Page 1


come here, go anywhere


3


welcome to Indiana University Maurer School of Law In these pages, you will learn a little more about

African American to serve on any state supreme

this great institution.

court, the first woman chief justice of Wisconsin,

The Law School has a tremendous history. Founded in 1842, and the ninth-oldest law school in the nation, our school celebrates its 175th anniversary this year. Our graduates have taken on leadership roles in the country’s most respected law firms, from Wall Street to Main Street. They have built and nurtured successful businesses that drive today’s global economy. And they have

alumni include giants like US Supreme Court Justice Sherman Minton, US Representative Lee Hamilton, and US Senator Birch Bayh. Our global influence has at times been even greater. We have one of the oldest LLM and SJD programs for international lawyers and collaborations with universities around the globe.

chosen careers in public service, on Capitol Hill,

Our legacy lies not just with our alumni.

and on the front lines of advocacy for people who

Since our founding, many of the nation’s most

need it most.

prominent scholars have called Bloomington

No matter what career they've chosen, our alumni make a difference in their community — wherever that may be. Every year, nearly 60 percent of our entering JD class comes from outside Indiana, representing nearly 100 undergraduate institutions in 25 to 30 states.

home. We became one of the leading institutions committed to the law and society movement in legal scholarship, which during the 1950s and 1960s involved a concerted effort to replace the “law on the books” approach with a “law in action” approach.

When they graduate, nearly 60 percent choose

That tradition of excellence continues today. We

jobs outside Indiana.

are proud to have pathbreaking scholars in a

Part of our proud legacy is how our graduates have left their mark. They include the first JapaneseAmerican admitted to the bar in the US, the first

4

and the first woman chief justice of Indiana. Our

wide range of fields. Our expertise is strongest in research focused on intellectual property, international and comparative law, environmental law, and criminal law, as well as tax, business


law, and entrepreneurship. Our Center for Constitutional Democracy and our Milt and Judi Stewart Center on the Global Profession are among a very few number of centers in the world exploring these areas of research and building new fields. We have received accolades for our pioneering work in the area of cybersecurity. For each new class, we build on this legacy. We look for remarkable individuals: students who want to be part of a lively community of smart, motivated, supportive classmates who are ready to learn and eager to make an impact. Our research centers, our live-client clinics, our pro bono projects, our Washington, DC externship program, our foreign summer internships, and our unique curricular offerings are designed not just to provide tremendous learning experiences, but to enable students, working hand-in-hand with faculty, to make a difference outside the classroom. For us, we are building not just a class, but protecting a legacy. I look forward to meeting you and seeing you in Bloomington.

Austen Parrish Dean and James H. Rudy Professor of Law

5


Baier Hall is the Law School’s main building. It is located on the corner of Indiana University’s flagship Bloomington campus, adjacent to Dunn’s Woods, but only steps away from shopping, restaurants, and free bus service.

6


3

9

9

30 15 23 25 25 27

third-most beautiful college campus (CondĂŠ Nast Traveler) ninth-oldest law school in US ninth-lowest student/faculty ratio among public law schools ranked 30th in the nation by U.S. News among top 15 public law schools tax program ranked 23rd environmental program ranked 25th international program ranked 25th intellectual property program ranked 27th

Unless otherwise indicated, rankings are from U.S. News & World Report Best Graduate Schools, 2018 edition.

7


passionate teachers, influential scholars Indiana Law faculty are renowned for their

them some of the most sought-after experts and

passion for teaching and for being caring role

influential legal thinkers in the world, which

models and supportive mentors. In fact, many of

is why we are 14th in the country for scholarly

them have received Indiana University’s highest

impact among public schools.*

teaching honors. Their classroom discussions are rigorous and thorough, and they have a gift for challenging your old ways of thinking as never before. As part of our community, you will be invited — and expected — to join our esteemed professors in fostering the Law School’s vibrant intellectual life.

uates of the nation’s finest law schools — including this one — and their research informs and shapes contemporary legal discourse, from cybersecurity and constitutional reform to patent law and conservation. They include an award-winning filmmaker,

adjunct faculty and leading scholars to serve as guest lecturers. Every year we host numerous scholarly conferences that enrich the intellectual life of the Law School. As an upper-division student, you will be able

And our teachers are scholars, too. They are grad-

documentary

In addition, the Law School attracts impressive

acclaimed

to work alongside our faculty as an assistant, whether in one of the research centers they direct, or aiding them with their independent scholarship. Either way, you will gain additional skills and knowledge from our talented community of teacher-scholars.

authors,

Fulbright Scholars, a Carnegie Fellow, a US Supreme Court clerk, Wall Street lawyers, accomplished litigators, and members of the Council on Foreign Relations, the American Law Institute, and the American Society of International Law. Our faculty’s research makes

*Gregory C. Sisk, et al., “Scholarly Impact of Law School Faculties in 2015: Updating the Leiter Score Ranking for the Top Third,” 12 University of St. Thomas Law Journal 100 (2015).

8


the Indiana Law faculty

28 percent of faculty with advanced degrees (PhD, LLM, or SJD)

8 1

.3

student/faculty ratio

14 13 scholarly impact among public US law schools

number of faculty diversity hires in past eight years

9


highly credentialed faculty from around the world

10

Ashley Ahlbrand

William & Mary

Sophia C. Goodman

Case Western

Earl R.C. Singleton

Maurer

Alfred C. Aman, Jr.

