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2015–16

Annual Review


Reflections on 2015 A YEAR OF SUCCESSFUL TRANSITIONS 2015 was a year of historic remembering, where campus celebrated KU’s sesquicentennial and 150 years of innovative, educational successes. The sesquicentennial’s commemorative events allowed the collective KU community to reflect on decades of KU progresses despite economic uncertainty and cultural shifts and transitions. Through 2015, KU Libraries also transitioned. Mary Roach and Kent Miller continued their role as interim co-deans, working tirelessly to guarantee that KU Libraries remain the center of academic innovation on campus. Their work has maintained an environment of achievement, guiding the libraries to provide programming, instruction and resources across campus.

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KU LIBRARIES ANNUAL REVIEW 2015–16

KU Libraries also introduced Kevin L. Smith as the incoming dean, remaining confident that his expertise and oversight will continue to propel KU Libraries forward. “I am honored to have joined the leadership team at KU Libraries,” said Smith. “Kent and Mary have been instrumental in maintaining a culture of excellence. In the time we have spent together, I’ve been given insight into the libraries’ and witnessed the passion and compassion our interim deans have upheld.” This review illustrates the progress made during a year in transition, showcasing student, faculty and staff successes throughout the libraries and across campus.


“I am honored to have joined the leadership team at KU Libraries.” -Kevin L. Smith

Incoming Dean of Libraries

KU LIBRARIES ANNUAL REVIEW 2015–16

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Enhancing student success The Centers for Undergraduate and Graduate Initiatives & Engagement assist students in achieving their educational potential by facilitating dialogues on research and acting as collaborators to aid in student success. Each center provides invaluable outreach, including writing and research assistance, data management oversight and more. KU Libraries continue to prioritize efforts to refine collaborations across the organization in order to improve the scalability of outreach efforts—allowing library faculty and staff to expand the scope and breadth of their contributions toward student learning and success.

STUDENT ENGAGEMENT Research consultations and instruction sessions with graduate and undergraduate students Apr. 1, 2015–Mar. 30, 2016

Research consultations:

831

Caleb Bobo is a senior studying political science and African-American studies. He has been involved in Student Senate, the Student Endowment Board, the Dole Institute of Politics' Student Advisory Board, the Student Alumni Leadership Board and KU Libraries’ Image of Research.

“Simply put, I probably wouldn’t have made it to graduation without KU Libraries.” -Caleb Bobo

students

KU Senior

“Not only does it serve as an amazing place to study, but the resources housed within the libraries are amazing,” said Bobo. “Their collection of books, newspapers, academic journals, primary resources and more has, on several occasions, assisted me with projects. Additionally, the research help offered by the librarians is unmatched and has several times connected me to research/information that I couldn’t find on my own.”

Instruction: graduate undergraduate

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KU LIBRARIES ANNUAL REVIEW 2015–16

9,790 students


KU LIBRARIES ANNUAL REVIEW 2015–16

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KU Libraries Student Ambassadors The Student Ambassadors engage undergraduate students in enhancing the libraries’ services and facilities. Their contributions remain a valuable part of the libraries, providing feedback and assisting in campus-wide outreach. Here’s a short introduction of the KU Libraries’ ambassadors: KATHERINE BERGER English JESSE BURBANK History and Political Science EMILY DERRICK Journalism: Strategic Communications and Sociology LAUREN FOULKES English: Creative Writing

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KU LIBRARIES ANNUAL REVIEW 2015–16

MEGAN FOX English and Global & International Studies HEATHER GARCIA English and Women’s Studies ALI GHAISARNIA Athletic Training JENA KLAAS Community Health

AMY LEVIN English and French TYLAR LOCK Nursing PARAKH MODY Biochemistry MARGARET MOORE English BRENNA MURRAY English


NINA NGANGA Human Biology: Anthropology EMILY NIELSEN Biology and Math BRYCE PRESKO Computer Engineering KATELYNN SCHULTZ Theatre and Law

STUDENTS LEARNING IN THE LIBRARIES Conducive to quiet study or group work, the libraries provide students access to spaces that meet a variety of educational needs to support diverse student learning. Tutoring and group study rooms provide students with private locations to finish assignments, work with others and reach their educational potential. Study rooms can be reserved and remain in high demand for undergraduate and graduate students alike.

