Page 1

K ansas State Universit y Salina

beyond

Fall 2010 Alumni Magazine

Keeping Wildcats Beyond our Campus Informed Volume 2, Issue 1

Leaving their mark

Students continue to leave their mark on campus through participating in student clubs, organizations, and service.


letter from the dean

featured content

Under President Kirk Schulz’s leadership over the past year, Kansas State University has continued to grow and develop. His vision of a three-campus university has brought K-State Salina more attention than ever before.

Within the next year we anticipate adding a professional master’s of technology degree program and adding bachelor’s degree programs in unmanned aerial systems and avionics. We are continuing to look at other degree programs that would benefit our students and prospective students from the surrounding region. As we look to increase enrollment, we must also maintain the things that make us great, like a 15:1 student to faculty ratio, small campus setting, and 90 plus percent job placement rate. It is because of the support that we’ve received from you – our alumni and friends – that we have been able to develop into a campus that offers students more than just a classroom experience. Research projects on and off campus, internships, extracurricular activities, part-time employment and on-campus living are experiences that students appreciate and many of the reasons why students choose K-State Salina for their education.

K-State Salina welcomes three club sports teams to campus with the opening of the new Student Life Center.

8 Leaving their mark

Students continue to leave their mark on campus through student clubs, organizations, and service.

16 Alan Cordel

19 Donors’ Gift

Lee and Beverly Gatton support their alma mater with a deferred gift.

other news 4

it’s first year on campus.

Best personal regards,

8 14

Campus timeline

difference everyday

Student Life Center The Student Life Center celebrates

Campus profiles Students and faculty making a

Send us your current contact information or tell us where your career is going, how your family is growing or any of your other accomplishments. Get us your updataes by Friday, February 4, 2011, and we’ll enter your name into a drawing for a basket of wine accessories including K-State Salina wineglasses, bottle opener, and cheeseball mix. See page 18 to fill out the contact information card.

17

Alumni profiles Janelle Baron & Clayton Gililand

20

Campus news The Salina campus sees exciting

development in clubs & grounds.

22

K-State Salina donors

Contributors Editor

Natalie Blair

Designer

Ashley Flowers

Contributing Writers Rachel Skybetter, Trevor Davis, Rebecca Van Allen

Photographer David Mayes

Contributing Photographers

Heather Wagoner, Trista Gorrell, Michael Oetken

Special Thanks

January 18 – Spring semester begins February 23-25 – 2011 Alumni Fellow recognition 27 – Telefund March 21-25 – Spring Break

2010 K-State Salina Alumni Fellow

Your continued partnership will allow us to continue to grow and become known for our research, scholarship, and community support efforts.

Win a basket of wine accessories!

Write these upcoming campus events on your calendar!

6 For the love

Our campus has risen to the challenge with the opening of the Student Life Center, making upgrades to lounge areas in the residence halls, installing a welcome desk in the College Center lobby, offering club sports teams, increasing academic offerings, and putting more emphasis on research with the progression of our Unmanned Aircraft Systems program. But we aren’t done yet.

Events

Pat Ackerman, Pam Bower, Mark Friesen, Jaci Walsh

April 1 – K-State Salina Day for Juniors and Seniors 16 – Open House May 7 – Commencement


letter from the dean

featured content

Under President Kirk Schulz’s leadership over the past year, Kansas State University has continued to grow and develop. His vision of a three-campus university has brought K-State Salina more attention than ever before.

Within the next year we anticipate adding a professional master’s of technology degree program and adding bachelor’s degree programs in unmanned aerial systems and avionics. We are continuing to look at other degree programs that would benefit our students and prospective students from the surrounding region. As we look to increase enrollment, we must also maintain the things that make us great, like a 15:1 student to faculty ratio, small campus setting, and 90 plus percent job placement rate. It is because of the support that we’ve received from you – our alumni and friends – that we have been able to develop into a campus that offers students more than just a classroom experience. Research projects on and off campus, internships, extracurricular activities, part-time employment and on-campus living are experiences that students appreciate and many of the reasons why students choose K-State Salina for their education.

K-State Salina welcomes three club sports teams to campus with the opening of the new Student Life Center.

