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History of the Evanston Woman’s Board Northwestern University Settlement 1909-2009 By Mary Paula Baumann


Evanston Woman’s Board History

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Preface The Evanston Woman’s Board, founded in 1909 as the first Auxiliary Board of the Northwestern University Settlement, celebrates its Centennial Anniversary in 2009. This chronicle aims to provide an overview of the Board’s remarkable century of service to Settlement. The history of the Evanston Woman’s Board of the Northwestern University Settlement has been described in part in The Worn Doorstep: Informal History of Northwestern University Settlement Association 1891-1991 1 published in 1991 to celebrate Settlement’s 100th anniversary. It tells a fascinating story and is highly recommended reading for all Board members. The Evanston Woman’s Board history as detailed in The Worn Doorstep is included here. Additional information was obtained from the records held by Northwestern University Archives, the official repository for the Settlement. Although only limited information about the early years is available, those records on file provide us with a glimpse of some of the many exceptional women and notable activities of the Board from its founding in 1909 until 1990. A more detailed rendition of the workings of the Evanston Woman’s Board from 1990 to 2009 is possible thanks to long-time Board members and files available for reference. Generally, mention has been made of notable changes, new initiatives, major donations and recurring annual events grouped by presidential terms, usually one or two year periods. Although presidents are referred to by name, all activities in any one term are the result of the combined efforts, willing hands and hearts of many dedicated Board members without whom these accomplishments would not have been possible. The author has attempted to present historical details as concisely and accurately as possible. Any omissions or minor discrepancies in factual content are unintentional. Many thanks are given to Carolyn Krulee, Nancy Morr, Holly Sunshine and Carol Rahimi for reviewing this history and for their helpful suggestions; to Northwestern University Archivists Kevin Leonard and Janet Olson for their assistance in locating files; and to Gerhard Baumann for his help with the technical aspects of assembling this document. Mary Paula Baumann Board Member and Past President Evanston Woman’s Board June 2009

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The Worn Doorstep, Informal History of Northwestern University Settlement Association, 1891-1991, by Mark Wukas, edited by Doris Overboe and Ronald R. Manderschied, October 1991.

Permission to reproduce sections of The Worn Doorstep is granted by Ron Manderschied, President, Northwestern University Settlement Association. This publication is no longer in print. The Archives Chair and several Board members have copies available for loan.


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1891: The Founding of Northwestern University Settlement Throughout the past century Evanston Woman’s Board (EWB) Member Booklets have included the following story of the founding of Northwestern University Settlement House (NUSH). “Some time in the year 1891, Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Robert Wilson of Evanston invited Northwestern University [NU] President, Henry Wade Rogers and his wife, Mr. Charles Zueblin and Miss Rho Fisk to dinner. During the evening, Mr. Zueblin, who was interested in sociology, described the work of Toynbee Hall, the first Settlement House in England. The conversation turned to Hull House, which had been established two years previously, and the need of a second neighborhood house in the congested areas of Chicago. Inspired by Mrs. Rogers’ enthusiasm, the group originated the plan which was to result ultimately in the Northwestern University Settlement House, so named to honor the founders who were so closely associated with that institution. Mrs. Rogers was indefatigable in her efforts to interest her community and to persuade her friends to offer their services and financial support for the present site with Mr. Zueblin as director. She was instrumental in organizing the University students in a regular and responsible volunteer program of playground work, library, sewing and various educational courses. The faculty also contributed their services and for many years until the early 1940’s, the faculty wives bought the materials and made hundreds of new garments and layettes for the needy children and babies every year. Northwest Town (as it was called at that time) was the second most crowded area in Chicago, and was populated largely by immigrants of Polish and Southern European ancestry. A fund of $9,000.00 was raised largely by the efforts and generous donation of the Hugh Robert Wilsons to buy the land at 1400 Augusta Boulevard. Mr. Milton Wilson gave $25,000 for the erection of the building. In 1901, the present Settlement House was opened. Three years later, Miss Harriet Vittum came as a volunteer and remained to become its director for forty-one years of growth and development. The educational and recreational facilities offered by the Settlement to thousands of people each year are varied and numerous: music, drama, dance, crafts, athletics, health classes, First Aid, home nursing, cooking, sewing, lectures, discussion groups, citizenship classes, excursions, and summer camp experience. The House welcomes all, from babies in the Infant Welfare clinic, to the Golden Age club; from the American born to those people of varied race, creed and ancestry.” 2

What is a Settlement? In 1899, …the residents at Northwestern University Settlement defined the Settlement as “To anyone in trouble of any sort, we offer such help as one neighbor may give another, but alms we have not. That sentence, more than any other, describes the essence of Northwestern University Settlement. We are a neighbor.” 3 “In the front garden of the Settlement at 1400 West Augusta Boulevard are two stone pieces of the famed ‘worn doorstep’, eroded not by nature but by people of the Settlement between 1901 and 1938. That front doorstep bears silent testimony to the crucial role the Settlement has played

2 3

Verbatim text from 1968 EWB Member Booklet. NU Archives NUSH files, Series 41/1, Box 7, Folder 7. The Worn Doorstep, pp. 5-6


Evanston Woman’s Board History

in thousands of lives. The doorstep inspired a poem in 1926 by 16 year old Elmer Eck, who was a member of the Settlement’s Boy Scout Troop #11. He wrote: What a tale it would tell if but once it could speak Of sadness, gloom and despair, It would tell of the strong, of the brave, of the weak, And those willing to do and to dare. Northwestern University Settlement is more than food baskets or clothing. Many hundreds of residents, those people who literally lived and worked at the Settlement, gave courageously and selflessly to make the Settlement a vibrant and warm place. They reveled in the challenges that came each day, the opportunities to use their knowledge, idealism, dedication and courage to make West Town a better place to live. Residents’ work could be as important as providing a family with enough food to make it through the next meal or as simple as arranging for members of a boys club to visit ailing members. The Settlement became an island of hope in a sea of poverty and despair. While Division Street saloons offered temporary solace, the Settlement gave people the courage and the means to overcome poverty. The Settlement did not aid the indigent alone. Its many benefactors also benefited in being able to rest secure knowing that their support – financial, material and philanthropic – was being channeled by dedicated Settlement residents who made the generosity stretch to the furthest degree. The Settlement gave them the opportunity for philanthropy that would directly benefit people suffering in the inner city.” 4

4

The Worn Doorstep, pp. 5-6.

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How Northwestern University Settlement got its Name According to Ron Manderschied, President of Settlement: “Settlement was founded by Mr. Henry Wade Rogers, President of Northwestern University, and his wife Emma, Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Robert Wilson and Mrs. Charles Zueblin, who together with interested faculty members and Chicago business leaders established the Settlement in 1891. In 1901, when Settlement needed a larger location, Hugh Robert Wilson and his brother, Milton Wilson, Northwestern University trustees, donated the money for the lot and the new house. The University acted as trustee of the building fund for the new Settlement location, approved the building plans and received the warranty deed for the three lots. The property is held in trust solely for the use of Settlement. The concept at the time was that universities would found settlements and have faculty and students live there as neighbors in the community to share their skills and expertise. Many early settlements had names of universities and over the years the names were dropped since most had no financial support coming from the university or real participation. In our case, even though we were set up to be financially independent, there has remained a tie with Northwestern trustees, faculty, staff and students through all these years.”

1909 -1947 Recollections of a Founding Member Few documents about the early years of the EWB are available in the Archives. However, in 1947 Miss Elizabeth Whitely, one of the earliest members of the EWB, wrote down her recollections of the first three decades. A charming vignette about Miss Whitely is recalled in The Worn Doorstep 5 “One volunteer whose early work at the Settlement led to long-term involvement was Elizabeth Whitely of Evanston. Whitely first worked at the Settlement during her undergraduate years at Northwestern University in the early 1890s after Emma Rogers sparked her interest. She served as a volunteer and later on the Settlement’s Board of Directors. Miss Whitely began by teaching an English class and then for many years a girls’ sewing class. Like many Settlement volunteers, she went above and beyond her required duties and entered the lives of her charges. After a party, Whitely once retrieved dozens of red carnations from the garbage and took them to members of her sewing class, much to the delight of her students. The following week during class, Miss Whitely heard the students whispering among themselves, saying, “Mine died Tuesday,” “Mine lived till Saturday,” “Mine’s in church,” and “Mine’s still alive.” Worried, Miss Whitely asked whether there’s been an epidemic in the neighborhood only to discover, much to her relief, that the girls were talking about their treasured flowers.”

Miss Whitley’s written memories have been included in EWB Member Booklets for over six decades. Please note that the spelling of the Evanston Woman’s Board is sometimes written as ‘Women’s Board.’ This has occurred in the press, in some correspondence and some Board documents. However the most consistent spelling for most of its history has been Woman’s Board which will be used henceforth.

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The Worn Doorstep, p. 13.


