Issuu on Google+

Spencer adds rich variety of rare books from the 16th through 18th centuries with Eliot S. Berkley Collection By Sarah Kanning

Fewer than five European and American libraries report having Appian of Alexandria’s history of Roman civil wars (1551) or Diodorus Siculus’s history of the Italian city states of Venice, Milan, Mantua, and Ferrara (1548). “Because of Dr. Berkley’s gift, we have both at Spencer,” said Cook. One volume, whose vellum or leather covers is ornamented in gold with family crests, can be traced to noblemen’s libraries and reflects the earlier practice of selling books unbound. And illustrations printed from engraved copper plates grace the pages of several of the books, Cook said. Those illustrations include maps, battle scenes, landscapes, allegorical images and portraits that bring the author or the subject of the book to life. v

Far Above: The Campaign for Kansas, a comprehensive campaign to advance KU and the University of Kansas Hospital, launched its public phase in April of 2012, and is well on its way to a fundraising goal of $1.2 billion. Far Above seeks support to educate future leaders, advance medicine, accelerate discovery and drive economic growth. With the ultimate goal to secure a leading position among top-tier public research universities and academic medical centers in America, campaign priorities were established through extensive consultation with leaders throughout the university and hospital. v

spring 2013 A University of Kansas Libraries publication for alumni, friends and benefactors

MAJOR GIFTS

April 9, 2013: The Dole Institute of Politics and KU Libraries hosted a program on the Tuskegee Airmen, the nation’s first African American military aviators, featuring KU professor Kevin Willmott, who discussed the historical and racial significance of their service through the film lens. The program, The Tuskegee Airmen: “Red Tails” Examined by Kevin Willmott, was the final event in a threepart series on African Americans in World War II that was made possible by KU Associate Professor Dr. Sandra Gautt, a member of the KU Libraries Board of Advocates. Photo by Courtney Foat.

Mark your calendars: An Evening with Naismith: Artifacts of a KU Legend Join us for hors d’oeuvres, cocktails and a rare opportunity to view and hold artifacts from KU’s University Archives relating to the life and legacy of James Naismith.

Ninon de l’Enclos. “Lettres de Ninon de l’Enclos au Marquis de Sevigné.” Amsterdam: Chez Francois Joly, 1750. Courtesy of the Eliot S. Berkley Collection, Kenneth Spencer Research Library.

Houston, TX: Tuesday, June 11 | 6–7:30 p.m. 1941

Rhythm and Meaning: Jazz at KU Come see a selection of our rich jazz collection— one of the largest sound archives west of the Mississippi—and enjoy hors d’oeuvres, cocktails and KU camaraderie.

Chicago, IL: Thursday, June 27 | 6:30–8 p.m. Omaha, NE: Thursday, July 11 | 6–7:30 p.m.

“Dr. Berkley’s gift is a tremendous addition to our library. It will be a fantastic resource for scholars who come here,” said Beth Whittaker, assistant dean of distinctive collections. “This gift highlights the profound difference that private support makes to a research library like Spencer.” A Kansas City native and Harvard graduate, the late Dr. Berkley received his Ph.D. through Princeton University. He was active in educational and social-action organizations, and founded the International Relations Council in 1954, which continues to reach audiences to foster an understanding of international affairs in greater Kansas City. “Dr. Berkley had an excellent eye for old books and actively collected them for more than 50 years,” said Dr. Karen Cook, special collections librarian at Spencer Research Library. “While scholars will study the texts, a wider audience will appreciate the beauty and rarity of the books.”

St. Louis, MO: Monday, July 22 | 6–7:30 p.m. For additional event details, visit lib.ku.edu/events.

Questions? Comments? Email us at rasmith@ku.edu or send your letter to: Bibliophile; 502 Watson Library; 1425 Jayhawk Blvd.; Lawrence, KS 66045. Dr. Wade Williams and his family recently visited University Archives in Spencer Research Library to view drawings, memorabilia and other materials relating to his father Dr. Gene “Yogi” Williams, creator of the 1941 Jayhawk. The Williams family donated more than 30 original pencil and ink drawings to the Archives, many of which were drawn by Yogi when he was a KU student on the Jayhawker yearbook staff. Guiding Dr. Williams through the materials is University Archivist Becky Schulte. Photo by Rebecca Smith.

facebook.com/kulibraries twitter.com/kulibraries flickr.com/kulibraries youtube.com/kulibraries

David Beaham was passionate in all he did—leading a fourth-generation family business; continuing his quest for knowledge as an avid reader; supporting military leadership development through the Command and General Staff College in Leavenworth, Kan.; living life to its fullest with his wife and children; and of course, cheering on KU, his alma mater. David’s life was unexpectedly cut short when he died of a heart attack in October of 2011, but his family is seeing that his legacy lives on through a gift that will benefit students and faculty at KU. David Beaham is survived by his wife, Tricia, and three children: Taylor, who will attend KU’s School of Education next fall for early childhood development, Gracie, age 12, and Parker, age 16.

(CONTINUED INSIDE)

KU Libraries on the Road: KU Libraries staff members had the opportunity to display a traveling exhibit for “Rhythm and Meaning: Jazz at KU” during the KU Alumni Association’s annual Rock Chalk Ball, which drew 775 alumni and friends to the Overland Park Convention Center April 27. Photo by Katie Coffman. The exhibit also will make appearances in Chicago, Omaha and St. Louis this summer. For questions, contact Rachel Karwas, KU Libraries’ events coordinator, at 785-864-8961 or rkarwas@ku.edu.

CAN’T GET ENOUGH OF BIBLIOPHILE? Browse Bibliophile online at issuu.com/kulibraries.

By Katie Coffman

The Beaham family has generously donated $100,000 to establish a new reading room in Anschutz Library, which

Dallas, TX: Wednesday, June 12 | 6–7:30 p.m.

KEEP IN TOUCH!

A gift of 16th, 17th, 18th and 19th century rare books from Dr. Eliot S. Berkley to the Kenneth Spencer Research Library at the University of Kansas will offer scholars new insights into the period in such diverse topics as religion, philosophy, military and political history, geography, biography, social commentary and science. The gift significantly expands Spencer’s holdings of European literature from the Renaissance through the Enlightenment.

Denver, CO: Thursday, May 30 | 6–7:30 p.m.

