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the

Hilltop Check out what

Salem

has to offer! [page 8]

Photos by Megan Russell

Inside this issue:

New improvements on campus [Page 3] What’s going on in Libya? [Page 14] Guest Columnist: Dr. Kent Kersey [Page 15]

http://hil top.corban.edu

Sept. 27, 2011

the student publication of Corban University vol. 8, no. 1


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Voices

Sept. 27, 2011

Mandatory healthcare The ABCs of ASB robs students of choice Dear Corban,

Students are about to lose their liberty Staff Editorial of choice, with the institution of Corban’s mandatory healthcare policy. Five hundred thirty-two dollars: that is the sum of money that could be added to their tuition bill on Oct. 1. A $532 premium will be charged to students under the age of 26 who are taking 12 or more credits, and $812 to students 26 and older. The hefty fee can be avoided only if the student creates a profile on the healthcare website and completes a proof of insurance waiver before Sept. 30. After then, it’s too late. Students with or without other healthcare will be expected, nay, required, to pay up. And students without healthcare? The policy is mandatory. While medical care is important, it should be the concern of the individual, not the university. Students willing to take the risk of going uninsured should have the right to do so. In addition, students who are independent and currently uninsured are probably the least capable of paying. Lastly, parents will be none too happy when students who skimmed through their inboxes forget to fill out a waiver for a service they already have. It’s an easy mistake to make, and one that could cost students hundreds. What do you think? Email us at hilltopnews@corban.edu.

The Hilltop Staff

The student publication of Corban University 5000 Deer Park Dr. SE Salem, OR 97317 hilltopnews@corban.edu

Hilltop Content Editor Hali Anderson

Hilltop Design Editor Megan Russell

Hilltop Online Editor Kate Tracy

Photo Editor Jake Bowdoin

Yearbook Editor

The Hilltop Staff Maya Bartel Will Bassham Jessica Bruggeman Salina Cadena Eleanor Fazzari Natalie Grove Jenna Harbeck Kelsey Leavitt Hannah Lobban Sarah Moreau Lacy Ramirez

Hannah Yocum

Advisers

Christena Brooks Ellen Kersey

This publication reflects the views of the writers and editors and does not necessarily reflect the view of Corban University, its administration or trustees.

As I walk around the Corban University Campus I’ve found that this year, in particular, I’m surrounded by many faces I do not recognize. The freshman classes seem to be growing exponentially every year, making it harder and harder to get to know everyone who is a part of our campus. Our desire this year is to see Corban maintain a sense of unity on campus despite our rapidly rising population. We have made Romans 15:5-6 our theme verse for the year: “May the God who gives endurance and encouragement give you the same attitude of mind toward each other that Christ Jesus had, so that with one mind and one voice you may glorify the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ.” We hope we can be a part in helping you, the student body, be unified in one purpose, to glorify and serve our Lord Jesus Christ.

Carrie Bernard ASB President


The Hil top

News

Multiple changes seen on campus

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By Jenna Harbeck Staff Writer The new year brings new classes, new friends and new changes to the Corban Campus. The library, bookstore and IT all went through major renovations during the summer. On the outside, the library looks the same, but inside is a world of transformation. The locations of books, seating areas, and even the front desk have all been moved. Two solariums are on either side of the building, where students can find relaxing and quiet areas to tackle their homework. The computer lab is now located upstairs, in two separate rooms with brandnew computers. One of the most accommodating changes is that the passage between the second floor of the library and the main floor of the Academic Center is open, thus eliminating the hassle exiting the library to attend a class in the AC. The technology support team has taken over the computer lab’s old turf, and the space has been remodeled with offices for the staff. When a student has an IT question, he or she can send an email to support@corban.edu to set up an appointment to drop off a computer or printer, or have questions answered. What was the crammed, hole-in-thewall bookstore has been expanded. With almost double the space it had last year, it offers a larger interior to sell merchandise. The biggest changes in the entire space are the removal of individual mailboxes and the relocation of the mail area, more floor space for items, and textbooks available on the sales floor instead of behind the counter. “They did everything,” Heather Martin,

Photo by Jake Bowdoin

Mail room lady Carol Kruse is now the “key” to checking your mail.

bookstore manager, said about the IT team. “They tore down walls, took care of the lighting and electrical, and moved all the merchandise.” They often worked from 6 a.m. to 7 p.m., just to make sure the bookstore would be open for freshmen by the Aug. 24 goal. Removing the self-serve student mailboxes has created some controversy. The mail room now has a behind-the-counter system overseen by staff members. When a student receives mail, a staff member scans it, and the student receives an email alert. Students reacted differently to the transition. Sophomore Jordan Robeson said, “I was a little confused at first. The whole email system threw me off.” However, junior Grant Garrison favored the change. “It makes checking if you have mail so much easier. I already check my email every day, so now I know if I have to go to the mail room.” Whether students like it or not, this is a move toward the inevitable change CAMPUS CHANGES AT A GLANCE in the future from hard mail LIBRARY: to completely electronic, New check-out desk on main floor according to Corban’s ProCheck-out desk added on upper floor vost Matt Lucas. New seating/study areas And what about the dinMAIL ROOM: ing hall? Construction on Individual mailboxes removed the 1,540-square-foot adStudents emailed when mail arrives dition has begun and will Have to show ID to receive mail be completed by spring BOOKSTORE: semester. The expanded Much more space dining space will include Additional products, including Nike wear 70 more seats in the form

of tables and chairs, which is “a lot more flexible for students,” said Steve Hunt, vice president of Marketing. The doors to the new seating area can be closed, in case meetings or private sessions are desired. University administrators had hoped to start the dining hall addition this summer, but Schimmel Hall is 114 years old, which means it has very old construction codes. Hunt explained that it took about five months to come up with a price point for the construction to meet to the old codes. The renovation inside the existing dining hall will take place over Christmas break, when students will be on vacation. The addition will match the interior decor of the existing dining rooms and will have windows overlooking the valley.

Photo by Jenna Harbeck Graham Fujiwara sits behind the library’s new front desk. An additional check-out desk is located on the third floor.


Sept. 27, 2011

4 News

Welcome to Corban By Wil Bassham and Kelsey Leavitt Staff Writers

Alan Scharn, Criminal Justice Alan Scharn has worked in criminal justice in Oregon for 30 years. Throughout his years of experience he has held the positions of deputy, deputy director of the Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training, assistant chief investigator for special investigations under the office of inspector general, and his final move was to the Department of Corrections. Scharn’s career came to its close in his seventh year with the Department of Corrections when he reached the age of retirement. It was then he learned that Corban was looking for someone to lead the Criminal Justice program, he said, “Being an alumnus, it sparked my interest and I applied.” Scharn enjoyed serving in the criminal justice field and hopes his students will find the same fufillment.