8 Leaving their mark

Students continue to leave their mark on campus through student clubs, organizations, and service.

16 Alan Cordel

19 Donors’ Gift

Lee and Beverly Gatton support their alma mater with a deferred gift.

other news 4

it’s first year on campus.

Best personal regards,

8 14

Campus timeline

difference everyday

Student Life Center The Student Life Center celebrates

Campus profiles Students and faculty making a

Send us your current contact information or tell us where your career is going, how your family is growing or any of your other accomplishments. Get us your updataes by Friday, February 4, 2011, and we’ll enter your name into a drawing for a basket of wine accessories including K-State Salina wineglasses, bottle opener, and cheeseball mix. See page 18 to fill out the contact information card.

17

Alumni profiles Janelle Baron & Clayton Gililand

20

Campus news The Salina campus sees exciting

development in clubs & grounds.

22

K-State Salina donors

Contributors Editor

Natalie Blair

Designer

Ashley Flowers

Contributing Writers Rachel Skybetter, Trevor Davis, Rebecca Van Allen

Photographer David Mayes

Contributing Photographers

Heather Wagoner, Trista Gorrell, Michael Oetken

Special Thanks

January 18 – Spring semester begins February 23-25 – 2011 Alumni Fellow recognition 27 – Telefund March 21-25 – Spring Break

2010 K-State Salina Alumni Fellow

Your continued partnership will allow us to continue to grow and become known for our research, scholarship, and community support efforts.

Win a basket of wine accessories!

Write these upcoming campus events on your calendar!

6 For the love

Our campus has risen to the challenge with the opening of the Student Life Center, making upgrades to lounge areas in the residence halls, installing a welcome desk in the College Center lobby, offering club sports teams, increasing academic offerings, and putting more emphasis on research with the progression of our Unmanned Aircraft Systems program. But we aren’t done yet.

Events

Pat Ackerman, Pam Bower, Mark Friesen, Jaci Walsh

April 1 – K-State Salina Day for Juniors and Seniors 16 – Open House May 7 – Commencement


we’re ! s e Y

OPEN

The Student Life Center opened in November 2009 and has been a hot spot on campus ever since.

Photos by David Mayes

When the doors of the Student Life Center

opened in November 2009, students were greeted with many new opportunities – and not just state-of-the-art equipment and a place with air conditioning and heat.

The term “student athlete” wasn’t often heard on the K-State Salina campus before the SLC opened. But it seems appropriate that with the new building on campus, there would be new student organizations. Among the new activities available to students are three club sports: women’s softball, men’s basketball, and women’s dance. The Dodge Ball Club is happy to have space to play in the racquetball court when it isn’t being used for racquetball games.

The Salina community has also benefitted from the new building. The Science Olympiad and Teen Women In Science and Technology workshop both used the facility as a gathering place for competitors, and a deployment ceremony was held for members of the Kansas Agribusiness Development Team #3 deploying to Afghanistan in November.

Other student organizations have found a meeting space in the Cessna Lounge – a place where students can also play pool, air hockey or pingpong, as well as watch TV, play video games, and work on class assignments.

“The new building has provided many new opportunities for our students and the Salina community,” said Dennis Kuhlman, Dean of K-State Salina. “It’s exciting to think about how many more opportunities having the Student Life Center will create in the future.”

Several watch parties have been held in Cessna Lounge, including cheering the Wildcats men’s basketball team through an Elite 8 season. The SLC hosted several events during New Student Orientation and Wildcat Welcome Week - including meet and greets, an ice cream social, and the student organization fair – so it seems fitting that three graduation ceremonies have been held in the gym. 4 Beyond

A group of alumni, including a few former Student Governing Association members who passed the legislation that provided funding for the building’s construction, toured the SLC before enjoying a meal and memories in the cafeteria during K-State Salina Open House 2010. An alumni gathering is in the works for Open House 2011 on Saturday, April 16.

Memberships are available to all K-State alumni and community members. For more information contact K-State Salina Recreational Services at: 785-826-2667 or SLC-RecServices@salina.k-state.edu

Fall 2010

5


we’re ! s e Y

OPEN

The Student Life Center opened in November 2009 and has been a hot spot on campus ever since.