Chicago

Gabrielle L. Goodwin

Chicago Kent

Jeffrey E. Stake

Georgetown

Amy G. Applegate

Harvard

Edwin H. Greenebaum

Michigan

J. Alexander Tanford

Duke

John S. Applegate

Harvard

Norman J. Hedges

Maurer

Inge Van der Cruysse

Maurer

A. James Barnes

Harvard

Robert H. Heidt

Wisconsin

Shana Wallace

Chicago

Jeannine Bell

Michigan

William D. Henderson

Chicago

Timothy William Waters

Harvard

Terry A. Bethel

Ohio State

J. William Hicks

Michigan

W. William Weeks III

Maurer

Brian J. Broughman

Michigan

Joseph L. Hoffmann

U. of Washington

Carwina Weng

NYU

Kevin D. Brown

Yale

Sarah Jane Hughes

U. of Washington

Deborah Widiss

Yale

Keith A. Buckley

Maurer

Feisal A. Istrabadi

Maurer

Susan H. Williams

Harvard

Hannah L. Buxbaum

Cornell

Mark D. Janis

Maurer

David C. Williams

Harvard

Fred H. Cate

Stanford

Dawn E. Johnsen

Yale

Elisabeth Zoller

UniversitĂŠ Paris II

Daniel Cole

Lewis & Clark

Jayanth K. Krishnan

Ohio State

Daniel O. Conkle

Ohio State

Seth M. Lahn

Yale

Stephen A. Conrad

Yale

Julia C. Lamber

Maurer

Paul P. Craig

Oxford

Marshall A. Leaffer

Texas

Yvonne M. Cripps

Victoria U. of Wellington

Leandra Lederman

NYU

Cindy Dabney

Maurer

H. Timothy Lovelace

Virginia

Laura B. Daghe

Illinois

Jody L. Madeira

Penn

Kenneth G. Dau-Schmidt

Michigan

Kimberly Mattioli

Michigan

Jost DelbrĂźck

Maurer

Michael Mattioli

Penn

Robert Downey

Maurer

Donna M. Nagy

NYU

Roger B. Dworkin

Stanford

Mark E. Need

Maurer

Jessica M. Eaglin

Duke

Christiana Ochoa

Harvard

Lisa A. Farnsworth

Maurer

Aviva A. Orenstein

Cornell

David P. Fidler

Harvard

Austen L. Parrish

Columbia

Robert L. Fischman

Michigan

William D. Popkin

Harvard

Gina-Gail S. Fletcher

Cornell

Jennifer S. Prusak

Michigan

Pamela Foohey

Harvard

Victor D. Quintanilla

Georgetown

Luis Fuentes-Rohwer

Michigan

Cynthia Reichard

Maurer

Ralph F. Gaebler

Maurer

Lauren K. Robel

Maurer

David Gamage

Yale

Steve Sanders

Michigan

Ann J. Gellis

NYU

John A. Scanlan

Notre Dame

Charles G. Geyh

Wisconsin

Ryan W. Scott

Minnesota

Donald H. Gjerdingen

Yale

Gene E. Shreve

Harvard


The Jerome Hall Law Library is the academic hub of the Law School. Surrounded by the beautiful acreage of Dunn’s Woods, it is one of the nation’s top-ranked law libraries, with an extensive digital repository and librarians with law degrees. The Law Library has also been active in expanding instruction for research. In 2016, for example, the library launched a series of workshops on topics such as statutes, cases, and administrative law, along with information on how technology can best serve your practice.

11


a different approach to your first year

12


THE LEGAL PROFESSION

SUMMER START

In addition to the usual 1L courses — contracts,

If you are interested in getting a head start on

torts, property, criminal, and constitutional law

your first year, you may be interested in Summer

— you will enroll in an innovative four-hour

Start. Ours is one of the few law schools in the

course called The Legal Profession. This course

country to offer students the opportunity to begin

exposes students to the ethical dilemmas associ-

their legal education in the summer. Students who

ated with specific practice settings, such as large

take advantage of this option take one first-year

firms, small firms, plaintiff’s firms, in-house

class — typically Torts — from early July through

counsel, government agencies, and prosecutors.

early August. Summer Start students are merely

In The Legal Profession, you will wrestle with

starting before their counterparts who enter in

realistic problems that ask you to apply the

the fall. They acquire learning skills and knowl-

rules of professional responsibility and to compre-

edge that those who enter in the fall have yet to

hend how economics, workplace pressures, and

gain. By the end of the summer, these students

organizational incentives affect lawyers. Work-

are familiar with the basics of legal analysis, the

ing in teams, you will present or enact solutions

school, and the community. Students who start in

to those problems and hear critiques from your

the summer will take a full course load in the fall.

fellow students.

13


curriculum

The Jerome Hall Law Library

14


courses As an Indiana Law student, you can choose from a wide variety of courses in all the areas you would expect from a top-tier law school. The upper-division courses below are grouped by our 17 Areas of Focus, but you can select the combination best suited to your interests and career goals after you complete the required first-year courses.