USE OF GROUP STUDY ROOMS

25,260

Anschutz Library | Jan.–Dec. 2015

hours reserved in 19 rooms Contributions from friends of KU Libraries enable students to utilize and enjoy spaces within the libraries. Many individual donors, families and groups have shown their support and pride by naming spaces. Most recently, Ed and Marie Meyen (pictured at left) named a group study room in Anschutz Library. KU LIBRARIES ANNUAL REVIEW 2015–16

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The Learning Studio The Learning Studio is a dynamic, studentcentered space located on the third and fourth floors of Anschutz Library. This library is also home to an array of innovative resources, such as a technologically savvy active learning classroom and the School of Journalism’s interactive Media Crossroads.

A WEEK IN THE STUDIO Group room time slots reserved by day, Anschutz Library | Jan.–Dec. 2015 200 150 100 50

SUN

MON

TUE

WED

THU

FRI

SAT

A PLACE WITH DIVERSE FEATURES The Studio provides students with inviting and flexible spaces and a wide variety of resources and services to support their learning needs:

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24-hour study facility

KU LIBRARIES ANNUAL REVIEW 2015–16

Enclosed areas for group study

Scenic Beaham Family Reading Room


A PLACE FOR DIVERSE CONVERSATIONS The Learning Studio provides space for discussions and conversations on relevant campus and community issues. In 2015, for example: • Studio staff partnered with the Office of Multicultural Affairs to discuss microaggressions on campus. • The Studio hosted the first annual “Ideate” collaboration, where campus and community partners discussed water and resources shortages happening in Lawrence. The Studio frequently hosts events and workshops and offers many more opportunities to share student work and collaborate with others.

Cafe with light food and beverages

More than 140 computer work stations

Tutoring services

Essential services provided by on-site staff

KU LIBRARIES ANNUAL REVIEW 2015–16

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“Generous contributions have facilitated fieldwork and the acquisition of materials that enable the diverse lives of Kansans to be incorporated into the region’s permanent historical record.” -Deborah Dandridge

Field Archivist, African American Experience Collection Deborah Dandridge works to acquire donations of written and photographic materials that highlight the African American experience in Kansas and the Great Plains, overseeing the expanded growth of the African American collections in the Kansas Collection. A 2008 recipient of the Gretchen and Gene A. Budig Distinguished Librarian Award for KU library faculty, she is also co-author of the national traveling exhibit, "In Pursuit of Freedom and Equality: Kansas and the African American Public School Experience, 1855-1955.” She began work at the Kenneth Spencer Research Library more than 30 years ago.

Collecting untold stories DONOR CONTRIBUTIONS ENABLE EXPANDED COLLECTION OF AFRICAN AMERICAN AND LATINO/A EXPERIENCES A generous lead gift from KU alumnus Dana Anderson and his wife, Sue Anderson, supported the creation of KU Libraries’ Anderson Family Archivist for Diverse Experiences fund within the Kansas Collection at the Kenneth Spencer Research Library. In order to support teaching and research at the university and around the world, librarians work to acquire, preserve and make available resources that detail life in the Kansas region. In 1985, in cooperation with the African and AfricanAmerican Studies department, the Kansas Collection greatly expanded a collecting program designed to increase opportunities for researchers interested in state and regional African-American history. With financial support from the Andersons, the program has amassed significant resources. The Anderson Family Archivist for Diverse Experiences, once endowed, will provide additional staffing necessary to build a complementary collecting program to preserve letters, photographs, documents and stories of the Latino/a populations of Kansas. Contributions to the Anderson Family Archivist for Diverse Experiences fund will help ensure KU Libraries have the financial means to support staffing and resources to acquire and preserve the stories of our past and present.

KU LIBRARIES ANNUAL REVIEW 2015–16

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TRANSFORMING LIBRARIES

Gifts from KU librarians continue to be notable. Recently, KU Libraries received a major estate gift from former KU Librarian Ann Hyde, totaling $655,000. Hyde, who passed away in June 2014, was manuscripts librarian at Spencer Research Library before she retired in 2000. “Ann’s contributions as manuscripts librarian were integral in raising the profile of Spencer among the world’s special collections libraries,” said Beth Whittaker, assistant dean of Distinctive Collections and director of Spencer Research Library. Hyde’s generosity complements a 2015 gift to KU Libraries from the late Alexandra “Sandy” Mason, Spencer’s first librarian. Mason left a $1.03 million estate gift to KU Endowment to benefit KU Libraries, and specifically, Spencer Research Library.

