview With Confinement Loaf

IN REVIEW: ODD FUTURE WOLF GANG KILL THEM ALL OF Mixtape Vol. 2

APRIL TENTH, TWENTY-TWELVE

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AND AND AND: AN INTERVIEW WITH NAE OF COMMON PEOPLE Formed in 2009, And And And have increasingly grown in popularity, especially in the Northwest indie music scene. Nae of KUOI’s Common People had the privilege of interviewing these hilarious musicians at around 3:00pm on Saturday at Treefort Music Festival in Boise, Idaho. So, obviously, some members were already a little tipsy. The  guys  often  talked   over  one  another  with   great  energy  and   enthusiasm  (the  kind   you  find  in  crushed  up   No  Doz).     Berg  Radin,  called   Baby,  seemed  to  take  the   reigns  of  much  of  the   interview  and  gave   distinct,  humorous   interjections.  The  rest  of   the  group  spoke  over   and  in-­‐between  one   another,  creating  an   unforgettable  tapestry  of   what  one  would  hope  to   experience  being  on  tour   with  such  fun  guys.     Nae:  How  did  you  get   your  band  name  and   how  did  you  guys  meet?     AAA:  It  was  a  stuttering   competition.    No,  we  got   our  band  name  because   Nathan  let  his  ex   girlfriend  name  our   band.  But  it’s  from  that   movie  The  Commitments   and  we  were  having  a   hell  of  a  time  coming  up  

with  a  name…     What’s  the  line?  It’s  like,   “That’s the  worst  band   name  ever.  And  they   were  saying  you’ll  never   go  anywhere.     It’s  from  a  bad  movie,   that’s  the  answer.   Nae:  How  would  you   describe  your  sound?     AAA:  Wild  Basement  Pop.     or  gangster  pop…   Gangster  wild  basement   pop.     Nae:  For  each  of  you,   what  would  you  say  are   your  major  influences?     AAA:  Honestly,  mine  is   Nathan.  Mine’s  actually   Nathan,  too.  Mine’s  Raf   from  the  Woolen  Men  in   Portland…and  a  little  ICP   thrown  in  there  too.   My  main  influence  over   the  last  few  years  has   definitely  been  Nick   Delffs  from  Death  Songs   formerly  from  Shaky   Hands.  

Definitely  more  local,   people  that  we  know   …Archers  have  been  a   really  big  influence  on me. I  like  soft  rock  radio   music,  it’s  good  stuff.     Nae:  What  do  you  like   about the  Northwest   scene,  it  sounds  like  you   have  a  lot  to  say  about  it   especially  in  the  Portland   area.     AAA:  There’s  a  lot  of   family  ties,  in  the  music   scene  in  the  northwest,   it’s  really  nice,   everybody  wants  to  help   each  other.   Portland’s  music  scene  is   the  only  thing  that’s  good   that  you  could  also  call   incest.  People  from  all   different  bands  helping   people  from  different   bands  helping  other   bands  record  or  play   stuff  or  whatever  else  It’s   really  like  family,  they’re   really  supportive,  like   they’re  on  the  same  team  

mentality  rather  than   other  places  where  it’s   more  competitive.   Everyone’s  in  a  band  and   everyone  goes  and  sees   those  bands.  The  whole   music  scene  is  bands, there’s  no  public  people   that  go  to  shit.   Everybody  kinda  talks   about  how  Portland  is   this  great  music  scene,   and  then  you  try  to  think   about bands  that  have   gotten  really  big  and   blown  up  out  of   Portland,  and  there’s  not   a  lot.  It’s  almost   saturated  so  much  that   nobody  has  great   ambitions  because  it’s   really  fun  to  just  be  in.  If   you’re  in  a  band  in   Portland  for  more  than  a   year,  it  probably  means   that  you  are  doing  it   because  you  want  to   make  music,  not  because   you  want  to  be   successful.  Because  you   won’t  be  successful.  It’s   fine,  it’s  just  a  bunch  of   bands  that  love  doing  it,  

