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ka j.

katie jones design portfolio 2004-2009.

virginia tech school of arch + design


Katie Jones : 2004 - 2009 a + d timeline

Thesis: Living Bridge Montessori School Greenville, SC

fall

Harrisonburg Middle School Harrisonburg, VA

Chicago Studio Olympic Village 2016 Olympics Chicago, Il

Harrisonburg Sponsored Studio First Place Award

Seoul Design Olympiad 2008 Exhibition

Chicago Architecture Foundation Exhibition

spring

Culinary School of Manhattan NYC

fall

spring

Japanese Embassy Washington DC

Collage / Photography Exploration

fall

Day Care Center Blacksburg, VA

spring

2005

spring

2006

fall

first year

second year

third year 2007

fourth year 2008

spring

2009

fifth year

One Makes Many Many Makes One Stained Glass Lamp

fall


KATIE JONES

education

katie jones, associate aia 221 Fairforest Way #27208, Greenville, SC 29607

katie.jones216@gmail.com 856.906.8839

Virginia Tech, College of Architecture and Urban Studies, School of Architecture + Design Graduated May 2009 : Bachelor of Architecture (B. ARCH), Professional Degree Minor in Art and Architecture History Awarded Dean’s List : Fall / Spring 2004-2009 Ranked #1 Undergraduate Architecture Program in North America : 2008 Ranked in the Top 5 during all five years of study : 2004 - 2009 NCARB Completion : 23% of Hours Completed

experience

McMillan Pazdan Smith : Intern Architect Greenville, South Carolina : October 2009 - Present

Developed skills in creating construction documents, construction processes, assessing client needs, generating client proposals and coordinating details + materials in both large and small projects. Assisted in adminitrative organization during merger, which included creating new branding strategies, developing a new code of employee procedures and reorganizing the firm’s administrative process.

NEON Design Collaborative : Partner Los Angeles / Washington DC / Greenville : May 2009 - Present

Co-founded in 2009. Consult with clients on their various design needs ranging from interior design to marketing + branding strategies. Projects: Zenergy House, Los Angeles, CA - Fall 2009 - Spring 2010

Kanalstein Danton Associates : Intern Voorhees, New Jersey : May 2006 - August 2006, 2007

Completed + revised construction documents, developed the building standards library, created client presentations, renderings, 3D models and physical models.

special study

Chicago Studio 2007, Perkins + Will Chicago, Illinois : August 2007 - December 2007

Participated in a semester-long studio in Chicago that focused on designing for the 2016 Olympics. Designed Olympic Village housing for 16,000 athletes to be built in and unite two segregated neighborhoods on the South Side of the city. Presented my work weekly to many professionals in the architecture field. Used urban planning strategies in the process of the project, as well as focused on four main scales: city, site, building, and detail. Details of this extensive project are included in my portfolio.

activity

professional

AIA Greenville - Executive Committee - Director of Government Affairs (current) AIA Upstate Women in Architecture - Founding Member - Director of Graphic Media + Design (current) honors

Shriver Holland Scholarship, April 2008 Harrisonburg Studio Scholarship, First Place, May 2008

exhibitions / publications

Seoul Design Olympiad 2008, Fall 2008 MAS Context : The University Issue 2010

skills

Digital : AutoDesk : AutoCAD, Revit; SketchUp, Montage Rendering Adobe : Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign Microsoft Office : Word, Excel, Powerpoint, Outlook Analog : Rendering, Sketching, Hand Drafting, Watercolor, Collage, Silkscreening

references

Kathryn Clarke Albright, aia, associate professor - Virginia Tech School of Architecture + Design Gary Kanalstein, Principal - Kanalstein Danton Associates Online Portfolio : http://issuu.com/ktjones/docs/issuu


harrisonburg middle school harrisonburg, virginia architecture IV - spring 2008


4

2 3

4

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

4

4 1

4

3

1

5 1

4

classrooms library science labs / special classrooms circulation auditorium grade guidance office

