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Academic Guide   2014-­‐‑2015  

1957 Lutheran High School South educates for excellence in a Christ-centered environment, preparing youth for leadership in service to the church, the home, and the world.


TABLE OF CONTENTS

The Mission of Lutheran High School South ........................................................................................................

4

An Introduction to Lutheran High School South ...................................................................................................

4

Accreditation, University Academic Admission Standards, LHSS Recommended Academic Plans ...................

5

Courses Offered .....................................................................................................................................................

6

Academic Policies and Procedures ........................................................................................................................ 10 Report Cards and Letter Grades ............................................................................................................................ 11 English Department ............................................................................................................................................... 14 Guide to Electives ......................................................................................................................................... 20 Yearbook/Digital Journalism Policy ............................................................................................................. 21 Fine Arts ................................................................................................................................................................ 22 Art Department ............................................................................................................................................ 22 Music Department ........................................................................................................................................ 24 Foreign Language Department .............................................................................................................................. 27 Mathematics Department ....................................................................................................................................... 31 Physical Education Department ............................................................................................................................. 36 Practical Arts ......................................................................................................................................................... 38 Business Education Department .................................................................................................................. 38 Family and Consumer Sciences Department ............................................................................................... 39 Industrial Technology Department .............................................................................................................. 42 Science Department ............................................................................................................................................... 45 Social Science Department .................................................................................................................................... 49 Theology Department ............................................................................................................................................ 54 Faculty Roster ........................................................................................................................................................ 57

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THE MISSION OF LUTHERAN HIGH SCHOOL SOUTH Lutheran High School South educates for excellence in a Christ-centered environment, preparing youth for leadership in service to the church, the home, and the world.

AN INTRODUCTION TO LUTHERAN HIGH SCHOOL SOUTH The Saint Louis Lutheran community, long accustomed to its own system of quality parochial elementary schools, re-entered the secondary education field in 1946 with the opening of Lutheran High School Central (now Lutheran High School North). The Lutheran High School Association of Saint Louis, with a membership of 64 congregations, currently operates two high schools—Lutheran High School North and Lutheran High School South. Lutheran High School South (LHSS) began in the fall of 1957. During the past fifty years, Lutheran South’s campus has grown to 40 acres and includes 100,000 square feet of classroom and administrative space. The entire building has wireless internet access to support the 1-1 iPad initiative the school recently launched. The athletic facility has grown to include two gymnasiums, six tennis courts, two baseball fields, and two softball fields. The most recent major addition occurred in 2008 with the construction of Lancer Stadium. This includes an all-weather 8-lane track along with the renovation of the football field with synthetic turf and lights. The 57th academic year began at LHSS on Wednesday, August 13, 2014 with 500+ students. The first graduation class was the Class of 1961. Of the 136 graduates of the class of 2014; over 98% are continuing their education at universities, colleges, and junior colleges. The school is blessed with an excellent faculty. More than 70% of the faculty members have their Master's degree, receiving their training in over 30 different colleges and universities. Certification by the State of Missouri is required of all teachers. The average teaching experience is 20+ years. Teachers have a high degree of concern for the growth of each student. The professionally trained staff is sensitive to youth, and faculty and staff personnel assist students in developing and actualizing their capabilities in the classroom, in the co-curricular program and in the world outside of school. Lutheran South offers a diversity of courses in a rigorous academic program, including theology, English, mathematics, social science, science, foreign languages, health and physical education, business education, family and consumer sciences, industrial technology, art, and music. Twenty-eight units of credit, including one-half unit of theology for each year in attendance, are required for graduation. Students take seven subjects each semester in an eight-block scheduling format. One block is set aside as a "Seminar". See page 9 for a more complete explanation of Seminar time. Worship is held daily, with small-group, student-led devotions alternating with all-school worship services. Worship services may take many forms, including drama and singing groups, as well as faculty, student and guest speakers. There are many options for student involvement beyond the classroom. Lutheran South has 19 athletic offerings with 38 teams and 24 other clubs and organizations. More than 60% of students at Lutheran South participate on at least one athletic team, with more than 90% participating in extracurricular activities. Lutheran High School South admits students of any race, color, gender, national and ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the school. It does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, gender, national and ethnic origin in administration of its educational policies, admission policies, scholarship and loan programs, and athletic and other school-administered programs.

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ACCREDITATION Lutheran High School South is fully accredited by the Committee on Accredited Schools and Colleges, University of Missouri, and the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. It employs only teachers fully qualified and licensed by the State of Missouri in their respective fields.

UNIVERSITY ACADEMIC ADMISSION STANDARDS Representative Samples

Truman State University English Mathematics Social Science Science Foreign Languages Fine Art

4 3-4 3 3 2 1

University of Missouri Columbia/Kansas City/ Rolla/Saint Louis 4 4 3 3 2 1

Valparaiso University 4 3 2 2 *2 -

Saint Louis University

Washington University

*4 *4 *3 *3 *2 -

4 *4 *4 *4 *2 -

* The University recommends this number of units. If no asterisk appears, the university insists on that number of units as the minimum standard. One unit represents one full year of study. Mathematics units include Algebra I and beyond. Students must also satisfy all requirements for high school graduation.

LUTHERAN HIGH SCHOOL SOUTH Recommended Academic Plans LHSS Graduation Requirements

State Universities & Other Selective Universities

Highly Selective Universities

Theology English Mathematics Science Social Science Foreign Language PE/Health Practical Art Fine Art Electives

2 4 3 3 3 0 1.5 1 1 9.5

Theology English Mathematics Science Social Science Foreign Language PE/Health Practical Art Fine Art Electives

2 4 3 3 3 2 1.5 1 1 7.5

Theology English Mathematics Science Social Science Foreign Language PE/Health Practical Art Fine Art Electives

2 4 4 4 3-4 3-4 1.5 1 1 2.5 - 4.5

Total Units

28

Total Units

28

Total Units

28

Students seeking admission to highly selective universities should maximize the number of courses at the advanced and AP level. 5


COURSES OFFERED AT LUTHERAN HIGH SCHOOL SOUTH 2014 – 2015 COURSE TITLE

NUMBER

UNITS

YR/SEM

GRADES

½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½

Semester Semester Semester Semester Semester Semester Semester Semester Semester Semester Semester Semester Semester Semester

9

020201 & 020202 020301 & 020302 020401 & 020402 020501 & 020502 000208 021201 & 021202 021401 & 021402 000216 000217 000222 000226 000228 000230 024401 & 024402 024501 & 024502 000246 000252 000253

1 1 1 1 ½ 1 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 1 ½ ½ ½

Year Year Year Year Semester Year Year Semester Semester Semester Semester Semester Semester Year Year Semester Semester Semester

9 9

030501 & 030502 031001 & 031002 031501 & 031502 315A01 & 315A02 032001 & 032002 000324 000326 033001 & 033002 033501 & 033502 033601 & 033602 034001 & 034002 000357 000358 000372 & 000373 000374

1 1 1 1 1 ½ ½ 1 1 1 1 ½ ½ 1 1

Year Year Year Year Year Semester Semester Year Year Year Year Semester Semester Year Semester

9 9 9

THEOLOGY * Theology I * Theology II Apologetics Advanced Old Testament Studies Ethics and Moral Decisions Heritage of the Faith Leadership Neighbors Christian Living Spiritual Battles The Christian in Community Worship and the Arts Introduction to Christianity Relationships

000105 000110 000111 000112 000113 000114 000130 000131 000132 000150 000155 000160 000165 000170

10

9

11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 10 11 11

12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12

ENGLISH * English I English I (Honors) * English II English II (Honors) Adolescent Literature ** English Language & Composition (AP) ** English Language & Literature (AP) ** World Literature: Pre 1850 ** World Literature: Post 1850 Creative Writing Intermediate Composition ** College Prep Writing Advanced Speech Digital Journalism Yearbook United States Literature ** English Literature Pre 1800 ** English Literature Post 1800

10 10 11 12 11 12 11 12 11 12 11 12 11 12 11 12 11 12 11 12 11 12 11 12 11 12 11 12

MATHEMATICS Pre-Algebra Algebra I Formal Geometry Geometry Algebra II with Trigonometry Trigonometry Finite Math Pre-Calculus ** Calculus I (AP) **Calculus II (AP) Algebra II Computer Programming Advanced Computer Programming (AP)

Statistics (AP) Data Analysis

6

10 10 10 10

11 11 11 11 11 11

11 10 11 10 11 11

12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12


COURSES OFFERED AT LUTHERAN HIGH SCHOOL SOUTH 2014 - 2015 COURSE TITLE

NUMBER

UNITS

YR/SEM

GRADES

SOCIAL SCIENCE * Modern World History * Geography * Modern United States History United States History (AP) World History (AP) Economics United States Government Psychology Psychology (AP) Contemporary Issues Civil War ('15-'16) History of Political Thought ('15-'16) U.S. Colonial History ('14-'15) Human Geography (AP) World History: Non-Western ('14-'15)

041001 & 041002 041201 & 041202 041501 & 041502 041601 & 041602 041101 & 041102 000420 000425 000435 000440 000445 000455 000476 000477 000482 000491

1 1 1 1 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½

Year Year Year Year Year Semester Semester Semester Semester Semester Semester Semester Semester Semester Semester

9

SCIENCE Cell Biology Introductory Physics Astronomy Geology Zoology/Botany HEM Biology Chemistry Physics Anatomy and Physiology Biology (AP) Chemistry (AP)

000501 000502 000503 000504 000505 000506 051501 & 051502 052001 & 052002 000540 055001 & 055002 055501 & 055502

½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 1 ½ 1 1

Semester Semester Semester Semester Semester Semester Year Year Semester Year Year

9 9

FOREIGN LANGUAGE German I German II ** German III ** German IV Spanish I Spanish II ** Spanish III ** Spanish IV French I French II ** French III ** French IV Chinese I Chinese II Italian I Italian II

060101 & 060102 060201 & 060202 060301 & 060302 060401 & 060402 061101 & 061102 061201 & 061202 061301 & 061302 061401 & 061402 062101 & 062102 062201 & 062202 062301 & 062302 062401 & 062402 065101 & 065102 065201 & 065202 064101 & 064102 064201 & 064202

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Year Year Year Year Year Year Year Year Year Year Year Year Year Year Year Year

9

7

10

9

9

9 9

10 10 10 10 10 10 10

11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11

12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12

11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11

12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12

10 11 12 10 11 12 10 11 12 11 12 10 11 12 10 11 12 10 11 12 11 12 10 11 12 10 11 12 10 11 12 11 12 10 11 12 10 11 12 10 11 12 10 11 12


COURSES OFFERED AT LUTHERAN HIGH SCHOOL SOUTH 2014-2015 COURSE TITLE

NUMBER

UNITS

YR/SEM

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION * Health 000705 * Girls Physical Education 000710 * Boys Physical Education 000711 Varsity Physical Education 000712 Body Dynamics 000715 * Junior-Senior Physical Education 000730

½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½

Semester Semester Semester Semester Semester Semester

9 9 9

PRACTICAL ARTS Business Education Computer Applications Business Communications Introduction to Business Accounting Business & Personal Law

000802 000803 000804 080701 & 080702 000810

½ ½ ½ 1 ½

Semester Semester Semester Year Semester

9 9

10 11 12 10 11 12 10 11 12 11 12 11 12

Family and Consumer Sciences Foods and Child Development Clothing and Interior Design Foods and Nutrition Gourmet Foods Clothing II Parenting and Child Development Clothing III Relationships Interior Design Consumer Decisions Fashion Merchandising

000840 000841 000842 000843 000844 000845 000846 000170 000850 000855 000860

½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½

Semester Semester Semester Semester Semester Semester Semester Semester Semester Semester Semester

9 9

10 10 10 10 10 10

11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 10 11 11 10 11

12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12

Industrial Technology Drafting Technology Machine Design Architectural Drawing Material Technology Mechanical Technology Woodworking Automation Technology Pre-Engineering

088001 & 088002 088201 & 088202 088401 & 088402 000885 000887 000888 000890 000891

1 1 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½

Year Year Year Semester Semester Semester Semester Semester

9

10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10

12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12

FINE ARTS Visual Art Art I(a) Art I(b) Art II Art History (AP) Ceramics Sculpture Advanced Drawing

000901 000902 090501 & 090502 000921 000915 000917 000920

½ ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ ½

Semester Semester Year Semester Semester Semester Semester

9 9

Dramatics Dramatics

000930

½

Semester

8

GRADES

10 10 11 12 11 12 11 12

9 9

11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11

10 11 12 10 11 12 10 11 12 11 12 10 11 12 10 11 12 10 11 12 11 12


COURSES OFFERED AT LUTHERAN HIGH SCHOOL SOUTH 2014-2015 COURSE TITLE

NUMBER

UNITS

YR/SEM

GRADES

Vocal Music Mixed Chorus/Women Mixed Chorus/Men Concert Choir Lancer Singers Role & Importance of Music – A Role & Importance of Music – B

095201 & 095202 095301 & 095302 095401 & 095402 096001 & 096002 000940 000941

1 1 1 1 ½ ½

Year Year Year Year Semester Semester

9 9

10 10 10 10 10 10

Instrumental Music Concert Band Wind Symphony Jazz Band

095601 & 095602 095701 & 095702 000959

1 1

Year Year Year

9 9 9

10 11 12 10 11 12 10 11 12

¼

11 11 11 11 11 11

12 12 12 12 12 12

BLOCK SCHEDULING Lutheran South operates on a block schedule with four 90-minute blocks on A days and four 90-minute blocks on B days. A days and B days alternate consecutively throughout the school year. On A days, students are enrolled in four courses. On B days, they are enrolled in three additional courses, with the fourth block being Seminar.