and  that’s  great.       Baby:  I’m  rich.       Nae:  So  speaking  of   success,  I  noticed  that   you  guys  were  voted  best   new  band  in  Portland,  do   you  want  to  talk  a  little   bit  about  that?       AAA:  Yeah,  that  cost  us   about  20  grand.     We  bribed  ‘em  (laughs).    That  was  a  really   awesome  thing  and  there   are  so  many  bands  in   Portland  that  it’s  almost   ridiculous  that  there  is   that  thing.  Yeah,  there’s  a   lot  of  opposition  to  that   whole  release  every  year.   I  think  it  should  be  made   clear  that  it’s  not  the  best   new  band  in  Portland,   it’s  their  pick  of  their   favorite  new  band  in   Portland  because  really   there’s  so many  great   bands  in  Portland  that   nobody’s  ever  even   heard  of  because  they’re   not  out  there  to  get  

APRIL TENTH, TWENTY-TWELVE press.  People  that  pick   are  generally  like   bookers  and promoters   and  people  that  work   with  the  bands  most  of   the  time  so  it’s  not   necessarily  the  best   new  band  it’s  just   happens  to  be  the  band   that’s  actually  trying  to   do  the  most.  It’s  like  the   best,  new,  most   ambitious.  It’s  not   about  how  good  the   music  is  really  as  what   the  band  really  wants   to  get  out  there.  We’re   talking  our  music  down   right  here.   Hey,  whoa  whoa  whoa   No,  we’re  alight!  We’re   not  horrible!       Baby:  I’m  OK.  I’m  a   little  buzzed,  I’m  rich.       Nae:  So,  I  was  curious,   who  you  guys  were   looking  forward  to   seeing  this  weekend,   since  you  are  so   supportive  of  the  scene,   is  there  anybody  so  far   that’s  been  awesome  or   who  you’re  looking   forward  to  seeing  this   weekend  at  Treefort   [Music  Festival  in   Boise]?       AAA:  Aan  is  amazing.   Aan,  Deathsongs,   Typhoon-­‐  our  good   Portland  buds,  Built  To   Spill,  ShivasYeah,   Shivas  are  awesome.   We  haven’t  been  able  to   do  a  lot,  we’ve  been   talking  to  people.       Baby:  I’ve  been   desperately  looking  for   something  to  drink  all   day.       Nae:  So  I  was  going  to   ask  each  of  you  what  is  

IN CUE

your  favorite  adult   beverage,  what  do  you   guys  drink?   Baby:  He  drinks  AMF,   I  mostly  drink  this  4   Loco  drink,  its  not  4   Loco,  it’s  like  you   make  this  original  4   Loco,  it’s  got  a  bunch   of  ingredients  you  put   in  it  and  it’s  like  the   original  4  Loco   You  crush  up   Nodoz   It  sounds  like   you’re   making  crack   cocaine.       Baby:  Yeah,   you  crush  up   NoDoz  and  OE.       AAA:  Lighthouse  is   101  proof   Rumplemintz,  and   then  it  has  a  float  of   Kahlua…   In  reality  we  all  drink   Pabst.  Yeah,  Rainer,   Pabst.  For  me  Rolling   Rock  is  the  jam.  That’s   the  cheapest   champagne.       Nae:  So,  I  have  kind  of   a  fun  question  for  you   guys,  what  would  you   tell  12  year  old  you   about  music  today?       AAA:  Powerman  5000   was  a  huge  mistake.   I’m  telling  myself,   that’s  what  I’m  saying,   it  was  a  huge  mistake   and  you  shouldn’t  get   involved.   I’d  say  keep  listening   to  Rush.  A  lot.  I   listened  to  a  lot  of   Rush  when  I  was   twelve.  My  real   answer  would  totally   be  don’t  listen  to   things  farther  than  six  

hours  away  from  where   you  can  drive.  Like  stay   local  because  local  music   is  the  shit  that’s  really,   really  good.   That’s  not  always  the  case   though…   In  smaller  towns…   No,  6  hours  away?  You’re   always  6  hours  close  to  a   good  music  scene  unless   you’re  in  middle  America       Nae:   Incidentally,   Moscow  is  6   hours  away   from  Boise.  

