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RAW Autumn/ Winter 2016

KUDOS | a celebration of food

08 All new

recipes inside Hipster tipples for Bonfire Night David Cavalier’s alternative Christmas dinner Our Cockney-English Food Handbook

SHARING OUR PEARLS OF WISDOM Find out what makes us different


from peter bruun , senior partner kudos As we enter the autumn season and watch the trees shed their leaves and nature prepare itself for winter, we at KUDOS are also building up momentum. Having recently joined the company, I am proud to say that we have built a solid and dynamic senior management team - combining decades of experience from within KUDOS with a number of newcomers; bringing new influences, ideas and extremely high standards. Together we are tirelessly working to improve all of our bespoke food retail offerings and catering solutions which will reflect our proud historic pedigree, coupled with creativity and innovation; all centred around seasonality, premium quality food and service. I hope you enjoy this issue of RAW which again very much sets the tone for where we are going in the future. A MASSIVE thank you to Head Chef, Bradley Smith, and General Manager, Jonathan Mulgrew from Winchester Cathedral. We couldn’t have produced this magazine without the wonderful KUDOS team at the Cathedral. LOOK OUT for the Cathedral’s magical Christmas market this December. www.winchester-cathedral.org.uk/events/christmas-market-2/

other contributers David Cavalier, Food Director, KUDOS Rocio Redoli, creative Max Burnett, photography

kudos Crown House, 855 London Road, Grays RM20 3LG T: 01708 711 200 E: hello@kudosknowhow.co.uk @kudosknowhow

RAW | issue #2 | page 2

| PLUMS | PHEASANT | PUMPKINS | QUAIL | RABBIT | RASPBERRY | SALSIFY | SCALLOPS | SEA BASS | SKATE | TRUFFLE | TURNIPS | VENISON | WATERCRESS | WILD DUCK | WILD MUSHROOMS |

Hello!

T H E

AUTUMN S E A S O N Lingering leaves, burning bonfires, playful pumpkins, glorious game, shucking good shellfish, colourful cardigans and wonderful walks Autumn begins with the autumn equinox in late September and ends in late December with the winter solstice.

Autumn is the best season … There’s conkers to smash, apples to bob, pumpkins to carve, fruit and nuts to gather and hoard. The mornings are crisp and clear. The trees are bronzed and golden. The vintage scarves are flapping. The morning pumpkin spiced lattes are back!

Are you game for trying something new? Be inspired! Isn’t it about time you tried your hand at jam making, apple pressing or cider making? It might even be time to get pickling? It’s harvest time which means only one thing… an abundance of delicious apples, pears and blackberries and a world of homebaked treats.

Our culinary repertoire takes a seasonal shift in autumn with different methods of preparation such as ‘pot-roasted’ and ‘slow-cooked’, and the introduction of more powerful and rustic dishes, rich sauces and bold colours.

It’s time to get your game on! British game starts to appear in our farmers’ markets with wild pheasant, partridge, rabbit and venison full of rich deep flavours too tempting not to give them a go.

| LAMB | MACKEREL | MUSSELS | NATIVE OYSTERS | PARSNIPS | PARTRIDGE | PEARS | PIGEON | PLAICE |

Autumn/ Winter 2016

| CAULIFLOWER | CELERIAC | CHESTNUT | CHICORY | CLAMS | CRANBERRY | FENNEL | GREY MULLET | GLOBE ARTICHOKE | GROUSE | HARE | HAZELNUTS | HERRING | HORSERADISH | KALE |

RAW

| APPLES | BEETROOT | BROCCOLI | BRUSSELS SPROUTS | BUTTERNUT SQUASH | CABBAGE | CARROTS |

RAW | issue #2 | page 3


WAYS TO GIVE YOUR CONKER SOME ARMOUR PLATING … Boil in water Store in shoebox for 1 year Paint with nail varnish Dip in cement Soak in vinegar for 1 month Freeze Bake

Horse CHESTNUTS

Today, classic cockney or mockney rhyming slang is as popular as ever.

FOOD SLANG

SLANG FOOD

APPLES AND PEARS - STAIRS

ARMY AND NAVY - GRAVY

LOOP THE LOOP - SOUP

BREAD AND HONEY - MONEY

Today, conker fights are frowned upon, if not banned from most primary schools. Some schools allow it but provide students with safety goggles - #bonkersconkers. So forget the iPads and PlayStations, the real action is outside this autumn.