SEMINAR Seminar is a specially-designed study period at Lutheran South, structured to help students assume individual responsibility for completing their homework, consulting with their teachers, and working with other students. During the first 20 minutes of Seminar, students remain in their Seminar room for silent reading time, after which they complete a planning sheet which allows them see a teacher, make up a test, work with other students on a group project, use a computer, or see a Guidance counselor. The Seminar period is an important component of the college-preparatory program offered at Lutheran South.

SPECIAL EDUCATION These services are available to students who have a diagnosed learning deficit. The school employs two special education teachers who, working with the students, parents, and classroom teachers, develop an I.E.P. (Individualized Educational Program) with each student. The goal is to equip these students to be successful in a “mainstream” academic setting by utilizing appropriate available interventions and to enable them to avail themselves of similar interventions at the college level. Special education services are limited to 10% of each incoming class.

..................................................................................................................................................................................................... * = Required course ** = Saint Louis University credit available

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ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS The academic program at Lutheran High School South is regarded as a full-time, four-year endeavor and all students are expected to carry a full academic load of 3.5 units for each of 8 semesters. Graduation requirements include 0.5 units in Theology for each year in attendance, plus a total of 4 units in English, 3 units in Social Science, 1.5 units in Health/Physical Education, 3 units in Science, 3 units in Mathematics, 1 unit in Fine Arts, 1 unit in Practical Arts, a cumulative GPA of at least 1.000, and the complete payment of all financial obligations. Students will normally graduate with 28 units of credit; but, under certain unusual or severe circumstances beyond the student’s control, special administrative approval will permit 27 units to satisfy the graduation requirement. STUDENTS FAILING A COURSE MUST MAKE UP THE LOST CREDIT OUTSIDE THE REGULAR SCHOOL DAY. ANY SENIOR STUDENT WHO RECEIVES AN "F" SEMESTER GRADE MUST HAVE SPECIAL ADMINISTRATIVE APPROVAL IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THE BACCALAUREATE AND COMMENCEMENT CEREMONIES.

CLASS CHANGES Changes in class schedule must be discussed with the student's counselor. No changes will be permitted after the sixth school day of the semester. Students will be charged a $20 fee for schedule changes made at the request of the student.

GUIDANCE SERVICES Guidance service is provided to assist the students in understanding themselves, in choosing a balanced program of studies and in selecting the courses required for certain vocations or for college entrance. Discussion with a teacher or a counselor will help students solve many problems that may confront them during these years of high school life. Students should make use of the guidance service just as they do the library or co-curricular program. Each student should feel free to consult the counselors or teachers at any time. Students should expect to be interviewed by the counselors at least once a year during their high school years.

HOMEWORK Some time for supervised study may be provided in most classes each day. The teachers and the administration of Lutheran South stand ready to discuss home study problems at any time. Effective Christian stewardship of Godgiven time and talents is the school's goal. Few students can maintain satisfactory work in the major subjects unless they acquire the habit of systematic home study. Home study includes not only completing assignments, but it also entails review and additional study of previously learned material.

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REPORT CARDS AND LETTER GRADES The school year is divided into two semesters of two grading periods each. Report cards are issued at the end of each grading period (approximately every nine weeks) and are reports of student progress to both student and parent. Report cards are to be examined and evaluated by the parent with the student. Grades and grade quality points are described below. In courses where college credit is available, (AP & 1818) one point is added to each of the GPA Values given below. These numbers are used in calculating the student’s weighted GPA. Students will receive a maximum of 16 weighted GPA courses during their time at Lutheran South.

Superior achievement {good work habits, commendable conduct} A 4.0 A3.7 Above average achievement {good work habits, commendable conduct} B+ 3.3 B 3.0 B2.7 Average achievement {satisfactory work habits, satisfactory conduct} C+ 2.3 C 2.0 C1.7 Below average achievement {unsatisfactory work habits and/or conduct} D+ 1.3 D 1.0 D0.7 Failing achievement {unsatisfactory work habits, and/or poor conduct} F

0.0

Low achievement but satisfactory for ability {satisfactory work habits and conduct} This grade is not calculated into the GPA, so it does not increase or decrease the GPA. S

Not included in GPA

Achievement at least two grades below student's potential but passing {unsatisfactory work habits and/or unsatisfactory conduct}This grade earns credit but no grade point. X

0.0

Incomplete Work - The designation "I" is assigned when sickness or other legitimate cause beyond the control of the student results in ABSENCE and prevents the completion of major course work. In such cases, a reasonable time extension, usually equal to the number of days of absence, will be allowed. IF THE REQUIREMENTS ARE NOT MET, THE PARENTS AND THE STUDENT WILL BE INFORMED AND THE "I" WILL BE CHANGED TO "F." All grades are passing except "F." No credit is given for a semester "F" grade. STUDENTS FAILING A COURSE MUST MAKE UP THE LOST CREDIT OUTSIDE THE REGULAR SCHOOL DAY.

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GRADING STANDARDS A grade at Lutheran High School South is a professional judgment by a teacher of a student's progress and represents an evaluation of three factors: 1. ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT - This means satisfactorily completing assignments, passing tests, and participating in class discussion or activities. 2. WORK HABITS - This means appropriately using assigned study time, bringing required text and necessary working tools to class, keeping work well organized, paying attention to instruction by teacher or presentations by classmates, doing independent work, spending sufficient time on home assignments, and completing assignments on time. 3. CONDUCT OR CLASSROOM RELATIONS - This means taking one’s assigned place immediately after arrival in classroom, not interrupting classroom routine by misbehavior, and showing courtesy and respect for the teacher and classmates.

TRANSCRIPTS OF ACADEMIC WORK Only semester grades are permanently recorded on the transcript. All the other grades are indicators of the student's progress for a grading period or for a final examination. To request a transcript use the forms and envelopes provided in the office. The person requesting the transcript is to address and stamp the envelope.

SAVED TO SERVE Christ's work of salvation is the most important thing ever done for His people. Our response to that saving work is shown by a life of gratitude to Him and service to others. •

All freshman and sophomore students will complete 20 hours of service per year. All junior and senior students will complete 30 hours of service per year. Some of this will occur during school-wide service activities.

Additional service hours for the year may be completed at one location or in several locations. The student will be responsible for keeping track of the hours completed.

Hours may be completed wherever help is needed—in neighborhoods, in church, in community agencies— wherever help is needed. Service work done in the summer will also qualify.

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ACADEMIC HONORS HONOR ROLL Honor Roll is established each semester using the weighted grade point average for that semester's work according to the scale below: Academic Honors with Highest Distinction Academic Honors with High Distinction Academic Honors with Distinction Academic Honors

4.000 + 3.800 3.600 3.200 -

3.999 3.799 3.599

Lutheran South presents the Academic Letter to sophomore students and beyond who attain a semester GPA of at least 3.600. The Honor Roll is printed in the Parents’ Newsletter, is mailed to our area churches and feeder schools, and is posted on the Academic Honors Wall in the school Commons.

NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY The Lancer Chapter of the National Honor Society was organized in 1968. Membership is limited to juniors and seniors and is based upon scholarship, service, leadership, and character. Students who have at least a 3.2 unweighted GPA are asked to complete a form, which provides information in the areas of service, leadership, and character both in school and in the community. This information along with the academic record, is used by the faculty to elect students. The Lancer Chapter is affiliated with the National Honor Society of Secondary Schools. The purpose of this chapter is to create an enthusiasm for scholarship, to stimulate a desire to render service, to promote worthy leadership, and to encourage a development of character in all students of Lutheran High School South.

SABRE HONOR SOCIETY An honor key and lifetime membership in the Sabre Honor Society will be presented upon graduation to the Senior class students who have a weighted 3.5 average or above for the total time they have attended high school.

VALEDICTORIAN Selection as valedictorian is the highest academic honor that is bestowed on a graduating senior. The valedictorian will maintain the maximum academic load of regular classes and will rank first in the graduating class based on the weighted grade point average (GPA) over the full eight semesters of high school work. SENIOR CLASS SPEAKER The graduating class will be represented by a student speaker at the graduation ceremony. A panel of faculty members and senior class students will audition candidates who are nominated by their classmates or who nominate themselves for this honor. The senior class speaker may or may not be the valedictorian.

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ENGLISH DEPARTMENT ENGLISH I 020201 & 020202 PREREQUISITES:

FULL YEAR GRADE: 9

None

English I is designed to introduce the freshman students to the communication processes involving reading, writing, listening and speaking and to develop a basic competency in using them. Writing is creative and expository. Literature includes novels, short stories, and poetry. Drama is presented both as a performing medium and as a medium to be read and analyzed. SPECIAL MATERIALS: HONORS ENGLISH I 020301 & 020302 PREREQUISITES:

Students may be required to buy one or more paperback novels.

Explore Test Score and/or recommendation from English I teacher

FULL YEAR GRADE: 9

Honors English I is based on the regular English I curriculum but also includes enrichment activities plus additional literature. The goals of the class are to challenge the students while at the same time continuing to develop their enjoyment of literature and language. In addition to the study of short stories, poetry and novels, students will have more opportunities for writing. Among the major works studied are To Kill a Mockingbird, The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet and Lord of the Flies. SPECIAL MATERIALS: ENGLISH II 020401 & 020402 PREREQUISITES:

None

FULL YEAR GRADE: 10

English I

English II is an extension of English I in which the student will continue to develop skills in the communication processes. Emphasis is placed on reading, writing, and listening. Literature includes novels, dramas, short stories, poetry, and non-fiction. Expository writing is emphasized in a five-paragraph essay form. An introduction to public speaking is included. SPECIAL MATERIALS: HONORS ENGLISH II 020501 & 020502 PREREQUISITES:

Students may be required to buy one or more paperback novels.

Honors English I and/or recommendation from English I teacher

FULL YEAR GRADE: 10

Honors English II is designed to enhance the learning experiences of academically talented students. Based on the curriculum for the regular English II class, Honors English II will offer additional American literature and more formal writing assignments. Among the major works studied is The Crucible, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, O Pioneers! The Great Gatsby, and The Old Man and the Sea. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

None

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ADOLESCENT LITERATURE 000208 PREREQUISITES: English I, II Department approval

SEMESTER GRADES: 11, 12

The class will focus on novels, which examine the adolescent character and experience, emphasizing the dominant theme of the "innocent becoming experienced." Anyone choosing this course should plan to read extensively, think about and discuss what was read, and be prepared to write papers. Novels read will include both modern and classic. This is not a course recommended for students on the college preparatory track. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

Students may have to purchase some of the novels required for the course. Cost per student will vary.

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION: ADVANCED PLACEMENT 021201 & 021202 PREREQUISITES: Honors English I and II and/or Department Approval

FULL YEAR GRADE: 11

This course will help prepare the student for the College Board’s Advanced Placement Examination for Language and Composition. The curriculum is similar to a freshmen level college course. Students will write eight to ten expository compositions and a research paper within a disciplined process. Challenging literary selections will be analyzed, including short fiction, novels, poetry, drama, and non-fiction essays. Skills will be developed to think and write critically. Grammar will focus on strengthening the foundations of vocabulary and sentence structure. Extensive in-class writing is required in addition to compositions written outside of class. This course may also be taken for three semester hours of college credit. NOTE: Saint Louis University requires that college credit must be earned in this class BEFORE college credit may be earned in any other English elective. SPECIAL MATERIALS: school.

Students may be asked to purchase novels in addition to those supplied by the

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE: ADVANCED PLACEMENT 021401 & 021402 PREREQUISITES: Honors English I and II and English Language and Composition

FULL YEAR GRADE: 12

This is an Advanced Placement course designed to prepare students for the Advanced Placement Literature exam. It follows the basic curriculum for English Literature I and II with various modifications including more intensive writing experiences. Various genres are used to demonstrate the growth in styles and thought in British literature from Beowulf to the present. A good portion of class time will be spent on discussion and analysis of the various authors and their works covered in class. Poetry, drama, fiction and non fiction will be used in this course. This course may also be taken for three semester hours of college credit. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

Students may be required to buy one or more paperback novels, and a journal will be needed for class.

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WORLD LITERATURE CLASSICS: PRE 1850 000216 PREREQUISITES: English I, II

SEMESTER GRADES: 11, 12

This course will survey world literature from the Classical Age through the Romantic Period. Emphasis will be given to the author's structure, creativity, and technique in creating some of the world's outstanding literature. The course will deal with many different genres -- drama, short story, poetry and novels -- and will include such writers as Shakespeare, Goethe and Chaucer. Students who elect to take this course should plan to read extensively and be prepared to discuss and write papers on what is read and studied in class. Qualified juniors and seniors approved by the English Department may take this course for college credit. Three semester hours of college credit will be granted by Saint Louis University upon successful completion of this course. To enroll for college credit, a student must have a 3.0 or higher overall GPA, a 3.0 or higher overall GPA in English courses, and have earned college credit for College Prep Writing. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

None

WORLD LITERATURE CLASSICS: POST 1850 000217 PREREQUISITES: English I, II

SEMESTER GRADES: 11, 12

This course will survey world literature from 1850 through contemporary literature. Emphasis will be given to an author's structure, style, and influence on modern world literature. The course will deal with various genres— drama, short story, poetry and the novel—and will include works by Eliot, Ibsen, Chekhov and Shaw. Students who elect to take this course should plan to read extensively and be prepared to discuss and write papers on what is read and studied in class. Qualified juniors and seniors approved by the English Department may take this course for college credit. Three semester hours of college credit will be granted by Saint Louis University upon successful completion of this course. To enroll for college credit, a student must have a 3.0 or higher overall GPA, a 3.0 or higher GPA in English courses and have earned college credit for College Prep Writing. SPECIAL MATERIALS: CREATIVE WRITING 000222 PREREQUISITES:

Students may be asked to purchase other materials for class.