“I’M OKAY. I’M A LITTLE BUZZED”

AAA:  Yeah,   you’re  always   six  hours   away,  and  you  should  find   that  scene.   I  would  have  said  “Listen   to  Bruce  Springsteen  with   a  keener  ear”.   I  would  have  said,  “stop   playing  butt  rock  guitar   solos,”  because  that’s  all  I   did.   You  still  do  that!   What  I  would  have  said  is   listen  to  Flaming  Lips  a  bit   more  intently.   You  can’t  do  that,  that’s  all   you  listen  to.   More  local  bands  when  I   was  younger  would  have   been  better.       Baby:  When  I  was  twelve,   I’d  have  said,  “Stop  riding   bulls,  and  start  playing   guitar.”  It  took  until  I  was   18  or  19  to  get  out  of   fucking  bull  riding.       Nae:  So  we’re  with  a   college  radio  station,  do   you  guys  listen  to  college   radio?       AAA:  The  only  reason  I   was  really  bummed  about   moving  from  Eugene  to   Portland  was  because  

PAGE FIVE Eugene’s  campus  radio   was  so  awesome.   Everybody  has  an  hour   block,  is  that  how  you   guys  do  it?  There’s  a  block   and  you  get  to  choose…   there’s  people  that   specialize  different  stuff,   so  you  tune  in  to  certain   shows…  I  loved  it.  The   PSU  radio,  there’s  a  few   DJ’s  on  there  that  I  love.   Like  when  John  Raul  was   doing  it,  there’s  some   good  stuff  in  Portland.  Of   any  radio  stuff,  that’s  all  I   listen  to.  College  radio  is   always  the  best,  because   it’s  people  who  actually   care.   Nae:  And  we  can  play   what  we  want,  it’s   freeform  radio. Baby:  Freeform  radio!       Nae:  Absolutely.  So  do   you  guys  have  any  fun   tour  stories  or  anything   funny  that’s  happened   recently?     AAA:  Berg  rescued  a  kid!   Oh  yeah!       Baby:  Yeah,  I  rescued   three  children  out  of  a   burning  SUV.       AAA:  It  wasn’t  burning.   …it  was  totaled.       We  were  stopped  at  a  gas   station,  in  California  on   some  little  two  lane   highway  section  on  like   405  or  something,  and  an   SUV  came  out  and  a  car   was  pulling  out  of  the  gas   station  and  the  SUV   swerved  and  clipped  it   and  flew  literally  ten,   twelve  feet  in  the  air  and   rolled  like  three  times,  all   the  way  over  and  was  in  a  

ditch,  and  Berg  and  I…  I   thought  it  was  a  fight,  not   a  flight,  but  we  were  just   bookin’  it  over  there,  berg   rips  the  door  off  of  this   car,  pulls  these  kids  out  of   it,  and  one  of  the  kids  is   like  “who  are  you!?”  and   Berg  for  some  reason   responds:  “I’m  with  your   mom.”       Baby:  I  was  comforting   them!       AAA:  He  was  trying  to   make  them  feel   comfortable,  like  “I’m  not   a  stranger”,  but  it  came   off  more  like  “I’m  your   new  dad.”   But  everybody  walked   away  from  it,  everybody   was  standing  up.   Yeah,  everybody  was  fine,   The  car  had  roll  bars  and   stuff,  but  we  though  we   were  going  to  be  pulling   dead  people  out  of  these   cars   Baby:  Afterwards,   everybody  calls  me  a  hero   and  stuff,  you  know?       Berg  ripped  his  shirt  off.       [to  Baby]  You’re  gonna   get  a  call  from  a  private   investigator  that  those   kids  have  hired  in  six   years  and  they’re  gonna   find  their  real  dad…  they   know  that  you’re  the  real   one  because  you  were   there  when  they  needed   you.       Nae:  That  is  amazing!   Well,  I  know  you  guys   have  to  go  but  I  want  to   thank  you  so  much,   college  radio  thanks  you,   Common  People  thanks   you.       Baby:  C’mon,  People!  