Photos by David Mayes

When the doors of the Student Life Center

opened in November 2009, students were greeted with many new opportunities – and not just state-of-the-art equipment and a place with air conditioning and heat.

The term “student athlete” wasn’t often heard on the K-State Salina campus before the SLC opened. But it seems appropriate that with the new building on campus, there would be new student organizations. Among the new activities available to students are three club sports: women’s softball, men’s basketball, and women’s dance. The Dodge Ball Club is happy to have space to play in the racquetball court when it isn’t being used for racquetball games.

The Salina community has also benefitted from the new building. The Science Olympiad and Teen Women In Science and Technology workshop both used the facility as a gathering place for competitors, and a deployment ceremony was held for members of the Kansas Agribusiness Development Team #3 deploying to Afghanistan in November.

Other student organizations have found a meeting space in the Cessna Lounge – a place where students can also play pool, air hockey or pingpong, as well as watch TV, play video games, and work on class assignments.

“The new building has provided many new opportunities for our students and the Salina community,” said Dennis Kuhlman, Dean of K-State Salina. “It’s exciting to think about how many more opportunities having the Student Life Center will create in the future.”

Several watch parties have been held in Cessna Lounge, including cheering the Wildcats men’s basketball team through an Elite 8 season. The SLC hosted several events during New Student Orientation and Wildcat Welcome Week - including meet and greets, an ice cream social, and the student organization fair – so it seems fitting that three graduation ceremonies have been held in the gym. 4 Beyond

A group of alumni, including a few former Student Governing Association members who passed the legislation that provided funding for the building’s construction, toured the SLC before enjoying a meal and memories in the cafeteria during K-State Salina Open House 2010. An alumni gathering is in the works for Open House 2011 on Saturday, April 16.

Memberships are available to all K-State alumni and community members. For more information contact K-State Salina Recreational Services at: 785-826-2667 or SLC-RecServices@salina.k-state.edu

Fall 2010

5


love for the

They practice from 10 to midnight because that’s when they can all make it to practice, which is scheduled around the classes they’re taking – including the coach’s. Then some of them head to class at 8 the next morning.

Colton Mosiman, sophomore in Professional Pilot, Sedgwick, a point guard, doesn’t mind that the team has to practice so late in the evening. “We’d be up anyway,” he said. “And I’d rather practice late at night instead of early in the morning.”

They hold fundraisers to pay for uniforms, equipment, and travel expenses.

The team played Sterling College on November 2. The final score was 35-83.

They have no dreams of going on to play in the pros or of one day signing a multimillion-dollar endorsement deal.

“It was everyone’s first game at a collegiate level and we were up against a team that’s always been nationally ranked,” said Fitch. “We were really nervous.”

Ask the 14 members of K-State Salina’s club team why they do it and they’ll say, “because I love to play basketball.” Some team members have only been out of high school for a year or two. For others, it’s more like a decade or two. Only coach Cameron Jackson had experience playing basketball at a collegiate level, though John “Jay” Smith is a former pitcher and outfielder for Cloud County Community College and Texas A&M baseball and now is the team forward. Smith came to K-State Salina to make a career change, never expecting he’d change sports in the process. The switch started about a year ago when he was shooting around with Jackson. Jackson complemented him on his technique and asked where he had played. “I’m a baseball player,” Smith told him. While a student at Cloud two of his roommates were basketball players who taught him some fundamentals but the most organized game he had played was on an intramurals team. The other players had all played on high school teams but “we weren’t looked at to play at the collegiate level so having this opportunity to play is amazing,” said Tanner Thompson, sophomore in Professional Pilot, Phillipsburg, screening guard. Kalen Fitch, junior in Aviation Maintenance, South Haven, who plays forward, agrees. “We thought we were done so getting a second chance is awesome,” he said.

K-State Salina welcomes three club sports teams to the campus

The team played three games in the Ambassadors Classic at Colby Community College and have started to work out their nerves. Their tournament scores were 38101, 60-73, and 77-80. The ‘Cats first home game against Colby Community College on December 2 was covered by 92.7 “The New Zoo.” Other games on the schedule include Sterling College at home Feb. 3; and away games with Hesston College, Feb. 9, and Brown Mackie College, Feb. 24.