APPLE CIDER - SPIDER

BORROW AND BEG - EGG

ROAST PORK - FORK

SAUSAGE ROLL - GOAL

SPANISH ONION - BUNION

PIG AND ROAST - TOAST

ROSY LEE - TEA

CUSTARD AND JELLY - TELLY

The game

BAKED BEAN - QUEEN

GIVE AND TAKE - CAKE

RUBY MURRAY - CURRY

LOAF OF BREAD - HEAD

Drill a hole in a large hard conker (aka nut) Thread a 20cm piece of string (or shoelace) through the nut Tie a large knot at one end Find a friend Player 1 lets their nut dangle on the full length of the string Player 2 swings their nut to smash their opponent’s Alternate and repeat until one nut is smashed.

MINCE PIES - EYES

PLATES OF MEAT - FEET

SATIN AND SILK - MILK

SHERBERT (DAB) - CAB

BREAD AND CHEESE - SNEEZE

SCOTCH EGGS - LEGS

we came, we saw, we conkered

WINNER!

Food slang

&

Slang food

TEMPTING TOFFEE APPLE INGREDIENTS 10 Granny Smith apples 150ml water 600g Golden Tate & Lyle caster sugar 1.5 tsp white wine or clear vinegar 5 tbsp golden syrup Hundreds and thousands Mini marshmallows Small mixed nuts Diced dried fruit

Apples & PEARS “apples and pears” is the most widely recognised cockney rhyming slang

Historically the polished display of apples and pears was used as “steps” and “stairs” to market the best fruit.

RAW | issue #2 | page 4

Rhyming slang originated in the mid-19th century in the East End of London, but was also used throughout the rest of the UK. It reached its height of popularity thanks to 80s TV hits like Only Fools and Horses and the colourful “lingo” of Del Boy and Rodney.

spoon into the boiling liquid, then place into cold water. The toffee should harden and be brittle straight away if the correct temperature has been reached. Continue cooking if the toffee has not reached the ‘crack and brittle’ point.

Place the apples in a large container. Boil a kettle and pour the boiling water

Every good fruit and veg man worth his salt knows how to set up an attractive market stall, and you wouldn’t be a successful trader without good old cockney rhyming slang.

thermometer or dip a small

over them. Leave for two minutes. Drain the water off. Wipe the apples dry. Lightly grease a flat tray.

Place a skewer into the stem side of each apple. Work quickly and carefully. Dip and twist each apple in the toffee until coated, then place onto the greased

To make the toffee, place the sugar

tray, Heat the toffee again if

and water into a pan. Boil for a few

needed to coat all of the apples.

minutes. When the sugar has

To give the apples a slight twist,

dissolved, add the vinegar and

try also coating them in the

golden syrup. The mixture needs

marshmallows, mixed nuts or

to reach 150c – use a sugar

hundreds and thousands. RAW | issue #2 | page 5


Halloween

Bonfires

a cauldron of halloween high jinks

get your hipster hipflask at the ready !

For some, All Hallows’ Eve is all about the fancy dress and face paint, but we’re more about taking a twisted culinary stance to test, tease, trick or treat the taste buds and celebrate a gastronomic explosion. To take the hassle (and horror) away, our

team have trawled through an abundance of innovative ideas to ensure your Halloween has those all-important devilishly divine dishes. Here’s some of our ‘trick or treat’ style favourites from our hero chefs, super trendy restaurants and funky foodie blogs.

SPICED POPPING CANDY CHOCOLATE TART

CRAB DONUTS

BLOOD ORANGE MARGARITAS

An indulgent treat bursting with sumptuous chocolate, foraged walnuts and crumbly shortbread, all served up with a sweet surprise of a popping candy crunch.

Who said donuts should be sinfully sweet? Chiltern Firehouse has certainly got our taste buds tinging with a deceitfully savoury version!

Why let all the food have the fun, let’s gross-out our cocktails too! These wonderfully authentic citrus margaritas certainly pack a zingy punch and the ruby red colour adds to the Halloween festivities.

www.chilternfirehouse.com

Pumpkins

it’s a smashing pumpkin

For what once was invented as a logistical and concealed solution to carrying a sneaky nip of whiskey, the humble hipflask today is becoming a super trendy essential for the free-thinking travellers and ‘too cool for a glass’ hipsters. Whichever self-confessed category you fall into we have the ideal hipflask to suit all. SWIG offer the trendiest and bespoke hipflasks that boast individuality and on-point fashion. Each of the hipflasks have their own unique ‘passport’ number allowing the members of the SWIG Society to snap a selfie, with their hipflask of course, and post it to the eagerly awaiting society.