Evanston Woman’s Board History

REMINISCENCES OF THE EARLIEST DAYS OF THE EVANSTON WOMAN’S BOARD OF NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY SETTLEMENT 6 by Elizabeth Whitely In the summer of 1909 Mr. T.K. Webster, then President of the Northwestern University Settlement Board, called a meeting of the Board at the home of Mr. Philip Shumway in Evanston. The Settlement was in debt, needed $3,000.00. Miss Harriet Vittum was the new Head Resident. It was decided at this meeting to give a large benefit entertainment to raise the money, preferably a Pageant on the Campus. Mrs. Henry J. Patten was suggested as the best person to organize it. The following day she was approached by a member of the Board and she agreed, showing great interest and enthusiasm for the project. The first meeting of those interested and willing to help was held at the home of Mrs. Hugh Wilson, where the Committees were appointed – Thomas Wood Stevens wrote, “An Historical Pageant of Illinois” depicting a few of the most stirring events from the days of the Pottawatomi Indians to Pere Marquette and La Salle, George Rogers Clark and the covered wagon, the surrender of Fort Dearborn and finally, a torch light procession in Lincoln’s election year. The Pageant was held on the Northwestern University Campus on the evenings of October 7, 8 and 9, 1909. The weather was perfect and it was a great success – clearing $3,000.00. This Pageant was widely written up, by Mr. William Hard among others. At the next meeting of the Board, it was decided to form an Evanston Woman’s Board and Miss Clara Griswold and I, being at that time the only women on the Men’s Board, were appointed to ask women who had been especially active in the Pageant to become members of it. They were: Mrs. Henry J. Patten, Honorary Member Miss Mary Wilson Mrs. Charles G. Little Mrs. Oliver Wilson Mrs. Laurence De Golyer Miss Estelle F. Ward Miss Clara C. Griswold Miss Elizabeth Whitely In 1911 and 1912, when the Board was enlarged, among the first to come on were: Mrs. George B. Dryden, Mrs. Martin M. Gridley, Mrs. J. Scott Clark and Mrs. Edward K. Hardy. Our meetings were very informal; we chose a chairman and the first one to occupy that position was Mrs. Laurence De Golyer. It was she who planned the “Dollar Letter” and she wrote the first one. It succeeded from the start and has continued to be an excellent money raiser. Long before the Woman’s Board was formed, some of the women who later belonged to the Board and others interested gave regular volunteer service to the Settlement activities. Miss Mary Wilson organized a Circulating Picture Loan for children. Helping her, among others and going regularly to Settlement were Miss Carrie Wilson, Mrs. Gridley, and Miss Estelle Ward. Miss Griswold and Mrs. Laurence de Golyer had charge of a Children’s Circulating Library with Mrs. James A. James and Mrs. Arthur Galt as regular helpers. Miss Estelle Ward did a very fine work with a Boy’s Club, which she organized, keeping in touch with the boys for many years. 6

Verbatim text: 1947 EWB Member Booklet: NU Archives NUSH files, Series 41/1, Box 7, Folder 7.

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There was a Sewing Class for little girls, which met every Saturday morning and which continued for more than twenty-five years. Miss Minnie Terry and I were in charge and we had a number of enthusiastic helpers at different times. Many Members of this Board have given personal service and contributed generously towards the various activities in later years, but it is fitting to close this record of the earliest days with a few words about the Playground of which the Settlement is justly proud. In January 1912, Mrs. J. Scott Clark, at the suggestion of Miss Vittum, established a Playground on the roof of the Settlement Gymnasium in memory of her husband. Professor Clark had been for many years an influential member of the Men’s Board, showing constructive interest in Settlement activities. His friends in the First Congregational Church of Evanston, wishing to honor him, stood back of the Playground project. Nothing could be more appropriate than this memorial, with which Mrs. Clark for nearly 40 years, until her death has kept in close personal touch. 7 Professor Clark, at a Church dinner in 1909, expressing his “hobby” in verse, ended with the following lines, which we of the Evanston Woman’s Board may be permitted to quote: “If you want some fun delicious, Just quit being avaricious; Drop your selfish fad pernicious, And go down to any slum; Find the children who are staying In the grime and set them playing, Help to keep their feet from straying, Help to make the Kingdom come.” Respectfully submitted, January 25, 1947

Elizabeth Whitely

In 1949, after Miss Whitely’s death, Mrs. William M. Kaiser, Dollar Letter Chairman, wrote: “Throughout the years, Miss Whitely has been an inspiration to this Board. We all know that for many years she sent out our annual appeal with letters of her own to a large group of friends, many of whom lived at a great distance. She kept their interest in Settlement alive and active. During the past years though, Miss Whitely was confined to bed and very frail, she continued each fall, by writing a few lines at a time, to send out her notes with the Dollar Letter to the twenty-one friends on her list. This was a truly arduous task and a real labor of love. To the end of her life, she raised the second, and once the third, largest amount of any member with a Dollar Letter list.” 8

7

Worn Doorstep, p. 81: “Mrs. Clark continued to help with this project and her daughter, Mrs. Caryl Holton of Cincinnati, continued her mother’s interest with annual gifts to the playground until her death in 1976.” 8 NU Archives EWB files, Series 41/8, Box 2, File 3.


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1910: The First Members

Founding members of Evanston Woman’s Board (photo 1910). Source: The Worn Doorstep, p. 82. Founding members in 1909 included, Mrs. Henry J. Patten, Honorary Member, Miss Mary Wilson, Mrs. Charles G. Little, Mrs. Oliver Wilson, Mrs. Lawrence De Golyer, Miss Estelle F. Ward, Miss Clara C. Griswold, and Miss Elizabeth Whitely. In 1911 and 1912 Mrs. George B. Dryden, Mrs. Martin M. Gridley, Mrs. J. Scott Clark and Mrs. Edward K. Hardy joined. Mrs. Frederick T. Connor and Mrs. F. Marion Wigmore are also listed on the 1912

Dollar Letter. According to the 1947 Member Booklet: “In 1909 the Evanston woman’s board of Northwestern University Settlement appointed its first Chairman, Mrs. Laurence De Golyer, who served in that capacity for two years. No records have been found of who the succeeding Chairmen were between 1911 and 1920, but it is known that in this small group such faithful workers as Mrs. Martin M. Gridley, Miss Elizabeth Whitley, Mrs. J. Scott Clark, Mrs. Arundel Hopkins, Mrs. Charles D. Little, Mrs. Philip Shumway, Mrs. George B. Dryden and Mrs. Sewell Avery, probably each served her turn.” 6

One of the early archival records of the EWB is a treasurer’s notebook indicating that the women were responsible for an annual pledge of $100. At least one thousand dollars was raised in the first year. In 1911, 19 women are recorded as members and $1,495 was sent to Settlement. In 1912, $2,000 was given to Settlement. 9

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NU Archives EWB files, Series 41/8, Box 6, Folder 6.


Evanston Woman’s Board History

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1912: First Dollar Letter

First Dollar Letter sent out September 1912 by Mrs. Lawrence DeGolyer, First President of the EWB. The snapshot is of the boys at the House in the Wood Camp and the quotation is from Rupert Brooke. This Dollar Letter was given to Mrs. Frederick G. Martin, mother of Mrs. William M. Kaiser by Mrs. DeGolyer. (Source: NU Archives, GAR files, Series 41/7, Box 10, brown scrapbook)


Evanston Woman’s Board History

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Executive Directors of Northwestern University Settlement. 10 Miss Harriet Elizabeth Vittum “The name of Miss Harriet Elizabeth Vittum, beloved head resident of the Northwestern University Settlement, long ago won its place beside those of the Great Ladies of Chicago. At the close of the Columbian Exposition of 1893, she started her long career of public service as a staff member of the Illinois Children’s Aid Society, a forerunner of the Children’s Home and Aid Society. She came to the Settlement in 1904 as a volunteer and became its Head Resident in 1906, holding that position until her retirement in 1947, at the age of 75. In and out of the Settlement, her extensive range of interests and social services knew no bounds. She established the first infant Welfare station, began free milk distribution, started school nurses – to mention only a few of her achievements. She served as advisor, board member, chairman or president of all leading welfare organizations in Chicago. After her retirement, Miss Vittum lived in Chicago and continued her vital interest in Northwestern University Settlement, whose sustaining board elected her their honorary president in perpetuity. Her outstanding career ended December 16, 1953 and she was laid to rest in her home town, Canton, Illinois.” Mr. Michael Rachwalski “Mr. Michael Rachwalski, Executive Director of the Settlement, is an outstanding example of the Settlement’s lasting influence on the lives of its children. As a boy he grew up in Northwest Town and has always been interested in the work of the Settlement. He worked for many years as a permanent staff member in charge of adult education and boy’s work. In 1937 he became Associate Head Resident. In 1968 the title was changed to Executive Director. Mr. Rachwalski is a veteran of World Wars I and II.” Mrs. Michael Rachwalski “Mrs. Michael (Helen) Rachwalski, Associate Executive Director came to the Settlement in the 1930’s. She has participated in every phase of Settlement life – staff member and volunteer, secretary, bookkeeper, treasurer of money raising campaigns, group worker, accompanist for choral groups, club leader, teacher of classes in shorthand, typing and other business subjects. Since 1947, she had been Associate Head Resident and in 1968 she became Associate Executive Director.”