Passion for learning will endure through memorial gift

1425 Jayhawk Blvd. Lawrence, KS 66045

A gift to Spencer Research Library expands book arts collection, provides cross-discipline resource By Katie Coffman

Over the years, Baker University professor John English has amassed hundreds of items featuring American artist Leonard Baskin. Last fall, he decided to seek a new home for part of his collection. English’s search brought him back to a familiar place, where he once had spent “many happy hours” for his own research, poring over books and periodicals from late 17th and 18th century England—the Kenneth Spencer Research Library at the University of Kansas. Leonard Baskin (1922-2000) was a master printmaker who also was known for his sculpture, watercolors and book designs. In 1952, he founded the Gehenna Press, located in Northampton, Mass., to produce fine books in limited editions. Baskin designed and frequently illustrated the dozens of elegant books that the press published. The new John C. English Collection of Leonard Baskin contains more than 150 items, including fine press and

commercial volumes, exhibition catalogues, ephemera and works on Baskin. Among these are 22 volumes published by Baskin’s Gehenna Press, as well as additional Gehenna broadsides and ephemera. Also present are numerous editions of poetry and literature from commercial publishers that contain illustrations by Baskin, including eight volumes by the poet Ted Hughes, with whom he frequently collaborated. (CONTINUED INSIDE)

IN THIS ISSUE: • Spencer adds rich variety of rare books from 16th through 18th centuries with Eliot S. Berkley Collection • A note from Debbie McCord, our partner at KU Endowment • Celebrate Vosper’s 100th • Book dedicated in honor of inaugural board chair


A note from Debbie McCord, our partner at KU Endowment

Passion for lifelong learning

By Debbie mccord

Debbie McCord, the development director for KU Libraries, has deep roots at KU, beginning 16 years ago at the KU School of Social Welfare, where she managed events and alumni relations. Since then, she has moved to KU Endowment, where she cultivates and stewards major gifts for the libraries and the School of Social Welfare. Feel free to contact her at dmccord@ kuendowment.org or 785-832-7372. Under the capable leadership of Dean Lorraine Haricombe, KU Libraries are thriving. Each year the libraries make critical strides to enhance support and services that benefit all of KU; they have accelerated the open access movement to make taxpayer-funded research more widely available; and they are working toward a new organizational structure that will better position the libraries as a leading campus partner in teaching and discovery. Yet with growth comes need. This past year we have seen a flourish of generosity through gifts in support of the libraries. Many of these contributions aim to augment the libraries’ existing resources. In this issue, for example, you’ve read about the Beaham family’s gift to establish a quiet retreat within the Learning Studio of Anschutz Library—something KU students have voiced is lacking at our busiest branch. Other gifts to the Learning Studio

include $25,000 pledges from Gladys and Bob Sanders, and Becky and Jim Pruett; both gifts will name tutoring spaces in the studio. Enhancement of the Learning Studio is a campaign priority for the libraries, and will reinforce the chancellor’s goals for recruitment and retention. Our donors are diverse with distinct backgrounds and priorities, and there are so many ways to support the libraries. Perhaps you will want to carry on your family’s legacy through a naming opportunity. The Kenneth Spencer Research Library requires funds to catalog and preserve materials that serve as the institutional memory of KU. Maybe you’ll want to acknowledge and support that we were the first public university to adopt a faculty-led open access policy, making our peer-reviewed journals available to all. Or you can help us continue to move forward in our digitization efforts, which open up a world of information and help our graduate students with their theses and dissertations. Some have great memories of studying in the stacks and want to give unrestricted support to the libraries. No matter what stirs you, there is a giving opportunity that matches your passion. Contributing to the libraries means providing support across campus—benefiting every student, faculty member and unit at KU.

By Katie Coffman

favorite poem of David’s, and one that each Beaham family member can recite by heart: Rudyard Kipling’s “If.”

“I would love for students to enter this room, and think of a man who loved KU, loved reading and loved the idea of our world becoming a better place.” - Tricia Beaham David’s wife, Tricia, explained that this gift was the perfect solution to combine his love for reading and his passion for KU. “There is no greater gift that we can give to others—and to society—than the gift of knowledge. Information instills in us an understanding and appreciation of our own views and those of others.” Conceptual rendering of the David Beaham Reading Room at Anschutz Library.

is set to open the first day of classes this fall. The room will be located on the east side of Anschutz, awash in natural light and overlooking the third-floor atrium below. With a floor-to-ceiling glass wall enclosing the space, it will provide a much-needed quiet retreat for private study. The reading room will also feature a

Sincerely, Debbie McCord KU Libraries Director of Development at KU Endowment

Celebrate Vosper’s 100th

Book dedicated in honor of inaugural board chair

(CONTINUED FROM FRONT)

P.O. Box 928 Lawrence, KS 66044-0928 1-888-653-6111 www.kuendowment.org

Gift Information

100 percent of your gift will be used to benefit the area of your choice at the University of Kansas.

A portrait of David will be displayed in the new reading room, along with his story, in hopes of inspiring students to follow in David’s footsteps to a lifetime of learning. Tricia said, “I would love for students to enter this room, and think of a man who loved KU, loved reading and loved the idea of our world becoming a better place.” v

Giving Options (choose one) q Please make check payable to: KU Endowment q Credit Card # ________________________________

Exp. Date _____ _____ Print Name __________________________________ Signature ____________________________________

By Katie Coffman

I/We would like to

Vosper Society giving level:

q Give securely online: kuendowment.org/givetoKUL

Named for renowned librarian and former director of KU Libraries Robert Vosper (1913-1994), the Vosper Society honors those who demonstrate interest in and support for the future vitality of the KU Libraries’ service to teaching and learning at KU. Help us commemorate what would be Vosper’s 100th birthday by making a gift of $100 or more, which will automatically enroll you as a member in the Vosper Society. Learn more at lib.ku.edu/vosper.

make a gift of :

q Benefactor - $2,500+ q Friend - $100+

q Call 1-888-653-6111 to make a gift.

$______ in support of

q Advocate - $1,000+

KU Libraries

q Donor - $500+

Can your gift be matched?

Donors who give at least $1,000 by June 30, 2013, will be invited to a special tour and dinner at Allen Fieldhouse on Aug. 28. For more information, contact Rebecca Smith, executive director of communications and advancement for KU Libraries, at 785-8641761 or rasmith@ku.edu. v Bibliophile is published in print and online semi-annually by the University of Kansas Libraries for alumni, friends and benefactors. Printing is paid for with private contributions.