SUSTAINING STUDENT SCHOLARSHIP The Sanders Scholars Program, created through a gift from former dean of KU Libraries William J. Crowe, provides a scholarship for graduate or undergraduate students working with a librarian. The 2015 Sanders Scholar recipient is Jamie Rees, mentored by Sarah Goodwin Thiel, KU Libraries’ community engagement librarian and exhibits program coordinator. Rees and Goodwin Thiel are developing the Traveling University Libraries Exhibit, a flexible, portable exhibition template for use in the KU Mobile Collaboratory.

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KU LIBRARIES ANNUAL REVIEW 2015–16


Gifts in action

PRESERVING LEGACIES KU Libraries have launched a crowdsourcing campaign entitled “Preserving the Legacy of the Phog” to digitize more than 66,000 documents and memorabilia from the late Forrest “Phog” Allen. Gifts from donors will assist in sustaining the legacy of the “Father of Basketball Coaching.”

2015 marked the farewell to 50-year-old McCollum Hall, named after brothers Elmer V. McCollum and Burton McCollum.

REMEMBERING HISTORY Gifts to KU Libraries, financial and material, have the potential to reach vast audiences. Spencer Research Library, for example, houses historic documents that have been useful evidence in a recent legal case. The papers of Burton McCollum played a central role in deciding the origin of designs for accelerometers—a claim disputed within the civil case. A native Kansan, McCollum graduated from KU in 1903 with a degree in electrical engineering and went on to invent the world’s first electric accelerometer, an electromechanical device used to measure acceleration forces. His gifted documents provided expert witness Dr. Ron BarrettGonzalez, associate professor of aerospace engineering at KU and director of the Adaptive Aerostructures and Aircraft Design Laboratories, the primary resources necessary to uncover the original accelerometer designs. KU LIBRARIES ANNUAL REVIEW 2015–16

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CELEBRATING OUR RICH HISTORY In honor of the sesquicentennial celebration, KU Libraries launched a series of exhibits to commemorate historic successes at KU. “KU 150: Celebrating 150 years of Leadership, Scholarship and Tradition at the University of Kansas" was featured in Watson Library’s Haricombe Gallery. The exhibit uncovered the rich and diverse contributions made to the university throughout its long history.  U Libraries collaborated across K campus to transform the KU Mobile Collaborator, also known as the MoCOLAB, into a mobile gallery, re-creating the “KU 150” exhibit. The MoCOLAB traveled to the KU Edwards Campus, expanding the reach and celebration of KU’s 150year history. “The Achievement of a Dream: The Birth of the University of Kansas” was showcased in Spencer Research Library and highlighted original documents, photographs and memorabilia related to KU’s 1865 origins. Library faculty and staff created and launched “In Their Own Words: Selected Interviews from the Endacott Society Oral History Collection.” The digital collection features selected interviews documenting the lives and experiences of KU faculty and staff—recollections that begin as early as 1917. KU Libraries brought a traveling exhibit of historic university artifacts across the country in collaboration with the KU Alumni Association. These events gave alumni and friends a direct glimpse at archived materials, such as Baby Jay’s shoes.

KU LIBRARIES ANNUAL REVIEW 2015–16

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Faculty support and success KU Libraries support faculty as teachers, researchers and scholars. For example: • The Center for Faculty Initiatives & Engagement hosted a reception for new faculty, introducing faculty to librarians with diverse expertise and beginning dialogues on how KU Libraries can assist and support faculty throughout their scholarly processes. • The Shulenburger Office of Scholarly Communication & Copyright coordinated a suite of events for faculty and students during Open Access Week, informing attendees about scholarly publishing opportunities, the benefits of open access journals and related library resources and expertise.

2015 KU LIBRARIES FACULTY RESEARCH KU faculty librarians also contribute original research and scholarship across diverse fields.