1 6

1 4

1

1

1 3

3

4

1

4

4

3

4

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

4 2

2

4

6

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classrooms elective classrooms science labs circulation administration gathering area

first floor plan open to below below ow

first floor plan

view to below

public spaces classrooms outdoor spaces administration entrance / safe bus zone bus drop-off / pick up lane

second floor plan

N

second floor plan public spaces open to below classrooms outdoor spaces walkway / roof garden

library section the view from the second floor onto the first is an important concept in the design. the visual connection from upper to lower and vice versa gives a connectivity to the entire school. students have view into the community spaces of the school to encourage students to take part in everything the school has to offer. the concept also reflects the urban nature of the downtown by allowing views to people circulating and going about their day.

entrance / safe bus zone

N


library

parking

ďŹ elds

classrooms

outdoor

outdoor

lobby

entry

theater

classrooms

exterior perspective

parking

site

N


provide an environment for children to grow into young adults

provide an environment for children to grow into young adults

- straight axes to create “blocks” for students to travel around and through. - the visual connection between the two levels creates a sense of community within the school and encourages students to participate in all of the activities the school has to offer. - for the first time, students are given the freedom to learn how to use their inbetween class time and lockers how they want.

- the design enables students to learn about their environment through hands-on participation in maintaining roof gardens. - students will learn about the different strategies used to keep the site and building sustainable and how to apply those strategies in their everyday lives. - students will use their experience providing fresh and organic fruits and vegetables used in their cafeteria lunches.

- the design of the school allows for students to make their own decisions of involvement in extracurricular activites. - the lay out of the floor plan makes it easy for students to navigate the space and the placement of classrooms allows for a specific grade-oriented zone within the entire school community.

circulation stair

provide an environment for children to grow into young adults

relationship studies 6th

library

library

8th

library

8th

gym theater

gathering space

gathering space cafeteria

6th gym

8th

7th

gathering space

6th

cafeteria

gym gym

cafeteria theater

loud vs. quiet

primary spaces

7th

6th

light vs. dark

theater

library 7th 7th

8th library

6th

gathering space

gathering space

8th theater

cafeteria

gym cafeteria

8th

gym

6th gathering space

admin.

library

6th

cafeteria library

7th 8th

library

7th

7th

gathering space gym

cafeteria

theater

theater

high traffic areas

large vs. small space

bus drop-off

high vs. low density

a day in the life 1 2 3 4

8:10 : bus drop-off

5 2

10:10 - 10:55 : science

7 2 9

12:00 - 12:30 : lunch

8:10 - 8:20 : locker 8:20 - 9:05 : english

11:50 - 12:00 : locker

first floor plan

3

2 4

10

second floor plan

11

9 1

12:40 - 1:25 : art

11 2:30 - 3:15 : history 3:15 bus pick-up

7

classroom

12:30 - 12:40 : locker

10 1:35 - 2:20 : study hall

1

5

9:15 - 10:00 : math


olympic village chicago oympics 2016 chicago studio - fall 2007 kathryn albright & terry surjan


the 2007 Chicago studio focused on the Olympic bid for 2016 to take place in Chicago. during the semester, my team was hosted by perkins + will and we developed the Olympic Village, which is essential to any Olympic games. We created housing for 16,000 athletes as well as made an urban design plan for the entire site. The site we chose for the Olympic village was the extensive parking lot around the current Chicago White Sox stadium located in the South Side of Chicago. This site was very important in our planning process because it links two very different neighborhoods which are currently separated by the parking lot. The neighborhood of bronzeville suffers from poverty and dilapidation, while bridgeport is booming with new growth. Linking the two neighborhoods through the Olympic Village will help revitalize bronzeville by bringing in new residents, retail, and other services not currently present in the community. The Dan Ryan Expressway also creates a large barrier between the two neighborhoods. We proposed a parking garage which suspends across the expressway to provide parking for residents and visitors as well as bridge the boundary between the communities and provide more area for the housing to grow towards the lake. To turn the Olympic Village into a destination, we included a retail center across from the stadium to attract people into the neighborhood. This retail center would include anything from clothing boutiques and home goods to grocery and convenience stores. Outdoor public space was also created by cutting the strips created by the different housing units and sliding them out in an east-west direction into bridgeport and bronzeville. A system of circulation for pedestrians and trafďŹ c was also created in this same way, and many details of the village itself were based off this main idea of cutting pulling and ďŹ lling. We focused on four main scales throughout our project: city, site, building, and detail. Each of these scales is discussed more indepth in the following pages.

