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Lawrence law firm of Thompson Ramsdell & Qualseth and a 1997 KU Law graduate, said the deposition skills and concepts he taught KU students during the workshop were the same ones he and his law partners taught associates at the firm. “Like anything, practice makes perfect,” he said. “The students in the workshop crammed a lot of practice SEPT into a short time. When the time comes for them to take or defend their first depositions, they will already have a lot of practice under their belts.” “By the third day, the students had become comfortable enough with the basics that they could focus on themes and fleshing out in-depth information from the witnesses,” Qualseth said. “A lot of the instruction on the third day involved very nuanced aspects of a deposition – nuances that are only possible if there is a mastery of basic skills and a level of confidence.” In addition to Davis, Qualseth and Valdez, the following attorneys helped teach the course: n Ron Bodinson, L’73, a partner at Shook, Hardy & Bacon n Chuck Marvine, L’96, chief trial attorney for the Commodity Futures Trading Commission Division of Enforcement n Joyce Rosenberg, L’96, Lawyering instructor at KU Law and experienced litigator with three Kansas City law firms Despite the nerves involved, Collier said that she and her classmates had fun learning from experienced attorneys in a practical setting that SEPT remained relaxed enough for occasional laughter. “I think more KU Law courses should be offered like this,” Collier said. “It really gives students a chance to focus solely on one topic at a time, which I found refreshing and effective.”

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Geneticist probes power, problems of DNA technologies at biolaw symposium Princeton University geneticist Lee Silver predicts there will come a time when parents use DNA technologies to ensure that their children are resistant to cancer and have artistic aptitude. Silver presented the keynote address at the Kansas Journal of Law and Public Policy symposium. During Biolaw 2.0: Law at the Frontiers of Biology, Nov. 13-14, 2008, Silver and other distinguished scholars shared cutting-edge research on the intersections of law and science, morality and health, religion and progress.

WATCH video of geneticist Lee Silver’s keynote address at the 2008 Kansas Journal of Law and Public Policy symposium

Judge discusses environmental protection at the U.S. Court of International Trade Russell native Judith M. Barzilay, a judge on the U.S. Court of International Trade, explained to an audience at the law school how environmental protection cases end up at the court, which only handles cases that involve imports to the United States. Barzilay visited Green Hall on March 31, giving a guest lecture to students in Raj Bhala’s Advanced International Trade Law class before delivering her public address, “Environmental Protection at the U.S. Court of International Trade: Walking the Tightrope between Protecting the Environment and Complying with our International Agreements.” This was Barzilay’s second visit to the law school in two years. Devin Sikes, L’08, is clerking with Barzilay at the court.

LISTEN to a podcast of Judge Judith Barzilay’s lecture on “Environmental Protection at the U.S. Court of International Trade”

KU LAW MAGAZINE 17

KU Law Magazine | Spring 2009  

A magazine for alumni and friends of the University of Kansas School of Law. Story highlights include: Alumni spread legal roots in rural Ka...

KU Law Magazine | Spring 2009  

A magazine for alumni and friends of the University of Kansas School of Law. Story highlights include: Alumni spread legal roots in rural Ka...