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K .T. A N T H O N Y C H A N PROJEC TS


K .T. A N T H O N Y C H A N PROJECTS

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Hampton Bays House Hampt on Bay , NY

12 Chelsea

16 Lake

Apartment

New York, NY

House

Lake Placid, NY

22 Fresh

Hong Kong, Beijing, S hanghai, a n d F i x t u re D e v e lo p e me n t

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Creative Arts Gateway

K .T. A N T H O N Y C H A N

Princet on, NJ

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HAMPTON BAYS HOUSE Hampton Bay, NY

K .T. A N T H O N Y C H A N

Hampton Bays House

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ABOUT Situated atop a bluff overlooking the Hampton Bay, this residential dwelling offers dramatic views across the bay into the horizon; yet, it is decidedly humble with its natural surrounding. The five-bedroom house is designed for a multi-generational French family as their vacation home in New York. Because of its low profile and placement on a gentle slope, the house slowly reveals itself on two approaches – by foot and from the bay. Designed with green building methodologies in mind, the narrow cross-section provides cross-breeze in the summer. The combination of the green roof and submersion of the building into the earth enable the building to achieve a high thermal mass, hereby lowering energy consumption in the winter.

BRIEF Category: Private Residence Year: 2015 Location: Hampton Bays, NY Size: 3,800 sf

In terms of form and material selection, it is the client’s desire to have a relatively simple and straightforward home. In order to simultaneously convey a sense of refinery and to streamline the material palette, consistency in detailing became a major undertaking. We employed primarily cedar, white oak, weathering steel, and limestone, relying on their natural imperfection to bring warmth and life into the residence. Extensive use of diffused lighting allowed us to have minimal interruption to the ceiling and to highlight the quality of the cedar.

Project Team: Caleb Mulvena Principle & Lead Designer K.T. Anthony Chan Project Designer & Project Manager (DD, CD, and CA phase) Natasha Amladi Designer (CD phrase) Xinyang Chen Designer (SD, and DD phase)

With the Vitrocsa window system on the upper level communal spaces, the indoor and outdoor spaces were connected, offering sweeping views into the bay. The terraces slowly cascade with the landscape, providing various leisurely outdoor activities.

Architect of Record: Mapos, LLC

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Building Exterior (bay side) LEFT

Main Approach K .T. A N T H O N Y C H A N

Hampton Bays House

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UPPER LEFT

Main Entrance LEFT

Kitchen Shutters K .T. A N T H O N Y C H A N

ABOVE

Master Bedroom Overlook ABOVE

Terraces over bay Hampton Bays House

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K .T. A N T H O N Y C H A N

Hampton Bays House

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K .T. A N T H O N Y C H A N

Hampton Bays House

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FACING PAGE & UPPER LEFT

Living Area UPPER RIGHT

Dining Area RIGHT

Section Cut Through Upper Level K .T. A N T H O N Y C H A N

Hampton Bays House

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S un Deck

Di n i n g D e ck

Ma s te r Bedr oom

Liv ing

Gri l l D e ck

Di n i n g

Family

P a n t ry Ma s te r Bath

Mu d ro o m

Corridor / Office

Pow der Roo m

E n t ry F o ye r Kitchen

ABOVE

Plan: Main Level No t t o s c a l e

K .T. A N T H O N Y C H A N

Hampton Bays House

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S pa

Pool D e ck

Cabana Bat h Gues t R oom

Mechanical

S t eam

Laundry

Boys ’ R oom

Sh ar ed Bath

Gi r l s ’ R o om

Play room

S t aff

ABOVE

Plan: Lower Level No t t o s c a l e

K .T. A N T H O N Y C H A N

Hampton Bays House

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LEFT COLUMN

Master Suite K .T. A N T H O N Y C H A N

ABOVE

Millwork Detail

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Sun Deck at Dusk Hampton Bays House

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K .T. A N T H O N Y C H A N

Hampton Bays House

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CHELSEA APARTMENT New York, NY