SEMESTER English I, II GRADES: 11, 12 One writing and one literature class beyond Sophomore English Department Approval

This course offers the student an opportunity to learn some of the techniques involved in creative seeing and creative writing. A variety of forms—short story, poetry and drama—will be written. Emphasis will be on the students' experimenting and expressing their own creative vision. Note: Students should limit writing electives to one per semester.

SPECIAL MATERIALS:

None

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INTERMEDIATE COMPOSITION 000226 PREREQUISITES: English I, II

SEMESTER GRADES: 11, 12

This semester course for juniors and seniors involves writing an average of 500 words each week. Beginning with topic sentence construction, it evolves sequentially, culminating in five-paragraph, 500-600 word developed essays. The student should come prepared to write a paragraph (or its equivalent) daily, to keep an organized notebook, and to complete assignments within the allotted time frames. A large proportion of class time is devoted to independent, teacher-assisted work. The finished products are judged according to ideas, organization, mechanics, and appearance. This elective can be used as preparation for College Prep Writing or it can be utilized solely for its own merits to improve written expression in other classes. Note: Students should limit writing electives to one per semester.

SPECIAL MATERIALS:

None

COLLEGE PREP WRITING 000228 PREREQUISITES: English I, II

SEMESTER GRADES: 11, 12

This course will prepare the student for the writing assignments most commonly experienced in college. Emphasis will be an expository writing (the type required in most freshman composition courses), but some narrative writing will also be done. The research paper and literature analysis will be taught. This course is highly recommended for all college-bound students. Juniors may take the course only with special approval of the English Department. Juniors are encouraged to take Intermediate composition prior to enrolling in College Prep Writing. Qualified juniors and seniors approved by the English Department may take this course for college credit. Three semester hours of college credit will be granted by Saint Louis University upon successful completion of this course by those enrolled. Note:

Saint Louis University requires that college credit must be earned in this class before college credit can be obtained in any other English elective.

To enroll for college credit, a student must have a 3.0 or higher overall GPA, and a 3.0 or higher GPA in English courses. Students wishing to take the Advanced Placement English Language and Composition test should give strong consideration to taking College Prep Writing during the first semester. Note:

Students should limit writing electives to one per semester.

SPECIAL MATERIALS:

None

ADVANCED SPEECH 000230 PREREQUISITES:

English I, II

SEMESTER GRADES: 11, 12

The course is designed for the serious student of public speaking. In addition to presenting numerous types of speeches (persuasive, informative, entertaining, etc.), the students will read, listen to, and examine famous speeches from history, and students will be called upon for oral and written criticism and self-evaluation. Please note some colleges and universities will not allow this course for English credit. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

None

DIGITAL JOURNALISM 17


024401 & 024402 PREREQUISITES:

FULL YEAR GRADES: 11, 12

English I, II Department approval

Journalism is designed to familiarize the student with the skills involved in concise, clear writing and adapting writing to a given audience. The digital component of the course will teach students to apply traditional writing skills to the digital world. Students will learn how to integrate text, images, sound, and video into a compelling and relevant medium. Students will also learn about the history and ethics involved in modern journalism. Students will work in and out of class to regularly produce and maintain the new online “Troubadour.” Students will have the option to take this class for either the fall semester or the entire school year. Please note that some colleges and universities will not allow this course for credit in English. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

None

YEARBOOK PRODUCTION 024501 & 024502 PREREQUISITES: English I, II Department approval

FULL YEAR GRADES: 11, 12

This class will produce “THE LANCE.” Students wishing to take the course should confer with the instructor before signing up. Students adept in design, arts, and copy are encouraged to consider this class. Copyrighting, layout, photography, as well as all other aspects of yearbook journalism, will be treated. Please note that some colleges and universities will not allow this course for credit in English. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

None

UNITED STATES LITERATURE 000246 PREREQUISITES: English I, II

SEMESTER GRADES: 11, 12

The course is designed to give students an understanding of the development of literature in the United States. This is a course a student will find valuable for college-level work. Stories, biographies, essays, poetry and novels will be read and discussed. These will show the growth of literary thought in the United States, while at the same time emphasizing consistent themes in our literature. Some work will be completed independently by the student, and essays will be written on various topics relating to the readings in class. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

None

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ENGLISH LITERATURE Pre 1800 000252 PREREQUISITES: English I, II

SEMESTER GRADES: 11, 12

This course is designed to give students an understanding of and background in the development of English literature through the 18th Century. Different genre will be studied in their historical context to examine the growth of thought and language in the English tradition. Poetry, short stories, novels and non-fiction will be covered in the class. A good portion of class time will be spent in discussion and analysis of the various authors and their works. Various independent projects, both essay and analysis-oriented, will be expected of the students. Qualified juniors and seniors selected by the English Department may take this course for college credit. Three semester hours of college credit will be granted by Saint Louis University upon successful completion of this course. Prior to enrollment for college credit, a student must have a 3.0 or higher overall GPA, a 3.0 or higher GPA in English courses, and have earned college credit for College Prep Writing and World Literature Classics: Pre 1850 OR World Literature Classics: Post 1850. Note:

It is suggested that if the student wishes to take the AP English Language and Literature Test, they take both English Literature I and English Literature II.

SPECIAL MATERIALS:

None

ENGLISH LITERATURE Post 1800 000253 PREREQUISITES: English I, II

SEMESTER GRADES: 11, 12

This course is designed to give students an understanding of and background in the development of English literature from the Romantic Period to the present. Poetry, novels, plays and short stories will be studied in their historical context to develop an appreciation of literature and language. A good portion of class time will be spent in discussion and analysis of the various authors and their works. Independent projects, both essay and analysisoriented, will be expected of the students. Qualified juniors and seniors approved by the English Department may take this course for college credit. Three semester hours of college credit will be granted by Saint Louis University upon successful completion of this course. Prior to enrollment for college credit, a student must have a 3.0 or higher overall GPA, a 3.0 or higher GPA in English courses, and have earned college credit for College Prep Writing and World Literature Classics: Pre 1850 OR World Literature Classics: Post 1850. Note:

It is suggested that students wishing to take the AP English Language and Literature Test take both English Literature I and English Literature II.

SPECIAL MATERIALS:

Several books may have to be purchased for the class.

19


Guide to Electives The following explanations apply to the labels used below: COLLEGE PREP: Concentrated, persistent emphasis on analytical reading and disciplined thinking and expository writing to prepare for college needs. DIVERSIFIED: Basic, essential emphasis on reading, writing and thinking skills, but these requirements are not as concentrated as those in the College Prep electives. Requirements are structured to average abilities, to a wider range of skills and talents than the requirements in college-prep electives. PERFORMING: Basic, essential emphasis on reading, writing and thinking skills, but more attention is given to oral activities and to performance requirements in class. COLLEGE PREP ELECTIVES Intermediate Composition College Prep Writing English Literature I English Literature II World Lit to 1850 World Lit 1850 to Present United States Literature

DIVERSIFIED ELECTIVES Adolescent Literature Creative Writing Individualized Reading

PERFORMING ELECTIVES Advanced Speech Digital Journalism Drama Yearbook

Note: College Prep Writing is designed for seniors. Juniors desiring college credit may enroll with the consent of the department chairman, assuming they meet established criteria. Every elective has basic reading and writing requirements. Students may take more than four semesters of electives when their schedules allow and when their counselor advises such. Students should enroll in the elective only once; no academic credit will be granted for repeating an elective. (Digital Journalism and Yearbook exceptions are noted below.) All students are required to take one unit (two semester electives) of English beyond the sophomore year. Colleges and universities require two units (four semester electives) beyond the sophomore year. The English Department suggests the following guide for choosing units beyond the sophomore year:

A. Take at least two courses which offer college-accepted Writing credit. One of these courses should be Intermediate Composition or College Prep writing. (Check with your counselor and/or college so you know which electives offer college-accepted writing credit.) College and universities urge students to take as many writing courses as they can. B. Take at least two of any of the following literature courses: Adolescent Literature; English Literature I: English Literature II; World Literature to 1850; World Literature 1850-Present; United States Literature. C. Take one writing-credit course each semester so you have a consistent opportunity to develop writing skills. (Note that writing-credit courses include both literature courses and composition courses.) D. Ideally, students should take a literature course and a composition course each year. E. The honors program is comprised of English Honors I, English Honors II, English Language and Composition AP, and English Language and Literature AP. Admission to the honors program is based on test scores, faculty recommendation, and academic performance.

20


YEARBOOK/DIGITAL JOURNALISM POLICY YEARBOOK: 1. 2. 3. 4.

Yearbook is a two-semester course. Final enrollment in yearbook will be determined by the English Department; some who register will not be in the course due to limited enrollment. Yearbook is primarily an elective. Juniors are encouraged to sign up, because a small number will be allowed to take the course. Yearbook can be taken only once FOR CREDIT by juniors or seniors. EXCEPTION: Juniors who have taken Yearbook will be allowed to take the elective as seniors FOR CREDIT if the department selects them for leadership positions on the staff of the next school year's yearbook and the administration approves.

DIGITAL JOURNALISM: 1. 2. 3.

Final enrollment in Digital Journalism will be determined by the English Department; some who register will not be in the course due to limited enrollment. The English Department recommends that students who choose to take only one semester of digital journalism do so the first semester. A limited number of people will be allowed to take four semesters of Digital Journalism for credit. These students will be chosen by the department for leadership positions on the following year's staff.

21


FINE ARTS ENGLISH DEPARTMENT DRAMATICS 000930 PREREQUISITES:

SEMESTER GRADES: 11, 12

English I, II

This course will introduce the student to the various dramatic arts. The class will concentrate on basic acting, improvisation, pantomime, stage movement, and oral interpretation. Students will perform various scenes from dramatic literature. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

None

ART DEPARTMENT

ART I(a) INTRODUCTION TO DRAWING 000901 PREREQUISITES: None

SEMESTER GRADES: 9, 10, 11, 12

Art I(a) is a fundamentals class that deals primarily with the development of specific drawing skills and techniques. While this class was designed with the beginner in mind, the advanced student will also find new challenges and areas of interest. Art I(a), in addition to Art I(b), is a prerequisite for Art II, Advanced Drawing, Ceramics, and Sculpture. Although it is strongly suggested that Art I(a) and Art I(b) be sequenced, it is not an absolute requirement. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

A $15 lab fee will be charged to help cover the cost of the materials provided throughout the course.

ART I(b) INTRODUCTION TO CERAMICS AND COLOR APPLICATION 000902 PREREQUISITES: Art I(a) preferred

SEMESTER GRADES: 9, 10, 11, 12

Art I(b) is a fundamentals class that deals primarily with the basic manipulation of clay and pottery, color and paint. Here students will discover many new skills that are usually not covered in pre-secondary art education programs. Art I(b) is a prerequisite for Art II, Advanced Drawing, Ceramics, and Sculpture. It is strongly suggested that Art I(a) should precede Art I(b). If scheduling does not permit this, however, Art I(a) and Art I(b) may be taken in reverse order. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

A $15 lab fee will be charged to help cover the cost of the materials provided throughout the course.

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ART II – TWO DIMENSIONAL DESIGN AND PAINTING 090501 & 090502 PREREQUISITES: Art I(a) and Art I(b)

FULL YEAR GRADES: 10, 11, 12

Art II is an advanced course that provides a strong emphasis in the areas of two-dimensional design, painting and computer graphics. This course seeks to increase artistic ability through the creative manipulation of the elements and principles of art. Here students will also receive a detailed series of tutorials on how to handle various artistic mediums and subject matter, including photography, comics, and animation. It is strongly suggested that Art II be taken for an entire year. However, if scheduling does not permit this, the course may be divided in a way that best serves the student’s particular needs. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

ART HISTORY (AP) 000914 PREREQUISITES:

A $15 lab fee will be charged each semester to help cover the cost of the materials provided throughout the course.

SEMESTER GRADES: 11, 12

None

Art History is a survey course that focuses on the scope and sequence of Western art history; prehistoric to present. This course, while employing a strong focus on art and art production, is truly interdisciplinary in that it also includes to some degree the realms of history, sociology, and geography. During the semester students will be expected to visit local art museums, research and report on special topics, and contribute to in-class discussions. It should also be mentioned that this is not a production-based art class. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

None

CERAMICS 000915 PREREQUISITES:

Art I(a) and Art I(b)

SEMESTER GRADES: 10, 11, 12

Ceramics is an advanced class that deals exclusively with the production of art pottery and greatly expands on the information learned in Art I(b). Here students will receive a better understanding of advanced ceramic techniques ranging from Native American craft to the Japanese art of Raku and everything in between. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

SCULPTURE 000917 PREREQUISITES:

A $20 lab fee will be charged to help cover the cost of the materials provided throughout the course.

SEMESTER GRADES: 10, 11, 12

Art I(a) and Art I(b)

Sculpture is an advanced course that provides students with an opportunity to experiment and work through exercises dealing with three-dimensional design. Mediums include clay, plaster, paper, and found objects. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

A $20 lab fee will be charged to help cover the cost of materials used throughout the semester.