Gift is from:

q KU Community any giving level AFFILIATION: _________________________

Name ___________________________________________________ Address __________________________________________________ Robert Vosper. Image courtesy of KU University Archives, Kenneth Spencer Research Library.

Dean of Libraries – lorraine j. haricombe Editor – Rebecca Smith | Content – Katie Coffman Design and production – Courtney Foat and Luke Englert

__________________________________________________

Preferred email ____________________________________________ Phone number _____________________________________________

Pliny, the Elder. “Naturae historiarum libri xxxvii,” Hagenoae: T.A. Badensis, 1518. Courtesy of Kenneth Spencer Research Library.

A. Phillips—the first mayor of Salina. The box bears the inscription, “In recognition of William J. Crowe and his service as the inaugural chair of the KU Libraries Board of Advocates, 2009-2012.”

To acknowledge his outstanding service as the first chair of the KU Libraries Board of Advocates, former dean of libraries Bill Crowe has been honored with the creation of a box specially constructed in the Stannard Conservation Laboratory to protect KU’s “first rare book.” This container will help preserve the Spencer Research Library’s 1518 edition of Pliny the Elder’s “Naturae Historiarum,” which was the gift, in 1886, of William

A gift to Spencer Research Library

English is Professor Emeritus of History and former chair of the Department of History and Political Science at Baker University in Baldwin City. He joined the Baker faculty in 1965 and taught

Since Crowe completed his service as chair in 2012, his successors include Edwyna Condon Gilbert, Barbara Schowen and Kala Stroup. Stroup, the current board chair, will serve in this position through the summer of 2014. v

(CONTINUED FROM FRONT)

“These materials present exciting possibilities for cross-disciplinary research,” said Beth Whittaker, assistant dean of distinctive collections. “Scholars will find something interesting whether they are looking into Baskin as an artist, the literature around which he based his work, or the book arts and the fine press movements more generally.”

“These materials present exciting possibilities for cross-disciplinary research.” - Beth Whittaker

Crowe’s service to the libraries spans more than two decades, and includes his roles as librarian administrator and advocate. He was instrumental in the formation of the Board of Advocates, and Crowe’s leadership as inaugural chair brought together this key group that has become an important part of his legacy at KU and critical to the libraries’ fundraising efforts.

courses on English, South Asian and religious history, among others. English received his undergraduate education at Washington University in St. Louis; a master’s degree from Yale; and his Ph.D. from Vanderbilt. He was awarded a fellowship by the U.S. Office of Education to pursue additional studies at the University of Chicago. John’s wife, Evonne, is a painter and printmaker. Thanks to her, he became acquainted with Leonard Baskin’s prints and drawings. This in turn led to his interest in the books that Baskin published or designed. “This gift is a token of appreciation for the research library and all it offers,” English said. “What I have given is but a small nucleus of Baskin’s work—a book arts collection that I hope another might be interested in building upon.” v

Your gift may be enhanced through employer matching gift programs. You may be eligible if you or your spouse are employed by, serve on a board for, or are retired from a matching gift company. Contact your HR department or call 1-800-661-5874 or visit kuendowment.org/matching.

Company ______________________________________________ Spouse’s Company ______________________________________________ LBN (00639)

The University of Kansas prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, ethnicity, religion, sex, national origin, age, ancestry, disability, status as a veteran, sexual orientation, marital status, parental status, gender identity, gender expression and genetic information in the University’s programs and activities. The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding the non-discrimination policies: Director of the Office of Institutional Opportunity and Access, IOA@ku.edu, 1246 W. Campus Road, Room 153A, Lawrence, KS, 66045, (785)864-6414, 711 TTY.

Left: “Crow” from a New Year’s greeting, [Crow & Pomegranate Press Mark], c. 1964, wood engraving, 3.4 x 2.6 inches. Center: [Two-page “E” spread} from “A Gehenna Alphabet: The Drawings by Leonard Baskin with Aphorisms and Poems by Sidney Kaplan.” Northampton: Gehenna Press, 1982, wood engraving, approximately 9 x 6.5 inches each sheet. Right: “Sons” from “Titus Andronicus.” Northampton: Gehenna Press, 1969, etching, 32 x 20 cm. Images courtesy of the John C. English Collection of Leonard Baskin, Kenneth Spencer Research Library. Produced by permission of the Estate of Leonard Baskin. © Estate of Leonard Baskin. Courtesy Galerie St. Etienne, New York.


Spencer adds rich variety of rare books from the 16th through 18th centuries with Eliot S. Berkley Collection By Sarah Kanning

Fewer than five European and American libraries report having Appian of Alexandria’s history of Roman civil wars (1551) or Diodorus Siculus’s history of the Italian city states of Venice, Milan, Mantua, and Ferrara (1548). “Because of Dr. Berkley’s gift, we have both at Spencer,” said Cook. One volume, whose vellum or leather covers is ornamented in gold with family crests, can be traced to noblemen’s libraries and reflects the earlier practice of selling books unbound. And illustrations printed from engraved copper plates grace the pages of several of the books, Cook said. Those illustrations include maps, battle scenes, landscapes, allegorical images and portraits that bring the author or the subject of the book to life. v

Far Above: The Campaign for Kansas, a comprehensive campaign to advance KU and the University of Kansas Hospital, launched its public phase in April of 2012, and is well on its way to a fundraising goal of $1.2 billion. Far Above seeks support to educate future leaders, advance medicine, accelerate discovery and drive economic growth. With the ultimate goal to secure a leading position among top-tier public research universities and academic medical centers in America, campaign priorities were established through extensive consultation with leaders throughout the university and hospital. v

spring 2013 A University of Kansas Libraries publication for alumni, friends and benefactors

MAJOR GIFTS

April 9, 2013: The Dole Institute of Politics and KU Libraries hosted a program on the Tuskegee Airmen, the nation’s first African American military aviators, featuring KU professor Kevin Willmott, who discussed the historical and racial significance of their service through the film lens. The program, The Tuskegee Airmen: “Red Tails” Examined by Kevin Willmott, was the final event in a threepart series on African Americans in World War II that was made possible by KU Associate Professor Dr. Sandra Gautt, a member of the KU Libraries Board of Advocates. Photo by Courtney Foat.

Mark your calendars: An Evening with Naismith: Artifacts of a KU Legend Join us for hors d’oeuvres, cocktails and a rare opportunity to view and hold artifacts from KU’s University Archives relating to the life and legacy of James Naismith.