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PAGE SIX THROUGH THE LENS KENTARO MURAI Program Director Kentaro went down to the inaugural Treefort Music Festival in Boise on March 23rd and 24th. The festival's lineup was heavily composed of emerging artists from the Northwest and beyond as well as toptier indie acts such as Of Montreal and Built to Spill.

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1) Built to Spill played on the Main Stage on Saturday, March 24. The performance was the band's first in Boise in nearly two years. 2) Boise straight edge punk band 1d played at The Crux on Friday, March 23. 3) In The Shadow Of The Mountain played the Main Stage Saturday, March 24. 4) Seattle dream pop band Lemolo played at the Red Room on Saturday, March 24. 5) Los Angeles experimental psych group Sun Araw played at the Linen Building on Friday, March 23. 6) Boise band TEENS played a raucous set at the Red Room on Saturday, March 24. Audience members were encouraged to dance on stage. 7) Moscow power pop punk band Tim Blood & the Gutpanthers played at The Crux on Friday, March 23.

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TEENS TYPHOON

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8) San Fransisco post-rock outfit Tartufi played the Main Stage Saturday, March 24. Go to the KUOI blog to read Captain Ron Blow's 2010 Tartufi interview. 9) Boise indie-rock group Le Fleur (featuring KUOI alums) played at the Neurolux on Saturday, March 24. 10) Portland post-pop group Typhoon played the Main Stage on Saturday, March 24. 11) Boise folk band Hollow Wood played at The Crux on Saturday, March 24. For more Treefort photos, go to http://www.flickr.com/photos/kentaro_m_photography

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PHOTO COURTESY MARK CLUNEY

DOUBLE THE HEARTACHE: HOW THE HORSE THIEVES CAME TO BE Anthony Saia Station Manager For a lot of fledgling groups, it takes a lot of work, time and effort to put together a single song, let alone an entire album. Spokane, Wash., The Horse Thieves are the exception to the rule, releasing their first two albums the same day. Outlaw Ballads and Valley of Decision were released in the Fall of 2011 featuring Marshall McLean, Fawn Dasovich and brothers Adam & Jordan Miller. As the band came together, the lyrical stylings came from the band’s personal experiences, particularly Adam’s – who was rather candid with us. “My old lady kind of cheated on me and ran off with someone and I wrote most of my songs about that. Most of the songs that I sing are about that story.” McLean, one of the band’s vocalists said, “I think a lot of the songs took on the theme of searching for direction. A lot of us at this time were at a

crossroads with different things. I think a lot of bands form that way – in crisis – at least ours did.” The project has turned out to be a cathartic experience for all of them – to the point where keyboardist Dasovich said, “It’s really become kind of like a therapy project.” It was obvious that the band had a lot to say since they produced two albums over a long cold winter at their family’s guest home in Elk, Wash. Adam said, “My aunt and uncle have this cool cabin on my parent’s property out at the Miller family ranch. They are actually from California and they didn’t lock the house so we kind snuck up there, put all our stuff up and recorded the album in their house. I don’t actually know who was paying the electric bill.” Despite their rogue tactics for recording, both records were a long time coming – especially for the two brothers who have have musicianship bred into them. The Miller boys father Rand is a musician as well and the band performed one of his songs “Dirty City” that is featured on their “first” record Outlaw Ballads.” The band are continuing to gain a larger following and plan a music video shoot in the near future.