Mr. Rachwalski lived at Settlement House with his wife since becoming Head Resident in 1937. After the war, the remaining residents at Settlement were not replaced when they retired. However, Mr. and Mrs. Rachwalski continued to live in a private apartment on the third floor of the Settlement House. Helen Rachwalski died in 1977 after 45 years of service to Settlement. Mr. Rachwalski retired in 1981 at age 80. In 1986 due to failing health, he moved from Settlement House to a retirement hotel. He ended his career as one of history’s last Settlement residents. Mr. Rachwalski died in October 1987. 11

10

Verbatim text: 1947 Member Booklet. NU Archives NUSH files, Series 41/1, Box 7, Folder 7, with additions made in the 1968 EWB Member Booklet. 11 The Worn Doorstep, p. 68.


Evanston Woman’s Board History

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1936: Evanston Woman’s Board Helps to Found the North Shore Junior Board 12 This Evanston Review article describes the founding of the Junior Board in 1936. In its earliest days, news articles sometimes referred to it as the Evanston Junior Board.

12

NU Archives EWB files: Series 41/8, Box 1, Folder 3.


Evanston Woman’s Board History

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1945: Miss Vittum Thanks the Board Miss Vittum’s typed notes indicate that she appreciated being invited to EWB meetings. 13 October 24, 1945 Mrs. Edward P. Welles 1315 Forest Avenue Evanston, Illinois Dear Mrs. Welles, That was such a grand party last week. You have no idea how heartening it is to have such a large group of women get together in the name of Settlement. Your house is so lovely and it is such fun to go there that I came away warmed and cheered and determined to do a better job because of those like you who are back of us. With appreciation, always. Sincerely yours, Harriet E. Vittum Head Resident

October 24, 1945 Mrs. William H. Barnes 1510 Forest Avenue Evanston, Illinois Dear Mrs. Barnes, Just to say thank you to the co-hostess of that beautiful party at Mrs. Welles’. It was so lovely and I had such a happy time and I felt so keenly the lovely spirit back of it all. With greetings to Mr. Barnes and much appreciation to you both. Very sincerely yours, Harriet E. Vittum

1947: Member Booklets The earliest Member Booklet in the archival files is for the year 1947. The 5”x 7” Booklet of 19 pages with a blue cover contained: “The Founding of Northwestern University Settlement” written by then President, Margaret D. Falley; Miss Whitely’s Reminiscences; a list of past presidents; officers and chairman of standing committees; 1946 Annual Report of the Treasurer; by-laws; a photograph of Miss Vittum who retired that year; brief biographies of the new Head Residents; and a list of members with addresses and phone numbers. Over the years membership lists were either included in the Booklet or printed separately. Traditionally, the Booklets, updated with changes in by-laws and occasional editing of Mrs. Falley’s history, have been given to members at the beginning of each year or presidential term. In 1995 the Booklet format changed to larger folders with pockets that accommodated members’ notes and files.

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NU Archives NUSH files, Series 41/1, Box 7, Folder 7.


Evanston Woman’s Board History

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Longtime “Worker Bee” The EWB members were and continue to be remarkable women. Unfortunately, it is beyond the scope of this history and available records to tell all of their stories. It is hoped that the few vignettes mentioned are representative of the women who have served over the years. Leah Kinne Robson was such a woman. 14

Hidden Treasures Doris Overboe, former member of the Evanston Woman’s Board, member of Settlement’s Board of Directors, the Northwestern Settlement Associates Board, and former president of the North Shore Junior Board, chaired the Centennial History Committee at Settlement which was responsible for locating old records and putting together a history of its first 100 years. Mrs. Overboe writes in The Worn Doorstep: “that the initial search...in 1990 for records and documents… was disappointing.” Only after the previously inaccessible attic, vault room and basement at Settlement were opened was a long hidden treasure trove of over 3,000 pounds of documents covering 90 years of Settlement activities discovered. 15

14 15

NUSH The Neighbor, Winter 1999, Volume 9, Issue 2. The Worn Doorstep, pp. 97-98.


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Mrs. Overboe and her committee organized and sorted through the mounds of documents and chose those appropriate for the history as told in The Worn Doorstep. All the documents were eventually delivered to Northwestern University Archives, where they were culled and stored for posterity. Mrs. Overboe gave special thanks to Mrs. Dudley Robinson and Mrs. Robert E. Lee of the EWB and others who helped her.15 Doris Overboe was recognized for her outstanding work by receiving the President’s Award in 1994. 1947 -1990 The EWB Member Booklet continues: “Through the years the Board grew by attracting women from the North Shore with Northwestern University connections, relatives of former Board members, women who were members of University Circle faculty wives Sewing Groups, and women who came up through the North Shore Junior Board (a group formed by the Evanston Woman’s Board in 1936), and women knowing of the good work done by Settlement and who wished to participate. Many special projects have been completed through the efforts of members of the EWB. Necessary repairs, renovation and redecoration at the House were directed by a member of this Board whose skill and professionalism produced effective and beautiful results. Another member, skilled in the art of landscaping, designed and executed the charming garden along Augusta Boulevard. Several rooms were rebuilt and refurbished through the generosity of certain members. Another member, a capable linguist, helped teach English to the Spanish-speaking neighbors of Settlement. Another of the late members not only gave volunteer service for years and enrolled her family’s help in packing the Thanksgiving and Christmas baskets, but was also responsible for acquiring the first stock to go into the Endowment Fund and for interesting the Allison Family 16 in Settlement. Through the years the members of the Board have had the ability to generate enthusiasm and support from their friends. The Dollar Letter, so successful from the beginning, has grown and the Endowment fund continues to expand through gifts from devoted and generous members. These funds make it possible for the EWB to support the Settlement and, in so doing, make a better life for the individuals and families of the community.” 17

The wife of the president of Northwestern University, as well as the wives of former presidents, were and continue to be Honorary Members. It was traditional for the president of the North Shore Junior Board to attend a yearly meeting of the Evanston Board. For many years Board membership was limited to 65 persons. In 1958 the Board decided to allow a few more members to join in order to compensate for those members who were less active. Origins of the Endowment Fund The Endowment Fund established in 1947 continues to this day to be a vital financial resource for the EWB in helping Settlement. Over the years, members have been very grateful for the vision and the generosity of the women and their families who established the Fund. Presidents and Finance Officers annual reports reflect the careful efforts of the Board to manage the Fund well so that it could be used to the maximum benefit of Settlement. One such report given by Mrs. Kaiser in 1963 includes a comprehensive description of its origins. 16 17

Mr. and Mrs. Allison were generous supporters of Settlement. The Allison Gym is named in their honor. Member Booklet 1963. NU Archives EWB files, Series 41/8, Box 3, Folder 9.


Evanston Woman’s Board History

Mrs. William M. Kaiser’s Report

Source: NU Archives EWB files, Series 41/8, Box 3, Folder 6.

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Evanston Woman’s Board History

1953: Dollar Letter

Source: NU Archives EWB files, Series 41/8, Box 1, Folder 7.

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1959: 50th Anniversary Celebrated

Source: NU Archives EWB files, Series 41/8, Box 1, Folder 3.

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Evanston Woman’s Board History

1962 The local news reports the election of a new President of the Board, Mrs. George Haight.

Source: NU Archives EWB files, Series 41/8, Box 1, Folder 3.

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Evanston Woman’s Board History

The 1962 Dollar Letter

Source: NU Archives EWB files, Series 41/8, Box 4, Folder 1.

19


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In 1968 President Marie Burnside (1966-1968) reported “that the kindergarten was refurbished at considerable cost. It is now without a doubt one of the most attractive and functional rooms in the Settlement and we will be ever grateful to the EWB for conceiving of this project and carrying it through to completion. The termite infested Whitely Room used by the Golden Agers was renovated to a beautiful and functional room in memory of Mrs. Alfred W. Bays. Dollar Letter contributions ranged from $2.00 to $2500.00.” 18 Upon the death of Mrs. Norman Westerhold Sr., President (1927-1928) and honorary member, President Camilla Boitel (1968-1970) said of her: “She was associated with Settlement since she was a young woman, working at Settlement herself and interesting her family and friends and as a result, bringing in large sums of money to the Settlement. It was she who interested Mr. Allison and many other generous people who have contributed heavily to assure its work in the future.” 19 In 1968 $100,000 was given to Settlement by Mr. Bill Allison’s estate. 1970’s In 1971 in celebration of Settlement’s 80th birthday, $2,000 was given to Settlement for the purchase of five stoves and a refrigerator to make a cooking class for boys and girls possible. President Nan Kerr (1976-1978) reported that new permanent books were issued the 61 members containing revised by-laws, an updated history of the Board and membership lists. 20 Virginia Winter joined the Board in 1977. In a recent interview by the author, Virginia recalls: “Women joined the Board because they wanted to help others. The bottom line going in was asking what can I do for other people? The result was often receiving much more in return. Times were different then, we didn’t dash down to Settlement at a moment’s notice as is done today. I hosted meetings at my home and remember those at Ruth Robinson’s home where Ruth played piano duets. Once a year the Board met at Settlement. After one meeting we attended an afternoon party with music for the Golden Agers. A Polish gentleman asked me to dance and there was much laughter and joy at the House that day. The boxing gym was an impressive place to visit as its program had such a good influence on many young lives in West Town. I remember Mr. Rachwalski as a man committed to the neighborhood allowing Peabody Elementary School to use Allison gym for sports and parties. When Ron Manderschied arrived in 1981, everyone was impressed with his energy and new ideas.”