Ninon de l’Enclos. “Lettres de Ninon de l’Enclos au Marquis de Sevigné.” Amsterdam: Chez Francois Joly, 1750. Courtesy of the Eliot S. Berkley Collection, Kenneth Spencer Research Library.

Houston, TX: Tuesday, June 11 | 6–7:30 p.m. 1941

Rhythm and Meaning: Jazz at KU Come see a selection of our rich jazz collection— one of the largest sound archives west of the Mississippi—and enjoy hors d’oeuvres, cocktails and KU camaraderie.

Chicago, IL: Thursday, June 27 | 6:30–8 p.m. Omaha, NE: Thursday, July 11 | 6–7:30 p.m.

“Dr. Berkley’s gift is a tremendous addition to our library. It will be a fantastic resource for scholars who come here,” said Beth Whittaker, assistant dean of distinctive collections. “This gift highlights the profound difference that private support makes to a research library like Spencer.” A Kansas City native and Harvard graduate, the late Dr. Berkley received his Ph.D. through Princeton University. He was active in educational and social-action organizations, and founded the International Relations Council in 1954, which continues to reach audiences to foster an understanding of international affairs in greater Kansas City. “Dr. Berkley had an excellent eye for old books and actively collected them for more than 50 years,” said Dr. Karen Cook, special collections librarian at Spencer Research Library. “While scholars will study the texts, a wider audience will appreciate the beauty and rarity of the books.”

St. Louis, MO: Monday, July 22 | 6–7:30 p.m. For additional event details, visit lib.ku.edu/events.

Questions? Comments? Email us at rasmith@ku.edu or send your letter to: Bibliophile; 502 Watson Library; 1425 Jayhawk Blvd.; Lawrence, KS 66045. Dr. Wade Williams and his family recently visited University Archives in Spencer Research Library to view drawings, memorabilia and other materials relating to his father Dr. Gene “Yogi” Williams, creator of the 1941 Jayhawk. The Williams family donated more than 30 original pencil and ink drawings to the Archives, many of which were drawn by Yogi when he was a KU student on the Jayhawker yearbook staff. Guiding Dr. Williams through the materials is University Archivist Becky Schulte. Photo by Rebecca Smith.

facebook.com/kulibraries twitter.com/kulibraries flickr.com/kulibraries youtube.com/kulibraries

David Beaham was passionate in all he did—leading a fourth-generation family business; continuing his quest for knowledge as an avid reader; supporting military leadership development through the Command and General Staff College in Leavenworth, Kan.; living life to its fullest with his wife and children; and of course, cheering on KU, his alma mater. David’s life was unexpectedly cut short when he died of a heart attack in October of 2011, but his family is seeing that his legacy lives on through a gift that will benefit students and faculty at KU. David Beaham is survived by his wife, Tricia, and three children: Taylor, who will attend KU’s School of Education next fall for early childhood development, Gracie, age 12, and Parker, age 16.

(CONTINUED INSIDE)

KU Libraries on the Road: KU Libraries staff members had the opportunity to display a traveling exhibit for “Rhythm and Meaning: Jazz at KU” during the KU Alumni Association’s annual Rock Chalk Ball, which drew 775 alumni and friends to the Overland Park Convention Center April 27. Photo by Katie Coffman. The exhibit also will make appearances in Chicago, Omaha and St. Louis this summer. For questions, contact Rachel Karwas, KU Libraries’ events coordinator, at 785-864-8961 or rkarwas@ku.edu.

CAN’T GET ENOUGH OF BIBLIOPHILE? Browse Bibliophile online at issuu.com/kulibraries.

By Katie Coffman

The Beaham family has generously donated $100,000 to establish a new reading room in Anschutz Library, which

Dallas, TX: Wednesday, June 12 | 6–7:30 p.m.

KEEP IN TOUCH!

A gift of 16th, 17th, 18th and 19th century rare books from Dr. Eliot S. Berkley to the Kenneth Spencer Research Library at the University of Kansas will offer scholars new insights into the period in such diverse topics as religion, philosophy, military and political history, geography, biography, social commentary and science. The gift significantly expands Spencer’s holdings of European literature from the Renaissance through the Enlightenment.

Denver, CO: Thursday, May 30 | 6–7:30 p.m.

Passion for learning will endure through memorial gift

1425 Jayhawk Blvd. Lawrence, KS 66045

A gift to Spencer Research Library expands book arts collection, provides cross-discipline resource By Katie Coffman

Over the years, Baker University professor John English has amassed hundreds of items featuring American artist Leonard Baskin. Last fall, he decided to seek a new home for part of his collection. English’s search brought him back to a familiar place, where he once had spent “many happy hours” for his own research, poring over books and periodicals from late 17th and 18th century England—the Kenneth Spencer Research Library at the University of Kansas. Leonard Baskin (1922-2000) was a master printmaker who also was known for his sculpture, watercolors and book designs. In 1952, he founded the Gehenna Press, located in Northampton, Mass., to produce fine books in limited editions. Baskin designed and frequently illustrated the dozens of elegant books that the press published. The new John C. English Collection of Leonard Baskin contains more than 150 items, including fine press and

commercial volumes, exhibition catalogues, ephemera and works on Baskin. Among these are 22 volumes published by Baskin’s Gehenna Press, as well as additional Gehenna broadsides and ephemera. Also present are numerous editions of poetry and literature from commercial publishers that contain illustrations by Baskin, including eight volumes by the poet Ted Hughes, with whom he frequently collaborated. (CONTINUED INSIDE)

IN THIS ISSUE: • Spencer adds rich variety of rare books from 16th through 18th centuries with Eliot S. Berkley Collection • A note from Debbie McCord, our partner at KU Endowment • Celebrate Vosper’s 100th • Book dedicated in honor of inaugural board chair