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16

4

book chapters

30 7

other scholarly works

16

articles

creative works or exhibitions

editorial instances or memberships

KU LIBRARIES ANNUAL REVIEW 2015–16

Erin Ellis, assistant dean of Research & Learning at KU Libraries, has been selected as a 2016-17 Association of Research Libraries Leadership Fellow. This fellowship facilitates growth and development for future leaders in research libraries through a program of self-assessment, workshop sessions, strategic institutes and shadowing opportunities with current library deans. “I am so honored to be selected to participate in such a prestigious and respected program,” said Ellis. “I believe that the success of academic libraries lies in our ability to build and capitalize on partnerships and relationships, and that this must come from an organization that is agile, adaptable and actively engaged with users.”

“I look forward to expanding my skills to further the mission of KU Libraries.” -Erin Ellis

Assistant Dean of Research & Learning


KU LIBRARIES ANNUAL REVIEW 2015–16

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Committing to open educational resources KU Libraries remain an international leader in promoting open access to scholarly materials. In 2015, our faculty and staff expanded open access advocacy by responding to the increased cost of textbooks—costs that regularly fall on students’ shoulders.

PERCENT CHANGE SINCE 1978 PERCENT CHANGE SINCE 1978:

AL

812%

Source: BLS, Census Bureau

812% 575%

575%

MEDICAL SERVICES

325%

NEW HOME PRICES

325%

250%

250%

1980

1990

2000

EDUCATIONAL TEXTBOOKS

CONSUMER PRICE INDEX

2010

HIGH TEXTBOOK COSTS LEAD STUDENTS TO: Source: The Florida Distance Learning Consortium

51% not buy a textbook

24%

11%

withdraw from a class

not register for a class

7%

fail a class

STUDENTS SPEAK UP

HIGH COST OF TEXTBOOKS Students expressed concerns about the rising cost of textbooks in anSTUDENTS open forum held by KU Libraries. To the LEADS TO:

right are select direct quotations from KU students who responded to a simple prompt, “How are you affected by high51% cost texts?” not buy textbooks

“Actively chase classes with cheap books.”

24%

not register for classes

11%

withdraw

7% fail

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KU LIBRARIES ANNUAL REVIEW 2015–16


IN RESPONSE: • KU Libraries joined the Open Textbook Network (OTN), an alliance of schools from across the country committed to improving access, affordability and academic success through the use of open textbooks. • The libraries’ Shulenburger Office of Scholarly Communication & Copyright and the Open Textbook Initiative team also hosted workshops for KU faculty with national experts David Ernst and Sarah Cohen. • KU Libraries partnered with KU Endowment’s Parents Campaign, where a portion of the funds raised will benefit efforts in open educational resources, by offering grants to faculty who wish to adopt or adapt already published open textbooks (no fees, no copyright restrictions) in their classes, or to faculty who wish to author a new open textbook.

“Paying $250 for a ‘custom’ text from my teacher when the last edition was just as good and only $20 on Amazon.”

“Last semester $650. Not even from the bookstore. Can’t sell back because it’s ‘no longer used.’”

“I had to give my cat away to pay for books over vet bills!!”

KU LIBRARIES ANNUAL REVIEW 2015–16

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ACCESSIBLE RESEARCH CENTRAL TO DEBATE TEAM SUCCESS KU’s nationally ranked debate team relies heavily on the libraries’ resources and databases to maintain their No. 1 public university ranking. The team, coached by Dr. Scott Harris, has an astounding record, including five national titles. In 2015, the debate team won the National Debate Tournament Varsity National Rankings Championship and the National Junior Division National Championship. In addition, they placed second at the Cross Examination Association National Championship. Their success continued in 2016, placing second at the National Debate Tournament. “The libraries allow us remote access to prestigious journals and databases,” explains Harris. “The tournament experience requires that you research all day, every day, so accessible electronic resources are vital for timely scholarly and news updates. In addition to online resources, access to books and hard copy materials are also instrumental to our research.”

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KU LIBRARIES ANNUAL REVIEW 2015–16

The Jayhawk debaters also host a summer debate institute for high school students to learn argumentation and research skills. In 2015, the Jayhawk Debate Institute housed 180 students from across the U.S. “We take seriously the educational mission of our team,” said Harris. “Part of that mission is providing young students guidance on research and argumentation through our summer camp and giving each student access to libraries’ databases, books and resources.”