FIRST-YEAR COURSES Civil Procedure Constitutional Law Contracts Criminal Law The Legal Profession Legal Research and Writing Property Torts

UPPER-DIVISION AREAS OF FOCUS

BUSINESS AND COMMERCIAL LAW

ADMINISTRATIVE LAW AND GOVERNMENT REGULATION

Accounting for Lawyers Advanced Bankruptcy: Business Reorganization Antitrust Law I Banking Law Bankruptcy Business and Human Rights Business Planning Corporate Finance Law Corporations Deliberative Leadership Entertainment Law Entrepreneurship Law Clinic Insurance Law International Business Negotiations International Business Transactions International Securities Regulation International Trade Law and Sports Legal Issues in Mergers and Acquisitions Mergers and Acquisitions Municipal Finance Negotiable Instruments Non-Profit Law Clinic Non-Profit Organizations Principles of Law and Economics Sales Secured Transactions Securities Regulation Seminar in Commercial Law: Consumer Credit

Administrative Law Advanced Environmental Law and Practice American Legal History Antitrust Law Banking Law Employment Discrimination Employment Law European Union Law Immigration Law Introduction to Environmental Law Land Use Controls Lawyering in the Public Interest Legislation Public National Resources Representing the State Securities Regulation Seminar in Administrative Law: Lawyering in the Modern Administrative State Seminar on the Supreme Court as an Institution

Seminar in Corporate Law Seminar in Corporate Law: Financial Regulation Seminar in Law and Development Seminar in Law and Economics Transactional Drafting

CIVIL RIGHTS AND EQUALITY American Legal History Civil Rights Statutes Constitutional Litigation Employment Discrimination Feminist Jurisprudence Gender and the Law Human Rights Immigration Law Law and Education Law and Social Psychology Lawyering in the Public Interest Poverty Law Race, American Society, and the Law Seminar in Children and the Law Seminar in Comparative Inequality

15


16

CONSTITUTIONAL DESIGN

CONSTITUTIONAL LAW

CRIMINAL LAW AND PROCEDURE

ENVIRONMENTAL LAW

After Atrocities: Processes of Post-Conflict Justice Constitutionalism in the Middle East Constitutional Design in Multiethnic Societies Constitutional Law I Constitutional Law II Human Rights International Criminal Law Seminar in Constitutional Design: Rights, Gender, and States of Emergency

Administrative Law Advanced Constitutional Law Advanced Constitutional Law: Issues Related to the Press American Constitutional Law for Foreign Lawyers American Legal History Constitutional History Colloquium Constitutional Law II Criminal Procedure: Trial Criminal Process: Investigation Law and Religion Seminar in American Legal History Seminar in Constitutional Law Seminar in Constitutional Law: Congress, Presidency, and the Courts Seminar in Constitutional Law: The Courts, the Democratic Process, and the People Seminar in Constitutional Law: First Amendment Seminar in Constitutional Law: Sexuality, Reproduction, and the Law Seminar in Jurisprudence Seminar on Judicial Conduct State Constitutional Law

Core courses Appellate Practice and Procedure: Criminal Appeal from Transcript to Argument Criminal Law Externship Criminal Procedure: Capstone Criminal Procedure: Investigation Criminal Procedure: Trial Federal Criminal Law Federal Sentencing Law International Criminal Law Seminar in Criminal Law Seminar in Law and Psychology of Crime, Culpability, and Punishment

Core courses Introduction to Environmental Law Administrative Law Public Natural Resources Law

Other related courses Advanced Trial Practice Evidence Constitutional Litigation Federal Jurisdiction Trial Advocacy

Advanced courses Advanced Environmental Law and Practice Climate and Law Policy Seminar in Environmental Law: Institutional Analysis of Social-Ecological Systems Enrichment courses Conservation Law Clinic International Environmental Law Water Law Wildlife Law Other related courses Land Use Controls Legislation


FAMILY LAW

GENERAL PRACTICE

Community Legal Clinic Disability Law Clinic Domestic Relations Mediation Estate Planning Family Law Family and Children Mediation Clinic Feminist Jurisprudence Gender and the Law Mediation Negotiations Public Interest Internship Program Strategies in Critical Reading and Writing: Family Law Seminar in Children and the Law Seminar in Law and Society: Work, Family, and the Law

Administrative Law Bankruptcy (or Secured Transactions) Corporations Criminal Procedure – Trial (or Criminal Process – Investigation) Evidence Family Law International Law Introduction to Income Tax Mediation (or Negotiations) Non-Profit Law Clinic Project Management Trial Advocacy Wills and Trusts

INFORMATION, COMMUNICATIONS, AND PRIVACY LAW Constitutional Law II Copyright Law Cybersecurity Entertainment Law Health Law Health Privacy Law Information Privacy and Security Management Practicum Information Privacy Law I Information Privacy Law II Information Security Law Internet Law Internet Law: Political and Legal Dimensions National and Homeland Security Law Patent Law Seminar in Electronic Mass Media Seminar in Information Privacy Seminar in International Law: Drone Law Seminar in Introduction to Biotechnological Innovation Seminar in Intellectual Property Survey of Intellectual Property Trademarks and Unfair Competition

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY Core courses Copyright Law International Intellectual Property Patent Law Survey of Intellectual Property Trademark and Unfair Competition Law Advanced courses Advanced Patent Law Entertainment Law Federal Circuit Advocacy Intellectual Property Antitrust Intellectual Property Colloquium Intellectual Property Transactions Internet Law Internet Law: Political and Legal Dimensions Law and Biomedical Advance Patent Prosecution Patent Trial Practice Seminar: Introduction to Biotechnological Innovation Seminar in Intellectual Property Clinics and Practicum Entrepreneurship Law Clinic Intellectual Property Externship Intellectual Property Law Clinic Intellectual Property Practicum: The Legal Aspects of Music

17


INTERNATIONAL AND COMPARATIVE LAW International Law International Business Transactions International Trade Advanced Courses Business and Human Rights Comparative Law: Comparative Legal Systems Comparative Law: Constitutional Design and the Economy Comparative Law: Islam and Human Rights Comparative Law: Regulating Religion Comparative Law: South Asian Constitutionalism Constitutional Design in Multiethnic Societies Constitutionalism in the Middle East European Union Law Human Rights Immigration Law International Business Negotiations International Criminal Law International Environmental Law International Intellectual Property International Securities Regulation Seminar in Comparative Inequality Seminar in Comparative Law: Islamic Law Seminar in Globalization Seminar in International Law: Drone Law Seminar in International Law: Legal Dimensions of the Fight Against the Islamic State Seminar in Law and Development Seminar in Law and Society of China Seminar in Transnational Law

