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Christopher and Lindsay Shepard don’t yet have children, but when they do they want to coach their sports teams and be involved in their schools. “Having two attorneys in the family, if we were both working at a megafirm – or even at a midsize firm in a bigger town – the demands of the job would preclude us from both being able to be involved in our kids’ lives to the extent that we can here,” Christopher Shepard says.

Rural opportunities Sen. Derek Schmidt ends his KBA journal article with a sales pitch for small-town lawyering. “There’s opportunity out on the rural frontier for recent law school graduates and for midcareer professionals looking for a change,” he writes. In this economy, Peckham thinks more law students should consider practicing in small communities. He admits it’s not for everyone. There’s no dry cleaner in Atwood, for example. Residents take their clothing to the grocery store, which sends jobs to Hays and gets them back a few days later. But the Internet makes shopping and tapping into state library resources possible, and it’s only a few hours to Hays and a few more to Denver. “If family is important and they’re willing to get involved in the community and strike out on their own, they might want to look at some of the small towns in southeastern and northeastern Kansas and the west,” he says. “There are opportunities out here. They’re going to have to go out and work, be willing to make mistakes. But there’s a lot of room out here for attorneys if what they’re thinking about is becoming part of the community and knowing that they may do more than just be an attorney.”

Scholarship encourages students to practice in small-town Kansas scholarship established by a KU Law alumnus helped lure Katie Cheney home. Established in 2000, the Bremyer Summer Clerk Scholarship Fund provides scholarships for law students who accept and complete summer internships with law firms in small Kansas towns. Cheney, L’08, received the scholarship two summers in a row while clerking at Frasier & Johnson in her hometown of Beloit. “Until the clerkship, I had no idea how many different areas of law a ‘small-town attorney’ really deals with on a daily basis,” she says. “I was surprised and excited because I knew I wanted to work in a general practice firm and work on many different types of cases.” Todd Rogers, assistant dean for career services, says his office encourages students to think about a Bremyer-eligible summer clerkship through an annual panel discussion, the involvement of attorneys from western Kansas in events like Legal Career Options Days, and a steady stream of e-mails from December to the end of the academic year. “If a student is from western Kansas, the likelihood that they’ll be interested in clerking there over the summer is greatly enhanced,” he says. John Bremyer attended KU until 1942, when he was com-

missioned as ensign in the U.S. Navy. He served at sea, then with the chief of naval operations, and finally as officer-in-charge of the Officer Courier Service in Washington, D.C., until discharged as lieutenant. He returned to KU, finishing his law degree in July 1946. He practiced law in his hometown of McPherson with Bremyer & Wise until retiring. Bremyer died in 2008. His scholarship program has provided summer funding for more than 30 students – awarding more than $108,000 – since its inception. “I think the Bremyer program is an excellent program for law students,” Cheney says. “I believe I learned more and probably saw more court time than some of my classmates who took a research job during the summer. I did my fair share of research and briefs, but was also able to see a lot of different types of cases. “I have encouraged and will continue to encourage current law students to consider the program. It was a great learning experience and helped me land a job after law school.”

KU LAW MAGAZINE 7

KU Law Magazine | Spring 2009  

A magazine for alumni and friends of the University of Kansas School of Law. Story highlights include: Alumni spread legal roots in rural Ka...

KU Law Magazine | Spring 2009  

A magazine for alumni and friends of the University of Kansas School of Law. Story highlights include: Alumni spread legal roots in rural Ka...