Scharn

Eave

Jesse Payne graduated from Vanguard University in Southern California in 2006 with his B.A. in Business and earned his M.A. in Education in 2009. He is currently finishing his dissertation with USC and will graduate with his Doctorate in Education. While searching for a career in higher education, Payne discovered Corban’s available Thesis and Professor of Education position. Payne is passionate about addressing individuality of students in education. “I’m hoping to instill that idea of not just treating your class as a whole but learning to address the individual needs of each child academically, emotionally, and spiritually,” Payne said.

Teschner

Payne

Kelli Gassman, Business Kelli Gassman is new to Corban, but not to teaching or business classes. She taught International Business and Marketing for 13 years at the University of Memphis and worked for 13 years for FedEx in marketing and consulting. She has worked in connection with 147 countries and speaks three languages: Spanish, German, and English. She feels that God has led her here. “Teaching at Corban is really cool,” she said. “Everyone is friendly and joyful to be here.” She loves being in an environment of closeknit believers in a private school, as opposed to a public school.

Michele Eave received her B.A in Psychology from the University of Oregon in 1987 and her Master’s of Counseling from George Fox University in 2006. She has a passion for people and enjoys helping others through times of pain and confusion. Eave was first captivated by Corban’s mission statement and soon fell in love with Corban’s students and staff as well. This year Corban is helping open a free mental health clinic at Broadway Commons for underprivileged patients; it will provide counseling students with field experience. Eave is very excited to assist students as they work in the center. “I am honored to be a part of their journey,” she said. Eave believes important qualities to bring to the counseling profession are the willingness to be open and flexible and the ability to see the workmanship of God in each individual.

Jesse Payne, Education

Pam Teschner, Director of Assessment Dr. Pam Teschner previously worked at Corban as an adjunct instructor and is joining Corban faculty half-time as the Director of Assessment. A part of her job is to ensure Corban meets government standards, so the university can keep its accreditation. “All the job experience I’ve had has led me back to Corban,” she said. Teschner said she hopes to be working at Corban for the rest of her career. In the future she may work more hours and even return parttime to the classroom.

Michele Eave, Psychology

Gassman

Photos courtesy of Sheldon Traver

Hussey

Shawn Hussey, Business Some men can say they are Marines, but few can say they have worked to protect the President on Marine One, the helicopter that transports the President of the United States. Shawn Hussey has done just that. Hussey, a Marine sergeant, protected Presidents Bill Clinton and George W. Bush. Going from protection duties and business to teaching is a change for him, but it is a change he is enjoying. “A lot of learning on my end,” Hussey said with a chuckle. His business classes are Entrepreneurship and Financial Management. Before becoming an instructor, Hussey was a student himself. He was part of Corban’s adult-degree program and earned his Business Degree in Management and Communication. “God opened a few doors for me to come here,” he said.


News

The Hil top

CCS program transforms into Reach

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Reach’s goal: to get Corban students involved in the Salem community

By Jenna Harbeck Staff Writer For years, the acronym “CCS” floated around Corban’s campus as a familiar term that stood for “Church and Community Service.” Every Corban student knew that he or she had to fulfill all six CCS credits (church service, community service, and spiritual growth) in order to be rewarded with a diploma on graduation day. However, a new term is making waves in the Corban community: “Reach.” It’s new to returners, and it’s new to freshmen. A lot of changes and tweaks to the program make it more effective in achieving its goal: to get Corban students involved in the Salem community. The most obvious change is the new name, which is not an acronym. As Lori Schilling, the director of Reach, put it, “We want to reach out to our community, reach in to our church, and reach up to the relationship with our God.” Reach no longer requires two credits of spiritual growth. “Students should develop their own spiritual growth while serving the community at the same time,” Schilling said.

The new credit requirements are two church service and four community service. Another important change is the locations where students can fulfill these service requirements. One of the church credits must be done with a local Salem/ Willamette Valley church. Reach is currently connected with 18 different organizations students can serve with in the Salem community. There are four areas in which a student can serve: Hunger and Housing, Education and Literacy, Justice and Dignity, and Creation Care. Though it may seem odd to limit where students can serve in Salem, it actually makes community service more accessible and effective. A few of the organizations even offer transportation. For more information about the organizations, brochures are available outside the Reach Office in Student Life. Returners who were partway through their CCS credits do not need to be concerned.All credits already earned still count for them, whether they were spiritual growth or not. The 25-hour requirement still remains, as well as the required paperwork. Some students were confused as to why

the program was changed at all. Junior Gabby Payne said, “The change surprised me. I didn’t know anything was wrong with the previous CCS program. But after I learned more about Reach, it sounded like a great transition. I’m excited that some of the volunteer programs offer rides, because I don’t have a car.” The reason for the change is simple yet important. Schilling evaluated the CCS program a couple summers ago, and found out that a large percent of students were not serving in the Salem community. Corban’s Provost, Dr. Matt Lucas, once asked, “If Corban were removed from Salem, would anybody notice the difference?” The change in the CCS program was made so students would make a noticeable difference in the community and build a relationship with people, while sharing the love of Christ. Reach might be new and unfamiliar to students, but the aim of the program is not to stay in a complacent state. “The goal is not for students to be comfortable,” Schilling stated. It’s to achieve Corban’s creed; to make a difference in the world for Jesus Christ.

Corban receives $337,000 technology grant By Sarah Moreau Staff Writer Thanks to a recent technology grant, pastors and Christian workers may soon have the opportunity to go to seminary at Corban without leaving their homes and ministries. Corban was awarded a $337,000 grant this year from the M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust. According to Corban Chief Information Officer Brian Schmidt, the grant will be used to fund a project called “Ministry Education for the 21st Century.” Schmidt said that although Corban has been connected with the Trust for many years, the university has normally received funding for new buildings or major purchases. “This kind of program development grant is new for them and a new opportunity for us as well,” Schmidt said. “It

truly is exciting news to receive such support!” Corban’s School of Ministry has been training students for many years in areas such as ministry leadership, pastoral ministry, student and family ministry, missions, biblical studies, and women’s ministry. The school has recently joined with Northwest Baptist Seminary, which has allowed expansion of ministry training to graduate level programs, as well as access to more faculty members. Schmidt said, “Together, we hope to break new ground in ministry education by re-examining what it means to educate students in the age of technology, mobility, and Internet.” The administration hopes to use the project to adjust graduate level ministry programs to reach out to students in rural areas. Leaving a familiar and local ministry to go to seminary is normally a tough transition for both the students

and the ministries they are leaving, and this project aims to help in that area. Schmidt said that, although there is much more work to be done on the project, the grant has given them the means to hire staff members and make purchases needed for their work. The application for the grant was a combined effort of the Provost’s Office, University Information Services, and the School of Ministry, a method that had not been tried before. “Many thanks to Dr. Greg Trull [biblical studies professor] and his team of ministry faculty who have spent countless hours dreaming of this kind of program and passionately pursued this request in addition to their other work,” Schmidt said. “It was a great pleasure to work with them to write the grant and shepherd it through the rather daunting grant process.”