K .T. A N T H O N Y C H A N

Chelsea Apartment

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ABOUT Located in one of New York’s most historic & uniquely vibrant neighborhoods, this street-level Chelsea apartment is a rare, sun-filled home for a young professional. The owner plans to acquire the cellar unit below, creating an expansive living space. The layout and strategy of the renovation is decisively straight forward: to maximize usable space whilst avoiding major modification to the 150+ year-old structure and mechanical system. Material selection is streamlined due to the project’s compact scale—limited to only four: limestone, marble, white oak and white paint. From the rounded counter top corners to the integrated door pulls, millwork details are intended to create an emotional resonance with the enduser via the sense of touch. The material palette is light and airy to create a warm and congenial atmosphere, while fabric selection is expressive and cheerful. Original brickwork along the east wall will be repaired and whitewashed to reveal the history of the building. BRIEF Category: Residential, One Bedroom Apartment Year: 2016 Location: New York, NY Size: 700 sf Project Team: K.T. Anthony Chan (Lead Designer & Project Manager) Architect of Record: To be determined

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Living Room, towards street UPPER LEFT

Living Room, towards stairs LEFT

Kitchen K .T. A N T H O N Y C H A N

Chelsea Apartment

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N

Plan: Ground Level

Plan: Cellar

No t t o s c a l e

Not to scal e

K .T. A N T H O N Y C H A N

Chelsea Apartment

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UPPER LEFT

Kitchen & Pantry K .T. A N T H O N Y C H A N

LEFT

Millwork Detail

ABOVE

Bathroom Chelsea Apartment

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LAKE HOUSE Lake Placid, NY

K .T. A N T H O N Y C H A N

Lake House

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ABOUT Lake House is a 44-room motor inn located on the main street of Lake Placid, New York. The town hosted the Winter Olympic Games twice; perhaps most remembered as the site of the 1980 USA–USSR hockey game. Originally built in the 1960s, Lake House was subjected to a haphazard renovation in the eighties and had since been neglected for years. Mapos was tasked by hotel developer AWH to spearhead a full rebranding and remodeling, hereby modernizing the Adirondacks experience for the Lake House patrons and to provide a distinctive offering from the local competitors.

BRIEF Category: Hospitality Client: AWH Partners Year: 2014 Location: Lake Placid, NY Size: 29,500 sf

The hotel is situated on the edge the scenic Mirror Lake and is surrounded by well over 2,000 miles of hiking trail and 3,000 lakes. Mapos drew inspiration from the rugged architectural style of the Great Camps of the Adirondack Mountains, the bright and optimistic aesthetic of the classic American Motor Inns of the sixties, and the local color and nature. The result is a distinctly playful and welcoming stay for the modern adventurous travelers.

Architect of Record: Mapos, LLC

Mapos partnered with Tag Collective to develop an entirely new identity for Lake House—a full redesign of the hotel including print collateral, naming strategy, branding, color palette, way-finding signage, letterhead, and artworks. Mapos created custom millwork, case-goods, and light fixtures throughout. In fact, all furnishing was designed to survive the “hockey stick test”, thus daily wear and tear will only add to its character. The team worked closely with local conservationists to create a simultaneously minimal yet distinctive color palette: a muted rustic brown so the building envelope would live harmoniously with its natural surrounding with a pop of fire engine red to paid homage to the Adirondack design and architectural heritage. To further this immersive experience, we painstakingly put together a unique FF&E package and partnered with local antique vendors.