23


ADVANCED DRAWING 000920 PREREQUISITES:

SEMESTER GRADES: 10, 11, 12 Art I(a) and Art I(b)

Advanced Drawing is a challenging course that is designed for serious art students who wish to further their drawing abilities beyond the basics. Here students will learn how to employ new drawing techniques and mediums, how to think and produce work in a way that is truly creative, and experience artistic freedom on a new and broader scale. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

A $15 lab fee will be charged to help cover the cost of materials used throughout the semester.

MUSIC DEPARTMENT The Role and Importance of Music in our Lives, Part A 000940 PREREQUISITES: None

SEMESTER GRADES: 10, 11, 12

This is the first semester of a two-semester fine arts music class. This course explores the sociological and personal impact of music in our lives as experienced in a variety of styles. This course requires reading, listening, discussion, class presentations, research, tests, and a willingness to learn more about music. This is NOT a performing ensemble. Enrollment is open to sophomores through seniors. It is recommended but not required to take “Part A” before “Part B”. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

None

The Role and Importance of Music in our Lives, Part B 000941 PREREQUISITES: None

SEMESTER GRADES: 10, 11, 12

This is the second semester of a two-semester fine arts music class. This course explores the sociological and personal impact of music in our lives as experienced in a variety of styles. This course requires reading, listening, discussion, class presentations, research, tests, and a willingness to learn more about music. This is NOT a performing ensemble. Enrollment is open to sophomores through seniors. It is recommended but not required to take “Part A” before “Part B”. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

None

MIXED CHORUS/WOMEN 095201 & 095202 PREREQUISITES: Students must be approved by the director.

FULL YEAR GRADES: 9 10, 11, 12

Mixed Chorus is a performing choral group for those students interested in singing and improving their musicianship skills. This is a beginning-level course, open to all students. Included is a study of the fundamentals of music, music appreciation, sight-singing, and development of the singing voice. Attendance at four concerts is required. Students may need to purchase some items. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

None

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MIXED CHORUS/MEN 095301 & 095302 PREREQUISITES:

Students must be approved by the director.

FULL YEAR GRADES: 9, 10, 11, 12

Mixed Chorus is a performing choral group for those students interested in singing for enjoyment and improving their musicianship skills. This is a beginning-level course, open to all students. Included is a study of the fundamentals of music, music appreciation, sight-singing, and development of the singing voice. Attendance at four concerts is required. Students may need to purchase some items. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

None

CONCERT CHOIR 095401 & 095402 PREREQUISITES:

Students must pass an audition.

FULL YEAR GRADES: 10, 11, 12

Concert Choir is a performing, upper-level choral class. The emphasis is on developing musicianship, sightsinging, and vocal skills. Performance is required at four major concerts, as well as at occasional Sunday worship services and civic events. All students are expected to participate in the Spring Tour. Additional opportunities for individual growth include District Choir, Solo/Ensemble, and the ABC Festival. Students are encouraged to audition for Saint Louis Metro All-District Choir and to participate in the MSHSA District Solo and Ensemble Festival. Students may be required to purchase some items for their uniform. SPECIAL MATERIALS: CONCERT BAND 095601 & 095602 PREREQUISITES:

Additional fees vary by activity.

Previous experience playing a band instrument

FULL YEAR GRADES: 9, 10, 11, 12

Participation in the Concert Band is open to students with previous experience in instrumental music. This organization develops ensemble and individual musicianship through preparation of selections from the literature of the modern symphonic band. No audition is required. This is a full year class. You may not register for only one semester of Concert Band without permission from the instructor. Performance Expectations: Spring Concert.

SPECIAL MATERIALS:

Pep Band for some home football and basketball games, Advent Concert, Winter Concert,

Some instruments will require special equipment.

25


WIND SYMPHONY 095701 & 095702 PREREQUISITES:

FULL YEAR GRADES: 9, 10, 11, 12

Students must pass an audition

Participation in Wind Symphony is open to students in instrumental music who have shown a desire and commitment to excel in making music. Students in Wind Symphony are encouraged to study privately and to audition for honors bands. This organization is designed to develop ensemble and individual musicianship through studying and performing the highest quality selections from the modern symphonic band and wind ensemble literature. This is a full year class. You may not register for only one semester of Wind Symphony without permission from the instructor. Performance Expectations: Pep Band for some home football and basketball games, Advent Concert, Spring Tour, Spring Concert, Sunday church services, chapel services.

SPECIAL MATERIALS:

Some instruments will require special equipment.

JAZZ BAND 095901 & 095902 PREREQUISITES:

Students must pass an audition

FULL YEAR - Before School GRADES: 9, 10, 11, 12

Participation in Jazz Band is open to students in instrumental music who have shown a desire and commitment to a more in-depth study of jazz music and its performance. Students will have the opportunity to play big band music and learn the basics of improvisation and jazz history. Trumpets, trombones, saxes, and drummers in Jazz Band are expected to also participate in Concert Band or Wind Symphony. Performance Opportunities: Advent Concert, Winter Concert, Spring Tour, Spring Concert, home basketball games, grade school tour days.

LANCER SINGERS 096001 & 096002 PREREQUISITES:

Students must pass an audition

FULL YEAR GRADES: 10, 11, 12

Lancer Singers is an advanced, performing choral class for a select group of singers—men and women as available. The emphasis is upon developing their musicianship, ear training, sight-singing, and vocal skills to sing challenging music. In addition to performing at four major concerts, at occasional Sunday worship services, and on choir tour, this group is frequently invited to sing for a variety of community events. All students are expected to participate in the Spring Tour. Students in this class are encouraged to audition for Saint Louis Metro All-District Choir (Fall) and to participate in the ABC Solo/Festival and/or MSHSAA District Solo and Ensemble Festival (Spring). Students may need to purchase some items for a uniform. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

Additional fees vary by activity.

26


FOREIGN LANGUAGE DEPARTMENT GERMAN I 060101 & 060102 PREREQUISITES:

FULL YEAR GRADES: 9, 10, 11, 12

None

The course introduces students to the basic structure and vocabulary of the German Language. The textbook is the first of a two-year series and encourages students to become actively involved with the learning and the use of German. The vocabulary presented is roughly 800 words, and the text is proficiency-based. Cultural topics and situations are introduced with special emphasis on the land, people, German customs and traditions. If students begin taking German as a freshman, they have the opportunity to receive 9 hours of college credit from Saint Louis University’s 1818 program when they successfully complete German III and German IV. (See German III & German IV) SPECIAL MATERIALS:

Student workbook, at approximately $20.

GERMAN II 060201 & 060202 PREREQUISITES:

German I

FULL YEAR GRADES: 10, 11, 12

The second year of German continues and reinforces the pattern of the first-year program. A stronger emphasis is placed on grammar, writing, oral comprehension and reading skills. DVD’s, special mini-units and Foreign Language Week highlight the course and will bring students to a better understanding of the German people and their culture. SPECIAL MATERIALS: GERMAN III 060301 & 060302 PREREQUISITES:

Student workbook, at approximately $20.

German II (B- or above is advised)

FULL YEAR GRADES: 11, 12

The text for the third year course is Schaum's German Grammar. The third year is taught as an intensive, intermediate language course. The course is proficiency-based and communicative-skills-oriented; and it reviews, reinforces, and expands the vocabulary, structure and cultural content of the previous two years. To supplement the text, various mini-units will be included. This class may be taken for college credit using the Saint Louis University 1818 program. (3 hours of college credit for the year.) Depending on enrollment, this class may be taught in tandem with German IV or it may be offered on an individual basis. SPECIAL MATERIALS: GERMAN IV 060401 & 060402 PREREQUISITES:

Student workbook, at approximately $20.

German III (B- or above is advised)

FULL YEAR GRADES: 12

The German IV course continues the intensive study of the German language, along with an emphasis on German literature and culture. The target language will mainly be used in the classroom. Students will be encouraged to use their knowledge of the language both orally and in a written format. This course may be taken for college credit using the Saint Louis University 1818 program. (3 hours of college credit each semester.) Depending on enrollment, this class may be taught in tandem with German III or it may be offered on an individual basis. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

Student workbook, at approximately $20. 27


SPANISH I 061101 & 061102 PREREQUISITES:

FULL YEAR GRADES: 9, 10, 11, 12

None

Spanish I is an introductory course in the Spanish language and Hispanic cultures. Emphasis is placed on developing a strong foundation for reading, writing, speaking and listening abilities in the Spanish language. Students have the opportunity to explore a variety of cultural topics. If students begin taking Spanish as a freshman, they have the opportunity to receive 9 hours of college credit from Saint Louis University’s 1818 program when they successfully complete Spanish III and Spanish IV. (See Spanish III & Spanish IV) SPECIAL MATERIALS:

One workbook, at approximately $20.

SPANISH II 061201 & 061202 PREREQUISITES:

Spanish I

FULL YEAR GRADES: 9, 10, 11, 12

Spanish II expands on the skills learned in Spanish I. intermediate-level students will enhance their grammar skills by adding new verb tenses, expanding their vocabulary, and re-enforcing previously learned skill. Strong emphasis is placed on learning intermediate skills through more advanced writing, target language communication activities, and deeper cultural exploration. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

One workbook, at approximately $21.

SPANISH III 061301 & 061302 PREREQUISITES:

Spanish II (B- or above is required)

FULL YEAR GRADES: 10, 11, 12

Spanish III is an advanced course that explores more complex grammatical structures while placing a direct emphasis on communication skills. Students will engage in weekly conversation practice, develop more advanced writing skills through journaling activities, and explore Spanish and Hispanic cultures through a variety of media. This course can be taken for college credit using the St. Louis University 1818 program. (3 hours of college credit given for the spring semester only) SPECIAL MATERIALS:

One workbook, at approximately $21.

SPANISH IV 061401 & 061402 PREREQUISITES:

Spanish III (B- or above is advised)

FULL YEAR GRADES: 11, 12

Spanish IV is an advanced, college level course that engages students in real world situations that can be directly applied to any Spanish-speaking situation. Students continue to use journaling to refine advanced writing skills, participate in a myriad of Spanish-only conversation activities, and develop an in-depth knowledge of Hispanic traditions and customs. Current, interactive media is used to engage students in current events in Spanish speaking courtries. This course can be taken for college credit using the St. Louis University 1818 program. (3 hours of college credit per semester).Spanish IV students continue their journey into the culture, history and literature of the Spanish-speaking world. An integrated approach is used to combine all four language skills through new material and intensive review. Cultural awareness is further developed through the study of well-known Hispanic artists and writers. Authentic literature and periodicals will be read in class. Videos are used to broaden a student's view of the world. This course can be taken for college credit using the Saint Louis University 1818 program. (3 hours of college credit each semester.) SPECIAL MATERIALS:

One workbook, at approximately $25. 28


FRENCH I 062101 & 062102 PREREQUISITES:

FULL YEAR GRADES: 9, 10, 11, 12

None

French I is an introductory course in the French language and the culture of French-speaking people. The textbook is proficiency based and is the first of a three-year series. Simple grammar constructions and basic vocabulary are taught. Emphasis is placed on speaking proficiency and listening comprehension. Individual projects are assigned once each semester to help student develop greater proficiency in the language. If students begin taking French as a freshman, they have the opportunity to receive 9 hours of college credit from Saint Louis University’s 1818 program when they successfully complete French III and French IV. (See French III & French IV) SPECIAL MATERIALS:

Student workbook, approximately $20.

FRENCH II 062201 & 062202 PREREQUISITES:

French I

FULL YEAR GRADES: 9, 10, 11, 12

French II continues the study of grammar, composition, speaking, writing skills, and listening comprehension started in French I. The level II textbook facilitates the articulation between levels I and II. In order for the student to have an easy transition to the second year of study, half of the first quarter is spent in review. Individual projects will be assigned at least twice a year. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

Student workbook, approximately $20.

FRENCH III 062301 & 062302 PREREQUISITES:

French II (B- or above is advised)

FULL YEAR GRADES: 10, 11, 12

Students begin to study complex grammar constructions with emphasis on speaking proficiency, listening comprehension and composition. Individual projects are required which help to develop advanced writing and research skills. Essays are assigned in the target language. Students are exposed to cultural activities from francophone nations around the world (Senegal, Belgium, Switzerland, etc.). This course may be taken for college credit using the Saint Louis University 1818 program. (3 hours of college credit for the year.) Depending on enrollment, this class may be taught in tandem with French IV. SPECIAL MATERIALS: FRENCH IV 062401 & 062402 PREREQUISITES:

A student workbook at approximately $20.

French III (B- or above is advised)

FULL YEAR GRADES: 11, 12

French IV is an advanced class designed for the Francophile student. Students complete the study of French grammar and begin to analyze French literature, novels, history and art. Students are expected to use the target language in classroom discussion. Projects are assigned to add depth and productivity to the student's knowledge of the French language. Essays are required in French each quarter. This course may be taken for college credit using the Saint Louis University 1818 program. (3 hours of college credit each semester.) Depending on enrollment, this class may be taught in tandem with French III or French V. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

A student workbook at approximately $20.

29


CHINESE I 065101 & 065102 PREREQUISITES:

FULL YEAR GRADES: 9, 10,11, 12

None

This course is an introduction to the Mandarin language and to Chinese culture. Study will include basic language patterns, life styles, and highlights of Chinese culture. The student will learn elementary skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing Mandarin. Students will be introduced to one hundred characters and will engage in simple conversation using these characters. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

A student workbook at approximately $23.