Sept. 27, 2011

6 Lifestyle

Bonding with your ‘roomie’ By Elisa Schwarze Guest Writer

And, ladies, while guys are so much fun to be with, don’t forget There is no one like a “roomto enjoy some “roie.” tic,” (RO-MANWho else will hide and overTIC without the heat under your covers for an man) dates with hour simply to scare you to your girlfriends. death when you finally call it Here are just a night? a few ideas for Who else will stash dirty roomie fun: socks, small rodents and halfCheck out the eaten pizza under your bed? great trails be(Yeah, that’s a Farrar thing!) hind PVG. Enjoy Who else will, when they a walk, pick some forget their keys and get blackberries and locked out of the dorm, yell have a blackberry up to your window, “Roomio, fight. Be sure to Roomio, wherefore art thou, wear a white TRoomio?” shirt for this; it’s It is kind of strange to sudlike paintballing. denly inhabit a small space You might even with someone who may have be able to find been a stranger the day you Photo by Jake Bowdoin the eagle’s nest moved in, but God has a won- Kyle Croft, Nathan Swanson and Chris that is rumored derful way of bursting our McGhee, cross country teammates, bond to be hidden back personal space bubble. over move-in day. there. Strangers become college Become a fanatic siblings, and this new family lings make for a lot of fun. relationship often entails simiFellas: buck up and embrace and go to the sports games. Have lar ups and downs to those you the “bromance” spirit that origi- you seen our Warriors? They are would face at home; however, nated in Farrar and has since amazing! Dress blue and yellow, don’t be mellow, cheer loudly no parents and same-age sib- spread to all men on campus.

and show them you’re proud. Have a Spartan war. Pick your favorite game such as flag football, capture the flag, etc., but play while dressed up as a Spartan. Don your capes, fake blood, shorts and shields. Nothing will make you feel manlier! Set up a scavenger hunt. Make up clues around the campus or around downtown Salem. Be sure to have a sweet prize at the end. Play mud football, just as long as you don’t use the Warrior Field. After you’ve sufficiently besmirched your roommate, sing and suds up in adjacent shower stalls and wrap up the evening with cocoa and minimarshmallows. Go ice blocking. It’s cheap, it’s fun, and it’s a Corban tradition. Simply purchase a block of ice from nearby Winco, and use it as a sled to slide down one of Corban’s many grassy hills. After you get done freezing your derrière, go freeze your face with some frozen yogurt at Sweet Papaya on Lancaster or Lime Berry on Commercial Street.

• •

Decorators strive for personalization By Kelsey Leavitt Staff Writer

If you’ve ever walked down a dorm hallway, you’ve seen the collision of colors and personal style that flow from room to room. Each college student is given the same amount of space and yet every room has a different feel to it. Girls’ rooms become feisty with bold animal prints hanging on the walls, while guys’ walls bear sports and movie posters, flags, or cam-

ouflage prints. Freshman Amanda Teach said, “I love walking down the halls, seeing how unique everyone’s style is. We’re all given the same stuff to work with, but we all use it so differently.” Some students take it one step further and decorate not only their dorms, but go on to paint their personalities on their books and notebooks as well. Sophomore Katie Baker can’t stand looking at the acid wash print on her

different composition journals for class, so she decided to get crafty. “I like being able to look at different things, and I really like to craft,” she said. It’s simple, she explained. All you need is some colored paper (or even a magazine page, poster, or newspaper), some tape, pencil, scissors, glue and anything else you’d like to use to decorate (stickers, sketches, photos, paper clippings), and then your book or

journal of choice! Start by taping the paper to the back of the journal, trace along the edges of the paper, then unattach the paper and cut along the lines. After that, simply glue the paper in place and decorate as your style sees fit. Whether you prefer to decorate your dorm, personalize your papers or both, Corban is “home” for the next eight months, and a little personal style can make it feel just that way.

Photo by Megan Russell Katie Baker, a sophomore in Baylo, turns boring notebook covers into original pieces of artwork.


The Hil top

Ask Katie

By Katie Wilson Columnist

I want to tell a girl I like her, but I’m scared. Should I tell her or not? “We cannot fight for love as men may do. / We should be wooed and were not made to woo.” (II.i.226-7) Ah, wise words of Helena in Shakespeare’s “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” Here’s a wild idea; some may call it rash, liberal and avant-garde – just tell her how you feel. Girls really fall for honesty and confidence, and whether you have these qualities or not, opening up to her will convince her that you do. Ask yourself whether a moment of (most likely polite) rejection is worth the constant nagging regret for never taking the opportunity.

Lifestyle Here are some ideas: flowers (awh), going to a movie (awh!), a sunset walk along the beach (awwhh!). Whatever you do, however, do NOT ask her out on Facebook or in a text. It is considered an automatic fail and your honesty/confidence points fly out the window. How do you get over a guy you constantly see and have activities with? Corban provides about as much distance for ex-es as a fishbowl would for two recently split-up goldfish. I am positive you don’t want me to advise distracting yourself, but hear me out. You have friends who want to spend time with you, and Corban is always teeming with a sea of activities. Maybe you’ll push for 100 percent on that next test

instead of 90. Distractions lie all around you, and this is a great time to deepen your relationship not only with God and with others, but also with yourself (think Eat Pray Love with a Christian twist). Instead of thinking about your ex, try saying a prayer or meditate on a verse. Distraction doesn’t necessarily mean overloading your life with activities and people; it starts in the mind. You can focus on your ex or you can focus on the other billions of things in the world worth your attention. The choice is, daily, yours. How do I get girls to stop talking to me and texting me all the time? Oh, sir (I assume), what a rough life you must lead. Amidst the rigors of homework and activities, commitments, responsibilities, athletics, work, and whatever else you’re

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roped into, how exhausting it must feel to be weighed down by the affection of the ladies. The thought that you may be busy or uninterested may never even register, so the ball is in your court. No reply to a text: fine. Gentle “hello” in passing and nothing more: great. If the really pushy ones are still trying to wedge their ways into your life, it may become necessary to tell them that you are not much of a texter, not very talkative, that you are busy. If all this fails, you have every right to let a girl know she is making you uncomfortable. If politeness doesn’t work, then directness is key: “Please stop talking to me so much.” That wasn’t so hard, was it?