When the basketball players leave the court, the club softball team will take the field. The 13 women on the club softball team took on Haskell University during the Midwest Fall Classic on Sept. 18. Despite a 17-2 loss, the team isn’t discouraged. “Even though we had minimal practice together we worked well as a team,” said pitcher and club vice president Whitney Spaulding, sophomore in business administration, Mulvane. Spaulding is one of the few players with organized softball experience. “It’s great that the team gives female students a chance to get involved with sports,” she said. “We’ve had a lot of support from students. When we had our scrimmage in the fall we had a lot of people there to cheer for us.”

The Salina Spirit Cats lead the Wildcats in enthusiasm. They dance before or during every club sports event on campus and a few intramurals events, as well. They also perform in the community at events such as St. John’s Military School football games and Girl Scout workshops as well as for groups like the Eaglecrest Retirement Community. “The goal of the Spirit Cats dance team is to serve as ambassadors for K-State Salina,” said Teresa Hartman, Instructor of Math and the team’s advisor. “In addition to supporting the other club teams, they promote the campus to the community. It also gives a group of students a chance to be involved on our campus in a way they’ve never had a chance to before.” “The club sports teams have benefitted not only the students who participate, but also the campus community, because it gives us an opportunity to support students in an athletic arena,” said Levi Esses, Director of Student Life. “Not only that, but the teams have raised funds in ways that also help the Salina community. They have put on youth basketball camps, refereed at high school games, and held car washes, which also helps the school get exposure that focuses on the opportunities that are out here, more than just taking classes.” “We’re the lucky ones,” said Smith. “Not many people get the chance to play collegiate ball, so having this opportunity at K-State Salina is great.”

If you are interested in supporting K-State Salina’s club sports teams, contact Mark Friesen at 785-826-2609 or mfriesen@k-state.edu.

Basketball team: Front row (L-R) John “Jay Smith, Tanner Thompson, Felipe Aguilar, Brandon Leander, Tyrel Robben. Back row (L-R) Desmond Calloway, Kalen Fitch, TJ Wikoff, Will Jones, Ethan Frasier, Anthony Russo, Colby Walter, Tomu Takase Dance team: (L-R) Kelsey Adams, LaCrista Brightbill, Erica Riffel, Kara Godsil, Madi Miles Softball team: (L-R) Coach Eric Brown, Dawn Ramp, Deanna Pachero, Megan Powell, Kelsey Adams, Danielle Howard, Erica Riffel, Megan Henderson, Whitney Spauling, Jennifer Hutfles, Rae Ives, Jennifer McLean, Jennifer Abbott, Coach Levi Esses

6

Beyond

Fall 2010

7


love for the

They practice from 10 to midnight because that’s when they can all make it to practice, which is scheduled around the classes they’re taking – including the coach’s. Then some of them head to class at 8 the next morning.

Colton Mosiman, sophomore in Professional Pilot, Sedgwick, a point guard, doesn’t mind that the team has to practice so late in the evening. “We’d be up anyway,” he said. “And I’d rather practice late at night instead of early in the morning.”

They hold fundraisers to pay for uniforms, equipment, and travel expenses.

The team played Sterling College on November 2. The final score was 35-83.

They have no dreams of going on to play in the pros or of one day signing a multimillion-dollar endorsement deal.

“It was everyone’s first game at a collegiate level and we were up against a team that’s always been nationally ranked,” said Fitch. “We were really nervous.”

Ask the 14 members of K-State Salina’s club team why they do it and they’ll say, “because I love to play basketball.” Some team members have only been out of high school for a year or two. For others, it’s more like a decade or two. Only coach Cameron Jackson had experience playing basketball at a collegiate level, though John “Jay” Smith is a former pitcher and outfielder for Cloud County Community College and Texas A&M baseball and now is the team forward. Smith came to K-State Salina to make a career change, never expecting he’d change sports in the process. The switch started about a year ago when he was shooting around with Jackson. Jackson complemented him on his technique and asked where he had played. “I’m a baseball player,” Smith told him. While a student at Cloud two of his roommates were basketball players who taught him some fundamentals but the most organized game he had played was on an intramurals team. The other players had all played on high school teams but “we weren’t looked at to play at the collegiate level so having this opportunity to play is amazing,” said Tanner Thompson, sophomore in Professional Pilot, Phillipsburg, screening guard. Kalen Fitch, junior in Aviation Maintenance, South Haven, who plays forward, agrees. “We thought we were done so getting a second chance is awesome,” he said.