18

LABOR AND EMPLOYMENT LAW Core courses Disability Law Clinic Employment Discrimination Employment Law Labor and Employment Arbitration Labor Law Seminar in Law and Society: Work, Family, and the Law Related courses Administrative Law Antitrust Law Contracts Corporations Immigration Law Judicial Field Placements Legislation Mediation Negotiations Trial Advocacy

LITIGATION AND ALTERNATIVE DISPUTE RESOLUTION Advanced Civil Procedure Advanced Appellate Advocacy Advanced Legal Writing Advanced Trial Practice Advocacy Appellate Advocacy Appellate Practice — Procedure Complex Litigation Conflict of Laws Domestic Relations Mediation Evidence Federal Circuit Advocacy Law and Social Psychology Litigation Drafting Mediation Negotiations Patent Trial Practice Pre-trial Litigation Products Liability Protection Order Litigation Remedies Representing the State Seminar on Judicial Conduct Trial Advocacy Trial Competition

PROPERTY Estate Planning Land Use Controls Law and Philanthropy Law and Political Theory: Institutional Analysis and Development Real Estate Finance Wills and Trusts


SKILL DEVELOPMENT

TAX

Advanced Appellate Advocacy Advanced Environmental Law and Practice Advanced Trial Practice Advocacy Appellate Advocacy Community Legal Clinic Conservation Law Clinic Criminal Law Externship Deliberative Leadership Disability Law Clinic Domestic Relations Mediation Entrepreneurship Law Clinic Estate Planning Federal Circuit Advocacy Family and Children Mediation Clinic Independent Clinical Project Indiana Legal Services Externship IP Externship IP Practicum Judicial Field Placements Lawyering in the Public Interest Mediation Negotiations Patent Prosecution Patent Trial Practice Project Management Student Legal Services Externship Trial Advocacy Washington Public Interest Program

Core courses Introduction to Income Tax Advanced courses Corporate Tax Partnership Tax Seminar in Tax Policy State and Local Tax Strategic Tax Planning Tax Policy Colloquium Transactional Drafting: Tax Allied Law School courses Accounting for Lawyers Corporate Finance Estate Planning International Business Transactions Law and Philanthropy Legislation Mergers and Acquisitions

PERSONAL ATTENTION With our 8.3/1 student/faculty ratio and small class sizes, you will have unparalleled access to faculty, both in and out of class.

63

typical first-year class section size

14

average upper-division class size

53

% of upper-division classes with 15 or fewer students

19


BEIJING

STEWART FELLOWS

125+ STEWART FELLOWS SINCE 2010

international opportunities SÃO PAULO

FLORENCE

PARIS

10

STEWART FELLOWS GLOBAL EXTERNSHIP COUNTRIES

BARCELONA

17+

0SUMMER AND 0SEMESTER EXCHANGE 0PROGRAMS 20

BUENOS AIRES

24

PARTNERSHIPS WITH INTERNATIONAL LAW SCHOOLS


Indiana Law offers a unique global fellowship

If a traditional semester or summer abroad bet-

Even if you spend all three years in Bloomington,

program that gives you the opportunity to work

ter suits your goals, we offer semester exchange

you will have many international opportunities.

directly with some of the nation’s leading legal

programs with partner universities in Auckland,

We have one of the world's oldest LLM programs,

scholars on issues affecting countries around

Barcelona, Beijing, Dublin, Hamburg, Hong

hosting about 70 graduate students from 20

the globe. Each of these programs features a se-

Kong, Leiden, Milan, New Delhi, Paris, Rio de Ja-

countries each year. You will attend classes with

mester abroad and a Stewart Fellowship: a paid

neiro, SĂŁo Paulo, Shenzhen, Taipei, and Warsaw.

LLM students and share global perspectives. We

summer externship with a prestigious law firm,

Summer study is available in Hamburg, London,

also offer a JD/LLM if you choose to extend your

non-governmental organization, or multinational

and Paris, among others.

studies on the international stage.

company. When you return to campus, you will serve as a paid research assistant for a faculty member conducting research on timely topics relevant to your country of interest. Stewart Fellowships are offered in Argentina, Brazil, Cambodia, China, India, Japan, Korea, Thailand, Uganda, and Vietnam.

LONDON

21


the vibrant life of a major research university

22


23


10

+

joint degree programs

As a lawyer, you will spend your professional life solving complex problems that span many disciplines. As an Indiana Law student, you will have access to the resources of a major research university that will prepare you for the creative problem-solving skills required of today’s lawyers.

JOINT DEGREES WITH IU’S #22 RANKED KELLEY SCHOOL OF BUSINESS JD/MBA (3- or 4-year program) JD/MBAA (Accounting) JD/MSA (Accounting)

JOINT DEGREES WITH IU’S #1 RANKED SCHOOL OF PUBLIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL AFFAIRS JD/MPA JD/MSES

OTHER IU JOINT DEGREES JD/MA or MS in Telecommunications JD/MLS in Library and Information Science JD/MA in Journalism JD/MPH in Public Health JD/MA in Russian and East European Studies

JOINT DEGREES WITH INTERNATIONAL PARTNERS JD/MBA with Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul JD/LLM with Université Panthéon-Assas (Paris II) JD/LLM with Trinity College Dublin JD/LLM with Peking University (Beijing) and PKU School of Transnational Law (Shenzhen) JD/LLM with Jindal Global Law School (Sonipat, India)

In addition to joint degrees in business and public and environmental affairs, the Law School offers several other formal joint degree programs, or you can create an individually designed joint degree with other schools and departments to meet your learning and career goals. The Law School will coordinate with the other school or department to establish the joint or concurrent program.