The opinions of this columnist have not been reviewed by a qualified medical professional.

Core groups provide transition for new students By Megan Russell Hil top Design Editor

A boating trip. A visit to the Oregon State Fair. Games at Pringle Park in downtown Salem. A hike at Silver Creek Falls. Every year, “core group activities” such as these fill the Sunday afternoon of Orientation Weekend at Corban. These core groups bring freshmen from the same region together to help them transition into a college setting. The advisers, Corban faculty, take special care to ensure that freshmen are settled and have class schedules. The core group advisers also teach a class that helps the new students adjust to college life. Core groups are Corban’s unique approach to building relationships among students and faculty. These relationships be-

Photo by Jake Bowdoin John Weber throws a frisbee to fellow core group members at Pringle Park during Freshman Orientation.

gin before students even arrive, as advisors travel to students’ homes to meet with them and their families in the summer. “It’s not just an academic relationship. It’s spiritual and social, too,” said Director of Admissions Heidi Stowman, whose core group consists of freshmen from Alaska, Hawaii and the Ya-

kima region of Washington. While core group advisors attempt to bridge the relationship between faculty and students from the beginning, the advisors are given a student helper who provides leadership and experience for the freshmen. These upperclassmen are also given opportunities to

lead throughout the semester-long class. “It’s a really great opportunity to lead,” said Emily Teterud, a core group assistant for Shannon Simmons, an associate professor in Human Performance. “It makes me excited for Corban when I see all the freshmen excited!” In addition to freshmen, transfer students are placed in a “transfer core group” to aid them in adjusting to Corban’s campus and life. Nathan Burres, a sophomore transfer student from Pierce College, said that orientation at his previous school was non-existent. “There’s a sense of community here,” he said. “Everyone’s in the same boat.” A unique opportunity for students and staff, core groups bring security and relief to nervous freshmen, while providing a sophisticated environment of growth for previously experienced college students.


Sept. 27, 2011 9

The Hil top

Explore. Discover. Love. By Hali Anderson

Hil top Content Editor

S

Salem.

ick of cafeteria food already?

FELLOWSHIP

Hanging out in the dorm lobby failing to quench your boredom? Wishing you had off-campus opportunities to worship and serve? Check out these salem attractions for fellowship, food and fun.

Salem Alliance

Located on 555 Gains St. NE, Salem Heights has services Saturday evenings at both 5 and 6:30 p.m. and Sunday mornings at 8, 9:30, and 11 a.m. “The dream of a church reaching the city and the world ... is what is known today as Salem Alliance Church,” Lead Pastor Steve Fowler writes on the church’s website. True to its dream, the outreach-driven church offers multiple ways for students to serve, such as volunteering with the children’s ministry, making meals to deliver to the homeless, or cutting and storing firewood for needy families in the community

Bethany Baptist

Located on 1150 Hilfiker Lane SE, Bethany Baptist has a high school and college group worship service at 9 p.m. on Saturday and worship services on Sunday morning at 9 and 10 a.m. A small, community-oriented church, Bethany has several ministries members can get involved in within the church. Bethany also has community outreaches such as its food pantry and partnership with Union Gospel Mission at the Simonka House for Women.

Outward

Located on 775 Front St. NE, Outward is a young church with loud Phil Wickham-inspired music, gospel-centered preaching and a missional focus. Outward meets at Saturdays at 7 p.m. and Sundays at 10 a.m., as well as in individual community groups throughout the week. Outward has many one-time service events throughout the year, such as park and school cleanups and delivering Thanksgiving dinners to needy families in the community. Outward’s vision is to be “gospel centered with a missional mindset that engages culture while truly making disciples.”

Morningstar

Located at 4775 27th Ave. SE, Morning Star meets Saturday at 6:15 p.m. and Sunday at 9 and 11 a.m. According to their mission statement, Morningstar is a “worshiping family, growing in our faith, loving God and neighbor, serving with our gifts, sharing with the lost …all for the glory of Jesus Christ.” Morningstar is a large, contemporary church with dozens of ministries in which to be involved. From motorcycling and sports ministries, to worship and media ministries, to addiction recovery and emotional healing ministries, there are many places to serve and be served.

FOOD

French Press

This adorable Parisian Café is conveniently nestled not only on this continent, but in Salem on 2725 Commercial St. SE. The atmospheric café provides outdoor seating, a large hearth inside, and a drive-through window. In addition to the delicious espresso beverages, the coffee house crafts a number of delectable crepes, made fresh with seasonal ingredients. The café is open 6 a.m. to 8 p.m., Sunday through Wednesday, and 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. Thursday through Saturday.

Sweet Papaya

Craving something icy, sweet and moderately healthy? Try Sweet Papaya! Conveniently located on 1134 Lancaster Dr. NE, in the same building as Starbucks, this sugary sweet location stays open until 11 p.m. The self-serve myriad of frozen yogurt flavors, candy bits and fruit toppings come in pay-by-the ounce containers, making Sweet Papaya as fiscally responsible or as extravagant as you would like to make it.

Broadway Coffee House

An outreach of Salem Alliance church, the Broadway Coffee house is located on 1300 Broadway Street. The coffee house serves hand-crafted Stumptown espresso beverages with foamy latte art and fresh-daily Great Harvest pastries. With two floors of plush couches, a large fireplace and free wifi, it’s a perfect place to plop down with a stack of books and study the day away.

La Perla

Located on the top of the Reed Opera House Downtown, La Perla is an authentic Mexican restaurant with reasonable prices. After a day perusing the Salem Center mall or window shopping the shops downtown, La Perla is the perfect place to sit with friends, scan the streets of Salem, enjoy a cool glass of cinnamon-sweet Horchata and chow down on dollar tacos.

Kroc Center

FUN

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Sick of being cooped up in your dorm room and craving a little physical activity? The Salem Kroc Center on 1865 Bill Frey Dr is the perfect place to do all things athletic. The Salvation Army community center sports a workout area, rock wall, indoor basketball courts, a lap swimming pool, a recreational pool with waterslides, and a hot tub. A day pass can be purchased for $7 and the center is open until 10 p.m.

Riverfront Park

While the sun is still shining, check out Riverfront Park on 200 Water Street NE.  Bordering the Willamette River, this park is the perfect spot for an impromptu ultimate Frisbee game on the sprawling greens, after-school runs on the jogging trails, or canoeing and kayaking in the river. The 23-acre park has an amphitheater, play equipment, a covered pavilion and large grassy areas. While you’re there, be sure to visit the Riverfront Carousel and the colossal modern art piece the “Ecoearth Globe.”

