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and actual performative practices. This interaction does not only allow to put musicological findings to the test – a kind of ‘reality check’ –, it also creates new possibilities to communicate research outcomes, both in the artistic field and in academia. The questions raised by KAREL VANHAESEBROUCK also deal with relationships between science and arts, in method and knowledge. In the field of ‘theatre’ – performance on stage and audiovisual representation – the previously strict distinction between fiction and reality becomes more and more troubled, resulting in ‘ontological theatrical doubt’ (the term of Carol Martin). Specific research strategies, particularly those borrowed from ethnography, could provide answers, for artists, to deal with this fundamental issue on a hands-on level. But these strategies also require, on the level of their artistic outcome, profound dramaturgical reflection: how do you translate your ‘raw’ material into a performative (live or audiovisual) presentation, without losing its links to the research endeavor as such? In her keynote, KATHLEEN COESSENS will situate artistic research in an ‘ecology of practices’, borrowing Isabelle Stengers’ term referring to the specificity of contextualization of scientific and artistic practices. How does artistic research, as an autonomous activity, relate to the larger field of artistic practice or, in other words, how should the ‘embeddedness’ of artistic research – with its own epistemological tools – be understood as a contribution to artistic practices? If the plus-value of artistic research consists in its explicit objectification of artistic tracks, how is the final artistic outcome influenced by and indebted to this embodied research, especially in contemporary music praxis – composition and performance? Klaas Tindemans

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Program book prepositions in artistic research  
Program book prepositions in artistic research  
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