24


INDIANA LAW'S RESEARCH CENTERS The Center for Constitutional Democracy helps

The Center for Law, Society, and Culture

people in post-conflict societies build legal insti-

promotes and disseminates a multidisciplinary

tutions that will allow them to live together in

understanding of law through scholarship, teach-

peace, justice, and democracy. It is one of the only

ing, and discussion. The Center produces, pres-

centers in the world to do active constitutional de-

ents, and coordinates research conducted by

sign consulting.

exceptional scholars in schools and departments

The Milt and Judi Stewart Center on the Global Legal Profession is focused on the unprecedented

challenges

lawyers

are

across Indiana University on law and legal problems.

facing

around the world and developing research and training materials to assist current and future attorneys in their understanding of international legal systems. The Center for Intellectual Property Research trains students who are passionate about innovation and creativity and who seek an intensive experience in IP law — patent, trademark and unfair competition, copyright, design, and information policy.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP RIGHT: KELLEY SCHOOL OF BUSINESS, SCHOOL OF GLOBAL AND INTERNATIONAL STUDIES, AND SCHOOL OF PUBLIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL AFFAIRS

25


experiential learning As one of the earliest schools to adopt an aspi-

The Protective Order Project helps victims of do-

Disability Law Clinic: Assist individuals and

rational pro bono service goal for its students,

mestic abuse, sexual assault, and stalking obtain

disability rights groups, including veterans with

Indiana Law’s pro bono and clinical programs

civil protective orders, with the additional goal of

disability claims, from case intake to appeals.

combine to provide the most extensive network

preventing further abuse.

of community legal support in south-central Indiana. In a typical year, our roughly 500 students log more than 15,000 hours of legal service to local and nearby communities.

PRO BONO PROJECTS The Inmate Legal Assistance Project provides le-

The Tenant Assistance Project helps tenants who

growth ventures become more operational and

face an immediate threat of eviction and educates

sustainable as you earn your JD/MBA.

them about their legal rights.

Intellectual Property Law Clinic: Help clients

The Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Project

protect their investment in innovation through

provides free income-tax preparation services to

this hands-on clinic, certified by the US Patent

qualifying residents each year.

and Trademark Office for both patent and trademark law.

gal counsel to inmates at the federal penitentiary

The Will Preparation Project pairs law students

in Terre Haute, Indiana.

with IU faculty and employees to offer this service

Non-Profit Law Clinic: Engage in public interest

at no charge in conjunction with the University

lawyering through business and transactional

Office of the Vice President and General Counsel.

work for non-profit organizations, including enti-

The LGBT project offers legal services on discrimination, legislation, and education matters on behalf of LGBT advocacy organizations throughout the state. The Pro Bono Immigration Project supports the unmet legal needs of non-citizens in Bloomington and surrounding areas.

ty formation, contract drafting, basic tax advice,

CLINICS

governance, and compliance.

Community Legal Clinic: Work with local resi-

Viola J. Taliaferro Family and Children Media-

dents whose incomes generally prevent them from

tion Clinic: Mediate real-life disputes among fam-

hiring lawyers for civil cases, including divorce,

ilies with children in family law cases while you

guardianships, adoption, and custody.

become a fully trained and registered domestic

Conservation Law Clinic: Serve as an intern in the Conservation Law Center, Inc. a public interest law firm, and work on actual matters for clients who need assistance with natural resource conservation issues. 26

Elmore Entrepreneurship Law Clinic: Help high-

relations mediator.


HELPING INDIANA LAW STUDENTS BECOME PRACTICE-READY In addition to traditional doctrinal study, you’ll have the opportunity to learn the law in some unusual ways. Here are some examples of the practical experiences you can choose from during your law school years: – How to negotiate a collective bargaining agreement — complete with going

on strike and picketing your professor’s office

– How to take a deposition – How to become a certified domestic relations mediator – How to enter an appearance in a criminal law proceeding – How to run the operations of a successful small law firm – How to deliver service learning that will help local community organizations while

you study the fundamentals of civil procedure

Many of these opportunities are available in our popular Wintersession course, a one-week, pass/fail intensive session for upper-division students offered just before the spring term begins. These are just a few ways in which Indiana Law integrates hands-on practice tips with rigorous analytical study.

27


7

7

7

7

number of pro bono projects: 7 number of clinics: 7 number of externship programs: 7 number of moot court and trial competitions: 7 number of law journals: 5

5


EXTERNSHIPS Our externships offer you ways to earn academ-

Judicial Field Placements: Spend a day every

ic credit while spending from one day a week to

week in the chambers of a US District Court

an entire semester working under the supervision

judge or magistrate judge in Indianapolis, where

of a trained legal practitioner. Our externship

you’ll gain first-hand experience from the judge

opportunities can be found throughout Indiana,

and his staff.

in the nation’s capital, and many places around the globe.

Public Interest: Our public interest externship program gives you the opportunity to explore

Criminal Law: Gain a better understanding of

this popular field while earning academic credit.

the major issues involved with criminal law prac-

About 30% of Indiana Law’s students participate

tice and the criminal justice system. In addition

each summer.

to legal research and writing tasks, you’ll observe and participate in various criminal court proceedings under attorney supervision. You will work in prosecutors’ and public defenders’ offices in south central Indiana.