Virginia, like many members of the EWB, has been a loyal volunteer for other organizations: the Infant Welfare League, the Mary Crane League and for 23 years the soup kitchen at First Presbyterian Church in Evanston. She is proud of her family’s efforts at Settlement: daughter Ann, formerly of the North Shore Junior Board, is President of the Winnetka Board; son-in-law, Glen Dahlhart, chairs the Settlement Board of Directors, four grandchildren are involved with the Chicago Board, and her sons are contributors. Their combined efforts are indeed an admirable family affair. Having just celebrated her 92nd birthday in June 2009, Virginia is pleased with how the EWB has been revitalized. As an active Board member, she delights in sharing her love of books with the children and families at Settlement by sending them down by the bagful.

18 19 20

NU Archives EWB files, Series 41/8, Box 4, Folder 6. NU Archives EWB files, Series 41/8, Box 4, Folder 8. NU Archives EWB files, Series 41/8, Box 5, Folder 6.


Evanston Woman’s Board History

1981-2006: The New Executive Director’s First 25 Years “In 1981, Ron Manderschied walked through the front doors at 1400 Augusta Boulevard filled with the dedication and long term vision that led the Settlement to where it is today. Robert Burnside, Board President at the time, saw in Ron an individual that would strive to improve people’s lives each and every day. He has done just that. Ron grew up in Minnesota. With a bachelor’s degree in sociology, he pursued some graduate study in social work at the University of Minnesota while volunteering at several YMCAs as a youth worker. After school he spent nine years working at Pillsbury-Waite Neighborhood Services, Inc, a settlement house organization in Minneapolis, believing ‘very firmly in settlements as a vehicle to bring social services and positive change to low-income communities.’ Over the past 25 years, Ron accomplished more that can be put into words. In his early years he oversaw the upgrade in communication and technology for the entire Settlement. From a manually operated switchboard to touchtone telephones, from handwritten financial and program records to a network of computers by 1990, the Settlement has advanced immensely in the area of technology. Through the 1980’s Ron worked to bring the Settlement’s buildings into the best shape they could be with new electrical systems, new roofs, new plumbing and rehabbed rooms. Ron also recognized the importance great staff make on the Settlement’s ability to provide for its neighbors. ‘We emphasize being multi-faceted and multi-functioned when we hire people.’ In the 1980’s, thanks to Ron’s dedication, House in the Wood began to operate year round. The Vittum Lodge was expanded and renovated, a new furnace was installed in the dining hall, new cabins were built along with the Hickory House and the office/director’s house and a nature center. When the building next to Settlement House, then known as Walsh hall, went up for sale in 1991, Ron immediately foresaw the Settlement’s need for expansion and led the purchase of what is now Evanston Hall. In 1991 Ron started the Head Start program, which is now in its 15th year. That same year he worked with dedicated supporters of the Settlement to form the Park Ridge Board. The creation of an arts program at the Settlement was an exciting step that spanned the 1990’s. The CCT Gallery opened in 1996 in Evanston Hall. The Campaign for Community Arts helped fund the building of the Vittum Theatre which opened in 1998. The Vittum Theatre was created to aid in community-building and to foster the personal growth of members of the Settlement. Since that time, the theater has developed into a regionally recognized resource for quality arts programming for youth. Its annual Season for Young Audiences currently accommodates 12,000 school age children from over 100 schools in Illinois, Indiana, Michigan and Wisconsin. In 1999 Ron worked with former teachers Michael Milkie and Tonya Hernandez to open the innovative highly successful Noble Street Charter High School. Ron oversaw a capital campaign to build a fully functioning school in the midst of the Settlement’s own buildings. In the short life of the Noble Street Charter High School it has become the best performing non-selective admission high school in the city of Chicago. In May of 2005, the Noble Street Charter School Board of Directors voted to adopt a business plan which will see the development of six additional high school campuses by 2008. The Chicago Board formed in 2004 under the guidance of Ron, making it the 6th active auxiliary board to the Settlement. Without question, Ron Manderschied’s leadership at the Settlement and Noble Network was essential to creating the places that so many people have come to count on. He started with a half-million dollar budget in 1981 and now oversees the Settlement’s 4.2 million dollar budget as well as the Noble Network’s budget of 6.7 million dollars. The Settlement has grown leaps and bounds under his leadership and will surely continue for years to come.” 21 21

NUSH The Neighbor, Spring 2006, Volume 17, Issue 3.

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The preceding article gives us a synopsis of the many changes which occurred at Settlement between 1980 and 2006. The EWB, along with the other auxiliary Boards, supported these important modernizations and innovations. During the 1980’s the EWB not only purchased new furnishings for the Nursery School and the Whitely room, it also supported the renovation of the House-in-the Wood Camp for year round use by underwriting the cost of putting a furnace in the dining hall, enabling the children there that winter to sleep on the dining hall floor. 22 Membership in 1980 was 46 and increased to 51 in 1981. From 1977 through 1996 the Dollar Letter format included a drawing of the Worn Doorstep or the Front Door and Steps at Settlement. The message changed each year reflecting the immediate needs or activities at Settlement. 1984: The 75th Year President Gail Burket (1984-86) in her annual report 23 given at the Annual Meeting in October 1985 noted that the Dollar Letter raised over $16,000 and that the Board’s total contribution to Settlement was $36,661. The Board decided to raise its annual pledge from $35,000 to $40,000 in order to help with necessary funds for the expanding Settlement activities. Members also contributed new ceiling fans for the gymnasium, as well as new chairs and window blinds. Meetings were held in members’ homes, at the Westmoreland and North Shore Country Clubs, Westminster Place and the Georgian. The meeting at the Botanic Garden in May included a tram ride after lunch. Speakers included Ron Manderschied and Jose Allatore from Settlement, a jewelry appraiser, young ladies from the Junior Auxiliary of the Women’s Club of Wilmette who presented a Christmas program, a geriatric specialist from Evanston hospital, the wife of the engraver at The Crystal Cave in Wilmette and Mr. Carl Von Ammon, president of Settlement’s Central Committee.

22 23

The Worn Doorstep. pp. 70 & 72. EWB files submitted to NU Archives in August 2009.


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1990’s: The EWB Approaches the Turn of the Century. 24 Major Capital Investment in Evanston Hall. The decade of the ‘90s began with a major contribution by the EWB to Settlement for the purchase of Evanston Hall. According to President Ron Manderschied, Settlement had been interested in the adjacent building, Walsh’s Hall, on Noble Street for years. It suddenly became available for sale (for $480,000) and Settlement needed to move quickly to acquire it. In 1991 President Ruth Robinson (1988-92) and Marie Burnside, Finance Chair, proposed that $500,000 from the Endowment Fund be donated for that purpose and the Board of over 40 women agreed. Eventually, $750,000 was provided towards the purchase and renovation of the building. Evanston Hall was named after the first Settlement Annex on Division Street, and in recognition of EWB’s significant gift. In an interview, Ron Manderschied stated “This had an enormous impact on change for Settlement House. Overnight the Settlement space more than doubled. Settlement’s purpose came full circle back to the arts which had been an important part of its original mission, as Evanston Hall was to have a performing arts center. There had been an earlier theatre on the land now occupied by the Peabody School playground on Augusta Boulevard which burned down around the time of WWII. Settlement had a rich history of community based arts utilizing performing arts to promote understanding and community building.” Start of a New Era According to Ron “The President of NU, Arnold Weber, and his wife Edna were very instrumental in the revitalization of Settlement and the EWB. Since 1990, The EWB has had much more of a hands-on nature of direct involvement at Settlement. This is very healthy – the glue that keeps more people active. The personality of the EWB changed with a new set of people with a new perspective of what it means to be involved with charity. Venture philanthropy changed for a lot of people.” Edna Weber took a personal interest in Settlement. She generously opened her home for meetings and encouraged University women and others to join the Board whose aging membership had been declining. Many current members of the Board remember those meetings, which generated excitement about Settlement and renewal of the long traditions of the EWB. Ron noted that “Betty Fischer, one of the new members who joined the Board, was successful in getting more people to come down to Settlement. This constituted a bigger transition than the other Boards and a bigger risk.” Betty recalls, “Edna Weber, wife of the University president, invited me to a board meeting in her home a few weeks after my husband Bill and I arrived at Northwestern University in 1990. Camilla Boitel, a longtime member of the EWB, invited me to join the Board. At that time, the Board membership was not growing and although the members were very generous and had dedicated many years of service to Settlement, they were getting older and unable to be as 24

Presidential files and other records used for the period 1990-2009 have been submitted to NU Archives for the EWB files in August 2009.