If Benedict Cumberbatch can sneak a cheeky hipflask into the Oscars, what’s stopping us from being prepared this fireworks night and heading out into the frosty night with a vessel of our favourite tipple?

Furthermore, our Creative Director, Daniel Clifford, has waved his two Michelin-starred wand and created the perfect boozy bonbon to pair with your winter warmer. Daniel’s whiskey sours are ideal for sharing around a bonfire or dipping into whilst firework gazing. So, make sure your hipflask is on-fleek this winter with SWIG and keep your sweet cravings at bay with Daniel’s whiskey sour bonbons. Visit: www.swigflasks.com Create: www.greatbritishchefs.com/recipes/whiskey-sours-recipe

Blackberries homemade hedgerow wild blackberry gin

shakedown

Our team has been waiting all year to choose their weapon of choice and hack away to their hearts’ content in a bid to transform the humble pumpkin into a work of art. The ‘pimp my pumpkin’ war has been declared and we’re only weeks away from declaring our winning pumpkineer. PUMPKIN CARVING 101:

RAW | issue #2 | page 6

1. Choose your pumpkin and use a sharp serrated knife to cut off the top. 2. Using a large serving spoon, scoop out the seeds and fibres, then discard or save for a pumpkin-licious recipe. 3. With a marker pen, draw a simple outline of your design on the pumpkin. 4. Use a small serrated knife to cut out the eyes, nose and mouth. Always cut away from you in case the knife slips - we don’t want a real life gore-fest!

Perfect for any autumn foragers (failing that, your supermarket), our blackberry gin is an easy to make tipple that’s a great companion for a cold night and perfect for your hipflask!.

Shake the mixture every day for about a week. Pass the liquid through a fine cheese cloth. Pour the liquid through a funnel into a clean bottle. Seal with a tight-fitting lid. The alcohol will last for 12 months but is best used at Christmas!

METHOD Place the blackberries and sugar into a suitable size pan, then allow to stand at room temperature for two hours. Heat the mixture on a low heat until the sugar has dissolved. Cool the mixture. Transfer to a clean bowl. Add the gin and tightly cling film the bowl.

INGREDIENTS 450g wild blackberries 225g caster sugar 750ml gin

RAW | issue #2 | page 7


S callops

S uper

simple

&

4

sustainable !

Portions

Scallops sometimes get a bad press for being hard to cook, but how hard can it really be? The great thing about scallops is they can be steamed, fried, roasted or grilled and once you understand how quickly they cook, you’ll never overcook them! FOR THE SCALLOPS Cut the ham lengthways and use to wrap the scallops. Heat a non-stick frying pan and add some olive oil and slowly fry the remaining ham until it is nice and crispy. Drain the excess oil from the pan and sear the scallops on each side for a couple of minutes.

FOR THE APPLE SAUCE Place all the ingredients into a covered pan on a low heat and cook until the apples start to turn to mush. Place into a food processor and blend into a fine purée.

FOR THE CALVADOS FOAM Place all the ingredients, except the double cream, into a suitable size pan and bring to a simmer. Reduce the liquid by half, add the cream and reduce by one third, until the sauce has a velvety appearance. Pass the sauce through a fine sieve, season and foam using a hand blender.

TO SERVE

50g caster sugar 6 Granny Smith apples, peeled and chopped (retain peelings) 2 tbsp water Small squeeze of lemon juice

½ small onion, finely chopped 12 scallops beards and roes, black sacks removed 25ml Calvados 25ml white wine 50ml water Peelings from 3 Granny Smith apples 125ml double cream

t

all

p ap

l

e

as

pu

Ro sc

Raw | issue #2 | page 8

12 medium fresh scallops 9 slices of air-dried Cumbrian ham (or Parma ham) Olive oil Bunch of chervil

e

Place a spoonful of the apple purée on the desired serving plates with the scallops on top. Spoon over the Calvados foam and garnish with the fried ham and chervil.