A note from Debbie McCord, our partner at KU Endowment

Passion for lifelong learning

By Debbie mccord

Debbie McCord, the development director for KU Libraries, has deep roots at KU, beginning 16 years ago at the KU School of Social Welfare, where she managed events and alumni relations. Since then, she has moved to KU Endowment, where she cultivates and stewards major gifts for the libraries and the School of Social Welfare. Feel free to contact her at dmccord@ kuendowment.org or 785-832-7372. Under the capable leadership of Dean Lorraine Haricombe, KU Libraries are thriving. Each year the libraries make critical strides to enhance support and services that benefit all of KU; they have accelerated the open access movement to make taxpayer-funded research more widely available; and they are working toward a new organizational structure that will better position the libraries as a leading campus partner in teaching and discovery. Yet with growth comes need. This past year we have seen a flourish of generosity through gifts in support of the libraries. Many of these contributions aim to augment the libraries’ existing resources. In this issue, for example, you’ve read about the Beaham family’s gift to establish a quiet retreat within the Learning Studio of Anschutz Library—something KU students have voiced is lacking at our busiest branch. Other gifts to the Learning Studio

include $25,000 pledges from Gladys and Bob Sanders, and Becky and Jim Pruett; both gifts will name tutoring spaces in the studio. Enhancement of the Learning Studio is a campaign priority for the libraries, and will reinforce the chancellor’s goals for recruitment and retention. Our donors are diverse with distinct backgrounds and priorities, and there are so many ways to support the libraries. Perhaps you will want to carry on your family’s legacy through a naming opportunity. The Kenneth Spencer Research Library requires funds to catalog and preserve materials that serve as the institutional memory of KU. Maybe you’ll want to acknowledge and support that we were the first public university to adopt a faculty-led open access policy, making our peer-reviewed journals available to all. Or you can help us continue to move forward in our digitization efforts, which open up a world of information and help our graduate students with their theses and dissertations. Some have great memories of studying in the stacks and want to give unrestricted support to the libraries. No matter what stirs you, there is a giving opportunity that matches your passion. Contributing to the libraries means providing support across campus—benefiting every student, faculty member and unit at KU.

By Katie Coffman

favorite poem of David’s, and one that each Beaham family member can recite by heart: Rudyard Kipling’s “If.”

“I would love for students to enter this room, and think of a man who loved KU, loved reading and loved the idea of our world becoming a better place.” - Tricia Beaham David’s wife, Tricia, explained that this gift was the perfect solution to combine his love for reading and his passion for KU. “There is no greater gift that we can give to others—and to society—than the gift of knowledge. Information instills in us an understanding and appreciation of our own views and those of others.” Conceptual rendering of the David Beaham Reading Room at Anschutz Library.

is set to open the first day of classes this fall. The room will be located on the east side of Anschutz, awash in natural light and overlooking the third-floor atrium below. With a floor-to-ceiling glass wall enclosing the space, it will provide a much-needed quiet retreat for private study. The reading room will also feature a

Sincerely, Debbie McCord KU Libraries Director of Development at KU Endowment

Celebrate Vosper’s 100th

Book dedicated in honor of inaugural board chair

(CONTINUED FROM FRONT)

P.O. Box 928 Lawrence, KS 66044-0928 1-888-653-6111 www.kuendowment.org

Gift Information

100 percent of your gift will be used to benefit the area of your choice at the University of Kansas.

A portrait of David will be displayed in the new reading room, along with his story, in hopes of inspiring students to follow in David’s footsteps to a lifetime of learning. Tricia said, “I would love for students to enter this room, and think of a man who loved KU, loved reading and loved the idea of our world becoming a better place.” v

Giving Options (choose one) q Please make check payable to: KU Endowment q Credit Card # ________________________________

Exp. Date _____ _____ Print Name __________________________________ Signature ____________________________________

By Katie Coffman

I/We would like to

Vosper Society giving level:

q Give securely online: kuendowment.org/givetoKUL

Named for renowned librarian and former director of KU Libraries Robert Vosper (1913-1994), the Vosper Society honors those who demonstrate interest in and support for the future vitality of the KU Libraries’ service to teaching and learning at KU. Help us commemorate what would be Vosper’s 100th birthday by making a gift of $100 or more, which will automatically enroll you as a member in the Vosper Society. Learn more at lib.ku.edu/vosper.

make a gift of :

q Benefactor - $2,500+ q Friend - $100+

q Call 1-888-653-6111 to make a gift.

$______ in support of

q Advocate - $1,000+

KU Libraries

q Donor - $500+

Can your gift be matched?

Donors who give at least $1,000 by June 30, 2013, will be invited to a special tour and dinner at Allen Fieldhouse on Aug. 28. For more information, contact Rebecca Smith, executive director of communications and advancement for KU Libraries, at 785-8641761 or rasmith@ku.edu. v Bibliophile is published in print and online semi-annually by the University of Kansas Libraries for alumni, friends and benefactors. Printing is paid for with private contributions.

Gift is from:

q KU Community any giving level AFFILIATION: _________________________

Name ___________________________________________________ Address __________________________________________________ Robert Vosper. Image courtesy of KU University Archives, Kenneth Spencer Research Library.

Dean of Libraries – lorraine j. haricombe Editor – Rebecca Smith | Content – Katie Coffman Design and production – Courtney Foat and Luke Englert

__________________________________________________

Preferred email ____________________________________________ Phone number _____________________________________________

Pliny, the Elder. “Naturae historiarum libri xxxvii,” Hagenoae: T.A. Badensis, 1518. Courtesy of Kenneth Spencer Research Library.

A. Phillips—the first mayor of Salina. The box bears the inscription, “In recognition of William J. Crowe and his service as the inaugural chair of the KU Libraries Board of Advocates, 2009-2012.”

To acknowledge his outstanding service as the first chair of the KU Libraries Board of Advocates, former dean of libraries Bill Crowe has been honored with the creation of a box specially constructed in the Stannard Conservation Laboratory to protect KU’s “first rare book.” This container will help preserve the Spencer Research Library’s 1518 edition of Pliny the Elder’s “Naturae Historiarum,” which was the gift, in 1886, of William

A gift to Spencer Research Library

English is Professor Emeritus of History and former chair of the Department of History and Political Science at Baker University in Baldwin City. He joined the Baker faculty in 1965 and taught

Since Crowe completed his service as chair in 2012, his successors include Edwyna Condon Gilbert, Barbara Schowen and Kala Stroup. Stroup, the current board chair, will serve in this position through the summer of 2014. v

(CONTINUED FROM FRONT)

“These materials present exciting possibilities for cross-disciplinary research,” said Beth Whittaker, assistant dean of distinctive collections. “Scholars will find something interesting whether they are looking into Baskin as an artist, the literature around which he based his work, or the book arts and the fine press movements more generally.”