chicago studio 2007


at the city scale, during the olympics athletes have easy access to other venues as well as downtown. residents postolympics share easy access via two train lines, the dan ryan expressway, and bus transportation.

2016

2018

2028

city site building detail


parks pocket parks retail

the formed strips are cut and pulled to extend the site into the neighborhoods of bridgeport and bronzeville. this cutting and pulling creates voids which make large parks and small pocket parks throughout the site. a retail center across from the stadium provides an attraction for residents and people living in surrounding neighborhoods.

the section of the site shows the high density relative to the low density regions as they spread away from the stadium. our main idea for the olympic village was to divide the buildings into strips according to their height and density. the red strips surrounding the stadium are high rise and the most dense, and they continue to become more low rise as the strips go north to south.

2016

city site building detail


voids created by the sliding of the strips leaves spaces for dining during the olympics and an urban center for retail afterwards within the neighborhood. this will attract residents for the surrounding neighborhoods of bridgeport and bronzeville. this mixing of the very different communities will prevent segregation among their residents. smaller retail centers are scattered throughout the site for convenience stores for the olympic village residents.

2016 buildings are raised to create an internal void. this becomes communal space to be used for dining and retail for residents, as well as drawing in bridgeport and bronzeville. these interal voids bring the living space of the units upwards, creating views looking out towards the downtown area of the city as well as Lake Michigan.

bridgeport

bronzeville

city site building detail


one bedroom /

2016 / single athletes

I

2028 / young adults

two bedroom /

2016 / two-person team

II post-olympics, parking needs to be more readily available to residents of the community and people using the planned retail center. a single level parking garage will be suspended in strips over the dan ryan expressway for more public parking. underground parking for each unit will be provided in their respective blocks.

2028 / small family

olympics 2016 three bedroom / approx. number of athletes / 16,000 living spaces required / 8,600 units

2016 / small team

III

sports - individual units / 83% sports - multi-person units / 17%

4,320 one-person units 2,160 two-person units 1,440 three-person units 680 four-person units

2028 / college students

four bedroom /

2016 / large team

IIII

2028 / extended family

city site building detail


culinary school of manhattan manhattan, new york city architecture III - spring 2007


japanese embassy washington, d.c. architecture III - fall 2006


first floor - lobby / reception

modernize the tradition. program: japanese embassy site: washington, d.c. concept: this design for the japanese embassy integrates the old with the new. sliding screens throughout the building designate functions as well as create aesthetic beauty that honors traditional japanese architecture.

second floor - dining / conference areas

third floor - offices

closed off to visiting diplomats the office area can be closed off to visitors during business hours. the japanese screens allow light to pass through while shielding the business functions of the embassy. fourth floor - ambassador offices / private quarters

private offices / waiting area during normal business days, each individual office can be closed to give privacy to employees of the embassy.


second year competition bright eyes day care center blacksburg, virginia architecture II - spring 2006


photography / collage exploration blacksburg, virginia architecture II - spring 2006


katie jones virginia tech 2004 - 2009 please contact me at: katie.jones216@gmail.com 856 . 906 . 8839

Katie Jones - Student Portfolio  

Architecture Student Portfolio

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