Cinebarre

Located at 501 Marion St NE, Cinebarre is a quirky, atmospheric theatre open to patrons ages 18 and older. Evening tickets run at $9, a whopping 100 cents less than a standard Regal ticket. However, students will be glad to see box office flicks for just $5 on Tuesday nights, or, better yet, buy one get one free tickets can be purchased with Corban ID’s on Thursday evenings. Another perk? Cinebarre is a dine-in movie theatre, meaning you can order a milkshake or burger at the beginning of the show, and they bring it right to your seat!

AMF Bowling Rink

For those of you dying to get your bowl on, AMF is where it is at. The rink, located at 4303 Center St. NE, is open until 10 p.m. Sundays, 11 p.m. Monday-Thursday, and 1:30 a.m. on Friday and Saturday. Bowlers pay per person, per game, plus the cost of shoe rental. Rates vary depending on the evening, but AMF will discount groups. For instance, the Fun Pack provides six bowlers with two hours of bowling, including shoe rentals, a pitcher of your favorite soda and a large popcorn.


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Sept. 27, 2011

Sports

Briefs Soccer teams take away wins

Photo by Tori Cole Derik Chaney takes the ball past a defender from Concordia in a game on Sept. 13.

Freshman striker scoring big By Hannah Lobban Staff Writer Enter Derik Chaney, the freshman striker from Helena, Mont. He may have been playing soccer with his older brother Devin for as long as he can remember, but Derik is standing out all on his own. Soon after stepping on campus, Chaney has been putting ball after ball in the back of the net, becoming one of the top scorers for the Warriors. He has scored three times in six games. However, stats aren’t what matter to Chaney. “Goals aren’t what it’s all about,” he said. “It’s about how the opportunity to score became possible.” He commends the goalkeepers and the entire defensive line for their solid work, saying he feels very safe with them. He doesn’t only have good words for his teammates, but he holds his coaches in the highest esteem. Head coach Paul Meehan recruited him early on, taking him from under the noses of Division 1 NCAA school, Belmont University. “Derik showed a very good change of

pace, [was] comfortable around connect, that’s when you have the penalty area, and had an in- a good team,” Chaney said. nate ability to score goals,” said Chaney went on to play all Meehan. four years of high school soccer Chaney has the focus needed at Capital High, as well playing to make every game count. club ball for Helena Arsenal. He “As a player, he has an amaz- was named all-state, all-league, ing work ethic and has the skill team MVP, and best offensive level to go player as along with a junior “he has an amazing work ethic it,” teamand seand has the skill level mate Aaron nior, as to go along with it.” Kinnes said. well as -- teammate Aaron Kinnes “As a freshhaving man, he been a has come in and started every member of the conference rungame and has performed great ner-up team as a sophomore. for us.” He graduated second in Chaney began playing soccer school history for most assists at about age 5, when his broth- in a season. er started. The two of them Now, as a starter for Corban, have been fiercely competitive Chaney wants to be able to go from the get-go, whether over all the way to conference chamsoccer or who could put their pions and the national tournaclothes away the fastest. ment. And if that happens to “A big part of why I play the occur more than once, he won’t way I do today is because Devin complain. challenged me to continue to Anyone could go on out and get better,” said Chaney. watch a men’s soccer game and He says that his love for soc- see Chaney and the rest of the cer stems from the fact that in team in action, but, according soccer, there aren’t plays, but to Chaney, who said this with a rather ideas. A coach can tell smile, “I know a lot of the guys his team the ideas but doesn’t on the team will step up their have much control over the re- game if there is a cute girl on sult. “And when a team’s ideas the sidelines watching them.”

The Lady Warriors came back from their California road trip with a 2-1 record, losing to The Masters College (3-1) Sept. 16 and William Jessup College (3-2) Sept. 19. They won against Menlo College (5-1) on Sept. 17 and are now 5-3 on the season. The men added another win on Sept. 24 against Evergreen State College. The game closed with a score of 2-1. On Sept. 21, they dropped a game to Northwest University (1-0). The Warriors stand at 4-4.

Cross Country Runners rank Freshman Olivia James was named NCCAA Student-Athlete of the Week after placing fourth in her debut on Sept. 8. Senior Courtney Welling led the team at the CCC Preview Meet in Ashland on Sept. 17. The men placed fifth overall at the Lewis & Clark Invitational on Sept. 10, led by David Brown, Caleb Goins and Jacob Bowdoin.

Golf teams place in Tourney Ranked second in the CCC, the men tied for the lowest combined score at the Pacific Fall Invitational that ended Saturday. In the opening round, senior Joey Duwe shot a 36-hole score of 2-under 142 (67-75). Freshman Jared Lambert finished with the first top 5 score of his career. Corban’s women’s golf team placed sixth in the Pacific Fall Invitational that ended on Saturday. Leading the team was sophomore Caley Hubert.


10

Sept. 27, 2011

Sports

Briefs Soccer teams take away wins

Photo by Tori Cole Derik Chaney takes the ball past a defender from Concordia in a game on Sept. 13.

Freshman striker scoring big By Hannah Lobban Staff Writer Enter Derik Chaney, the freshman striker from Helena, Mont. He may have been playing soccer with his older brother Devin for as long as he can remember, but Derik is standing out all on his own. Soon after stepping on campus, Chaney has been putting ball after ball in the back of the net, becoming one of the top scorers for the Warriors. He has scored three times in six games. However, stats aren’t what matter to Chaney. “Goals aren’t what it’s all about,” he said. “It’s about how the opportunity to score became possible.” He commends the goalkeepers and the entire defensive line for their solid work, saying he feels very safe with them. He doesn’t only have good words for his teammates, but he holds his coaches in the highest esteem. Head coach Paul Meehan recruited him early on, taking him from under the noses of Division 1 NCAA school, Belmont University. “Derik showed a very good change of

pace, [was] comfortable around connect, that’s when you have the penalty area, and had an in- a good team,” Chaney said. nate ability to score goals,” said Chaney went on to play all Meehan. four years of high school soccer Chaney has the focus needed at Capital High, as well playing to make every game count. club ball for Helena Arsenal. He “As a player, he has an amaz- was named all-state, all-league, ing work ethic and has the skill team MVP, and best offensive level to go player as along with a junior “he has an amazing work ethic it,” teamand seand has the skill level mate Aaron nior, as to go along with it.” Kinnes said. well as -- teammate Aaron Kinnes “As a freshhaving man, he been a has come in and started every member of the conference rungame and has performed great ner-up team as a sophomore. for us.” He graduated second in Chaney began playing soccer school history for most assists at about age 5, when his broth- in a season. er started. The two of them Now, as a starter for Corban, have been fiercely competitive Chaney wants to be able to go from the get-go, whether over all the way to conference chamsoccer or who could put their pions and the national tournaclothes away the fastest. ment. And if that happens to “A big part of why I play the occur more than once, he won’t way I do today is because Devin complain. challenged me to continue to Anyone could go on out and get better,” said Chaney. watch a men’s soccer game and He says that his love for soc- see Chaney and the rest of the cer stems from the fact that in team in action, but, according soccer, there aren’t plays, but to Chaney, who said this with a rather ideas. A coach can tell smile, “I know a lot of the guys his team the ideas but doesn’t on the team will step up their have much control over the re- game if there is a cute girl on sult. “And when a team’s ideas the sidelines watching them.”