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PHOTO BY CONFINEMENT LOAF

WITCH MOUNTAIN PORTLAND’S ORIGINAL DOOM BAND Through  the  laughter  and  the  tears,   your  humble  DJs  from  Confinement   Loaf  interview  Nate  Carson  and  Rob   Wrong  on  Portland,  Ore.,  doom   band  Witch  Mountain.     Confinement  Loaf:    You  said  life   has  been  good  so  far  since  we   talked  one  year  ago.    Why  don’t  you   tell  us  what  you  guys  have  been  up   to  and  what  makes  life  so  good.       Nate  Carson:    Well,  I  feel  like  the   last  time  we  talked  we  had  a  lot  of   ideas  and  visions  and  things  that   we  wanted  to  accomplish  and  I  feel   like  we’ve  really  kind  of   accomplished  all  of  them.    We’re  on   to  the  next  chapter  and  it’s  really   exciting  especially  after  such  a  long  

gap  between  records.    So,  as  of  September   we  had  put  out  that  song  “Veil  of  the   Forgotten”  on  the  Adult  Swim  compilation   which  has  gotten  a  lot  more  people  to  hear   us  and  we  put  out  our  record  in  April.    We   toured  with  South  X  Southwest,  we  toured   with  Christian  Mistress,  and  we’ve  been   writing  new  material  and  we’ve  been   gigging  around  the  Northwest  and  now   we’re  on  tour  with  Wino.       CL:    You  guys  made  the  short  trip  today   from  Portland  what  music  were  you   listening  to  today  and  what  keeps  you  going   on  the  road  while  you  are  on  tour?       Rob  Wrong:  We  listened  to  a  variety.    I  put   my  phone  on  shuffle  actually  and  just  let  it   roll.    Um,  Prank  Phone  Calls,  John  Lennon,   Candlemass,  Weird  Al  was  on  there.    Oh,  we  

listened  to  Prince,  Purple  Rain  all  the  way   through.    It  came  up  on  shuffle  and  Nate’s   like  ’we  just  need  to  hear  this  whole   album’.    ‘Cause  Purple  Rain  the  song  came   on  and  it’s  at  the  end  of  the  album  and   you  gotta  kind  of  earn  it.    Oh  yeah,   “Hemisphere  of  Shadow”,  Danava’s  new   record.    I’ve  listened  to  it  ten  times  in  the   last  week,  definitely  worth  checking  out.       CL:    So  you  just  released  South  of  Salem   this  April.    I’ve  seen  great  reviews  of  that   and  some  write  ups  about  you  guys.   That’s  great!    You  guys  mentioned  Weird   Al.    We  are  fellow  fans  of  Weird  Al,  of   course.    He  just  released  a  new  album  as   well.       NC:    We  had  a  band  date  to  go  see  Weird   Al  and  then  I  got  to  see  him  again  in  

IN REVIEW

ODD FUTURE WOLF GANG KILL THEM ALL THE GROUP, THE MYTH, THE LEGEND.

Ethan Arave Music Director

H

ere's the thing, you could read a lot of reviews concerning the new Odd Future Mixtape Vol.2 that have practically nothing to do with the music. This is because these boys (and a couple ladies, this time around) are polarizing: they say bitch a LOT and talk

about fucking your and my girlfriend and murdering some people along with rape and weed and, "fuck the police." They're purposefully transgressive in every sense and want to offend anyone and everyone as quickly as they can. For one reason or another, this approach, seemingly the simplest equation I can think of

in the rap world (young group of DIY rappers are youthful, offensive and loud) has made waves in the critical music world and everyone has weighed in. So every angle on this has been covered somewhere on the internet, from weird, high-art praising of their counter culture fervor (See: John Maus, The Wire, Tiny