Semester Public Interest (Washington, DC): If you think you’d like to work on Capitol Hill — or represent people who do — or for the federal government or a public advocacy organization, this is a perfect program for you. You’ll spend half of

Indiana Legal Services: Help elderly and low-in-

your 3L year in Washington, DC, working in a

come people in southern Indiana with legal prob-

federal agency, in Congress, or in a non-profit pub-

lems affecting their access to basics such as food,

lic advocacy organization, while you earn eight

shelter, income, medical care, and personal safety.

hours of credit.

Intellectual Property Externship: Work with fac-

Student Legal Services: Earn credit while you

ulty in our Center for IP Research to develop an

work at Student Legal Services, a nonprofit law

on-site program tailored to your interests.

office that provides legal services to Indiana University students and student groups. If none of these options meets your career objectives, our faculty and advisers will work with you to develop an independent clinical project.

29


MOOT COURT AND TRIAL COMPETITIONS A lawyer’s role is, above all else, one of client advocacy. Whether representing clients in a corporate transaction, in tax planning, or in a courtroom trial, proficiency as an advocate is essential. Indiana Law offers several opportunities for you to hone your skills as a litigator. Chief among these is our Sherman Minton Moot Court Competition, where you can participate in argument, legal representation, and jurisprudence by researching and writing an appellate brief and engaging in oral arguments. It is the school’s signature student event, with nearly 75 percent participation. Indiana Law alumni and other legal practitioners and judges from around the country serve as competition judges. The competition is named for Hon. Sherman Minton, class of 1915, who served on the US Supreme Court from 1949–1956.

OTHER COMPETITIONS INCLUDE: – Law School Trial Competition – Jessup International Moot Court – National Cultural Heritage Law Moot Court – National Environmental Law Moot Court – Williams Institute Moot Court – International Transaction Drafting – Venture Capital Investment Competition – Intellectual Property LawMeet

LAW JOURNALS As an Indiana Law student, you will be eligible to apply to one of our highly regarded law journals, which will enable you to conduct and publish original legal research as well as edit work by prominent legal scholars.

30

Moot Court Chief Justice and law journal editors


INDIANA LAW JOURNAL The ILJ publishes original articles by a distinguished and diverse selection of authors that have included United States Chief Justice William Rehnquist and US Solicitor General Seth Waxman. Students select, edit, and verify the accuracy and form of cited sources in the articles. The journal also publishes several student-written articles.

INDIANA JOURNAL OF CONSTITUTIONAL DESIGN The Indiana Journal of Constitutional Design is the first journal devoted specifically to the emerging field of constitutional design. This new field examines the ways in which basic legal ordering shapes and is shaped by political, economic, and cultural conditions.

INDIANA JOURNAL OF GLOBAL LEGAL STUDIES The Indiana Journal of Global Legal Studies publishes articles by distinguished legal scholars focusing on globalization and international law. Each issue generally contains articles by authors from many different countries. Students edit and proofread articles and verify the accuracy and form of cited sources.

INDIANA JOURNAL OF LAW AND SOCIAL EQUALITY The purpose of this journal is to serve as an interdisciplinary academic forum for scholars, practitioners, policy-makers, and students to contribute to society’s understanding of legal and policy issues concerning race, religion, gender, and class.

IP THEORY IP Theory is a peer-edited, on-line intellectual property law publication hosted by the Law School’s Center for Intellectual Property Research. It is neither law journal nor blog; it is a different sort of publication designed to occupy a niche between the two. IP Theory serves as a forum for essays, book reviews, and reviews of literature in IP and related fields.

31


student life

32


33


Every student’s experience at Indiana Law is

One hallmark of the Indiana Law community

> Law Students for Reproductive Justice

bound to be different, but there’s one common

is our large number of student organizations.

> Older and Wiser Law Students

thread: a supportive, collegial environment where

Whether you are looking for networking oppor-

> OUTlaw

students work together toward mutual success.

tunities, ways to serve the community, or just a

> Outreach for Legal Literacy

From day one, our students realize that the people

little fun and relaxation, you will find something

> Phi Alpha Delta

sitting next to them in class will be their future

of interest:

> Phi Delta Phi > Public Interest Law Foundation

colleagues (or opponents), and that it pays to treat them with dignity and respect, just as any legal professional should.

> Advocates for Life > American Bar Association Law

Student Division

Because we are not an urban school with traffic

> American Constitution Society

and safety problems, students and faculty like

> Asian Pacific American Law Student

to stay around after class, well into the after-

Association

noons and evenings. You’ll find them in the com-

> Black Law Student Association

mon areas of the library, along with the adjacent

> Business and Law Society

first floor lobby of Baier Hall, which serve as the

> Christian Legal Society

school’s Student Union. On Fridays, you will hear

> Environmental Law Society

students from IU’s acclaimed Jacobs School of

> Family Law Society

Music perform in the lobby during our lunchtime

> Federalist Society for Law and Public

Baier Hall Presents series. The library is also

where Dean Parrish visits informally with stu-

> Feminist Law Forum

dents over coffee and cookies every month.

> Health Law Society

Policy Studies

> Indianapolis Bar Association > Intellectual Property Association > International Law Society > J. Reuben Clark Law Society > Jewish Law Students Association > Labor and Employment Law Society > Latinx Law Student Association > Law and Drama Society

34

> Society for Law and the Arts > Sports and Entertainment Law Society > Student Animal Legal Defense Fund > Student Bar Association > Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Program > Women’s Law Caucus


Student life extends well beyond the walls of Baier Hall. Our signature social event, the Rapheal M. Prevot, Jr. Barrister’s Ball, brings the community together for a formal evening out every spring. It is sponsored by our Black Law Students’ Association, voted best chapter in the Midwest.