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physically active as they once were. There were also few members with NU affiliation. At Thanksgiving, Marie Burnside asked for volunteers to go down to Settlement and help bag dinners for those less fortunate. My husband Bill and I both went and we were ‘hooked’. As a Board member I wanted to actively participate in projects with the recipients of all that Settlement had to offer, to meet the wonderful staff and become familiar with what they did at the corner of Augusta and Noble. I thought others might feel the same way.” President Ruth Hobbs (1992-1994) reported that in November of 1992 Ron Manderschied addressed a joint meeting with the University Circle women on the NU campus. At Christmas, Ruth Robinson hosted a two piano concert at her home which everyone thoroughly enjoyed. The April meeting was held at Settlement and in May, the NBD Bank which managed our portfolio hosted our meeting and luncheon at the Westmoreland Country Club. Meeting notices were regularly submitted to the Pioneer Press for inclusion in their Club notices. The Board, with the help of Betty Fischer, started an aggressive recruiting campaign that brought in many new members and new ideas. Women who had been active for many years with the North Shore Junior Board joined when, according its rules at the time, they had to retire at age 40. Other recruits included relatives of former members and women associated with Northwestern University who facilitated more direct involvement with NU. President Betty Fischer (1994-1996) and the Board decided to refurbish the garden along Augusta Boulevard which was originally planted by EWB members in the early years but became neglected over time. Members enthusiastically dug deep in the hard soil pulling out lots of debris and old roots with the help of the ladies from Settlement’s Mother’s Club. All the efforts paid off when the colorful impatiens and other annuals planted bloomed all summer long to the delight of the neighbors, patrons and staff who passed by every day. To celebrate the refurbished garden, EWB members and women from the Mothers’ Club enjoyed a Mothers Day Lunch together in the board room at Settlement. Ana Janez, coordinator of the Mothers’ Club, organized the cooking of ethnic foods from Puerto Rico and Mexico; Board members brought salads and desserts. Marie Burnside noted at the time that in all her years of going down to Settlement it was the first time that she had sat down to lunch with some of the women who came there for the programs. She agreed that indeed it was a fine opportunity for Board members and the mothers to get to know one another in a relaxed social setting. Even though many of the women spoke no English, the hospitality was evident and all agreed that this should become an annual event. When Mary Barnett, artist and wife of the NU football coach, joined the Board she brought her talents to Settlement as a member of the new Visual Arts Committee formed after the purchase of Evanston Hall. Mary along with several other EWB members, Camilla Boitel (also an artist), Peg Gibson, Eileen McGowan and Betty Madden, assisted with the opening of the Art Gallery where the work of local artists is selected and hung by committee members several times a year. Mary recalls the excitement of the arts renewal at Settlement – “jewelry making, drawing and planting flowers, the art classes for the Mothers’ Club, art projects with the children in the after school program, the annual school spring art show ‘Youth Visions,’ visiting art galleries, walking through the neighborhood with candles and Jose Alatorre riding a donkey for the Nativity celebration” were great fun for all. Mary designed a silver Wildcat brooch which was


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sold at NU with profits going to Settlement and in 1997, a small pendant of the Front Door and Steps at Settlement which has been given to EWB presidents at the end of their terms. ‘Adopting’ Settlement families at the holiday time became an annual event. Betty Fischer noted that “the first year so much was collected from EWB members that it was necessary to transport car loads to the thrift shop at Settlement. The gift wrapping party became a favorite social event. Baking cookies at Settlement became a joint effort with EWB members and the Mothers’ Club. We baked at the Settlement and Ron Manderschied always appeared as the smell of cookies wafted through the house.” During this time the EWB and the Northwestern University Circle shared the costs for another popular event. Settlement children and their parents were invited to a Kid’s Fare Concert on a Saturday morning at NU. Music School Dean Dobroski provided tickets and the opportunity to meet the musicians backstage after the concert. Volunteers prepared the sack lunches (peanut butter and jelly being a favorite), greeted the families and joined them for the concert and lunch backstage where tables were set up. Before boarding the bus back to Augusta Street, the children delighted in rolling on the grassy hill outside of Pick-Staiger concert hall. For a number of years the Athletic Department at NU donated football tickets for a busload of children once a year. One year the children marched with the band before the game. Second Benefit for Settlement Initiated to Support the Campaign for the Arts President Terri Hummel (1996-1997) noted in her annual report that “the Matador Boxing Club (supported by the EWB with an annual $6,000 gift) sent an Olympic Athlete and two alternatives to the Atlanta Olympics. Nate Jones came home with a bronze medal. We recognize the team’s dedication and hard work. Through boxing, many team members have seen new horizons – pathways for their future that take them away from the gangs and the mean streets of Chicago towards a meaningful and promising future.” “..the Board embraced a radical new idea of a second benefit besides the Dollar Letter. On a lovely Sunday night in July EWB hosted ‘Sing for Settlement’ at Pick-Staiger Concert Hall on the NU campus. We were entertained by 125 singers of the Melodeers Chorus, who are world renowned for 4 part harmony - barbershop style, as well as the cast from the musical ‘Forever Plaid.’ Board members Nancy Morr, a Melodeer herself, Betty Fischer and Marie Burnside worked very hard to make this a great evening. All the proceeds, over $27,000, were donated to the Campaign for the Community Arts.” Terri recalled that “90 years ago Miss Griswold and Miss Whitely organized three shows at the NU campus to raise money for Settlement and it is fitting that since our Board started with a theatrical production at NU we pledge an additional $100,000 to the Community Arts Campaign for the Settlement Theatre to become a reality.” She noted that since 1991, the EWB has pledged and given $1,150,000 to the Centennial Fund and Campaign for the Arts. In addition, many individual Board members made substantial financial gifts towards the renovation of the third floor dance hall into the beautiful Vittum Theatre.


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Dollar Letter Revamped President Nancy Dorr (1997-1999) stated “with a view to meeting the millennium with a revitalized effort in our fundraising, we undertook a revamping of our Dollar Letter. We simplified, streamlined and brought our appeal into the 90s by using a brilliant, colored painting on our card entitled ‘The Family and The Home’ drawn by Bobberate, an artist helping at Settlement, and the artists she worked with in the Mothers’ Club. The results were phenomenal by our standards, raising $26,375!”

The 1998 Dollar Letter In the spring of 1997 at the Annual Dinner at Settlement, Marie Burnside and Bill and Betty Fischer received President’s Awards for outstanding service to Settlement. Mary Barnett received the award in 1998. At the spring Board meeting with the Mothers’ Club, Ron Manderschied announced that Settlement was granted a charter to operate a High School within Settlement House. He told members that new construction on the premises would occur and that the first class would start in the fall of 1999. In the fall of 1997, after a two year trial period, a change in the annual member pledge was incorporated into the by-laws, increasing it to $200. Since its founding, Board Members had been required to pledge $100 annually and bring in another $100 with the Dollar Letter.


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In 1998, EWB members of the Visual Arts Committee, consisting of chair Bill Goldman, Mary Barnett, Eileen McGowan, Camilla Boitel and Betty Madden, travelled to Oaxaca, Mexico with Jose Alatorre and others from Settlement to purchase crafts to be sold at the North Shore Folk Art Show. The trip was a great success and the sale proceeds were donated to Settlement. The New Millennium Our 90th Year President Betty Madden (1999-2000) noted that another new “splendid design” was created for the Dollar Letter by Bobberate and her team of Mothers as the decade came to an end and the Board celebrated its 90th birthday. In early 2000, as the plans for the Noble Street Charter High School’s expansion into Evanston Hall took shape, the EWB Board once again made a significant contribution of $100,000 from the Endowment Fund to assist in the remodeling of the kitchen, the wood shop and the thrift store. The Noble Street Charter High School (NSCHS) situated on the Settlement premises was in its inaugural year. The first class of freshman students were studying in classrooms in the House and eating their lunches in the cafeteria set up in Burnside Hall inside Evanston Hall. Having the school located on the premises meant that the thrift store and the rooftop playground had to be removed and remodeled to allow space for the school construction. EWB Responds to Changes at Settlement President Carol Rahimi (2000-2001) informed the Board that after eleven years of providing financial support to the Matador Boxing Club, the Settlement Board decided that the club was no longer a viable program due to declining interest in the sport and lack of suitable corporate sponsorship. The EWB had paid to build the training center and ring in the basement of Evanston Hall. The program had been very successful for many years. The Board now turned its financial support and efforts to the Evanston Hall’s Vittum Theatre dance program and the after school children’s Read-to-Win program. West Town Tile was created in the basement at Settlement to offer outside employment to members of the Mothers’ Club. The EWB purchased a new kiln for them and provided assistance in marketing and selling their personally designed and handmade tile products. This program ran for several years before the facilities became inadequate and the program was disbanded. Many practical business and artistic skills were learned by the mothers who participated in the program. The October meeting was designated for addressing and sending out the Dollar Letters. This collective effort helped to get the letters out in a timely and documented fashion. Other changes included a major revision of the by-laws and the addition of a morning and an evening meeting to accommodate working women. Meeting places were expanded from Member homes to Northwestern University in September, Settlement in December (gift wrapping and lunch with the high school students), the bank in February (financial meeting), and again Settlement in May (Mothers’ Club luncheon). For the first time brief profiles of Board Members were compiled and included in the annual Members Booklet.