“These materials present exciting possibilities for cross-disciplinary research.” - Beth Whittaker

Crowe’s service to the libraries spans more than two decades, and includes his roles as librarian administrator and advocate. He was instrumental in the formation of the Board of Advocates, and Crowe’s leadership as inaugural chair brought together this key group that has become an important part of his legacy at KU and critical to the libraries’ fundraising efforts.

courses on English, South Asian and religious history, among others. English received his undergraduate education at Washington University in St. Louis; a master’s degree from Yale; and his Ph.D. from Vanderbilt. He was awarded a fellowship by the U.S. Office of Education to pursue additional studies at the University of Chicago. John’s wife, Evonne, is a painter and printmaker. Thanks to her, he became acquainted with Leonard Baskin’s prints and drawings. This in turn led to his interest in the books that Baskin published or designed. “This gift is a token of appreciation for the research library and all it offers,” English said. “What I have given is but a small nucleus of Baskin’s work—a book arts collection that I hope another might be interested in building upon.” v

Your gift may be enhanced through employer matching gift programs. You may be eligible if you or your spouse are employed by, serve on a board for, or are retired from a matching gift company. Contact your HR department or call 1-800-661-5874 or visit kuendowment.org/matching.

Company ______________________________________________ Spouse’s Company ______________________________________________ LBN (00639)

The University of Kansas prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, ethnicity, religion, sex, national origin, age, ancestry, disability, status as a veteran, sexual orientation, marital status, parental status, gender identity, gender expression and genetic information in the University’s programs and activities. The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding the non-discrimination policies: Director of the Office of Institutional Opportunity and Access, IOA@ku.edu, 1246 W. Campus Road, Room 153A, Lawrence, KS, 66045, (785)864-6414, 711 TTY.

Left: “Crow” from a New Year’s greeting, [Crow & Pomegranate Press Mark], c. 1964, wood engraving, 3.4 x 2.6 inches. Center: [Two-page “E” spread} from “A Gehenna Alphabet: The Drawings by Leonard Baskin with Aphorisms and Poems by Sidney Kaplan.” Northampton: Gehenna Press, 1982, wood engraving, approximately 9 x 6.5 inches each sheet. Right: “Sons” from “Titus Andronicus.” Northampton: Gehenna Press, 1969, etching, 32 x 20 cm. Images courtesy of the John C. English Collection of Leonard Baskin, Kenneth Spencer Research Library. Produced by permission of the Estate of Leonard Baskin. © Estate of Leonard Baskin. Courtesy Galerie St. Etienne, New York.


A note from Debbie McCord, our partner at KU Endowment

Passion for lifelong learning

By Debbie mccord

Debbie McCord, the development director for KU Libraries, has deep roots at KU, beginning 16 years ago at the KU School of Social Welfare, where she managed events and alumni relations. Since then, she has moved to KU Endowment, where she cultivates and stewards major gifts for the libraries and the School of Social Welfare. Feel free to contact her at dmccord@ kuendowment.org or 785-832-7372. Under the capable leadership of Dean Lorraine Haricombe, KU Libraries are thriving. Each year the libraries make critical strides to enhance support and services that benefit all of KU; they have accelerated the open access movement to make taxpayer-funded research more widely available; and they are working toward a new organizational structure that will better position the libraries as a leading campus partner in teaching and discovery. Yet with growth comes need. This past year we have seen a flourish of generosity through gifts in support of the libraries. Many of these contributions aim to augment the libraries’ existing resources. In this issue, for example, you’ve read about the Beaham family’s gift to establish a quiet retreat within the Learning Studio of Anschutz Library—something KU students have voiced is lacking at our busiest branch. Other gifts to the Learning Studio

include $25,000 pledges from Gladys and Bob Sanders, and Becky and Jim Pruett; both gifts will name tutoring spaces in the studio. Enhancement of the Learning Studio is a campaign priority for the libraries, and will reinforce the chancellor’s goals for recruitment and retention. Our donors are diverse with distinct backgrounds and priorities, and there are so many ways to support the libraries. Perhaps you will want to carry on your family’s legacy through a naming opportunity. The Kenneth Spencer Research Library requires funds to catalog and preserve materials that serve as the institutional memory of KU. Maybe you’ll want to acknowledge and support that we were the first public university to adopt a faculty-led open access policy, making our peer-reviewed journals available to all. Or you can help us continue to move forward in our digitization efforts, which open up a world of information and help our graduate students with their theses and dissertations. Some have great memories of studying in the stacks and want to give unrestricted support to the libraries. No matter what stirs you, there is a giving opportunity that matches your passion. Contributing to the libraries means providing support across campus—benefiting every student, faculty member and unit at KU.

By Katie Coffman

favorite poem of David’s, and one that each Beaham family member can recite by heart: Rudyard Kipling’s “If.”

“I would love for students to enter this room, and think of a man who loved KU, loved reading and loved the idea of our world becoming a better place.” - Tricia Beaham David’s wife, Tricia, explained that this gift was the perfect solution to combine his love for reading and his passion for KU. “There is no greater gift that we can give to others—and to society—than the gift of knowledge. Information instills in us an understanding and appreciation of our own views and those of others.” Conceptual rendering of the David Beaham Reading Room at Anschutz Library.

is set to open the first day of classes this fall. The room will be located on the east side of Anschutz, awash in natural light and overlooking the third-floor atrium below. With a floor-to-ceiling glass wall enclosing the space, it will provide a much-needed quiet retreat for private study. The reading room will also feature a

Sincerely, Debbie McCord KU Libraries Director of Development at KU Endowment

Celebrate Vosper’s 100th

Book dedicated in honor of inaugural board chair

(CONTINUED FROM FRONT)

P.O. Box 928 Lawrence, KS 66044-0928 1-888-653-6111 www.kuendowment.org

Gift Information

100 percent of your gift will be used to benefit the area of your choice at the University of Kansas.

A portrait of David will be displayed in the new reading room, along with his story, in hopes of inspiring students to follow in David’s footsteps to a lifetime of learning. Tricia said, “I would love for students to enter this room, and think of a man who loved KU, loved reading and loved the idea of our world becoming a better place.” v

Giving Options (choose one) q Please make check payable to: KU Endowment q Credit Card # ________________________________

Exp. Date _____ _____ Print Name __________________________________ Signature ____________________________________

By Katie Coffman

I/We would like to

Vosper Society giving level:

q Give securely online: kuendowment.org/givetoKUL

Named for renowned librarian and former director of KU Libraries Robert Vosper (1913-1994), the Vosper Society honors those who demonstrate interest in and support for the future vitality of the KU Libraries’ service to teaching and learning at KU. Help us commemorate what would be Vosper’s 100th birthday by making a gift of $100 or more, which will automatically enroll you as a member in the Vosper Society. Learn more at lib.ku.edu/vosper.

make a gift of :

q Benefactor - $2,500+ q Friend - $100+

q Call 1-888-653-6111 to make a gift.