INGREDIENTS

op

& sw m ith a h d Cumb e i r rian air-d

RAW | issue #2 | page 9


VENISON FEISTY FOOD

Loin of wild venison ‘Wellington’ with Madeira sauce

FROM ‘THE DUKE’

METHOD

History books will tell us that the Brits defeated Napoleon at the battle of Waterloo in 1815. but

Finely chop the mushrooms by hand. Finely chop the shallots, then sweat in butter with the crushed garlic. Add the mushrooms and cook until the liquid has evaporated. Season with salt and pepper, then cool. Season the venison, then seal the outside surface over a high heat. Leave to cool.

do you know the myth explaining how the first

Duke of Wellington stoked the fire in his belly on the eve of battle? An indulgent dish of beef, mushrooms, Madeira and pastry - AKA beef Wellington. Here’s our twist on a military classic.

Mix the mushroom mixture into the raw chicken mousse, then add thyme and mix. Taste the mixture and check the seasoning. Lay the Parma ham (or caul fat) on a sheet of cling film as large as the size of the venison. Place the blanched spinach on top of the Parma ham (or caul fat). Spread the mushroom and chicken mixture on top of the spinach. Lay the venison fillet at the edge of the mushroom mousse, using the cling film to help roll the layers around the venison, trimming any excess off that overlays. Remove the cling film and place into a refrigerator to firm up.

Once the fillet is firm, completely wrap around with puff pastry sealing any joins with egg wash. Place the ‘Wellington’ on a suitable baking tray and egg wash. Place back into the refrigerator so that the egg wash dries, then brush with egg yolk to give it a nice rich golden colour when cooked. Preheat the oven to 170c/180c, then place into the oven for approximately 20 to 25 minutes, or until the pastry is a deep rich golden brown. A more precise way of cooking the Wellington is to use a meat probe. After 16 minutes place the probe into the centre of the meat and when it reaches 52c it will be a perfect pink. If the pastry is not a deep golden colour, turn the oven up to 200c to brown the pastry faster, or if it has reached the right colour but not reached 52c, place some tin foil over the pastry to protect it. Rest the Wellington for 15 to 20 minutes before you cut. Serve with the sauce and appropriate garnish.

6

Portions

INGREDIENTS 1kg of trimmed loin of venison 250g mixed wild and cultivated mushrooms 2 cloves of crushed garlic 3 banana shallots, finely chopped 50g unsalted butter ½ bunch of picked and blanched thyme leaves 100g chicken mousse 400g cauls fat or ten slices of Parma ham 20 large blanched spinach leaves Two packs of ready to use puff pastry Egg wash and egg yolk Salt and milled pepper Olive oil

FOR THE SAUCE Place the venison and chicken wings into a suitable roasting tray, then lightly roast the bones. Drain any excess fat, then add the chopped vegetables. Lightly colour in the roasting pan on top of the stove with the bones. Add the red wine and the chicken stock to lightly colour the bones and vegetables, scraping all the residue from the bottom of the tin. Transfer the contents of the roasting tray to a suitable sized sauce pan, then simmer for 20 minutes, skimming off any fat. In a clean pan add the Madeira and reduce by two thirds, then pass the liquid from the first pan through a fine sieve onto the Madeira reduction. Reduce to the required consistency. Whisk a knob of butter into the sauce, then spike with a dash of Madeira at the end. Check the sauce for seasoning.

RAW | issue #2 | page 10

1kg chopped venison bones 250g chicken wings 2 large chopped carrots 1 large chopped onion 1 clove crushed garlic 2 large sprigs of thyme 35cl red wine 50cl chicken stock 20cl Madeira

RAW | issue #2 | page 11


pitch p e rf ec t p e a r p u d d in g

A

P ears RAW | issue #2 | page 12

12~14 Portions

P ear &

brioche

pudding

This decadently creamy pudding is not for the faint-hearted and is the perfect recipe for the delicate sweet taste of succulent autumn pears. It’s a palpable pear paradise!

Bradley Smith, Head Chef Winchester Cathedral

FOR THE CUSTARD Bring the milk, sugar and vanilla beans to the boil. Place the whole egg and yolks into a large bowl. Whisk together, then add the whipping cream. Add the boiled milk, sugar and vanilla. Leave to infuse for 30 minutes, then strain

4 white wine poached pears

4 brioche buns

INGREDIENTS 750ml whipping cream 250ml semi skimmed milk 1 whole egg 300g sugar 7 egg yolks 2 vanilla bean split

4 cooked croissants

Line the bases of 14 ramekins with sliced pear. Slice the brioche or croissants so that they half-fill the bases of the ramekins. Fill to the top with the custard.

reaches halfway up the sides of the ramekins. Place the tray into a pre-heated oven at 140c, then cook for 40 minutes until just set. Serve hot or cold.