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Members Increase On-Site Volunteerism at Settlement In the fall of 2001 as President Carolyn Krulee (2001-2003) called the first meeting of the year to order, the country was reeling from the 9/11 terrorist attacks which occurred that very morning, when commercial airliners crashed into the World Trade Center in Manhattan, the Pentagon, and in a field in Pennsylvania. A somber Board endorsed the President’s proposal of setting specific goals for the year which included facilitating new opportunities for the Charter High School students. A Career/College Advising Day was set up at Settlement in which students interacted with college representatives and members of the armed services. In addition a visit to NU admissions office and campus was arranged and jointly sponsored by the EWB and the University Circle to orient students at NSCHS to a college campus. The Board provided funding for three students to attend summer academic programs. Another goal was to encourage more direct, on-site service at the Settlement. A booklet describing volunteer opportunities for Board members was made available and sign-up sheets for specific dates to volunteer were provided at each meeting. Members started volunteering on a regular basis to read to the children in the after school programs and to volunteer as ushers at the Theatre productions for the many Chicago school children who attended. In her annual report presented at the September meeting 2001, Marie Burnside, Finance Committee Chair, clarified the Endowment Fund. “For the benefit of the newer members of our group, and prospective members, I would like to tell you about our Endowment Fund which grew from our Dollar Letter campaign. Years ago when our expenses were not as large as they now are, large and smaller gifts of stock and bonds were given to the Board and became the basis of the Endowment Fund – moneys to be used for special needs of the Settlement. It is this Fund – which was well over a million dollars– that enabled us to make the large gifts we have made to Settlement. And we are grateful for the soaring stock market which made our money all the greater - and the excellent supervision our brokers gave us….. All too well we now know our bubble has burst. [Funds diminished substantially in 2000-2001.] Heaven only knows where we are today but we are hovering around $600,000 – and in the light of what has happened all over the country today, we are rich – we and our people are alive.” The Annual Dinner at Settlement was hosted by each of the Auxiliary Boards in turn. The EWB hosted the dinner in 2001 and was responsible for all the table decorations and flowers. At the suggestion of a member, centerpieces were created for the first time with 15 baskets filled with school supplies for the children in the Head Start and after-school programs rather than flowers that would have been thrown away. The useful centerpieces were such a success that all Auxiliary Boards now do this every year for the Annual Dinner, with each board taking a different group as its focus: Golden Agers, Theatre, after school programs, Head Start or High School students. In 2002 an ad hoc Long Range Planning Committee was established to address the issue of increasing Board membership. After thoughtful deliberations and a decided break with the tradition of the EWB, the Committee proposed that a new membership category be created to facilitate bringing younger members to the Board. Exploratory meetings with potential Junior Associates were held and significant interest was generated on the part of the young women and Board members. In the spring of 2003 the Board approved the Junior Associate category to include young women who would have full membership but pay a reduced annual pledge.


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At the 2003 Annual Dinner, Carolyn Krulee was presented with the Chairman’s Award by Patricia Johnson, Board Chairman, for her exceptional service as a faithful volunteer. Carolyn’s energy and enthusiasm for all that she does at Settlement is greatly appreciated, especially by the children in the after school program who look forward to her lively visits. The Board Welcomes Junior Associate Members for the First Time In September of 2003 President Mary Paula Baumann (2003-2005) welcomed four young women as the first Junior Associate members of the Board: Jane Bistry, niece of Carolyn Krulee, Rebecca Deaton, granddaughter of Marie Burnside, Katherine Hederick, daughter of Nancy Morr, and Heather Upchurch. In the following year Alita Guillen, Leslie Luning, Elif Martinez and Aimee Long, daughter of Sally Dumas, joined. These young women had an immediate impact on the Board with their innovative ideas for volunteerism at Settlement. We were thrilled to have their energy, enthusiasm and fresh outlook. “On December 9 Marie Burnside was surprised with a special gift by the Evanston Board while attending their annual gift wrapping party at Settlement. During lunch at Burnside Hall with students from Noble Street Charter High School, board president Mary Paula Baumann quieted the room and announced that the board wanted to recognize and thank a very special member who had faithfully served the Settlement for the past 62 years. Referencing the Settlement’s Worn Doorstep as an example of the tens of thousands of feet that have literally worn out the front steps of the House, Mary Paula applauded this as yet unnamed board member for her own part in wearing down the steps by so generously giving of her time, talents and finances to support the work of the Settlement. Marie was clearly touched when her name was announced and the students, staff and board members in attendance stood to their feet in applause. A wave of recognition went through the room as students put two and two together and realized that they ate their lunch every day in the very room named for this lady and her late husband, Robert H. Burnside. Several senior girls who have met Marie over their years at Noble Street also came up to give her a congratulatory hug. Mary Paula then presented Marie with a gift designed just for her, a charm pendant in the shape of the Worn Doorstep. Though it was a gift specifically from the Evanston Board, we know that the entire Settlement family joins together in thanking Marie for her incredible support and in applauding this much deserved recognition of a woman we’ve all come to know, love and appreciate.” 25

At the Annual Dinner, the EWB presented Pat Jaszka, Emergency Services Coordinator, with a special gift to commemorate her retirement: a professionally prepared oral history. Pat’s words are a fascinating personal reflection on her more than 46 years of service at the House on Augusta Street and the many changes that occurred there in the same neighborhood where she grew up. The CD, also recorded as written text, is a valuable documentary for the archives. 26 Innovative in-kind giving projects were readily adopted by members. An annual ‘Shower for Settlement’ at one of our meetings collects donated gently used or new household goods. Thanks to a member’s efforts, truckloads of clothing and toy donations from members of a Curves Health Club are donated, picked up and brought to Settlement. In addition, there is a constant 25 26

NUSH The Neighbor, Winter 2004, Volume 15, Issue 2. Copy of the Pat Jaszka CD is available for loan from the Archives Chair.


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collection of useful articles from friends of members which are brought to Settlement by the trunk loads. 2004 – Our 95th Year The 95th year was celebrated with a major gift of $35,000 from our Endowment Fund to Settlement House for the repair of its roof. Ninety-five books were donated to the Noble Street Charter High School, the Settlement Garden was refurbished with many new plantings, and spouses were invited for the first time to an evening meeting and 95th birthday party pot luck dinner which was a great success. Cost cutting measures were implemented by using e-mail for minutes and memos whenever possible. The Board also decided to send its own acknowledgements for in-kind giving to Settlement from members and friends. Thanks to the initiative and coordination of our members a delightful cookbook, Tried and True Recipes: From Neighbor to Neighbor, Recipes from the Northwestern University Settlement 27 Community, was published. This was a marvelous collaborative project to collect recipes from the staff at Settlement House, House in the Wood Camp, and the Associates, North Shore, Park Ridge and Winnetka Boards. It was a huge success and is still in constant use. Recipes from the book were used for the catered Annual Dinner at Settlement. Junior Associates continued to generate fresh ideas (along with new babies) and many innovative hands-on projects, such as the bake sale around Valentine’s Day for the high school students which raised money for the after school programs. They excel at soliciting school supplies from local businesses for a School Store set up in the gym in August, often bringing their own children along to help the 160 school children from the community “buy” school supplies at a very minimal cost, i.e. $2.00 for all the necessary pencils, crayons, erasers, note books, Kleenex, etc. needed to start the school year. Those who cannot pay use ‘NUSH dollars’ which they earn during the school year by extra reading or other good behavior. This is really a heartwarming event. The Junior Associates have been important committee members and have taken initiative on many projects such as the Holiday Family Assistance Program. In 2005, one of the Junior Associates arranged to have 20 original works of art donated to Settlement families as part of a Jump Start Art Project which she, her mother and others initiated as an independent project. One evening at Settlement, with the artists present and the paintings hung on the walls as in a gallery, each family received a work of art. They were thrilled at this unexpected gift of beauty and were delighted to be able to take the paintings home.