“Research is a central component to debate and necessary for national success.” -Scott Harris

KU Debate Team Coach

NEW STRIDES IN DATA MANAGEMENT Library faculty and staff continue to advance efforts in data management and research reproducibility. KU Libraries collaborated with KU Research, KU Information Technology and the Center for Research Methods and Data Analysis (CRMDA) to host a well-attended workshop on research reproducibility provided by the Center for Open Science, home of the Reproducibility Project. The workshop covered easy, practical steps researchers can take to increase the reproducibility of their work and focused on topics including project documentation, version control and open source tools. Additionally, pilot efforts related to data management planning and dissemination of graduate students’ electronic theses and dissertations were implemented, and librarians continue to provide outreach through workshops and one-on-one consultations for faculty and staff to expand data management expertise and outline best practices.

ALUMNI THANKFUL FOR DATABASE ACCESS “I am profoundly grateful for being able to access KU Libraries’ databases of academic and business journals,” said William Panning, a KU alumnus who has published more than 80 articles. “During my career, I helped senior executives understand and apply quantitative methods to improve their business decisions, a role that required extensive use of library resources. Since retiring I continue to write and publish, but no longer have access to crucial periodical databases on which I previously relied. Imagine my delight in learning that membership in the KU Alumni Association now enables me to utilize KU Libraries’ databases! I am incredibly grateful for this new benefit. It has made a huge difference in my ability to continue pursuing a principle goal of my life’s work.” Interested in gaining access to select KU Libraries journals? More information can be found online at kualumni.org/libraries. KU LIBRARIES ANNUAL REVIEW 2015–16

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BOARD OF ADVOCATES The KU Libraries Board of Advocates serves to advise the dean, providing the necessary resources to promote and achieve the mission and vision of KU Libraries. Members develop strategies that increase a sense of pride, loyalty and connection with KU Libraries. They also help devise communication strategies in order to share information about the quality of our programs and services with those beyond the university community. “The board plays an active leadership role in the libraries, encouraging alumni and friends to donate their time, talent and resources to support the services and programming offered through KU Libraries,” said Rebecca Pruett, chair of the Board of Advocates. “I am honored to uphold the board’s commitment to represent and advocate on behalf of the libraries.” For a complete list of members of the Board of Advocates, please visit lib.ku.edu/board.

THANK YOU We are grateful to the many friends and benefactors whose valuable support helps to preserve and build upon the libraries’ critical resources and diverse collections for the benefit of Jayhawks for generations to come. A complete list of 2015 donors is available at lib.ku.edu/giving.

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KU LIBRARIES ANNUAL REVIEW 2015–16


KU LIBRARIES ANNUAL REVIEW 2015–16

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lib.ku.edu Pictured on the cover: KU’s Debate Team

INTERIM CO-DEANS

Kent Miller & Mary Roach INCOMING DEAN

Kevin L. Smith

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS & ADVANCEMENT, EDITOR

Rebecca Smith

CREATIVE DIRECTION

Courtney Foat CONTENT

Meggie Mapes & LeAnn Meyer PHOTOGRAPHY

LeAnn Meyer & Nikki Pirch DESIGN

Nikki Pirch & Sarah Hinman

The University of Kansas prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, ethnicity, religion, sex, national origin, age, ancestry, disability, status as a veteran, sexual orientation, marital status, parental status, gender identity, gender expression and genetic information in the University’s programs and activities. The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding the non-discrimination policies: Director of the Office of Institutional Opportunity and Access, IOA@ku.edu, 1246 W. Campus Road, Room 153A, Lawrence, KS, 66045, (785) 864-6414, 711 TTY.

30% The mark of responsible forestry

30% post consumer fiber

Produced by Kingston Printing Paid for with private funds


lib.ku.edu 1425 Jayhawk Boulevard | Lawrence, Kansas 66045 | 785-864-3601

KU Libraries Annual Review 2015-16  

The University of Kansas Libraries' review of accomplishments from 2015-16 and a glimpse of priorities moving forward into next year.

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