$______ in support of

q Advocate - $1,000+

KU Libraries

q Donor - $500+

Can your gift be matched?

Donors who give at least $1,000 by June 30, 2013, will be invited to a special tour and dinner at Allen Fieldhouse on Aug. 28. For more information, contact Rebecca Smith, executive director of communications and advancement for KU Libraries, at 785-8641761 or rasmith@ku.edu. v Bibliophile is published in print and online semi-annually by the University of Kansas Libraries for alumni, friends and benefactors. Printing is paid for with private contributions.

Gift is from:

q KU Community any giving level AFFILIATION: _________________________

Name ___________________________________________________ Address __________________________________________________ Robert Vosper. Image courtesy of KU University Archives, Kenneth Spencer Research Library.

Dean of Libraries – lorraine j. haricombe Editor – Rebecca Smith | Content – Katie Coffman Design and production – Courtney Foat and Luke Englert

__________________________________________________

Preferred email ____________________________________________ Phone number _____________________________________________

Pliny, the Elder. “Naturae historiarum libri xxxvii,” Hagenoae: T.A. Badensis, 1518. Courtesy of Kenneth Spencer Research Library.

A. Phillips—the first mayor of Salina. The box bears the inscription, “In recognition of William J. Crowe and his service as the inaugural chair of the KU Libraries Board of Advocates, 2009-2012.”

To acknowledge his outstanding service as the first chair of the KU Libraries Board of Advocates, former dean of libraries Bill Crowe has been honored with the creation of a box specially constructed in the Stannard Conservation Laboratory to protect KU’s “first rare book.” This container will help preserve the Spencer Research Library’s 1518 edition of Pliny the Elder’s “Naturae Historiarum,” which was the gift, in 1886, of William

A gift to Spencer Research Library

English is Professor Emeritus of History and former chair of the Department of History and Political Science at Baker University in Baldwin City. He joined the Baker faculty in 1965 and taught

Since Crowe completed his service as chair in 2012, his successors include Edwyna Condon Gilbert, Barbara Schowen and Kala Stroup. Stroup, the current board chair, will serve in this position through the summer of 2014. v

(CONTINUED FROM FRONT)

“These materials present exciting possibilities for cross-disciplinary research,” said Beth Whittaker, assistant dean of distinctive collections. “Scholars will find something interesting whether they are looking into Baskin as an artist, the literature around which he based his work, or the book arts and the fine press movements more generally.”

“These materials present exciting possibilities for cross-disciplinary research.” - Beth Whittaker

Crowe’s service to the libraries spans more than two decades, and includes his roles as librarian administrator and advocate. He was instrumental in the formation of the Board of Advocates, and Crowe’s leadership as inaugural chair brought together this key group that has become an important part of his legacy at KU and critical to the libraries’ fundraising efforts.

courses on English, South Asian and religious history, among others. English received his undergraduate education at Washington University in St. Louis; a master’s degree from Yale; and his Ph.D. from Vanderbilt. He was awarded a fellowship by the U.S. Office of Education to pursue additional studies at the University of Chicago. John’s wife, Evonne, is a painter and printmaker. Thanks to her, he became acquainted with Leonard Baskin’s prints and drawings. This in turn led to his interest in the books that Baskin published or designed. “This gift is a token of appreciation for the research library and all it offers,” English said. “What I have given is but a small nucleus of Baskin’s work—a book arts collection that I hope another might be interested in building upon.” v

Your gift may be enhanced through employer matching gift programs. You may be eligible if you or your spouse are employed by, serve on a board for, or are retired from a matching gift company. Contact your HR department or call 1-800-661-5874 or visit kuendowment.org/matching.

Company ______________________________________________ Spouse’s Company ______________________________________________ LBN (00639)

The University of Kansas prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, ethnicity, religion, sex, national origin, age, ancestry, disability, status as a veteran, sexual orientation, marital status, parental status, gender identity, gender expression and genetic information in the University’s programs and activities. The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding the non-discrimination policies: Director of the Office of Institutional Opportunity and Access, IOA@ku.edu, 1246 W. Campus Road, Room 153A, Lawrence, KS, 66045, (785)864-6414, 711 TTY.

Left: “Crow” from a New Year’s greeting, [Crow & Pomegranate Press Mark], c. 1964, wood engraving, 3.4 x 2.6 inches. Center: [Two-page “E” spread} from “A Gehenna Alphabet: The Drawings by Leonard Baskin with Aphorisms and Poems by Sidney Kaplan.” Northampton: Gehenna Press, 1982, wood engraving, approximately 9 x 6.5 inches each sheet. Right: “Sons” from “Titus Andronicus.” Northampton: Gehenna Press, 1969, etching, 32 x 20 cm. Images courtesy of the John C. English Collection of Leonard Baskin, Kenneth Spencer Research Library. Produced by permission of the Estate of Leonard Baskin. © Estate of Leonard Baskin. Courtesy Galerie St. Etienne, New York.


Spencer adds rich variety of rare books from the 16th through 18th centuries with Eliot S. Berkley Collection By Sarah Kanning

Fewer than five European and American libraries report having Appian of Alexandria’s history of Roman civil wars (1551) or Diodorus Siculus’s history of the Italian city states of Venice, Milan, Mantua, and Ferrara (1548). “Because of Dr. Berkley’s gift, we have both at Spencer,” said Cook. One volume, whose vellum or leather covers is ornamented in gold with family crests, can be traced to noblemen’s libraries and reflects the earlier practice of selling books unbound. And illustrations printed from engraved copper plates grace the pages of several of the books, Cook said. Those illustrations include maps, battle scenes, landscapes, allegorical images and portraits that bring the author or the subject of the book to life. v

Far Above: The Campaign for Kansas, a comprehensive campaign to advance KU and the University of Kansas Hospital, launched its public phase in April of 2012, and is well on its way to a fundraising goal of $1.2 billion. Far Above seeks support to educate future leaders, advance medicine, accelerate discovery and drive economic growth. With the ultimate goal to secure a leading position among top-tier public research universities and academic medical centers in America, campaign priorities were established through extensive consultation with leaders throughout the university and hospital. v

spring 2013 A University of Kansas Libraries publication for alumni, friends and benefactors

MAJOR GIFTS

April 9, 2013: The Dole Institute of Politics and KU Libraries hosted a program on the Tuskegee Airmen, the nation’s first African American military aviators, featuring KU professor Kevin Willmott, who discussed the historical and racial significance of their service through the film lens. The program, The Tuskegee Airmen: “Red Tails” Examined by Kevin Willmott, was the final event in a threepart series on African Americans in World War II that was made possible by KU Associate Professor Dr. Sandra Gautt, a member of the KU Libraries Board of Advocates. Photo by Courtney Foat.