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Tried and True Recipes: From Neighbor to Neighbor. Recipes from the Northwestern University Settlement Community, Cookbook Publishers, Inc, Lenexa, Kansas, Copyright 2004. A copy of the recipe book is available for loan from the Archives Chair


Evanston Woman’s Board History

EWB Makes the Local News

The garden at Settlement

The writing of the Dollar Letter

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Settlement Memories In recognition of the 95th anniversary President Mary Paula Baumann invited members and past presidents to comment on their experiences with Settlement. Responses are included throughout the preceding text, and others follow. Mary Lou Wells, in her 86th year and a member since 1977 wrote: “It’s been so wonderful to be a member of the Board of the Settlement for all these years. Time flies by so fast. It means so much for the people of the area.” Peggy Rastetter, member since 1987 who had just moved to Connecticut wrote: “During the early 1950’s when I was President and/or Benefit chairman of the (then) North Shore Junior Board, one of the most pleasant tasks assigned to those two offices was to visit one of the meetings of the Evanston Senior Board to enlist its support for our spring benefit, the Antiques Show at the Lake Shore Club in Chicago. We always felt so welcome, we loved the meetings in your lovely homes, and always left with the feeling that you truly would help us in any way that you could. And I observe that it is the same now.” Mary Ruth Sanderson in her 95th year noted: “I was president from 1978-80 which seemed like yesterday. In 1955 I joined the Board at the invitation of Theresa Long. The best thing about being a member was getting to know women whom I would otherwise not have met. I have always been very impressed with the good Settlement is doing and the potential it has to do more. The workers at Settlement are great people.” Mary Ruth served on the search committee when Ron Manderschied was hired. “He is a real dynamo.” She noted with pleasure that the Board is more active now and is doing a better job of reaching out to the community. Marie Burnside said simply, “I truly love Settlement.” Many of us have accompanied Marie on trips to Settlement and enjoyed hearing stories about her early days there. She especially liked the joy and adventure of taking children on outings to museums and other Chicago places on public transportation. Holiday Gifting Program Restructured President Nancy Morr (2005-2007) and the Board focused on the many ongoing committee activities. One of the principal concerns was to take a hard look at our financial portfolio. Peggy Barr spearheaded the effort and after much thought and extensive study, the Board decided in the spring of 2007 to change the management of our endowment fund to maximize its potential for a higher yield to benefit Settlement. The holiday gifting program undertaken in the early ‘90’s was restructured to service more families. Nancy reported “we set a per person spending limit, and were able to provide food and two gifts, for each of 60 individuals, about five times as many as in previous years! There was a little miracle that coincided with our plan. One of our Junior Associates developed a relationship with Wal-Mart while obtaining a donation of school supplies for their school sale in the fall. Wal-Mart called her the last day of November and said they had $500 worth of merchandise to give away, the catch being that we needed to get it that day! One Junior Associate, her two young children and another Board member dropped everything to head for a day at Wal-Mart to shop for essentials for all 14 families – paper goods, tooth brushes, kitchen utensil, cleaning


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supplies, towels and more. ....The financial support of 100% of our Regular and Junior Associates made this expanded holiday adoption plan happen.� In 2007 the Dollar Letter returns of $42,000 exceeded the goal for the year. Nancy announced that a generous bequest of $25,000 to the Endowment fund was made by Camilla Boitel, President (1968-1970) and longtime dedicated member and generous donor whom many members knew and respected. Camilla was active with this Board for over 46 years until her death at age 89 in 2003. Outstanding Member Honored In honor of an exceptional volunteer with Settlement, a new fund was created in 2007 to provide emergency funds to Settlement at the discretion of the Board. A sum of $10,000 was raised for this purpose. The fund is named after Marie Burnside who was recognized as the Inaugural Winner of the Special Achievement Award for Outstanding Dedication. Marie joined the North Shore Junior Board in 1942, the EWB in 1958 and served as its president from 1966-1968. The award was presented to her at a luncheon celebration held at the Board’s annual meeting at the Glen View Club with many of her friends present. She was remembered as a friend, a role model and an inspiration to countless people for over 65 years of devoted service to Settlement.

Nancy Morr presents the award to Marie Burnside


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New Members and Initiatives In her 2008 annual report President Holly Sunshine (2007-2009) addressed the outcome of hiring a new portfolio manager and the realigning of our investments, noting that “our portfolio value since the transfer has held its own.” In 2009 she reported that the Endowment Fund is making a comeback. The Dollar Letter raised over $41,790, surpassing its goal of $35,000. These gains were particularly significant in light of the worst economic recession since the Great Depression. The EWB provided funds to insure Settlement’s much needed new truck. Among its many uses, Members arrange picks-ups of donated furniture, floor samples from Crate and Barrel stores, and household goods and clothing from St. Nicholas Church Rummage Sale. The Scrip program was first used by the Board in 2006 as a convenient way to raise funds for the holiday project. Gift cards sold by numerous retailers and restaurants are purchased by members to use as they wish. EWB receives a percentage of those purchases as rebates. The proceeds amounted to $300 in 2008. The North Shore Board participated in our Scrip program for the first time in 2008. A new fundraising event, called ‘Lift a Fork,’ was organized by the Junior Associates. It was great success! Thanks to the husband of a Junior Associate who runs a successful steak house in Evanston, members and their guests enjoyed dinner at the restaurant and the owner donated 25% of the proceeds to the EWB. Much goodwill and over $1000 was realized. The Board decided that more time to discuss ongoing projects was required. A working meeting without a speaker was added in March, a month which previously had no meeting scheduled. Members with NU ties organized the annual visit to the NU campus for Noble Charter High School sophomores for a day of orientation, facilitated a college night, as well as a “how to parent adolescents” evening for parents at Settlement. Two classroom libraries were stocked with age appropriate books recommended by the teachers for all reading levels. At the May meeting the Board was reminded of the impact these gifts may have when freshman students spoke about the books in their classroom libraries. Some admitted that before arriving at the high school they had never read for pleasure. They were genuinely surprised at how much they enjoyed reading for fun and expressed their delight at having easy access to so many interesting books. In the past two years 11 new members including five Junior Associates were welcomed to our Board. Two resignations were regretfully accepted, bringing the total membership to 44. As Holly brought the 99th year to a close, she thanked the women of the Board for their ongoing efforts in seeking new opportunities to benefit Settlement.


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Our Mission The goal of the EWB is to raise funds for the Northwestern University Settlement and to further its interests. The primary means of doing so continues to be the Annual Dollar Letter Appeal first instituted in 1912. Annual member pledges constitute another source of funding. The Endowment Fund is also a vital and much valued resource. It was established in 1948 with generous donations of stocks, bonds and other financial securities, and enhanced with additional gifts and legacies in subsequent years. This Board is unique among all the Auxiliary Boards in that it is the only one to have an unrestricted source of funding to help make Settlement financially secure. In addition, members do on-site volunteer work and provide gifts-in-kind on a regular basis. The EWB includes many long term members with new women joining each year. Over the past 19 years there have been between 35 and 47 women from Evanston, Chicago, Glenview, Northbrook, Northfield and Wilmette on the Board. There are currently four categories of membership: Regular, Junior Associate, Senior Associate and Honorary. In 2009, members make a $250 annual pledge, contribute $20 to cover operating costs and send Dollar letters to family and friends asking for financial assistance towards Settlement projects. Other member financial contributions to the Settlement Annual Fund, the Classroom Library Fund and the School Store are optional. Meetings are held monthly from September through June at members’ homes, at Northwestern University in the fall, at Settlement in December and May and at a private club for the annual meeting in June. Active members take turns serving as hostesses for the meetings. At the first meeting of the year Ron Manderschied, President, presents a review of Settlement’s goals for the upcoming year. Staff and others from Settlement speak at most meetings. The evening meeting in April includes spouses and other guests. Officers are elected by the Board and committees are appointed by the President to carry out the work of the Board. Several EWB members serve on the Board of Directors, the Auxiliary Committee and other Committees at Settlement. The EWB is the oldest of six Auxiliary Boards which support Settlement: the North Shore Board, Winnetka Board, Associates Board, Park Ridge Board and Chicago Board.


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Looking Back Looking back, we can appreciate that the women of today share the same genuine desire as the women of yesteryear to participate in the noble work undertaken by Settlement in helping people help themselves. Many activities started over the last 20 years have become valued Board traditions. Since the early days of Settlement the garden on Augusta Boulevard has been of special interest to members. It has been improved in recent years by members working their magic with spades, new plantings and soil enrichment. Jose Alatorre, Director of Children’s Programs, helps with the annual color selection of plants and arranges to have the Head Start parents, staff, and Americorps Volunteers assist. It is a labor of love which is enjoyed by all who pass by the garden and for the children who look out onto it from their preschool room and play in it during recess. A neighbor at Settlement commented,” The garden makes me feel like walking into a home.” Since its inception the EWB has made an annual unrestricted gift to Settlement for operating expenses with monies raised from the Dollar Letter and supplemented with funds from the Endowment Fund when needed. Since 1994 this amount has been $48,000. From 1994-2001 over $41,000 was contributed to support the Boxing program. From 1992 to 2005, $1,285,000 was given for the Centennial Fund, Evanston Hall, the Campaign for the Arts, Noble Street Charter School and the Roof Replacement project. 28 In addition, many members have made substantial personal donations to Settlement’s Annual Appeal and for major projects undertaken there. Several rooms at Settlement are named after EWB members to honor their generosity. The holiday gifting program is still a wonderful event and reaches more people than ever. Junior Associates arrange for the school store in late summer and the ever popular Valentine’s Day bake sale. Volunteers regularly read to the Head Start children, assist with the after school programs and usher at the Vittum Theatre. Members along with their children or spouses help serve Thanksgiving dinner to the Settlement neighbors and pack Easter baskets. In-kind gifts are collected and delivered to Settlement on a regular basis. The EWB assists the Northwestern University Circle women in sponsoring children and their families for a Kids Fare concert at NU. Support for the Noble Street High School includes providing books for the classroom libraries and utilizing NU resources for parent and student orientations about college. Members serve on the Visual Arts Committee at Settlement judging and hanging art for several exhibitions a year. Meetings at Settlement have evolved to happy occasions to meet families and students. In the spring, Head Start parents prepare a large buffet of ethnic foods paid for by the Board. As a thank you, members bring pots, soil and flowers which are potted by the cooks to take home. All agree that it is a pleasure to sit together, share the delicious foods and learn a little about one another. Goodwill and hospitality transcend cultural and linguistic differences. In December, after wrapping the holiday gifts for families, the Board enjoys lunch in the Burnside Hall cafeteria with Noble Street High School students who impress us with their good manners and poise. Each July all Auxiliary Board members are invited to visit the House in the Wood Camp at Lake Delavan in Wisconsin. It is a heartwarming experience to see the beautiful campgrounds on the shore of the lake and to meet campers and counselors who speak about the positive effect this 28

EWB Finance Committee Report 1/4/2006.