Place the ramekins into a roasting tray lined with old newspaper. Fill with hot water so that the water

N.B. You can add a dash of Poire Williams pear brandy to the custard.

RAW | issue #2 | page 13


T H E

WINTER S E A S O N Frosty fields, comforting casseroles, deluxe double duvets, multi-coloured mittens, fabulous fires, rollicking roasts, crummy crackers, triumphant turkeys, haphazard hangovers and diehard detoxing. Winter begins with the winter solstice at the end of December and ends in late March with the spring equinox.

Winter is the most festive season…Ever! There’s soup to simmer, tipples to taste, snowmen to build (sometimes!), marshmallows to toast, presents to wrap and resolutions to keep. Before you know it the nights are longer, the street lights are on, the winter woollies and ear muffs are out, the TV box sets are ready and waiting and the John Lewis advert is on repeat! Fill up your hot water bottle, tuck into your gourmet marshmallow vanilla hot chocolate, chop down your Christmas tree and look forward to the festive family fun, or a luxury winter escape! Mother Nature may be asleep preparing for the new spring, but all is not lost, winter is the season for entertaining, family gatherings, harvesting roots and hearty hotpots!

| CELERY | CITRUS FRUITS | CLAMS | CLEMENTINE | COCKLES | COD | DRIED FRUITS | ENDIVE | GOOSE | GROUSE | HALIBUT | HARE | HERRING | JERUSALEM ARTICHOKE | KALE | LEEKS |

| PIGEON | PLAICE | POMEGRANATE | PURPLE SPROUTING BROCCOLI | QUAIL | RABBIT | SALSIFY | SATSUMAS | SCALLOPS | SWEDE | TRUFFLE | VENISON | WILD GOOSE | WILD DUCK | WINKLES | WOODCOCK |

| BLOOD ORANGE | BRUSSELS SPROUTS | BROCCOLI | CABBAGE | CAULIFLOWER | CELERIAC |

MULLED WINE

& C R A NBE R R Y

12~14 Portions

christmas cake

Can you get tipsy on cake? This is a gorgeously fragrant, rich and moist fruit cake that packs a punch! Brimming with cranberries and doused in mulled wine, it’s an absolute joy. METHOD Soak the fruit the night before you bake the cake. Pour the port into a saucepan and drop in the mulled wine bag, a strip of orange zest and the cloves. Bring to the boil, then take off the heat and allow the flavours to infuse for 15 minutes. Mix the dried fruit and peel in a large bowl. Strain the mulled wine port onto it. Discard the mulling spices and orange peel. Cover the bowl with cling film, then leave at room temperature overnight.

Heat the oven to 140c. Grease and line the tin with a double layer of parchment paper. Beat the butter and sugar until light and creamy. Slowly add the beaten egg, adding a little flour if it starts to curdle. Fold in the rest of the ingredients and the soaked fruit. Spoon into a tin. Smooth the surface with a spoon, then make a slight dip in the middle. Bake for 60-70 minutes or until an inserted skewer comes out clean. Remove from the oven. Allow to cool before storing or decorating.

INGREDIENTS 500ml sweet port Mulled wine sachet ½ tsp whole cloves 1 strip orange zest 50g dried cranberries 35g butter 25g dark muscovado sugar 25g mixed peel 25g glace cherries 25g whole almonds 1 egg, beaten Large pinch mixed spice Large pinch cinnamon Pinch ground cloves 50g self raising flour

| LEMON SOLE | MACKEREL | MULLET | MUSSELS | OYSTER | PARSNIP | PARTRIDGE | PHEASANT | RAW | issue #2 | page 14

RAW | issue #2 | page 15


Turkey

Keep calm and get your pie on!

Christmas in a pie

8~12 Portions

If you’re the designated cook on Christmas day, take no prisoners, assume dictatorial control, don’t panic, stay focused, orchestrate your plans with precision and throw in an unusual twist to shock and awe. Christmas dinner is epic! A spectacular bronzed turkey nestled amongst golden roasted vegetables is to die for with stupendous stuffing, wonderful wine and a fizzed-up family. Chef is always at centre stage on Christmas day, so why not try something a little different this year and give your guests an unexpected Christmas bonus.