Project Team: Caleb Mulvena Principle & Lead Designer K.T. Anthony Chan Project Designer & Junior Project Manager Xinyang Chen Designer Katherine Kokoska Designer Branding Partner: Tag Collective Photographer: Oleg March

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Lobby LEFT

Exterior Views K .T. A N T H O N Y C H A N

Lake House

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Before

TOP

Porte-cochère B e fo re & a ft e r LEFT

Welcome / Check-in Desk K .T. A N T H O N Y C H A N

Lake House

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Before

UPPER LEFT

Lobby Study Alcove LEFT

Bar Seating Area K .T. A N T H O N Y C H A N

UPPER RIGHT

Lobby Living Room ABOVE

Lobby Before Lake House

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Por te - cochèr e

S t aff

Of f i ce

S t aff Wel com e Desk Bat h Bat h

Bar

Lobby

D o u bl e D o u bl e Room

Si n g l e Queen Room

S t orage

Fireplace

S t udy

Te r r ace

K .T. A N T H O N Y C H A N

Plan: Lobby

Plan: Typical Guest Rooms

S cale: 1 / 16” = 1’-0”

Sc a l e : 1/8 ” = 1’ -0 ”

Lake House

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TOP ROW, FROM LEFT

Hallway & Room Numbering System Guest Bath In-room Poster Developed by Tag Collective LEFT

Standard Guest Room ABOVE

Resort Stationary Developed by Tag Collective K .T. A N T H O N Y C H A N

Lake House

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FRESH

Hong Kong, Beijing, Shanghai, and Fixture Development

K .T. A N T H O N Y C H A N

Fresh

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ABOUT In 2010, the founders of Fresh approached Mapos to radically rethink the retail experience for their Union Square flagship—a new concept that would encapsulate the spirit and brand virtue of Fresh. My tenure at Mapos began two years later, where I worked on three shop-in-shops in Hong Kong and Mainland China. Our main objective was to distill and condense the original concept to smaller and more cost-conscious settings. After the success of the three initial stores, the company expanded rapidly in key markets in Greater China. Witnessing the growth of Fresh was exhilarating. The founders and the Fresh team were heavily involved and worked collaboratively with the revamping of the Fresh in-store shopping experience and the international roll-out. Each shop became a full-scale prototype of their vision. And each iteration was an improvement from the previous; our design evolved and refined itself based on the lessons and feedback from the customers, our client, and fabricator. 2012 A.R.E. Design Awards – Store Fixturing Award, Fresh Sensorial Bar 2012 Apex Awards – Digital Signage in Retail, Silver Medal

BRIEF Category: Retail Client: Fresh Years of Personal Involvement: 2012 - 2013 Projects & Locations: Queensway Plaza, Hong Kong SAR Shin Kong Place, Beijing Raffles City, Shanghai Cloud Nine, Shanghai Langham Place, Hong Kong SAR Miscellaneous Fixture Development, Global Fixture Library, Global Design Architect: Mapos, LLC Project Team: Caleb Mulvena Principle & Lead Designer K.T. Anthony Chan Project Designer & Junior Project Manager (Global) Denise Pereira Project Designer & Junior Project Manager (North America) Daniel Martynetz, Xinyang Chen, Katherine Kokoska Designers **project team varied by project

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Raffles City Mall, Shanghai K .T. A N T H O N Y C H A N

Fresh

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CURRENT SPREAD

Cloud Nine Mall, Shanghai K .T. A N T H O N Y C H A N

Fresh

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K .T. A N T H O N Y C H A N

Fresh

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CREATIVE ARTS GATEWAY Princeton, NJ

K .T. A N T H O N Y C H A N

Creative Arts Gateway

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“As catalysts for transformation, the visual and performing arts count on a sequence of action, revision, repetitions, and opportunistic exchanges to affect critical metamorphosis. Architect, a synthetic art, requires a range of medium and techniques to describe the fixed and ephemeral. The superimposition of different modes of representation in the Line and Shadow seminars established an invitation to initiate a translation toward architectural space. This project extends the question: how can hybrid and layered methods of representation be extracted to galvanize new means of generating spatial sequences and formulate new architectural spaces or programs?” – Course description by Marion Weiss ABOUT Unlike most design exercises, the exploration of this project was conducted in reverse sequence — with a mix analog and digital design techniques. We began with a series of drawing exercises. We extracted a few industrial details along the train tracks behind the Philadelphia 30th Street train station, through projective and free-and techniques, we imagined a world beyond though hand drawings and digital editing. Composition, nuances, were then studied then subsequently applied. The final design was driven by the synergy of the imagined world, existing site conditions, and programming needs – in effect, we allow these parts and nuances to propel the project. DESIGN PROCESS Iteration 1: Amplification through Arraying and Multiplication Images are taken behind 30th street train station in Philadelphia. Structural design elements along the train tracks are extracted then subsequently arrayed and repeated through many iterations of drawing techniques — hand drawings with pencil and ink, followed by digital manipulations in Photoshop.