Mark your calendars: An Evening with Naismith: Artifacts of a KU Legend Join us for hors d’oeuvres, cocktails and a rare opportunity to view and hold artifacts from KU’s University Archives relating to the life and legacy of James Naismith.

Ninon de l’Enclos. “Lettres de Ninon de l’Enclos au Marquis de Sevigné.” Amsterdam: Chez Francois Joly, 1750. Courtesy of the Eliot S. Berkley Collection, Kenneth Spencer Research Library.

Houston, TX: Tuesday, June 11 | 6–7:30 p.m. 1941

Rhythm and Meaning: Jazz at KU Come see a selection of our rich jazz collection— one of the largest sound archives west of the Mississippi—and enjoy hors d’oeuvres, cocktails and KU camaraderie.

Chicago, IL: Thursday, June 27 | 6:30–8 p.m. Omaha, NE: Thursday, July 11 | 6–7:30 p.m.

“Dr. Berkley’s gift is a tremendous addition to our library. It will be a fantastic resource for scholars who come here,” said Beth Whittaker, assistant dean of distinctive collections. “This gift highlights the profound difference that private support makes to a research library like Spencer.” A Kansas City native and Harvard graduate, the late Dr. Berkley received his Ph.D. through Princeton University. He was active in educational and social-action organizations, and founded the International Relations Council in 1954, which continues to reach audiences to foster an understanding of international affairs in greater Kansas City. “Dr. Berkley had an excellent eye for old books and actively collected them for more than 50 years,” said Dr. Karen Cook, special collections librarian at Spencer Research Library. “While scholars will study the texts, a wider audience will appreciate the beauty and rarity of the books.”

St. Louis, MO: Monday, July 22 | 6–7:30 p.m. For additional event details, visit lib.ku.edu/events.

Questions? Comments? Email us at rasmith@ku.edu or send your letter to: Bibliophile; 502 Watson Library; 1425 Jayhawk Blvd.; Lawrence, KS 66045. Dr. Wade Williams and his family recently visited University Archives in Spencer Research Library to view drawings, memorabilia and other materials relating to his father Dr. Gene “Yogi” Williams, creator of the 1941 Jayhawk. The Williams family donated more than 30 original pencil and ink drawings to the Archives, many of which were drawn by Yogi when he was a KU student on the Jayhawker yearbook staff. Guiding Dr. Williams through the materials is University Archivist Becky Schulte. Photo by Rebecca Smith.

facebook.com/kulibraries twitter.com/kulibraries flickr.com/kulibraries youtube.com/kulibraries

David Beaham was passionate in all he did—leading a fourth-generation family business; continuing his quest for knowledge as an avid reader; supporting military leadership development through the Command and General Staff College in Leavenworth, Kan.; living life to its fullest with his wife and children; and of course, cheering on KU, his alma mater. David’s life was unexpectedly cut short when he died of a heart attack in October of 2011, but his family is seeing that his legacy lives on through a gift that will benefit students and faculty at KU. David Beaham is survived by his wife, Tricia, and three children: Taylor, who will attend KU’s School of Education next fall for early childhood development, Gracie, age 12, and Parker, age 16.

(CONTINUED INSIDE)

KU Libraries on the Road: KU Libraries staff members had the opportunity to display a traveling exhibit for “Rhythm and Meaning: Jazz at KU” during the KU Alumni Association’s annual Rock Chalk Ball, which drew 775 alumni and friends to the Overland Park Convention Center April 27. Photo by Katie Coffman. The exhibit also will make appearances in Chicago, Omaha and St. Louis this summer. For questions, contact Rachel Karwas, KU Libraries’ events coordinator, at 785-864-8961 or rkarwas@ku.edu.

CAN’T GET ENOUGH OF BIBLIOPHILE? Browse Bibliophile online at issuu.com/kulibraries.

By Katie Coffman

The Beaham family has generously donated $100,000 to establish a new reading room in Anschutz Library, which

Dallas, TX: Wednesday, June 12 | 6–7:30 p.m.

KEEP IN TOUCH!

A gift of 16th, 17th, 18th and 19th century rare books from Dr. Eliot S. Berkley to the Kenneth Spencer Research Library at the University of Kansas will offer scholars new insights into the period in such diverse topics as religion, philosophy, military and political history, geography, biography, social commentary and science. The gift significantly expands Spencer’s holdings of European literature from the Renaissance through the Enlightenment.

Denver, CO: Thursday, May 30 | 6–7:30 p.m.

Passion for learning will endure through memorial gift

1425 Jayhawk Blvd. Lawrence, KS 66045

A gift to Spencer Research Library expands book arts collection, provides cross-discipline resource By Katie Coffman

Over the years, Baker University professor John English has amassed hundreds of items featuring American artist Leonard Baskin. Last fall, he decided to seek a new home for part of his collection. English’s search brought him back to a familiar place, where he once had spent “many happy hours” for his own research, poring over books and periodicals from late 17th and 18th century England—the Kenneth Spencer Research Library at the University of Kansas. Leonard Baskin (1922-2000) was a master printmaker who also was known for his sculpture, watercolors and book designs. In 1952, he founded the Gehenna Press, located in Northampton, Mass., to produce fine books in limited editions. Baskin designed and frequently illustrated the dozens of elegant books that the press published. The new John C. English Collection of Leonard Baskin contains more than 150 items, including fine press and

commercial volumes, exhibition catalogues, ephemera and works on Baskin. Among these are 22 volumes published by Baskin’s Gehenna Press, as well as additional Gehenna broadsides and ephemera. Also present are numerous editions of poetry and literature from commercial publishers that contain illustrations by Baskin, including eight volumes by the poet Ted Hughes, with whom he frequently collaborated. (CONTINUED INSIDE)

IN THIS ISSUE: • Spencer adds rich variety of rare books from 16th through 18th centuries with Eliot S. Berkley Collection • A note from Debbie McCord, our partner at KU Endowment • Celebrate Vosper’s 100th • Book dedicated in honor of inaugural board chair


Bibliophile, spring 2013