APRIL TENTH, TWENTY-TWELVE Mixtapes) to simple acceptance, in so many words (See: Pitchfork, Urb, The A.V. Club ) to outrage and dismissal (See: Cokemachineglow, Dusted Magazine, The Guardian). I've pointed you to the voices I find representative on the subject and there are many, many more out there. The rest of this review is dedicated to the mix-tape, stripped of this context, placed in a vacuum from all that discussion, like I like it. OF Tape Vol.2 is most certainly a mix-tape. It has huge jumps in quality, genre and pacing throughout its hour runtime, partially because the entire (sizable) Odd Future crew is on display. So you have the RnB styling of Frank Ocean on tracks like "White" and "Analog 2" or the electrosoul mishmash of The Internet on "Ya Know", up against a wall of rappers and beat producers. The production on these tracks engaged in a different genre are jarring when you hit them on the tape, but they do break up what is otherwise a bit of a slog. The beat making acumen of the Odd Future crew has, for me, always belonged with their defacto frontman, Tyler the

IN CUE

Creator, and he doesn't being the bottom of the really seem to be at the bottom. With nothing to rap reigns here. Instead it's about and a shitty, Hodgy Beats producing uninspired beat to rap over, most of the tracks and this there isn't much in these means a more austere, bass tracks to let the MC's shine. heavy, straight up variety of Along with "50" and "Lean" beats that are usually... and the insufferable fauxKind of boring. agro anthem "We Got the Tracks like Bitches", these "Bitches" and tracks BY THE 50TH "Snow White" highlight the aren't bad for worst of the TIME THEY their lame youthful, givePUNCTUATE A verses and no-fucks dumb names to SENTENCE WITH approach (though they rap: a dearth both have of ideas and BITCH AND those), they no quality REPEAT A WEAK control. just have beats that By the CHORUS OVER A sound 50th time they BORING ASS unfinished and punctuate a uninspired. with BEAT, THE ALBUM sentence By bitch and contrast, repeat a weak ISN’T FUN‌ tracks like the chorus over a epic, 10 boring ass minute album closer "Oldie" beat, the album isn't fun or (a great rap-group miccounter-culture or too much tradeoff in the best of the to handle, it's plain bad, by genre's tradition and way of being tiresome. definitely the best track on Compare these to songs like here) and "Doms" are the aforementioned "Oldie" served well by their austere and "Doms", as well as beats, and again, there's a "Sams" "Hcad" and "P"; all wild variety throughout this of which occur in the whole thing; including it's albums closing 27 minutes, heavily uneven pacing. and all of which show the In it's first 33 minutes, upswing of the give-noOF Tape Vol.2 runs through fucks business: they are the worst of its tracks and fun, slickly produced and they are pretty bad, showcases of undeniable "Bitches" and "Real Bitch" talent of the rhyme spitters

PAGE ELEVEN on the OF crew ("P" and "Oldie" make sure to tell you that the talent is undeniable, straight up). So OF Tape Vol.2 would all be much better if it were just a 30 minute tape of those tracks, cut with the weird RnB interludes and I guess that The Internet song too, but it isn't and instead it's a hard sell overall. As far as a showcase of OF, I think you'd be better served searching out a couple of the individual releases of the collective, if you're in the market for some intensely offensive, youthful rap and some weirdly great neo-RnB, that is. Namely: Tyler's Bastard and, to a lesser extent, Goblin; MellowHype's BlackandW hite and Frank Ocean's Nostaliga,Ultra. These are all much better albums than OF Tape Vol.2, which is not bad by any means, it just has too many songs that fall flat, are overlong, or simply have no reason to exist. Still, "Oldie"'s pretty slick, and Odd Future deserves to remain on the radar of anyone already on board. That being said, if you aren't on board already there is nothing here to sell you.

England  in  December  and  it  was   his  first  European  appearance   ever!    I  know,  hard  to   believe.    Actually  he  was  really   sick  that  night  and  he  was   apologizing  to  the  crowd  but  he   still  gave  a  200%  performance,   like  you  could  see  he  could   barely  stand  but  he  was  going   for  it  anyway.    His  voice  was  just   going  throughout  the  show  like   every  time  you  could  hear  his   voice  crackle  his  backup  band   would  just  step  up,  the   harmonies  would  get  louder,   there  would  be  a  few  extra   guitar  parts  here  and   there.    There  was  just  so  much   support,  so  much   professionalism,  I  just  love   seeing  that.    A  flawless   performance  to  me  is  not  as   interesting  as  seeing  an  amazing   band  covering  for  each  other,   dealing  with  what  ever  is  going   on.    Maybe  I’m  just  jaded  from   seeing ��so  many  concerts,  I  see  a   lot  of  shows  but  that’s  what  gets   me  excited  seeing  the   interaction  and  seeing  people   solving  problems  and  working   together.    I’m  a  nerd.      