K .T. A N T H O N Y C H A N

BRIEF Category: Concept, Institutional Year: 2008 Location: Princeton, New Jersey Project Team: Jeeyun Kim & K.T. Anthony Chan Project produced under the guidance of Marion Weiss of Weiss/Manfredi at the University of Pennsylvania School of Design.

BELOW

Perspectival Study W i t h p h o t o g ra p h s t a k e n fro m n e a r t h e 30 th St re e t St a t i o n i n P h i l a d e l p h i a

Creative Arts Gateway

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K .T. A N T H O N Y C H A N

Creative Arts Gateway

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FACING PAGE

K .T. A N T H O N Y C H A N

ABOVE

Line & Shadow

Line & Shadow

Charcoal, Graphite, Red Penci l, and Digital Print on Paper 18”x24” (2008)

Di gi t al Scan of Vari ous Medi ums , P hot os hop, Ink Jet P ri nt on Archi val P aper 27 ” x6 0 ” ( 2 0 08 ) Creative Arts Gateway

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Iteration 2: Site Analysis The site is situated at a relatively high trafficked area at the west edge of the Princeton campus. Currently, it is a relatively quiet and underutilized area with a multi-stories parking garage and a light rail terminus–lovingly called the “Dinky”. With proposed creative art programming, the area can potentially be an exciting hub, for transit and arts, where creative expressions are brought to a more convenient location for locals, visitors and students alike. Because of this unique hybrid of programming, the design team was very concerned with existing campus flow. The objective of new programming will simultaneously facilitate campus flow, putting various creative medias on display and create exciting new location for crowd to congregate for special events and normal daily interactions.

Pedestrian Studies FROM LEFT

∙ ∙ E xi s tin g b u ild in g e x its & pot ent ial pat hways ∙ ∙ P e de stria n flo w e mitte rs ∙ ∙ I n ten sity o f c o n flu e n c e

Vantage Points FROM LEFT

∙ ∙ Veh i c u la r ∙ ∙ Stu de n t & fa c u lty ∙ ∙ L oc al re sid e n ts

K .T. A N T H O N Y C H A N

Creative Arts Gateway

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Iteration 3: Programme Analysis The five main programming are: Theater, Music, Dance, Fine Arts, and Experimental Arts. The programmes were then analysis based on their size, public interaction, visibility, sequencing, moments, lighting exposure and daily cycles.

Public Interaction & Visibility

Spatial Sequence

Interlaced Clustered Topology

K .T. A N T H O N Y C H A N

Creative Arts Gateway

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Iteration 4: Final Design Based on the above studies, Performance and Exhibit were distributed to the corners of the site serving as anchoring volumes. Theaters and Concert Hall — programmes with more episodic events, events that requires tickets or reservations with a prescribed scheduling — were placed at more remote corner. Programmes with regular stream of people — such as galleries and lecture hall — were placed at more centralised area. Rehearsal and Workshop programs were shuffled / commingled to promote inter-disciplinary dialogue. Larger Rehearsal and Practice spaces are placed along key public path to elicit public engagements.

Promenade

Plan

V i e w to w a r d s o u t h

Not t o scale

K .T. A N T H O N Y C H A N

Creative Arts Gateway

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FACING PAGE

Animation Sequence ABOVE

Aerial View K .T. A N T H O N Y C H A N

Creative Arts Gateway

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