The Lady Warriors came back from their California road trip with a 2-1 record, losing to The Masters College (3-1) Sept. 16 and William Jessup College (3-2) Sept. 19. They won against Menlo College (5-1) on Sept. 17 and are now 5-3 on the season. The men added another win on Sept. 24 against Evergreen State College. The game closed with a score of 2-1. On Sept. 21, they dropped a game to Northwest University (1-0). The Warriors stand at 4-4.

Cross Country Runners rank Freshman Olivia James was named NCCAA Student-Athlete of the Week after placing fourth in her debut on Sept. 8. Senior Courtney Welling led the team at the CCC Preview Meet in Ashland on Sept. 17. The men placed fifth overall at the Lewis & Clark Invitational on Sept. 10, led by David Brown, Caleb Goins and Jacob Bowdoin.

Golf teams place in Tourney Ranked second in the CCC, the men tied for the lowest combined score at the Pacific Fall Invitational that ended Saturday. In the opening round, senior Joey Duwe shot a 36-hole score of 2-under 142 (67-75). Freshman Jared Lambert finished with the first top 5 score of his career. Corban’s women’s golf team placed sixth in the Pacific Fall Invitational that ended on Saturday. Leading the team was sophomore Caley Hubert.


The Hil top

Sports

11

A Manning down By Ralph Waldo Emerson I I Columnist

Photo by Jessica Baughman Courtney Mulford and Chandra Baskoro block the ball.

Shaky start to CCC season By Hali Andserson Hil top Content Editor

The Warriors suffered another loss, 1-3, in their away game against NorthThings are looking west University in bleak for Corban’s volKirkland, Wash., on leyball team, which, Sept. 16. after its defeat in EuOn the following gene on Friday, has lost day, however, the five games out of seven tide turned. The since Cascade Collegiate Warriors broke their Conference games befour-game losing gan earlier this month. streak with an imInitially, the Warriors pressive 3-0 victory entered the season with against Evergreen confidence, an impresState College. sive pre-season 6-2 Victory was shortwin-loss ratio behind lived, as the team them. lost 1-3 to NorthThe team started the west Christian Uniseason strong on Sept. versity on Sept. 23 2, defeating its first in Eugene. CCC competitor, WarPhoto by Jessica Baughman With a disconcertner Pacific College, 3Land sets the ball ing 2-5 standing in 1. The next day, still in Tiffany to Megan Dees. the Cascade CollePortland, the team sufgiate Conference, fered a 3-1 loss to the infamously talented Concordia the volleyball team looks forward to two home games this weekend team. On Friday, Sept. 9, the War- in the C.E. Jeffers Sports Center. The Warriors will play a match riors played their first home game against Eastern Oregon Univer- against the Oregon Institute of sity. After four matches on their Technology on Friday at 7 p.m. and home court, the Warriors lost 3- Southern Oregon University at 7 p.m. on Saturday. 1. On Sept. 10, the team lost yet another home game to the College of Idaho, with a 3-1 score.

The Indianapolis Colts – my fantasy football team – suffered a devastating blow before the NFL season began, with the news that Peyton Manning would undergo cervical fusion surgery. I’m just a lowly communications major, so I’m not quite sure what those words mean, but they seem a little scary. Manning will now be out anywhere from “two months” to “Who cares? The football season is over anyway.” This injury dealt a major setback to the Colts, as they mourn the loss of their star quarterback. Not to say there are not other stars and playmakers on their team, but as their Week One 34-7 loss to the Texans showed, playing without Manning is going to make for a long season. But where the Colts see devastation, the other three AFC South teams see opportunity. Since Manning joined the Colts in 1998, they have failed to make the playoffs only twice. In fact, since the addition of the Houston Texans to the NFL in 2002 (and thus the creation of the new AFC South), the other teams have seen far less success in the division. Since 2002, the Colts have made it to the playoffs nine straight years, while the Titans have made it to the playoffs only four times, the Jaguars two, and the Texans a big fat zero. Manning’s injury leaves the door wide open for these other teams to capture the AFC South and, hopefully, to use this opportunity to vault themselves into the Super Bowl. The question is, who will be that team that (pardon the inappropriate sports metaphor) steps up to the plate? It’s a long season, and many things could change. But so far, none of these teams look very impressive. Either way, this should make for an interesting division race and an exciting year of football. Now if you’ll excuse me, I need to go pick up a quarterback to replace Manning on my fantasy team. Apparently, he has a younger brother ….


12 Entertainment

Se Sept. 27, 2011pt.

‘Warrior’ Action-drama film stuns viewers

By Katie Wilson Guest Writer

By now the men have stopped reading. “I’m not going to see ‘Warrior’ if it made a girl cry.” Well, girls cry at “This is Sparta!” nearly everything. Now, you’re probably “Warrior” was not a rothinking, “I don’t know mance by any stretch, but what movie I just saw.” that sneaky category of I know that I saw “War“drama” zapped me right in rior,” starring Joel Edgerthe heartstring. ton, Tom Hardy and Nick I emerged from the theater, Nolte. I know it is about fighting teary-eyed as odd phrases in a cage and not in a rocky such as, “That intense fight scene was so touching!” and battlefield with superhu“Who would’ve known a body man muscle-man, Gerard slam would bring two brothButler. I know this because unlike ers together?” popped into “Warrior,” 300 didn’t make my mind. I consider myself fairly critime cry.

cal of action films, and men, but the fighting was superb. The story revolves around two brothers, Tommy and Brendan, and their recovering-alcoholic father, Paddy. The family is caught in a hate-triangle based on offenses brewing in the muddy past. “Where were you when it mattered?” Tommy interjects, as his father apologizes for a lifetime of rage and mistreatment. “Warrior” is an action-drama crafted with complex layers of emotion. The stunning cinematography accents the

Conlon brothers Tommy (Tom Hardy) and Brendon (Joel Edgerton) face off in the boxing ring.