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precious vacation away from the city has on their lives. Our members especially enjoy the one and one half hour road trip each way sharing good stories, much laughter and friendship. One of the pleasures of volunteering at Settlement is getting to know the remarkable staff and many of the neighbors who receive services at the House at 1400 Augusta Boulevard in Chicago. We are welcomed as family when arriving there and made to feel at home. Many of us work regularly with the staff and have personally interacted with children and their families, Golden Agers, school staff and students. Knowing how much good is accomplished and feeling a small part of the enabling team makes our work much more meaningful. It has been especially rewarding to see the progress some Settlement neighbors have made over the years in improving their lives through education and hard work with the guidance and assistance of the capable and caring staff. The Board has seen many changes over the past two decades which reflect the sensibilities and needs of the times. These years have been notable in major ways: financial contributions to Settlement have been significant; Board membership has been revitalized; the operations and procedures of the Board have been updated and streamlined, and members have become more involved in hands-on activities at Settlement. Members have often stated that one of the pleasures of working on this Board is having the opportunity to know and respect different generations of women who work together towards a common goal. We have gladly welcomed our new members and we have mourned the loss of too many dear members who served faithfully for so long. Looking Forward The EWB will celebrate its centennial during the 2009-2010 year. Plans to commemorate this grand occasion are well underway. The women of this Board are truly grateful to the women who have served as stalwart supporters of Settlement over the past century. The EWB is vibrant and active today because our predecessors have led the way with compassion, dedication, generosity of spirit and determination to succeed in helping to fulfill Settlement’s mission. A revitalized and stronger Evanston Woman’s Board is ready to embrace new challenges to continue this work.


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Members of the Board: June 2009

Annual luncheon at the Westmoreland Country Club in Wilmette Left to Right, Row 1: Paula Shapiro, Lisa Harries, Meg Krulee, Lucille Prudden: Row 2: Peggy Barr, Eileen McGowan, Virginia Winter, Charlotte Westfall, Terri Hummel, Lonnie Dunlap; Row 3: Aimee Long, Andrea Knohl, Anita Yamada, Sally Dumas, Jean Yale, Zoe Barron, Holly Sunshine, Mary Paula Baumann, Carolyn Krulee, Jennifer Kline. Members not pictured: Anna Atkinson, Jane Bistry, Marie Burnside, Carol Cyrus, Elizabeth David, Judy DeStafano, Lynne Eramo, Mary Ellen Fellman, Lori Goodman, Christine Grove, Mary Ann Grumman, Sally Kiper, Carrie Lassman, Dorothy Laudati, Leslie Luning, Elif Martinez, Nancy Morr, Christine Olsen, Carol Rahimi, Gwyn Rahr, Betty Reeder, Tammy Walker, Doris Woolsey.


Evanston Woman’s Board History

Evanston Woman’s Board Presidents 1909-2009 1909-1911 1912-1919 1920–1921 1921–1922 1922–1924 1924–1926 1926–1928 1928–1930 1930 1930–1932 1932–1933 1933–1935 1935–1936 1936–1938 1938–1940 1940–1941 1941–1942 1943–1945 1945–1946 1947–1948 1948–1950 1950–1952 1952–1954 1954–1956 1956–1958 1958–1960 1960–1962 1962–1964 1964–1966 1966–1968 1968–1970 1970–1972 1972–1974 1974–1976 1976–1978 1978–1980 1980–1982 1982–1984 1984–1986 1986–1987 1987–1988 1988–1992 1992–1994 1994–1996 1996–1997 1997–1999 1999–2000 2000–2001 2001–2003 2003–2005 2005–2007 2007–2009 2009–

Mrs. Laurence DeGolyer records unavailable Mrs. Edward K. Hardy Mrs. Harry Byram Mrs. Daniel Burnham Mrs. Robert Lord Mrs. Norman J. Westerhold Mrs. Edward P. Welles Mrs. James Winston Mrs. William B. Johnson Mrs. John Wilder Mrs. Chester D. Tripp Mrs. Thomas H. Eddy Mrs. Arlington Harvey Mrs. William H. Barnes Mrs. Robert L. Scott Mrs. Clinton Merrick Mrs. Arthur M. Betts Mrs. George Forsythe Mrs. George Frederick Falley Mrs. Charles F. Grey Mrs. Ira E. Westbrook Mrs. Arthur M. Long Mrs. Eugene L. Voss Mrs. Carol Wilson Alton Mrs. George C. Turnbull Mrs. Paul L. Morrison Mrs. George I. Haight Mrs. Robert C. Suhr Mrs. Robert H. Burnside Mrs. Arwed C. Boitel Mrs. Frank M. Mason, Jr. Mrs. Noel G. Shaw Mrs. Fred I. Norman Mrs. William S. Kerr Mrs. John C. Sanderson, Jr. Mrs. Noel S. O’Reilly Mrs. Floyd E. Grover Mrs. Walter C. Burket Mrs. Allin W. Proudfoot Mrs. Robert J. Allison Mrs. Dudley Robinson Mrs. Walter B. Hobbs Mrs. C. William Fischer Mrs. Greg W. Hummel Mrs. James P. Dorr Mrs. John E. Madden Mrs. Mort Rahimi Mrs. Gilbert K. Krulee Mrs. Gerhard Baumann Mrs. A. Allen Morr Mrs. Eugene Sunshine Ms. Margaret J. Barr

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Evanston Woman’s Board History

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Members of the Evanston Woman’s Board in the 99th Year Year joined

Anna Atkinson Mary Barnett, (Mrs. Gary) Margaret J. Barr Zoe Barron, (Mrs. D. R.) Mary Paula Baumann, (Mrs. Gerhard) * Leigh Buchanan Bienen Jane Bistry, (Mrs. Robert) Marie Burnside, (Mrs. Robert H.) * Jennifer Cline, (Mrs. Thomas) Carol Cyrus, (Mrs. George J. Jr.) Elizabeth David Judy De Stefano, (Mrs. James R.) Sally Dumas (Mrs. Lawrence) Lonnie Dunlap Lynne Eramo Mary Ellen Fellman (Mrs. Olaf) Lori Goodman, (Mrs. Adam) Christine Grove (Mrs.) Mary Ann Grumman (Mrs. David L.) Lisa Harries Terri Hummel (Mrs. Greg W.) * Sally Kiper (Mrs. Ronald) Andrea Knohl (Mrs. Keith.) Carolyn Krulee (Mrs. Gilbert K.) * Meg Krulee Carrie Lassman (Ms.), (Tony Malcoun) Dorothy Laudati (Mrs. Vittorio F.) Aimee Long (Mrs. Nick) Leslie Luning (Mrs. Chad) Elif Martinez (Mrs. Michael) Eileen Mc Gowan (Mrs. John) Nancy Morr (Mrs. A. Allen) * Christine Olsen Lucille Prudden (Mrs. Joseph) Carol Rahimi (Mrs. Mort)* Gwyn Rahr (Mrs. Sumner G.) Betty Reeder (Mrs. Robert J.) Paula Shapiro (Mrs. John) Meg Strotz (Mrs. Robert) Holly Sunshine (Mrs. Eugene) * Tamara Walker (Mrs. Randy J.) Edna Weber (Mrs. Arnold) Charlotte Westfall (Mrs. Ralph) Virginia Winter (Mrs. Frederick W.) Doris Woolsey (Mrs. William) Jean W. Yale (Mrs.) Anita Yamada (Mrs. Isshi)

* past president ** year joined the North Shore Junior Board

2005 1993 2002 2000 1996 1995 2003 1958 / 1942** 2002 1992 / 1977** 2008 1994 2007 2008 2008 1987 2007 2006 2007 2008 1993/ 1985** 1993 2006 1999 2008 2007 1988 2004 2004 2004 1994 1994 2009 2000 1994 1994 2003 2006 1970 1999 2000 1985 1995 1977 1973 1999 1993

Junior Associate Senior Associate

Honorary Junior Associate

Junior Associate Junior Associate Junior Associate Junior Associate Junior Associate Junior Associate Junior Associate Junior Associate

Honorary Honorary Senior Associate

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Evanston Woman's Board History  

Evanston Woman's Board History  

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