In addition, the IU Bloomington campus presents a world of cultural and athletic opportunities, from Big Ten sports to opera and musicals. Biking, boating, hiking, and camping are just minutes away. And Indianapolis, with its trendy downtown and #15 restaurant-city ranking, is only an hour north of campus. All of this is surprisingly affordable: You can live in Bloomington for much less than other comparable cities and college towns.

35


bloomington by the numbers

1

3

6

24 36

#1 city for work-life balance (Forbes) #3 most beautiful college campus (CondÊ Nast Traveler) #3 the decade’s hottest schools (The Daily Beast (IU Bloomington)) #6 best college town to live in forever (College Ranker) #24 best city for entrepreneurs (livability.com) #36 best college town (bestcollegereviews.org)

3


WASHINGTON, DC

BOSTON

MINNEAPOLIS

MADISON

CHICAGO

ATLANTA

IOWA CITY

OVERALL

BLOOMINGTON

WASHINGTON, DC

BOSTON

MINNEAPOLIS

MADISON

CHICAGO

ATLANTA

IOWA CITY

BLOOMINGTON

affordability index

HOUSING

NATIONAL AVG.

37


10,000+

650,000+

1,000+

200+

82.1%

62%

LAW SCHOOL ALUMNI

ALUMNI MENTORS

38

INDIANA UNIVERSITY ALUMNI

OF CLASS OF 2016 EMPLOYED 10 MONTHS AFTER GRADUATION1

ANNUAL VOLUNTEERS

OF CLASS OF 2015 EMPLOYED IN STATES OUTSIDE INDIANA


one degree, a world of connections An Indiana Law degree is your point of entry to a

Our Career Services Office will be at your ser-

Many students aren’t sure about their career goals

career with many options. Our alumni — whether

vice during your time in Bloomington and beyond.

when they start law school, and those goals can

five or 50 years out of school — bring honor and

A team of professionals will help you analyze

change. For this reason, the Career Services Of-

distinction to the profession in many ways: as solo

your options, perfect your résumé, and prepare

fice offers unique career exploration trips. Every

practitioners, corporate counsel, large-firm asso-

for interviews. Every year more than 30 nation-

year, students visit law firms and public interest

ciates, judges, entrepreneurs, and in public ser-

al firms come to Bloomington to interview from

and government organizations in Chicago, Wash-

vice. More than two dozen of them serve on our

major cities, including Chicago, Cincinnati, De-

ington, DC, and Indianapolis, where they engage

Young Alumni Steering Committee in 25 cities,

troit, Indianapolis, Minneapolis, and St. Louis.

in tours, networking, and panel discussions. Vis-

ready to help you build your network and get set-

We also conduct on-location recruiting with a

its include elite firms in Chicago, every major firm

tled after you graduate.

dozen large firms in Chicago, and we can connect

in Indianapolis, and the Department of Justice

you with other employers throughout the country,

and other federal agencies in Washington. These

in a variety of settings.

exploration trips help students sharpen their ca-

You will meet many of our alumni while you’re still in school. More than 200 of them serve as

reer focus while getting acquainted with potential

mentors, and over 1,000 volunteer in other ways

You will also benefit from on-campus visits from

in support of your success — as moot court judg-

alumni and other friends of the school as part of

es, adjunct professors, and speakers at various

our Career Choices program: a series of informal

events throughout the year.

lunches where lawyers introduce you to their pro-

employers.

fessional lives and trace the paths that led them there. If you’re leaning toward public service, our innovative Washington, DC semester externship program offers you course credit while you work in public service and make connections for a full-time position after earning your degree.

1 Employed in long-term, full-time JD required or JD advantage positions as of March 15, 2016.

39


Here are some of the firms and organizations that recruit our students in a typical year:

CHICAGO ON-LOCATION RECRUITING

ON-CAMPUS RECRUITING

Baker & McKenzie

Armstrong Teasdale (St. Louis)

Chapman & Cutler

Barnes & Thornburg (Indianapolis)

Dinsmore & Shohl

Barrett McNagny (Fort Wayne, Ind.)

Greenberg Traurig

Benesch Friedlander Coplan & Aronoff (Cleveland)

Jenner & Block

Bingham Greenebaum Doll (Indianapolis)

Jones Day

Bryan Cave (Chicago)

Latham & Watkins

Burke Costanza & Carberry (Merrillville, Ind.)

Locke Lord

Burke Warren MacKay & Serritella (Chicago)

Mayer Brown

Covington & Burling (Washington, DC)

McDermott Will & Emery

Fish & Richardson (San Diego)

Morgan Lewis & Bockius

Jackson Kelly (Charleston, W. Va.)

Carson Boxberger (Fort Wayne, Ind.)

Kirkland & Ellis (Chicago)

Densborn Blachly (Indianapolis)

Lowndes Drosdick Doster (Orlando, Fla.)

Dinsmore & Shohl (Cincinnati)

McDonnell Boehnen Hulbert & Berghoff (Chicago)

Faegre Baker Daniels (Indianapolis)

Nixon Peabody (Chicago)

Foster Swift Collins & Smith (Lansing, Mich.)