Top 5

55

33

songs to get you through the 2011-12 school year

“Dead Man (Carry Me)” by Jars of Clay: I’ve got a lot of things on my mind. It may not be close to New Year’s but it is a new school year. Make me breathe, I want to be a new man. “Every Road” by The Maine: We’re asking the same questions, singing the same songs, thinking of those we left back home and being transformed. We’re the lucky ones.

44

“Soulshine” by the Allman Brothers Band: When the stars ain’t shinin’ bright, you feel like you’ve lost your way, and that’s the time you just got to let your soul shine.

22

“Luv is a Verb” by dc Talk: It was black and white with no room for grey. These biblical truths and living out your faith can get you through those “Who am I?” and “What am I doing?” moments.

11

“Sound of Sunshine” by Michael Franti and Spearheads: There you are. Just waiting for the storms of life to pass you by. And that’s the sound of sunshine coming down.

tension, merging the visual with the emotional. Whether you enjoy fighting or always side with pacifism, whether you are interested in dramatic family dynamics or you could not give a hoot, this movie is for you. Its eclecticism makes it as emotionally stimulating as it is visually impressive, and fishing for thematic elements and analysis in theater is a worthy sport for any college student. My advice: live a little, spend the $8.50, and get to the box office. Photos courtesy of Lionsgate

iPhone 5 Last month Apple announced that Steve Jobs had resigned as Chief Executive Officer, and Tim Cook, previously Apple’s Chief Operating Officer, would take over as the company’s new CEO. Jobs will still offer his insights and creativity to Apple as Chairman of the Board. In the wake of management shifts, this company doesn’t hesitate to continue producing technology for everyone.

3G

9:41 AM

• By last July, over 200 million iPhone, iPad and iPod touch users (worldwide) had downloaded more than 15 billion apps from the App Store. • The iPhone 5 has been rumored not to be released until this month or next, which is a throwback to previous years. Historically, Apple has released the iPhone annually during the summer. • Apple recorded their best quarter of revenue and earnings this year, which ended in June. During the second quarter of the year, they sold 20.34 million iPhones; a 142 percent unit growth from the same quarter in 2010.


The Hil top

Refreshing, honest music By Hannah Lobban Staff Writer The Dangerous Summer put out their sophomore record “War Paint” in late July. This alternative rock band from Ellicott City, Md., may like to work in slow and medium tempos, but they pick things up in their tracks “No One’s Gonna Need You More” and “In My Room.” This preference, however, doesn’t hinder their power or impact. In fact, to have sped things up would have ruined the effect. It’s a catchy listen from the first run-through, but the honesty that the lyricism provides starts to seep in through many listens. There is a textured and cohesive feel throughout the whole thing, as the two guitarists interweave with their melodies.

Along with catchy melodies, The Dangerous Summer plays with a less poppy feel this time around, but just as refreshing. AJ Perdomo, the band’s frontman and lyricist, tells stories based around sadness. We realize that things are at their worst, yet we push through. “War Paint” is made by a group of guys not much older than I am, yet they are producing a much more mature sound than a lot of bands the same age are capable of. It can appeal to those of the older generation, yet can still connect with us. While it may not be a brand new, radio playing album, it is definitely worth checking out. Go listen to “I Should Leave Right Now,” “War Paint,” or “Work in Progress” and see.

Coffee, yoga and jazz

IKE

[box] By Megan Russell Hil top Design Editor When you buy their organic, all-natural coffee, your money goes to youth who need help learning basic skills like work ethics and budgeting. This isn’t a plea for a coffee-lover’s club at Corban. Or a scientific response to prove that coffee is the best way to lose weight or stimulate dead brain cells. It’s just a coffee shop, where delinquent kids can learn to “get a life.” There’s a lot of coffee involved, a lot of music, and best of all: a whole lot of Jesus-loving people.

Did I mention there’s yoga every Sunday? Throughout many years of different plans, Ike Box, a local coffee shop, came into existence. Ike Box began as a venue for music, but quickly morphed into a coffee shop, with local music constantly in its mini-ballroom. Every third Monday and Friday, Jazz night and Latino night take place; every Wednesday night a group of ladies, with welcoming hearts, knit and fellowship. They even invited me, a strong advocate for store-bought things because of my lack of talent, to learn to knit. The indie-vibe creates an atmosphere of welcome and openness with wood floors and soft pastel colors. In the ballroom, paintings of cherubs and pearl necklaces blanket the wall, giving a modernday Michelangelo feel.

The non-profit organization called “Isaac’s Room” began when a local couple, Mark and Tiffany Bulgin, lost their baby, Isaac. Instead of bitterness and anger, they harbored a desire to help local kids by giving them a chance at a real life through the idea of “Isaac’s Room.” The bean-loving workplace offers internships to at-risk, Mid-Valley teens, in order to help them gain control of their situations. The building provides an atmosphere where groups can come together to share common interests or play music. Ike Box also enjoys getting involved with Corban’s students as they promote $1 lattes during finals week. So support this coffee shop, promote the gospel, learn to knit, salsa dance, and venture downtown!

Entertainment

13

Entering Entertainment By Maya Bartel Columnist The problem with technology is that we’re the guinea pigs. Our generation is one of the first to delight in new technologies, and at a young age we develop an insatiable taste for our future love. Technology makes life easier. Too much easier. Our identities are caught up in technology as we hide behind online names and become bold enough to ask that question through text that we wouldn’t have in person. We are so caught up in the latest gadgets that we are constantly comparing what we already own to what we could own. We want the latest and the best technology. Advertising for new gadgets fuels our ever-growing shoppers’ stomachs. We let the corporations feed our consumeristic bellies until we are bloated, because we can no longer say “that’s enough.” We become sick through our diets with longing, love and lust. And yet we still say yes. Our generation is too stuck in being the most “epic,” the most “tight” and the most “sick” to realize there is more to life than an electronic piece of metal that within seconds expends our cash funds, within days gets broken and within weeks becomes outdated. There is no clear solution to this technological epidemic. And, in the end, the fastpaced world we live in makes it harder to slow down and let our tummies digest the technology that is already made. It’s no shock that the love we have for our technology never lasts.