CHINESE II FULL YEAR 065201 & 065202 GRADES: 10,11,12 PREREQUISITES: Successful completion of Mandarin I with a grade of “C� or higher or Department approval. The course will continue to expand on Mandarin I and focus on improving proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Students will refine these speaking and listening skills as well as increase their vocabulary. Students will also develop further appreciation and understanding of Chinese culture. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

A student workbook at approximately $23.

ITALIAN I 064101 & 064102 PREREQUISITES:

FULL YEAR GRADES: 9, 10, 11, 12

This course introduces students to the Italian language. The vocabulary presented is approximately 1200-1500 words. Topics include describing oneself and others, hobbies and sports, the family, home, school and education, the weather, the environment, etc. It explores the culture of Italy and emphasizes the four main goals of studying a foreign language: listening, reading, writing and speaking. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

A student workbook at approximately $20.

ITALIAN II 064201 & 064202 PREREQUISITES: Italian I

FULL YEAR GRADES: 10, 11, 12

The second year of Italian is built on skills developed in Italian I. It reinforces the basics of the Italian language to more complex grammatical structures, increase proficiency and competency in the language. Strong emphasis is placed on speaking proficiency in the target language. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

A student workbook at approximately $20

30


MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT PRE-ALGEBRA/ALGEBRA 030501 & 030502 PREREQUISITES: None

FULL YEAR GRADE: 9

Concepts and skills necessary for success in Algebra I are reviewed and developed. Basic operations with and properties of signed numbers are stressed. The use of variables in writing expressions, solving problems, and graphing functions is fundamental to the course. Simple applications and problem-solving techniques will enable the student to achieve the more complicated problems of Algebra. This class meets every day for the entire year. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

Scientific calculator required.

ALGEBRA I 031001 & 031002 PREREQUISITES:

None

FULL YEAR GRADES: 9, 10

Using the operations and properties of the real number system, students will solve problems by developing and solving algebraic equations and inequalities, both linear and quadratic. Other basic algebraic studies include exponents and radicals, absolute value, functions, and graphing rational algebraic expressions. SPECIAL MATERIALS: FORMAL GEOMETRY 031501 & 031502 PREREQUISITES:

Scientific calculator required.

Algebra I (minimum grade of A) and Department approval

FULL YEAR GRADES: 9, 10, 11, 12

The major organized body of Euclidean geometry is devoted to facts about spatial concepts and relations. Perhaps more than any other branch of mathematics, geometry features a method, pattern, and language of thought that is highly significant. Deductive reasoning is developed and applied to the theorems to establish their validity. Algebra skills are necessary to solve geometric problems throughout the course. SPECIAL MATERIALS: GEOMETRY 315A01 & 315A02 PREREQUISITES:

Compass, protractor, and scientific calculator are required.

FULL YEAR GRADES: 10, 11, 12

Algebra I

The basic facts of spatial concepts and relations from the organized structure of Euclidean Geometry are developed and applied. The process of deductive reasoning and logic are, for the most part, replaced by an intuitive, inductive reasoning through a discovery approach. The course is designed for students who have difficulty with the formality of developing (proving) concepts. Algebraic skills are incorporated throughout the course, further preparing the students for the next level, Algebra II. (See flowchart.) SPECIAL MATERIALS:

Compass and template (purchased from instructor), scientific calculator.

31


ALGEBRA II WITH TRIGONOMETRY 032001 & 032002 PREREQUISITES: Formal Geometry (minimum grade of B) and Department Approval

FULL YEAR GRADES: 10, 11, 12

Algebra II/Trig involves a thorough development of the number system from the natural numbers through the complex numbers. The study of polynomial, radical, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions and their applications is the basis of Algebra II/Trig. Trigonometry develops from the basic unit circle definitions of the three basic trigonometric functions and their graphs to the application of solving triangles, both right and oblique. SPECIAL MATERIALS: TRIGONOMETRY 000324 PREREQUISITES:

TI-84 Plus graphing calculator required.

Algebra II (minimum grade of B) and Department Approval

SEMESTER GRADES: 12

A review of non-algebraic functions, including exponential and logarithmic functions. The three main circular functions—sine, cosine, and tangent—and their graphs are developed. Application of these sinusoidal functions is made to solve harmonic motion and similar-type problems. Solving right and oblique triangles and solving trigonometric equations are topics which are presented. Vectors and complex numbers are analyzed using trigonometry, time permitting, as well as the establishment of important identities. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

TI-84 graphing calculator required.

FINITE MATH 000326 PREREQUISITES:

Algebra II

SEMESTER GRADES: 12

This course will introduce various basic topics of mathematics from the fields of Discrete and Finite mathematics. Another major portion of the course will be fundamentals of probability and statistics. These areas will provide background necessary for the technological age we live in. The course will provide some essentials in math for college-bound students who will not be taking calculus at all, or who will be taking it later in their college career. Major topics include: linear programming, graph theory, matrices, sequences, combinatorics and probability, and basic statistics. SPECIAL MATERIALS: PRE-CALCULUS 033001 & 033002 PREREQUISITES:

TI-84 graphing calculator required.

Algebra II with Trigonometry (minimum grade of B) and Department Approval

FULL YEAR GRADES: 11, 12

This course is designed to prepare students for the AP Calculus course. Previous mathematics topics (algebra through trigonometry) are enhanced and expanded; a complete analysis of functions is given, with applications; sequences, series, limits, analytic geometry, matrices, and vectors are presented. The study of Calculus is then begun: the concepts of limits, and differentiation are introduced. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

TI-84 Plus graphing calculator required.

32


CALCULUS I (AP) 333501 & 333502 PREREQUISITES:

Pre-Calculus (minimum grade of B) and Department Approval

FULL YEAR GRADES: 11, 12

This course is designed to prepare students for the Calculus BC Exam (fee required). (Note: The BC test includes a score for the AB component.) Topics include: limits and continuity of functions of a single variable; derivatives and anti derivatives of algebraic and trigonometric functions and their applications; advanced integration techniques; Taylor Series. College credit is obtained by receiving a qualifying score on the AP test. (Scores are given from 1 to 5, 5 being extremely well qualified. Contact your potential colleges for their definition of “qualifying.”) College credit may be received optionally via the 1-8-1-8 Program from Saint Louis University (fee required). Students are not required to pursue either college credit option. SPECIAL MATERIALS: CALCULUS II (AP) 333601 & 333602 PREREQUISITES:

TI-84 Plus graphing calculator required.

Calculus I (minimum grade of B) and Department Approval

FULL YEAR GRADES: 11, 12

This course is designed to prepare students for the Calculus BC Exam (fee required). (Note: The BC test includes a score for the AB component.) Topics include: limits and continuity of functions of a single variable; derivatives and anti derivatives of algebraic and trigonometric functions and their applications; advanced integration techniques; Taylor Series. College credit is obtained by receiving a qualifying score on the AP test. (Scores are given from 1 to 5, 5 being extremely well qualified. Contact your potential colleges for their definition of “qualifying.”) College credit may be received optionally via the 1-8-1-8 Program from Saint Louis University (fee required). Students are not required to pursue either college credit option. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

TI-84 Plus graphing calculator required.

ALGEBRA II 034001 & 034002 PREREQUISITES:

Geometry

FULL YEAR GRADES: 11, 12

A course designed for students who wish to continue their study of mathematics and whose algebra background and knowledge are not sufficiently strong to take Algebra II with Trigonometry. Students have the opportunity to learn Algebra II topics at a pace designed to span two entire semesters. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

Graphing calculator required.

COMPUTER PROGRAMMING 000357 PREREQUISITES: Be currently enrolled in or have completed Algebra II or Algebra II with Trigonometry and Department Approval

SEMESTER GRADES: 10, 11, 12

Object Oriented Programming techniques and design methods are developed utilizing the Java programming language. Topics include program design, implementation and analysis. Problem solving ideas and algorithm development will also be applied. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

None 33


ADVANCED COMPUTER PROGRAMMING (AP) 000358 PREREQUISITES: Computer Programming and Department Approval

SEMESTER Grades: 10, 11, 12

This course builds on skills developed in the prerequisite Computer Programming class to prepare students for the Advanced Placement (AP) Computer Science Exam. STATISTICS I (AP) 000372 & 000373 PREREQUISITES:

Algebra II/Trigonometry (minimum grade of B) or Pre-Calculus (minimum grade of C) and Mathematics Department Approval

FULL YEAR GRADES: 12

The instruction given in this class is for an Advanced Placement course: its goal is to prepare students for the AP Statistics exam. Topics include exploratory data analysis, planning studies, application of probability in predicting patterns, selecting and using appropriate models to make inferences and use of ANOVA processes. Advanced Placement is received with a qualifying score on the AP test (fee required). Scores are given from 1 to 5, with 5 being excellent. Since post-secondary schools have different definitions of “qualifying,” please contact your potential colleges for their level of acceptance. Students will not be required to take the AP exam. SPECIAL MATERIALS: STATISTICS II (AP) 000372 & 000373 PREREQUISITES:

TI-84 Plus graphing calculator required.

Algebra II/Trigonometry (minimum grade of B) or Pre-Calculus (minimum grade of C) and Mathematics Department Approval

FULL YEAR GRADES: 12

The instruction given in this class is for an Advanced Placement course: its goal is to prepare students for the AP Statistics exam. Topics include exploratory data analysis, planning studies, application of probability in predicting patterns, selecting and using appropriate models to make inferences and use of ANOVA processes. Advanced Placement is received with a qualifying score on the AP test (fee required). Scores are given from 1 to 5, with 5 being excellent. Since post-secondary schools have different definitions of “qualifying,” please contact your potential colleges for their level of acceptance. Students will not be required to take the AP exam. SPECIAL MATERIALS: DATA ANALYSIS A 000374 PREREQUISITES:

TI-84 Plus graphing calculator required.

Algebra II, Algebra II/Trigonometry

SEMESTER GRADES: 11, 12

This is a one semester course offered as an elective to students who have successfully completed Algebra 2 or Algebra 2 and Trigonometry. The course will integrate mathematics and science through the use of technology. Students will perform laboratory experiments and collect data using a variety of tools. The data collected with will 34


be examined from a mathematical viewpoint using the students' graphing calculators and iPads. Students will also make tables and graphs and display their results. Lab reports will be expected on a weekly basis. Mathematical functions which will be studied include: linear, quadratic, higher degree polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

Graphing calculator required.

35


Mathematics Department

Prealg / Alg I

Lutheran High School South

Algebra I

Formal Geometry

Algebra 2 / Trig

Geometry

Pre-Calculus

Algebra 2

Finite Math

Trigonometry

AP Statistics

Data Analysis

Entry level course for 9th graders (Formal Geometry requires passing of an algebra exemption test) Normal tracking Upper-level tracking (minimum grade of “B� required to continue)

36

AP Calculus


PHYSICAL EDUCATION DEPARTMENT HEALTH 000705 PREREQUISITES:

SEMESTER GRADES: 9

None

This course is designed to help students acquire knowledge about their body, develop a good attitude toward their overall health, and understand the role their environment plays in enabling them to maintain good health. The physical, mental, social and spiritual aspects of an individual’s health, and the responsibilities they demand, are all studied and discussed in a variety of settings. Assignments and projects are planned to allow the student to begin practicing healthy habits they will maintain for a lifetime. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

None

GIRLS' PHYSICAL EDUCATION 000710 PREREQUISITES: None

SEMESTER GRADES: 9, 10

Girls will participate in a fitness program that includes strength training, plyometric training, speed training, and flexibility training. Students will be tested throughout the semester to see progress based on the training that takes place in class. Students are expected to dress out in the PE uniform on a daily basis. Grades will be given based on attitude and effort given in class. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

PE Uniform - $10 or LHSS t-shirt

BOYS' PHYSICAL EDUCATION 000711 PREREQUISITES: None

SEMESTER GRADES: 9, 10

Boys will participate in a fitness program that includes strength training, plyometric training, speed training, and flexibility training. Students will be tested throughout the semester to see progress based on the training that takes place in class. Students are expected to dress out in the PE uniform on a daily basis. Grades will be given based on attitude and effort given in class. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

PE Uniform - $10 or LHSS t-shirt

VARSITY PHYSICAL EDUCATION 000712 PREREQUISITES: Qualifying students must obtain the written approval of their parents and the Director of Guidance.