CL:    You  mentioned  also  listening   to  some  Candlemass  on  your  way   here  today.    When  we  talked  last,   Nate,  you  said  you’d  played  with   every  band  you  ever  wanted  to   except  for  Black  Sabbath  and   Candlemass.    Could  that  be  an   opportunity?       NC:    Anything  could  happen.    I   mean  it’s  not  like  the  degrees  of   separation  are  very  far  away  at   this  point.       CL:    Did  you  get  to  see  them  at   Roadburn  Festival?       NC:    No.    Unfortunately  they  were   scheduled  to  play  Roadburn   when  I  was  there  but  the  volcano   in  Iceland  disrupted  a  lot  of   people’s  tour  plans  and   Candlemass  was  one  of  the  bands   that  didn’t  make  it.    So  they  did   do  the  show  the  next  year  and   performed  what  I  wanted  to  see   with  their  original  singer  doing   “Epicus  Doomicus”  in  its  entirety   and  I  wasn’t  there  for  that  which   was  a  heartbreaker.    But  at  the   same  time,  I  see  so  much  I  can   live  through  missing  almost   anything  at  this  point  but  I’m  

trying  to  catch  as  many  as  I   can,    especially  the  older   ones.    Like  last  year  I  saw  Styx   and  Heart,  Rush  and  I  want  to   see  as  many  of  those  bands  as   I  can  before  they’re  not  worth   seeing.    I  feel  like  a  lot  of  those   bands  know  what  people  want   to  hear  and  do  focus  on  the   best  moments  of  their  catalog   as  opposed  to  tryin’  to  just   play  their  limp  new  album,   Rush  being  the   exception.    Like,  I’ve  seen  ‘em   do  their  new  single  twice  now.   A  and  B  sides  and  it’s  fucking   killer,  sorry  if  I’m  swearing  on   the  radio,  but  anyway,  it’s   heavy  music  and  it’s   vital  .    Every  time  I  play  it  for   someone  I  say  a  new  Rolling   Stones  or  a  new  Bob  Dylan   album  would  not  sound   crushing  and  the  new  Rush   song  does.       CL:    Since  you  mentioned  it,  a   lot  of  older  bands  are  coming   out  of  retirement.    I’m  not   including  Witch  Mountain  in   that  because  I  don’t  consider   you  as  having  been  in   retirement  or  in  the  same  

generation  as  Styx.    But  what  do   you  think  it  is?     RW:  I  think  mainly  it’s  because   these  bands  were  influential  on   bands,  on  people  like  especially   our  age.  Wino  definitely  is   influential  on  people  our   age.    Yeah,  I’m  not  sure.    I  think   these  bands  are  just  around.    It   was  like  me  seeing  The  Rolling   Stones  a  few  years  ago.    I’d   never  seen  them  and  I  was  like  I   need  to  go  see  them  they’re   getting  old  a  lot  of  these  bands   are  getting  old  and  people  know   if  they  don’t  see  ‘em  somebody   in  the  band  is  gonna  die.    I  made   a  point  of  seeing  the  Stones   twice  on  their  last  tour  because  I   was  afraid  of  that  and  I  don’t   think  they’ve  toured  since.    I   think  a  lot  of  these  bands  are   taken  for  granted  because   they’ve  been  around  so  long  but   as  you  get  older  you  realize  that   these  bands  are  really  important   and  you  should  pay  homage  to   them  and  go  see  ‘em.     For  more  of  this  interview,   navigate  to   www.kuoi.org/music/interviews /witch-­‐mountain  


In Cue | Spring 2012