Sept. 27, 2011

14 World

Great Depression II? By Lacy Ramirez Columnist I know quite a bit about the Great Depression of the 1930s. I studied it to the point of exhaustion and even did a research project or two on the subject during my elementary school years. I was left completely horror-stricken every time I set my eyes on those black-andwhite pictures of starving children barely dressed in rags. I felt heartbroken, but constantly reminded myself that what I was seeing was a thing of the past and nothing similar would ever threaten my family. I’m not so sure anymore. Those mere memories are becoming fears of the near future. In December 2007, the world fell into what is called “The Great Recession,” the worst financial collapse since the depression of the 1930s. The National Bureau of Economic Research declared the recession at an end in June 2009, but researchers and regular citizens are in agreement that this “end” was short-lived. Or perhaps, it never ended at all. It’s no secret that the U.S. is suffering economically: mortgage foreclosures have hit a new high, the poverty rate keeps increasing and there’s no need to mention the ever-growing federal budget deficit (that has now

reached a whopping $14.5 trillion!). But did you know that Germany’s debt has reached $2 trillion? Or that European leaders are preparing for a Greek default due to Greece’s debt of more than $400 billion? Have you heard that Japan and France were hit by credit rating downgrades or that Italy and Spain are on the verge of disappearing from the market? I certainly had no idea. The Chinese government stated that it will be “withdrawing from stimulus spending and tightening bank lending,” according to The Huffington Post. In other words, if the financial world goes down the drain, China will not be the one to clean out that sucker; it will be the one to turn on that garbage disposal. Campaigning for the U.S. presidency is in full swing, with politicians left and right promising to rescue America from total economic downfall, but honestly, I am more concerned about the economic situation of the world as a whole. If Europe ever falls, no president — no matter how intelligent or diligent — will be able to prevent the states from tumbling down after. In the words of George Santayana, “Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.” So now I’ll ask America — no, I’ll ask the world – is it too late to remember and learn from our past?

Libya update: Gaddafi disappears By Eleanor Fazzari Staff Writer For decades, Libya has faced a lack of government and has reeked of corruption. Libya has been without an independent legal system, forcing Libyans to resolve conflict without the support of a governmental system. Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi, in power since 1969, lost his hold over the country after facing rebel revolts in August of this year. Since February, Libyan anti-government opponents have protested and revolted against his reign. Gaddafi responded to these protests with extreme violence, causing a brutal civil war between the two opposing troops.

At least 30,000 people have died, and another 50,000 have been injured. On Aug. 21, rebel forces attacked the capital city of Tripoli. By Aug. 23, Gaddafi’s hold on power was completely eradicated. Currently, his whereabouts are unknown. According to CNN, Gaddafi is believed to be on the run from the rebel fighters. Through CNN’s interview with Anees al-Sharif, a spokesman for the new Tripoli Military Council, it was learned that anti-government fighters have cornered Gaddafi and have cut off all ways for him to escape from the country. To find out more about the Libya conflict go to http:// topics.cnn.com/topics/libya.

The Blurb:

letting you know what in the world in going on out there

On Tuesday, Sept. 20, Typhoon Nesat hit the eastern Philippines with winds of up to 106 miles per hour. More than 100,000 people were ordered to evacuate. On Sunday, Sep. 25, Saudi Arabia’s King Abdullah announced a decree that has granted women the right to vote, run in elections and be appointed to the advisory Shura Council starting in 2015. Women are hoping to be allowed a driver’s license soon. Arch West, the inventor of the popular Doritos chips, passed away on Sept. 20. “We are tossing Doritos chips in before they put the dirt over the urn,” his daughter, Jana Hacker, told the Dallas Morning News. “He’ll love it.”

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The Hil top

Theology

Pop songs and treadmills

John Bennett (piano), Bryce Phelan (guitar), Shaelee Haglund (vocals) join together to practice for the upcoming Worship Nights.

By Dr. Kent Kersey Guest Columnist

I was recently reminded of theology’s importance when I was working out on a treadmill and listening to the pop album “Torches” by Foster the People.Most peo- dangerous outcast planple know Foster the People ning to slaughter innocent for their song “Pumped Up people who are shopping for high-end sneakers. Kicks.” There is absolutely no way As I was on the treadmill, gauging my speed to the I would ever dwell construcsong’s rhythm, the theolo- tively on a Columbine-type gian inside me asked a very outburst. However, over obvious question: What is the course of a few months, I had these kinds of images this song about? The ability to ask good flowing out of my speakers questions is one of the without any reflection. As I faced this huge distheologian’s most valuable resources. The creative connect between music and use of curiosity to uncover meaning, I was reminded hidden truth claims and that we believers frequently allow clandestine unfiltered agendas is a ...the song’s image ideas into sure mark of good theol- isn’t the Beach Boys our lives. According surfing ogy. So after on a hot summer day. to theologian Kevin singing along Vanhoozer, with this song for a few months, I “Cultural traits thus redecided to finally figure out semble viruses, both the kind that affect our bodies what I was singing about. I was surprised that this and the kind that affect our poppy tune contained lyrics computers.” For me, violent imabout some “cowboy kid” ages nuzzled deeply into a finding a gun and warning catchy pop tune and travpeople to outrun his buleled through iTunes into lets. Internet rumors claim that my iPhone and repeatedly the context of this song is a entered my brain, and I 2007 murder/suicide at a never wondered what was happening. mall in Nebraska. Vanhoozer asks, “Is there While confessing that such a thing as a cultural imthe song contains violent mune system?” The answer underpinnings, the band denies a direct link to any is yes. The best immune specific event. According to system for the believer’s the band, the song doesn’t spiritual life is good theologlorify this kind of shoot- gy grounded in an accurate ing; it is a psychological reading of the Bible. If we aren’t actively enlook inside the head of a gaging good theological potential killer. strategies throughout life, Wow! Unlike the song’s upbeat music, the song’s we might find ourselves image isn’t the Beach Boys humming catchy tunes surfing on a hot summer about some pretty alarmday. It’s the picture of a ing ideas.

15

Photo by Megan Russell

Worship Nights bring unity By Wil Bassham Staff Writer New to Corban this year are monthly Worship Nights, set to occur toward the end of each month. The concept is the brainchild of ASB Ministries Coordinator Bryce Phelan. “It is a time the students can come toether, encourage others, and work together,” Phelan said, “a time with no tension, no awkwardness, and no self-consciousness ... a time to define what worship is and why it is important.” Phelan intends each Worship Night to be an event where everyone is challenged to grow deeper in their relationship with God. “We are all broken,” he said. “We all have a tendency to stray from God.” Student Jason Buck said he would go and added, “I would like to see a rotation of worship leaders, testimonies of students, and an initiative of prayer.” The first Worship Night is set for Sept. 30, in the amphitheater between Davidson Hall and the Academic Center right after the 7 p.m. volleyball game.

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16

The Hil top

Sept. 27, 2011

To a

New Start... To

new beginnings and new

friends; to late nights and an awesome

God;

to cloudy skies

and rainy weather; this is the year for transformation. (Top) Sarah Ernst’s Core Group bond over initiary games. (Right) Freshmen listen to their core group plans for the following day. (Below) Freshmen enjoy watching their friends participate in the Corban Games.

(Left) Core Group Assistant Jeff Morse dancing down the soul train line.

Orientation 2011

Photos by Jake Bowdoin

Hilltop News  

September Issue

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