SEMESTER GRADES: 11, 12

This credit is an option for students who want a rigorous academic program and who have successfully participated for a full season in a Lutheran High School South varsity sport during their Junior or Senior year. The students will be exempted from the required Physical Education course 730 or 715. Credit will be awarded with a grade of >P=, so that this course will not affect the GPA. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

None

37


BODY DYNAMICS 000715 PREREQUISITES:

SEMESTER GRADES: 11, 12

Two semesters of PE Department approval

A high-intensity, advanced, specialized course in physical education. The course will include activity and study in the areas of strength training, plyometric training, speed training, and flexibility training. The class will be open to junior and senior boys and girls who have been approved by the PE Department. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

PE Uniform - $10 or LHSS t-shirt

JUNIOR-SENIOR PHYSICAL EDUCATION 000730 PREREQUISITES: Physical Education 710 or 711

SEMESTER GRADES: 11, 12

Students participate in a variety of sports and games that are chosen in order to expose them to possible competitive and leisure activities they can enjoy throughout their lives. Activities offered include speedball, tennis, basketball, ultimate Frisbee, softball, soccer, and volleyball. Six activities are done during the semester with a test given on the final day of each unit. Students are expected to dress out in the PE uniform or LHSS t-shirt on a daily basis. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

PE Uniform - $10 or LHSS t-shirt

38


PRACTICAL ARTS BUSINESS EDUCATION DEPARTMENT COMPUTER APPLICATIONS 000802 PREREQUISITES: None

SEMESTER GRADES: 9, 10, 11, 12

Computer Applications utilizes the PC based Microsoft Office Suite, an integrated software package focusing on the Word (word processing), Excel (spreadsheet) and PowerPoint (presentation) programs. Students, while typically computer savvy, learn to use many of the more detailed features within Microsoft Office to create professional documents, worksheets, reports and integrated files. Also included is an exploration of the iPad Apple Suite (Pages, Numbers and Keynote) as is compares and contrasts to the Microsoft products. This course equips students with the skills to use technology throughout the curriculum in their high school and college career, as well as lifelong use in the home and workplace. An introduction and/or review of proper alphabetic and numeric keyboarding is also integrated in to the semester. Students advance at their own rate. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

None

BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS 000803 PREREQUISITES: None, Computer Applications preferred

SEMESTER GRADES: 9, 10, 11, 12

It is recommended that students have successfully completed Computer Applications (or at least have a working knowledge of the keyboard and Microsoft Office applications). This course offers students an investigation into the different communication media used by businesses and a wide variety of professionals. The student will create desktop published materials (flyers, brochures and product labeling) using Microsoft Publisher. They will also create their own resume and business card while learning about basic internet job seeking strategies and professional net-iquette. Students will then utilize a variety of presentation software programs (PC and iPad based) to create persuasive presentations and use them to focus on developing public speaking skills. Also included in the course is exploration of the nature of product packaging. SPECIAL MATERIALS: Presentations booklet; cost approximately $10 and a consumer product with removable label; cost approximately $5 INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS 000804 PREREQUISITES: None

SEMESTER GRADES: 10, 11, 12

Introduction to Business exposes the student to many aspects of the business environment and organization. Topics that will be discussed include basic economics, global business, corporate social responsibility, business organizational structures, management and marketing. The student will select and study a company of their choice as a foundation for exploring these topics. The class offers focus into synchronous, qualified internet research and portfolio development similar to that required in college-level business courses. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

None

39


ACCOUNTING 080701 & 080702 PREREQUISITES:

FULL YEAR GRADES: 11, 12

None

Accounting introduces the basic concepts and terms of accounting. It provides the student with experience in analyzing transactions, posting, ledgering and preparing financial statements by use of the double-entry system. It takes the student through accounting cycles of businesses organized as service proprietorships. Included is the use of the computer as an accounting tool by way of Excel, QuickBooks and educational games. The year concludes with an analysis of payroll accounting and taxes. The course is presented through a series of accounting cycles which become increasingly difficult in the second semester. This course may be considered general education or as a foundation on which to continue studying business or accounting at the collegiate level. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

One workbook; cost approximately $30

BUSINESS AND PERSONAL LAW 000810 PREREQUISITES:

SEMESTER GRADES: 11, 12

Business and Personal Law explores the foundations of business law, while introducing personal law topics relevant to students. Topics covered include the development of the legal system, the US court system, Cyber Law and both criminal and civil law. The semester also includes an introduction to contract law. The students will look at current events with respect to business law, careers in the legal field and take part in simulated legal proceedings to demonstrate the concepts they learned. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

None

FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES DEPARTMENT FOODS AND CHILD DEVELOPMENT 000840 PREREQUISITES: None

SEMESTER GRADES: 9, 10, 11, 12

Child Development includes the study of pregnancy, prenatal development, labor/delivery, birth defects, infant and toddler care. This course will include interaction with children. Foods includes a unit on basic food preparation and nutrition. The students will prepare foods in several labs. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

None

CLOTHING AND INTERIOR DESIGN 000841 PREREQUISITES: None

SEMESTER GRADES: 9, 10, 11, 12

Clothing includes basic construction techniques resulting in the completion of two garments, pajama pants and a garment of the student’s choice. Interior Design includes elements and principles of design, color, housing and furniture styles. The students will decorate sample rooms as the final project. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

Sewing supplies and material. 40


FOODS AND NUTRITION 000842 PREREQUISITES:

SEMESTER GRADES: 10, 11, 12

None

An in-depth study of food preparation. Classroom and lab activities will focus on nutrition, and diet evaluation; sanitation and safety; measurements and manners; and preparation of fruits and vegetables; milk, eggs and cheese; breads, pasta and cereals; meat, poultry and fish; and cakes, cookies and pies. SPECIAL MATERIALS: GOURMET FOODS 000843 PREREQUISITES:

Lab fee of $15 & Workbook

SEMESTER GRADES: 10, 11, 12

Foods and Nutrition

An in-depth study of culinary arts, including the five mother sauces, garnishes and food presentation, herbs and spices, standardized recipes, and specialized tools and equipment. Final project will be preparation of a full meal. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

Lab fee of $25.

CLOTHING II 000844 PREREQUISITES:

None

SEMESTER GRADES: 10, 11, 12

Individualized instruction in clothing construction for the beginning or advanced student. Each student will complete five major sewing projects of varying degrees of difficulty with a variety of sewing techniques. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

Sewing supplies and material.

PARENTING AND CHILD DEVELOPMENT 000845 PREREQUISITES: None

SEMESTER GRADES: 10, 11, 12

Explores the rewards and responsibilities of being a parent. The importance of parenting decisions, becoming a parent, prenatal development, pregnancy and birth, and the study of the intellectual, social, physical and emotional development of the infant and toddler will be included. Hands-on experience will be provided with visits to a daycare center. Extra Credit: Parenting simulation - Students may "parent" the computer-programmed "Baby Think It Over" overnight.

SPECIAL MATERIALS:

None

CLOTHING III 000846 PREREQUISITE:

Clothing II

SEMESTER GRADES: 11, 12

Each student will complete five projects of their choice in clothing, interior design and/or quilting. Techniques— knits, plaids, stripe include quilting, embroidery on the machine, and customizing a pattern. The students may make a quilt. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

Sewing Supplies and Material 41


RELATIONSHIPS 000170 PREREQUISITES:

SEMESTER GRADES: 11, 12

None

This course will explore marriage and family themes fro the perspective of Christian theology, and the current state of family life in the American context. Students will strengthen their preparation for coping with the realities of life. Topics may include values, character, personality, coping with pressure-drugs, sex, alcohol-relationship with family, friends and others, dating love, responsibilities of human sexuality, marriage and family, the single living divorce, depression, conflict resolution and communication. By peer group discussion, independent study, guest speakers, field trips and team teaching the students will determine decision-making for success in many life situations. Attention will be given to the practices and skills necessary to build a healthy marriage and family. This course can be taken to fulfill either a (1/2) practical art credit or (1/2) theology credit. SPECIAL MATERIALS: INTERIOR DESIGN 000850 PREREQUISITES:

Workbook

SEMESTER GRADES: 10, 11, 12

None

Units of study include: floor plans; kitchen design; architecture and furniture design; elements of principles of design; lighting; and window, wall and floor coverings. The students will complete projects for each unit. A final project will be to decorate sample rooms, incorporating the topics studied during the semester. Field trips will be included. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

None

CONSUMER DECISIONS 000855 PREREQUISITES:

None

SEMESTER GRADES: 11, 12

Prepares students to manage all resources available in order to make responsible consumer choices. Topics include shopping for cars, housing, clothing, insurance, computers, cell phones and food; budgeting, saving, and balancing a checking account; and the proper use of credit. Basic consumer issues will be discussed in relation to each unit. Field trips and guest speakers. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

None

FASHION MERCHANDISING 000860 PREREQUISITE: None, but a clothing class is recommended.

SEMESTER GRADES: 10, 11, 12

Fashion Merchandising explores fashion and the fashion industry, fashion design, designers and history, the fabrics and design elements used in the design of clothing, and the production and marketing of fashion. Guest speakers and field trips. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

None

42


INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT DRAFTING TECHNOLOGY 088001 & 088002 PREREQUISITES: None

FULL YEAR GRADES: 9, 10, 11, 12

This course provides an introduction to engineering drawing processes, residential architecture planning, and Auto CAD. Class activities show students how drawings are used in the design and manufacturing processes used by engineers and architects.

MACHINE DESIGN 088201 & 088202 PREREQUISITES:

FULL YEAR GRADES: 10, 11, 12

Drafting Technology

Students will advance their mechanical drawing knowledge and skills by completing increasingly difficult drawings. Topics include Auto CAD, electronics, gears, welding, fasteners, and manufacturing processes. Class experience includes observing and operating various tools and machines. ARCHITECTURAL DRAWING 088401 & 088402 PREREQUISITES: Drafting Technology

FULL YEAR GRADES: 10, 11, 12

This course deals with the design and construction of homes. Topics are as follows: house designing, floor plans, elevation plans, pictorial drawings, sectional drawings, foundation plans, framing plans, door and window specifications, building codes, electrical plans, model construction and Auto CAD. MATERIAL TECHNOLOGY 000885 PREREQUISITES: None

SEMESTER GRADES: 9, 10, 11, 12

Students will explore the basic theory and applications in each of the following areas: project designing, woodworking, plastics and metalworking. The students will design and construct projects using various machines and equipment. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

Students must have approved safety glasses.

MECHANICAL TECHNOLOGY 000887 PREREQUISITES: None

SEMESTER GRADES: 9, 10, 11, 12

Students will explore the basic theory and applications in each of the following areas: residential electricity, structural engineering, gears, pulleys and motors. Students will design and construct electrical, structural, and mechanical projects using various materials, machines and equipment. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

Students must have approved safety glasses.

43


WOODWORKING 000888 PREREQUISITES:

SEMESTER GRADES: 10, 11, 12

Material Technology or instructor’s permission

This advanced course covers the following topics: wood science, woodworking drawing and planning, joinery, adhesives, woodworking hand tools and machines, cabinetmaking and finishing. Students will use their experience from Material Technology to complete one major woodworking project (teacher approved) for the semester. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

Students pay for project materials. Students must have approved safety glasses.

AUTOMATION TECHNOLOGY 000890 PREREQUISITES: Mechanical Technology or Material Technology Strongly recommended

SEMESTER GRADES: 10, 11, 12

This course introduces students to the technology involved in manufacturing automation and robotics. Content includes basic electronics, sensors, and mechanical drives. Students will design and build their own automation system using a variety of electronic, hydraulic, or pneumatic components. SPECIAL MATERIALS: PRE-ENGINEERING 000891 PREREQUISITES:

Students must have approved safety glasses. SEMESTER GRADES: 11, 12 Mechanical Technology is strongly recommended

This course provides an excellent introduction to the many exciting opportunities related to an engineering career. Students will develop their critical thinking skills and see how to use tools, materials and processes to solve problems. Student will have a greater appreciation of how Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) are used to improve our lives. This course is based on an integrated text and online learning program. Class work includes field trips, a research paper, class discussion, and analytical projects. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

Students must have approved safety glasses.

44


SCIENCE DEPARTMENT CELL BIOLOGY 000501 PREREQUISITES:

SEMESTER GRADES: 9, 10

None

A laboratory science course. The semester begins with an introduction to the carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids, including how such molecules contribute to the well-being of the cell as a whole. Cells are then studied, with emphasis on how plant and animal cells differ, work, reproduce, and repair themselves. Students then learn how information is stored within DNA molecules. After genes have been introduced, the fundamentals of heredity are studied. Finally, at the semester’s end, students consider how and if life forms change in order to adapt to changing environmental conditions. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

There are no special lab fees; however, students must pay for equipment that they break or damage.

INTRODUCTORY PHYSICS 000502 PREREQUISITES: None

SEMESTER GRADES: 9, 10

A laboratory science course. Physics is considered a core course in the science curriculum. All students should be familiar with the concepts of physics. Students, through the use of appropriate math, will study a variety of topics. A large portion of the course will be devoted to mechanics, including Newton’s laws of motion, vectors, and momentum. Also studied in this survey class will be topics on electricity and energy. This course will be heavily integrated with laboratory experiences to provide opportunities for independent exploration and reinforcement of what is learned in nonlaboratory sessions. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

ASTRONOMY 000503 PREREQUISITES:

There are no special lab fees; however, students must pay for equipment that they break or damage. Safety goggles, a simple calculator, and a protractor must be purchased by the student.

SEMESTER GRADES: 10, 11, 12

Cell Biology Introductory Physics

A laboratory science course. In this course students will study the universe around them. Through personal and laboratory experience the students will learn to map the universe in which they live. The students will also study the solar system and interstellar space. This course also devotes a large portion of time to meteorology. Students will observe current weather patterns and study the earth’s atmosphere. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

There are no special lab fees; however, students must pay for equipment that they break or damage.

45


GEOLOGY 000504 PREREQUISITES:

SEMESTER GRADES: 10, 11, 12

Cell Biology Introductory Physics

A laboratory science course. Geology is designed to allow students to study and explore their home, the Earth. Laboratory exercises will reinforce what students learn in class. Topics covered in this class include rocks, landforms, volcanism, crustal movement, erosion, fossils, and life from past ages. Through the semester experience, students will learn that, indeed, geology does make a difference. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

ZOOLOGY/BOTANY 000505 PREREQUISITES:

There are no special lab fees; however, students must pay for equipment that they break or damage.

SEMESTER Cell Biology, Except for Freshmen Taking Geometry GRADES: 10, 11, 12 Introductory Physics, Except for Freshmen Taking Geometry

A laboratory science course. “How does it work?” is a natural question posed by the curious mind. Our planet Earth is home to a bewildering variety of living things classified into six major kingdoms, two of which comprise the plants and the animals. ZooBot (an acronym for zoology and botany) is a journey into the plant and animal world, where travelers frequently pause to look at internal structures and function through dissection that they not only in wonder at the beauty and diversity within God’s creation, but also to answer the question so frequently asked when viewing specialized animal and plant structures, “How does it work?” SPECIAL MATERIALS:

HEM BIOLOGY 000506 PREREQUISITES:

There are no special lab fees; however, students should expect to pay for equipment that they break or damage. Safety goggles are required.