David Cavalier, Food Director

INGREDIENTS 200g chestnut mushrooms 100g peeled cooked chestnuts 20g flaked thyme 35cl red wine or port 1 egg for egg wash Salt and milled black pepper

RAW | issue #2 | page 16

1 oven ready turkey (Legs removed, meat diced) 100g baby onions peeled and blanched (or frozen) 1 ltr turkey or chicken jus 1 large sheet of puff pastry Olive oil

Season the turkey leg meat with salt, pepper and thyme. Fry the meat in a frying pan until golden. Remove and keep warm. Fry the mushrooms and onions until golden. Add the turkey meat back in, add the wine and reduce by half. Add the chestnuts and turkey jus. Braise until the meat is tender and then cool.

fill them all. Cut enough rounds of puff pastry to suit the amount of ramekins you have. Brush the egg wash around the inside outer circle of the pastry. Place onto the ramekin, then seal the pastry over the ramekin. Brush the outer side of pastry with egg wash. Place into a fridge until needed.

The portion sizes you yield will depend on the size of the turkey and the size of the pots you use. Select several small ramekins and divide the mixture until you

Pre-heat an oven to 180c and cook the ramekins for about 20 – 30 minutes, depending on size. Serve on Christmas day.

RAW | issue #2 | page 17


1

Portion

BLOOD ORANGE Orange is the new quack

Salad of duck confit with orange, lamb’s leaf, pine nuts & orange dressing This exquisite warm winter salad is a quacking good treat METHOD Season the duck leg with rock salt and leave for one hour. Place all of the ingredients into a suitable size pan. Bring to the boil. Place in an oven at 120c and slowly cook for two hours. Remove the duck leg and cool.

TO FINISH Cook the strips of orange in a little boiling water with a little sugar until tender, then remove and cool. Lightly coat the leaves with the dressing. Place them onto the centre of the plate, then place the crispy duck leg on top and garnish with the cooked orange strips. Spoon the dressing around the plate, then scatter over some pine nuts.

INGREDIENTS 1 duck leg (duck fat, enough to cover) 50g carrot 1 onion Bay leaf 2 garlic cloves 1 orange, peeled Sprig of thyme

TO MAKE THE DRESSING Whisk the mustard and honey together. Whisk in the orange juice followed by the olive oil. Season and taste. If the dressing is a little sweet then add a few drops of lemon juice or white wine vinegar. Place the duck leg onto a suitable ovenproof tray. Turn the oven up to 160c and roast until crisp for 30-40 minutes.

RAW | issue #2 | page 18

60g lambs lettuce 1 orange, peeled and juiced (cut peel into thin strips) 60ml olive oil 1 tsp Dijon mustard ½ tsp honey 15g toasted pine nuts

RAW | issue #2 | page 19


superfoods

superfood superheroes Superfood seekers in 2017 are scrapping the hellish word ‘diet’ and replacing it with an upbeat clean regime. We know how hard it is to avoid those tempting treats, but we all need a little life balance so we’ve given you

Avocado oil

a head start on a few life hacks into what superfoods to look out for in 2017. These 14 fab favourites will have you powering through january and prepping for that beach body in no time.

Black rice

Avocado oil is the new coconut oil, high in monounsaturated oleic acid, a heart healthy fatty acid.

Black rice is crammed with antioxidants, vitamin B1 and 30 times more fibre than white rice. Nutty!

Natural sweeteners

Black beans

Kohlrabi

These powerful beans are crammed full of minerals and vitamins, and also pack a punch of protein.

This ‘turnip cabbage’ is the new kale of 2017, exceptionally rich in vitamin C and boosts immunity.

Sweet potato flour

Black pudding

Maca root

Teff

Blood sausage is going to become a superstar in 2017 as it’s packed with protein and practically carb-free.

Also known as Peruvian ginseng, it is available in a powder and can be added to smoothies, juices and puddings.

“Sugar is bad!”, so artificial sweeteners such as raw honey, pure stevia, lucuma or monk fruit are very popular.

Gluten-free, paleo-friendly and packed with all the goodness of a sweet potato. Rich in flavour with a slight sweetness.

This Ethiopian gluten-free crop has tiny seeds and is the new quinoa. High in calcium, iron, protein & amino acids.

RAW issue #2  

Celebrate the autumn and winter seasons in Issue 2 of RAW Magazine brought to you by KUDOS; hipster tipples for Bonfire Night, David Cavalie...

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