Paul Hastings Janofsky & Walker (Washington, DC)

Fredrikson & Byron (Minneapolis)

Polsinelli (St. Louis)

Frost Brown Todd (Cincinnati)

Procter & Gamble (Cincinnati)

Hall Render Killian Heath & Lyman (Indianapolis)

Reinhart Boerner VanDeuren (Milwaukee)

Honigman Miller (Detroit)

Rothwell Figg Ernst & Manbeck (Washington, DC)

Ice Miller (Indianapolis)

Sidley Austin (Chicago)

Reed Smith

Skadden Arps (New York) Stinson Leonard Street (Minneapolis) Varnum (Grand Rapids, Mich.) Whyte Hirschboeck Dudek (Milwaukee) Woods Oviatt Gilman (Rochester, N.Y.)

40

PUBLIC-INTEREST ORGANIZATIONS THAT HAVE HIRED OUR GRADUATES IN RECENT YEARS INCLUDE: ACLU Animal Legal Defense Fund Court-Appointed Special Advocate Program (CASA) Indiana Legal Services Legal Aid Society of Washington, DC Legal Aid Society of Wisconsin Neighborhood Christian Legal Clinic Northwest Immigrant Rights Project Prairie State Legal Services Student Legal Services

Indiana Law sponsors students to participate in the Equal Justice Works Job Fair and the Midwest Public Interest Conference and Career Fair.


where is the class of 2016 working?

17%

business and industry

42%

law firms

16%

government

9%

clerkships

9%

other

2%

academia

41


take the next step ADMISSIONS We seek to enroll students whose intellect, ex-

> Two letters of recommendation from

Domestic applicants who wish to subsidize their

perience, creativity, and personal character will

individuals familiar with your academic work,

legal education using federal loans must complete

enable them successfully to complete their own

character, and/or professional background

the Free Application for Federal Student Aid

legal education, contribute to the education of

> A résumé that outlines your employment

(FAFSA), which can be found at fafsa.ed.gov. The

their classmates, and continue the Law School’s

history, volunteer experience, academic

Federal School Code for the IU Maurer School of

impressive legacy of producing leaders of the bar,

and athletic accolades, and other pertinent

Law is 001809.

the government, and the private sector.

information

To be eligible for admission, candidates must

For additional information about applying to

have completed or be in the process of complet-

Indiana Law, including how we review applica-

ing a bachelor’s degree from an accredited college

tions, and how to apply as a transfer or advanced-

or university. Candidates must register with the

standing student, visit law.indiana.edu/apply.

Law School Admission Council and supply LSAC with the following materials:

FINANCIAL AID

> A completed application (found at lsac.org)

Thanks to the generous support of Indiana

> A LSAT score that is not more than five years

University, alumni and friends, the Law School

awards over $13 million in scholarships each year

old. (The Law School accepts the June LSAT.)

> A personal statement that provides insight

to new and continuing students. Such generosi-

about you, describes your motivation to attend

ty, coupled with Bloomington’s low cost of living,

law school, and/or highlights your interest in

are significant reasons why our students gradu-

Indiana Law

ate with much less law school debt than students from most of our peer institutions. All admitted applicants are automatically considered for merit awards; no separate application is required.

42


the class of 2020*

3.75

MEDIAN UGPA

22% MINORITY

1,898 APPLIED

161 ENROLLED

161

143172

2.224.26

45%

LSAT RANGE

21-47 AGE RANGE

GPA RANGE

60%

NON-RESIDENT

MEDIAN LSAT

WOMEN

86

UNDERGRADUATE INSTITUTIONS FROM 22 STATES

*As of 8/25/17. See website for updates.

43


come here, go anywhere: join Indiana Law alumni throughout the country Alaska: 12/2

111/8

Indiana: 4,042/463

16/1 10/1

2/0

15/3 74/8

93/6 7/0

4/1

33/8 500/50

9/0

919/121

11/2

123/13

8/1

29/2

262/31

67/4

270/30

154/19

266/34

80/10

DC: 133/32

158/24 103/14

81/7

32/3

14/2 5/2

22/2

144/10

13/1

Hawaii: 22/0 All alumni/past five years West: 1,401 alumni Central: 6,305 alumni East: 1,703 alumni

5/1 52/8

113/21

14/0

21/3

134/7

253/37 390/53

15/6

25/4

67/4

120/10

5/2

44

8/1

103/14


come see us A visit to Indiana Law on the idyllic IU Bloomington campus is the best way to find out what makes our Law School one of the most impressive in the nation. Visit us during an upcoming information session, or set up an individual visit to meet our students, attend a class, or take a tour of the Law School. Contact our admissions office at (812) 855-4765 or at lawadmis@indiana.edu to arrange a visit. And to make the most of your visit, check out visitbloomington.com, which has plenty of helpful information about lodging, restaurants, and activities on campus and in Bloomington.

45


In accordance with applicable state and federal laws and university policies, the Indiana University Maurer School of Law provides equality of opportunity for all persons, including faculty and employees, with respect to hiring, continuation, promotion and tenure, applicants for admission, enrolled students, and graduates, without discrimination or segregation, on the grounds of race, ethnicity, color, citizenship, national origin, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender (including identity and expression), disability, age, marital status, veteran status or other legally protected status. It is the policy of the law school to seek to have a student body, faculty, and staff that are diverse with respect to race, color, and sex. Law school facilities are open only to employers whose practices employ this policy.

46


Baier Hall, 211 S. Indiana Ave., Bloomington, IN 47405 812-855-4765 lawadmis@indiana.edu @IUMaurerLaw Indiana University­– Maurer School of Law @IUMaurerLaw law.indiana.edu

Indiana University Maurer School of Law Viewbook  

Come here, go anywhere. We invite you to get acquainted with Indiana Law.

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you