SEMESTER Cell Biology, Except for Freshmen Taking Geometry GRADES: 10, 11, 12 Introductory Physics, Except for Freshmen Taking Geometry

A laboratory science course. This course expands on the student’s awareness in the biological sciences with three more areas of study—human (H), environmental (E), and microbiology (M). Students are introduced to basic human biology, where they will participate in the fetal pig dissection as they compare vertebrate and human structures. Microbiology will open students’ eyes to the tiny world of life that exists around them. Students will be introduced to viruses and the kingdoms of Archaebacteria, Eubacteria, Protista, and Fungi. Environmental biology will allow students an opportunity to understand fully their ecosystem. Students will be made aware of current environmental problems, as well as technological solutions being used to solve these problems. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

There are no special lab fees; however, students must pay for equipment that they break or damage. Students may be asked to pay for field trip expenses. Safety goggles are required.

46


CHEMISTRY 051501 & 051502 PREREQUISITES:

Algebra I Two semesters of biology classes

FULL YEAR GRADES: 10, 11, 12

A laboratory science course. This course covers the basic principles of chemistry. Beginning with experimental procedures in the laboratory, the important concepts of gasses, the mole, the periodicity of elements, atomic theory, chemical bonding, thermo chemistry, ionization, equilibrium, acids and bases are developed. There is an introduction to hydrocarbon chemistry and nuclear chemistry. Many arithmetic calculations are an integral part of this course. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

PHYSICS 052001 & 052002 PREREQUISITES:

There are no special lab fees; however, students must pay for equipment that they break or damage. Safety goggles and a simple calculator must be purchased by the student.

Algebra II with Trigonometry, Chemistry

FULL YEAR GRADES: 11, 12

A laboratory science course. This study includes a review of some mathematical functions and their application to physical problems. Topics include kinematics, dynamics, momentum, energy, work, electricity, magnetism, light, and an introduction to waves. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

There are no special lab fees; however, students must pay for equipment that they break or damage.

ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY 000540 PREREQUISITES: Chemistry, Cell Biology

SEMESTER GRADES: 11, 12

A laboratory science course. The major emphasis in this course is the study of structure and function of organ-system components within the human body. This course will focus on cells and tissue and then expand to organ systems as a whole. Students will explore specific organ systems and participate in dissections which allow for direct comparative anatomical studies between mammals and humans. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

There are no special lab fees; however, students must pay for equipment that they break or damage. Students may be asked to pay for field trip expenses.

47


BIOLOGY (AP) 055001 & 055002 PREREQUISITES:

FULL YEAR GRADES: 11, 12

Chemistry Department approval

A laboratory science course. AP (Advanced Placement) Biology is a senior-level science course taught as if participants are college biology majors. The course is highly recommended for students who have a genuine love for things biological and who show promise in the field of science. Experiences are designed to equip students to perform satisfactorily on the AP exam, usually administered in May. Current course emphases involves: Big idea #1: The process of evolution drives the diversity and unity of life. Big idea #2: Biological systems utilize free energy and molecular building blocks to grow, reproduce and maintain homeostasis. Big idea #3: Living systems restore, retrieve, transmit, and respond to information essential to life processes. Bid idea#4: Biological system interact and these systems and interactions possess complex properties. A battery of 12 advanced placement labs is an integral part of this course. Interested students must register, complete an application form, and gain department approval to be admitted to this program. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

CHEMISTRY (AP) 055501 & 055502 PREREQUISITES:

Safety goggles are required. Students will be expected to take the AP exam. . Textbook purchase is optional. In addition, students should expect to pay for equipment that they break or damage.

FULL YEAR GRADES: 11, 12

Chemistry

Advanced Placement Chemistry is designed to be equivalent to two semesters of college chemistry. The course builds on concepts learned in General Chemistry, as well as introducing thermodynamics and electrochemistry. Advanced laboratory experiences are included. Emphasis is placed on developing reasoning and effective communication skills. This class will stress chemical calculations and preparation for the AP exam. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

There are no special lab fees; however, students must pay for equipment that they break or damage. Approved chemical goggles and lab notebook are required. All AP students are required to take the AP Chemistry exam for an additional fee.

48


SOCIAL SCIENCE DEPARTMENT CURRICULUM REQUIREMENTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS Freshmen:....................................................... World History Sophomores: ........................................................ Geography Juniors: .......................................................... U.S. History or U.S. History (AP) and Electives Seniors: ................................................................... Electives ELECTIVES Economics U.S. Government Psychology Psychology (AP) Contemporary Issues Civil War History of Political Thought U.S. Colonial History Human Geography (AP) World History: Non-Western World History (AP)

000420 000425 000435 000440 000445 000455 000476 000477 000482 000491

(2013/14 only) (2013/14 only) (2014/15 only) (2014/15 only)

041101 & 041102

Which electives should you take? • •

• • •

If you are planning to go to college, you should take as many core (Social Science, Math, English and Science) electives as possible. If you are unsure of your area of concentration or are pursuing a degree in liberal arts, social work, education, the law, business or other related area, the following classes should be given special consideration: Psychology, U.S. Government, World History, Economics, and History of Political Thought, U.S. Colonial History, Civil War. If you are pursuing a degree in areas of technology, hard science, medicine or related areas, you should seriously consider Psychology, U.S. Government and Human Geography. If you are not sure if you will attend college but will be a participating American citizen, you will find U.S. Government, Economics and Contemporary Issues useful and interesting. Advanced Placement (AP) classes (U.S. History, Psychology, Human Geography, and World History) are recommended for those students of above-average abilities and study habits, who are willing to do the work necessary to take a college-level class in high school. Most universities will give college credit, or at least advanced placement, for a score of three (out of five) or better on the AP examination.

49


MODERN WORLD HISTORY 041001 & 041002 PREREQUISITES: None

FULL YEAR GRADES: 9

This course is a study of world history from the time of the Renaissance and Reformation to the modern era. World History focuses on the major social and political revolutions that have shaped our world. With a major focus on how the past has led to current crises around the globe, this course offers an understanding of how history affects everyday life, and the uneven progress of democratic thought in the modern world. Major topics covered in the course include the Reformation, the Enlightenment, Colonialism, The Age of Revolution, the Rise of Global Conflict, The World at War, the Communist Revolution, World War II, the Cold War, Globalism and Fractionalization, and the War on Terror. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

None

GEOGRAPHY 041201 & 041202 PREREQUISITES:

None

FULL YEAR GRADES: 10

Geography is the study of how people change the land and how the land affects people. During the first quarter students will learn the basic concepts needed to understand the United States and other countries. This will be followed by a study of North America. During the second semester some of the following regions are studied: Africa, Asia, Europe, Russia, the Middle East, and/or Latin America. Students will participate in a geographic simulation and discuss current events as they relate to geography. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

None

MODERN UNITED STATES HISTORY 041501 & 041502 PREREQUISITES: None

FULL YEAR GRADES: 11

AP United States History (416) may be taken instead of this course. This course offers a chronological study of United States history from the time from Reconstruction to near the present. The course includes a variety of projects which explore topics of US History. Primary documents and other writings that have had an impact on American history are read. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

None

UNITED STATES HISTORY (AP) 041601 & 041602 PREREQUISITES: Students with A’s/B’s in Social Science classes, and good work ethic This is to be taken in place of 415.

FULL YEAR GRADES: 11

This course offers a topical treatment of United States history and will cover the entirety of the history of the United States. Columbus, the Revolution, Colonial times, Jacksonian Democracy, Civil War and Reconstruction will be covered in the first semester. The second semester will include Indian Wars, railroad and cattle frontiers, immigration, the Great Depression, World War II, the Cold War, and modern day American history. Students will learn to write historically argumentative essays as part of this course, designed to emulate a college curriculum. Students should be highly motivated, good readers, and capable of at least “B” work for the course. This course is taught in preparation for the AP exam in May. SPECIAL MATERIALS: None 50


WORLD HISTORY (AP) 041101 & 041102 PREREQUISITES:

FULL YEAR GRADES: 11 & 12

Modern World History

AP World History covers history in a thematic manner, focusing on cross-cultural interaction and its effect on world history. It is a year-long course which studies the history of the world and its inhabitants from the dawn of time to the present. Students will have the option to receive college credit upon successful completion of the Advanced Placement exam at the end of the second semester. It is important to note that the acceptance of college credit varies by institution. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

None

ECONOMICS 000420 PREREQUISITES:

None

SEMESTER GRADES: 11, 12

The course covers the Free Market System as well as other economic systems. The course also covers the study of supply, demand and market-clearing models, as well as the role of consumers, savers and investors in our economic system. Material for the course is provided by Junior Achievement. A student company is formed, entailing the selling of stock, marketing a product and awarding dividends if the company is successful. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

None

UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT 000425 PREREQUISITES: None

SEMESTER GRADES: 11, 12

This course is a study of American political institutions: the Presidency, the Congress, the Supreme Court, the Bill of Rights and civil liberties, political parties and voting trends. Special attention will be paid to the way these issues affect the students in their everyday life. Current events, as they are related to political institutions, are discussed. SPECIAL MATERIALS: PSYCHOLOGY 000435 PREREQUISITES:

None

SEMESTER GRADES: 11, 12

None

Psychology is a college preparatory course discussing basic psychological concepts and patterns of development. Research procedures and statistical treatment of data are also introduced. Physiology and behavior, sensation and perception, learning, memory, intelligence and mental abilities, life span development, personality and abnormal behavior are but a few of the areas of concentration. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

None

51


PSYCHOLOGY (AP) 000440 PREREQUISITES:

Introduction to Psychology

SEMESTER GRADES: 11, 12

This advanced-level course is for the student with an interest in pursuing a behavioral science degree and career. Emphasis is on recent theoretical developments, research and topics in psychology. A course-long project: incorporating research and scientific methods is required. Optional college credit may be received by passing the AP Test (fee required). SPECIAL MATERIALS:

None

CONTEMPORARY ISSUES 000445 PREREQUISITES: None

SEMESTER GRADES: 11, 12

Contemporary Issues examines in a survey fashion current events, news items, and social issues occurring in the world-at-large and the Saint Louis community. Some topics to be covered include government, education, immigration, and terrorism. Students will have the opportunity to debate issues, and discussion is expected. SPECIAL MATERIALS: CIVIL WAR 000455 PREREQUISITES:

None SEMESTER GRADES: 11, 12 None

This class is taught only in alternate years, (next in 2015/16). This course takes the student into the tragic era of the Civil War, one of the major catastrophes of United States history. Some topics to be covered include the institution of slavery, causes of the war, and military campaigns and strategies with accompanying map work. Individuals prominent in the era will receive special attention, with particular emphasis on Abraham Lincoln. The Era of Reconstruction in the South will conclude the course. Novels about the Civil War could be assigned as required reading. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

Novels

HISTORY OF POLITICAL THOUGHT 000476 PREREQUISITES: None

SEMESTER GRADES: 11, 12

This class is taught only in alternate years, (next in 2015/2016). The History of Political Thought will examine the various intellectual, social and economic revolutions that have occurred throughout history. This discussion-based class challenges students to discover the philosophical foundations of political and social movements through writings of the movements’ leaders. Students will study political philosophies from Aristotle to Karl Marx with a focus on the Enlightenment philosophies upon which many modern democracies are based. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

None

52


UNITED STATES COLONIAL HISTORY 000477 PREREQUISITES: None

SEMESTER GRADES: 11, 12

This class is taught only in alternate years, (next in 2014/2015). The Birth of a Nation: Colonialism to Constitution in the United States will cover the foundation of American society. From Jamestowne to the peaceful transition of power in the election of 1800, the course will challenge students to use primary sources to put themselves in the role of ordinary Americans struggling with world-changing ideas. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

None

HUMAN GEOGRAPHY (AP) 000482 PREREQUISITES: Geography 412

SEMESTER GRADES: 11, 12

This course will satisfy the Advanced Placement curriculum for Human Geography. A review of your previous geography class will begin the semester. Topics covered include rural land use, urban geography, modern economic change and industry, political geography, social geography, and coping with a changing world. Students will be encouraged to take the AP examination for potential college credit. A short project may conclude the semester. Expect to achieve at the same level as a college freshman. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

None

WORLD HISTORY: NON-WESTERN 000491 PREREQUISITES: None

SEMESTER GRADES: 11, 12

This class is taught only in alternate years, (next in 2014/2015). This course is a historical and cultural study of areas often under-studied in traditional World History courses. The semester will cover topics in the Middle east, the Indian Subcontinent and China. Additionally, Africa, Latin America, Southeast Asia, and Russia may be studied. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

None

53


THEOLOGY DEPARTMENT THEOLOGY I 000105 PREREQUISITES:

SEMESTER GRADES: 9

None

An introduction to the theology of the Old Testament. Includes a thumbnail overview of the sweep of the Old Testament accounts, with special attention to God’s relationship with His people. Special emphasis is given to the theological understandings which grow from these covenant stories, understandings which find their fulfillment in the Christ of the New Testament and which continue to form the basis of the Christian faith and life today. SPECIAL MATERIALS: THEOLOGY II 000110 PREREQUISITES:

The Lutheran Study Bible

SEMESTER GRADES: 10

None

Building on what is taught in the Old Testament Theology course, this is an introduction to the theology of the New Testament. The class includes a study of the Gospel accounts of Matthew and Luke, and the Book of Acts, and some Pauline Epistles. Special attention is given to understanding more fully the cultural setting of the ministry of Jesus and the rise of the Christian Church. There is also an ongoing emphasis on applying Biblical theology to the Christian’s daily walk. SPECIAL MATERIALS: APOLOGETICS 000111 PREREQUISITES:

The Lutheran Study Bible

SEMESTER GRADES: 11, 12

None

This course will equip the student for defending the faith from modern and postmodern criticism. The goal of the class is to prepare the college bound student to address potential attacks of the faith. The student will be able to explain the rational, historical and theological basis that erode Christianity’s claim to exclusive truth. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

The Lutheran Study Bible

ADVANCED OLD TESTAMENT STUDIES 000112 PREREQUISITES: None

SEMESTER GRADES: 11, 12

An in-depth study of the Old Testament focusing on Old Testament peoples, prophecies, backgrounds, the contents of the four Old Testament divisions (Pentateuch, Books of History, Books of Wisdom and Poetry, and the Major and Minor Prophets), and the major covenants of the Old Testament. Use of the Law and the Gospel, application of the messages of hope and promise to everyday life will be examined. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

The Lutheran Study Bible

54


ETHICS AND MORAL DECISIONS 000113 PREREQUISITES: None

SEMESTER GRADES: 11, 12

The course will explore moral standards and ethical decisions on historical and contemporary issues. Basic questions about good, evil, right, wrong, justice, value, duty, and obligation will be examined. Matters about predestination, free will, truth, honesty, justice will be studied. Contemporary social issues of dating, sexuality, marriage, will be scrutinized as well as relations between individual ethics and modern societal ethics. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

The Lutheran Study Bible

HERITAGE OF THE FAITH 000114 PREREQUISITES: None

SEMESTER GRADES: 11, 12

This course focuses on the development of God’s church throughout history. The basis of study is the broad sweep of Church history and thought. From the first Pentecost through the Creeds, the Reformation into American history of the Lutheran Church, the student will see the conflicts, criticisms and resolutions that have impacted the church of yesterday and today. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

The Lutheran Study Bible

LEADERSHIP 000130 PREREQUISITE:

None

SEMESTER GRADES: 11, 12

The foundational assumption of this course is that God has called each of us to be leaders – that is, to influence our environment for the benefit of other people and for the expansion of God’s kingdom. Students will develop leadership awareness, knowledge, and skills through personal research, study of major leadership theories from a variety of settings, the expertise of guest speakers from different backgrounds, leaders’ communications through various media, and most importantly, through focused study of God’s Word. Students will grow in their capacity to be Godly leaders in their school, their homes, their churches, and in society as a whole. SPECIAL MATERIALS: NEIGHBORS 000131 PREREQUISITES:

The Lutheran Study Bible

SEMESTER GRADES 11, 12

None

Utilizing field trips, guest speakers as well as primary and secondary materials, this course examines the beliefs and practices of most Christian denominations in the United States as well as non-Christian beliefs. Much emphasis is given to detailing the similarities and differences in various religions. Reports are assigned. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

Churches in America (CPH), The Lutheran Study Bible

55


CHRISTIAN LIVING 000132 PREREQUISITES: None

SEMESTER GRADES 11, 12

Through an in-depth study of the Gospel of John, several of Paul’s Epistles, and the book of Revelation as well as other Biblical passages, this course examines how Biblical theology helps to affirm our personal life as Christians. How do we live our faith? What about the struggles we have in relationships? What about those daily doubts and temptations? This course attempts to help form critical thinking skills and mature theological reflections in young Christians. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

The Lutheran Study Bible

SPIRITUAL BATTLES 000150 PREREQUISITES: None

SEMESTER GRADES: 11, 12

A look at the Old and New Testaments Spiritual battles and the spiritual battles we face today - Miracles, healings, angels, demons, heaven, hell and the monumental struggle between the Lamb and the Dragon with his beasts. The study will explore the challenges of Biblical interpretation, design and impact on people and modern society and how to face individual battles each of us face. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

The Lutheran Study Bible

THE CHRISTIAN IN COMMUNITY 000155 PREREQUISITES: None

SEMESTER GRADES 11, 12

This course further develops theological skills for addressing the Christian man and woman’s vocation in the home, in their congregation, and in society. Contemporary theological and ethical issues are explored. The students assist in selecting which topics are covered each semester. Each issue is explored deeply, Scripturally, and historically. Students will design and operate a simulated congregation. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

The Lutheran Study Bible, Holy People, Holy Lives: Law and Gospel in Bioethics (CPH) The Spirituality of the Cross (CPH)

WORSHIP AND THE ARTS 000160 PREREQUISITES: None

SEMESTER GRADES: 11, 12

An in-depth look at the history and development of Christian worship arts, music, architecture, media, internet, movies, prayer and praise. The student will explore the various forms of worship, the future of worship styles and the criticism of different worship experiences. Three weekend field trips will observe various forms of Christian worship. This course can be taken to fulfill either a (1/2) fine art credit or (1/2) theology credit. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

The Lutheran Study Bible, Lab fee $5

56


INTRODUCTION TO CHRISTIANITY 000165 PREREQUISITES: None

SEMESTER GRADES: 9, 10, 11, 12

This course is provided for the student transferring to LHSS as an introduction to Christianity and the Lutheran South theology Curriculum. This course serves as an introduction to the Christian faith. It will present God’s plan of salvation as revealed in the Bible. Students will begin by studying the major biblical Old and New Testament stories of rescue, salvation, and hope. The major doctrines of the church will be explored. The primary focus will be on the person and work of Jesus Christ who is the Savior of all people. SPECIAL MATERIALS: RELATIONSHIPS 000170 PREREQUISITES:

The Lutheran Study Bible

SEMESTER GRADES: 11, 12

None

This course will explore marriage and family themes fro the perspective of Christian theology, and the current state of family life in the American context. Students will strengthen their preparation for coping with the realities of life. Topics may include values, character, personality, coping with pressure-drugs, sex, alcohol-relationship with family, friends and others, dating love, responsibilities of human sexuality, marriage and family, the single living divorce, depression, conflict resolution and communication. By peer group discussion, independent study, guest speakers, field trips and team teaching the students will determine decision-making for success in many life situations. Attention will be given to the practices and skills necessary to build a healthy marriage and family. This course can be taken to fulfill either a (1/2) practical art credit or (1/2) theology credit. SPECIAL MATERIALS:

The Lutheran Study Bible

57


LUTHERAN HIGH SCHOOL SOUTH FACULTY ROSTER

Albers, Michael

B.S. M.S.

Concordia Teachers College Seward, Nebraska University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Mathematics

Behling, Mark

B.A.

Concordia Teachers College River Forest, Illinois

Social Science

Berner, Beth

B.S.

University of Missouri Saint Louis, Missouri

Director of Admissions

Blackshear, Rayna

B.S. M.A.

Lindenwood University Saint Charles, Missouri

Director of Guidance

Capotorto, Kellie

B.A.

Lindenwood University St. Charles, Missouri Maryville University Saint Louis, Missouri

LFCS – School Based Counselor

M.A. Chang, Joy

M.A.

Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, Illinois Portland State University Portland, Oregon Yuan Ze University Taiwan University of North Carolina Greensboro, North Carolina

Chinese

Cox, Joseph

B.A.

University of Michigan Ann Arbor, MI Concordia Seminary-Saint Louis Saint Louis, Missouri

Theology

M.Div. Davis, Angela

B.S.

Fontbonne University Saint Louis, Missouri

Family & Consumer Science

Davis, Deborah

B.A.

Fontbonne University Saint Louis, Missouri Webster University Saint Louis, Missouri

Special Education

Scripps College Claremont, California Claremont Graduate School Claremont, California Claremont Graduate School Claremont, California

French

M.A.T. DeBuhr, Astrid

B.A. M.A. Ph.D.

58


DeNoyer, Scott

B.S. B.S. M.A.T.

Ealick, Benjamin

B.A M.A.

Saint Louis University Saint Louis, Missouri Saint Louis University Saint Louis, Missouri Webster University Saint Louis, Missouri

Mathematics

Lindenwood University Saint Charles, Missouri Lindenwood University Saint Charles, Missouri

Social Science

Faucette, Chuck

B.A.

University of Maryland College Park, Maryland

Physical Education

Figur, Liane

B.A.

Concordia University Texas Austin, Texas Universidad Pontificia Salamanca ULBRA/Salamanca, Spain Pontificia Universidade Catolica Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil Faculdade Sao Judas tadeu Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil Universidade Vale do Rio dos Sino Sao Leopoldo, RS, Brazil

Spanish

University of Texas Austin, Texas Concordia Teachers College River Forest, Illinois

Choral Music

ABD M.Ed. Graduate Program Graduate Program et al Gastler, Greg

B.M.Ed. M.C.M

Gilbert, Joel

B.S. Ed.

Concordia University Seward, Nebraska

History & Geography

Glessner, Eric

B.S.

University of the Pacific Stockton, California

Science

Harms, Daniel

B.S.Ed.

University of Missouri Saint Louis, Missouri University of Missouri Saint Louis, Missouri

Dean of Students Psychology

University of Wisconsin Stevens Point, Wisconsin Marquette University Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Business

Southeast Missouri State Cape Girardeau, Missouri University of Missouri Columbia, Missouri

Library Science

M.Ed.Adm. Hempel, Thea

B.A. M.B.A.

Holman, Melissa

B.S. M.S.

59


Hopkins, Theodore

B.S M.Div.

Janssen, Matthew

B.S.Ed. M.Mus.

Johnston, Nathan

A.B. B.J. A.M.

Ladage, Robert

B.S. M.S.

Liebmann, Martin

B.S. M.A.T.

Lind, Brian

B.A. M.A.T.

Lorenz, Melissa

B.A M.A.

Valparaiso University Valparaiso, Indiana Concordia Seminary Saint Louis, Missouri

Theology

Concordia University Seward, Nebraska University of Louisville Louisville, Kentucky

Instrumental Music

University of Missouri Columbia, Missouri University of Missouri Columbia, Missouri Washington University Saint Louis, Missouri

Social Science

Valparaiso University Valparaiso, Indiana Washington University Saint Louis, Missouri

Mathematics

Concordia Teachers College Seward, Nebraska Webster University Saint Louis, Missouri

Art

Fontbonne College Saint Louis, Missouri Webster University Saint Louis, Missouri

Science

Webster University Saint Louis, Missouri Fontbonne University, Saint Louis, Missouri

Family & Consumer Science

Martin, Dawn

B.S.

Concordia University Seward, Nebraska

Mathematics

Miller, Ellen

B.A.

Concordia Teachers College River Forest, Illinois

Elementary Music

Miller, John

B.A.

Concordia Teachers College River Forest, Illinois Northern Illinois University DeKalb, Illinois

Instrumental Music

Universitat Hannover, Germany Univrsitat Lubeck, Germany

German

M.Mus. Muller-Williams, Daniela B.A. M.A.

60


Nations, Michael

B.A. M.A.

University of Missouri Columbia, Missouri University of Missouri Columbia, Missouri

English

Omura, Ann

B.A.

Monmouth College Monmouth, Illinois

English

Perkowski, Christina

B.A.

Saint Louis University Saint Louis, Missouri Webster University Saint Louis, Missouri

Spanish

University of Missouri Rolla, Missouri National-Louis University Saint Louis, Missouri University of Missouri Columbia, Missouri

Science

M.A.T. Pfund, Steven

B.S. M.A.

Pitman, Bethany

B.S

Concordia University Seward, Nebraska

English

Reck, Thomas

B.A.

Concordia Teachers College River Forest, Illinois Webster College Saint Louis, Missouri Washington University Saint Louis, Missouri

English

M.A.T. M.A. Reinitz, Carol

B.S.Ed.

Missouri Baptist College Saint Louis, Missouri

Physical Education

Roma, Ron

B.A.

Concordia Senior College Ft. Wayne, Indiana Concordia Seminary Saint Louis, Missouri Washington University Saint Louis, Missouri

Counseling Theology

Concordia Teachers College Seward, Nebraska Oklahoma University Norman, Oklahoma

Science

Concordia College River Forest, Illinois University of Houston Houston, Texas Illinois State University Normal, IL

Principal Leadership

M.Div. M.A.Ed. Rusch, Wilbert

B.S.Ed. M.N.S.

Ryherd, Brian

B.A. M.Ed. ABD

61


Schmid, Steve

B.A. M.Ed.

Concordia University, Wisconsin Mequon, Wisconsin National Louis University Evanston, Illinois

Science

Steinbrueck, Kathy

B.A

Concordia College St. Paul, Minnesota

IT Director

Steinbrueck, Kenneth

B.A.

Concordia Teachers College River Forest, Illinois Webster University Saint Louis, Missouri

Industrial Technology

M.A.T. Stelmachowicz, Casey

B.S.

Concordia University Mequon, Wisconsin

English

Wietfeldt, Cathy

B.S.

Concordia Teachers College River Forest, Illinois Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, Illinois

Mathematics

School Nurse

M.S. Wilson, Chris

B.S.N

University of Missouri Columbia, Missouri

Wolter, Kristin

BA

Millikin University Decatur, Illinois Southern Illinois University Carbondale, Illinois

M.S.Ed.

62

Counseling


9515 Tesson Ferry Rd., Saint Louis, MO 63123 Phone: 314-631-1400 Fax: 314-631-7762 www.lhssonline.org

Academic Guide 2014 - 2015  
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