K-State Salina welcomes three club sports teams to the campus

The team played three games in the Ambassadors Classic at Colby Community College and have started to work out their nerves. Their tournament scores were 38101, 60-73, and 77-80. The ‘Cats first home game against Colby Community College on December 2 was covered by 92.7 “The New Zoo.” Other games on the schedule include Sterling College at home Feb. 3; and away games with Hesston College, Feb. 9, and Brown Mackie College, Feb. 24.

When the basketball players leave the court, the club softball team will take the field. The 13 women on the club softball team took on Haskell University during the Midwest Fall Classic on Sept. 18. Despite a 17-2 loss, the team isn’t discouraged. “Even though we had minimal practice together we worked well as a team,” said pitcher and club vice president Whitney Spaulding, sophomore in business administration, Mulvane. Spaulding is one of the few players with organized softball experience. “It’s great that the team gives female students a chance to get involved with sports,” she said. “We’ve had a lot of support from students. When we had our scrimmage in the fall we had a lot of people there to cheer for us.”

The Salina Spirit Cats lead the Wildcats in enthusiasm. They dance before or during every club sports event on campus and a few intramurals events, as well. They also perform in the community at events such as St. John’s Military School football games and Girl Scout workshops as well as for groups like the Eaglecrest Retirement Community. “The goal of the Spirit Cats dance team is to serve as ambassadors for K-State Salina,” said Teresa Hartman, Instructor of Math and the team’s advisor. “In addition to supporting the other club teams, they promote the campus to the community. It also gives a group of students a chance to be involved on our campus in a way they’ve never had a chance to before.” “The club sports teams have benefitted not only the students who participate, but also the campus community, because it gives us an opportunity to support students in an athletic arena,” said Levi Esses, Director of Student Life. “Not only that, but the teams have raised funds in ways that also help the Salina community. They have put on youth basketball camps, refereed at high school games, and held car washes, which also helps the school get exposure that focuses on the opportunities that are out here, more than just taking classes.” “We’re the lucky ones,” said Smith. “Not many people get the chance to play collegiate ball, so having this opportunity at K-State Salina is great.”

If you are interested in supporting K-State Salina’s club sports teams, contact Mark Friesen at 785-826-2609 or mfriesen@k-state.edu.

Basketball team: Front row (L-R) John “Jay Smith, Tanner Thompson, Felipe Aguilar, Brandon Leander, Tyrel Robben. Back row (L-R) Desmond Calloway, Kalen Fitch, TJ Wikoff, Will Jones, Ethan Frasier, Anthony Russo, Colby Walter, Tomu Takase Dance team: (L-R) Kelsey Adams, LaCrista Brightbill, Erica Riffel, Kara Godsil, Madi Miles Softball team: (L-R) Coach Eric Brown, Dawn Ramp, Deanna Pachero, Megan Powell, Kelsey Adams, Danielle Howard, Erica Riffel, Megan Henderson, Whitney Spauling, Jennifer Hutfles, Rae Ives, Jennifer McLean, Jennifer Abbott, Coach Levi Esses

6

Beyond

Fall 2010

7


student life

campus organizations

Cat Canon

Ready. Aim. Breathe. Fire

Operation : Baja

The mission: win the international Baja SAE competition The plan: completely rebuild the Baja SAE car The budget: $10,000 “There will be about 100 schools from around the world at the competition in Pittsburg (Kan.) at the end of May,” said club president Colin Tipton, junior in Mechanical Engineering Technology, Munden. “Brazil brings the top three teams from their country’s competition.” The team gets to build a car one year and make alterations the next. This is a build year. After spending several months analyzing the previous car’s weak points they have plans to build twice the car on half the budget. “Our previous car cost us $17,000 to build but we’re really going to have to scale back our spending while making an even better car,” said Dustin Turner, junior in Mechanical Engineering Technology, El Dorado. The new design will have more efficient weight distribution and will have improved maneuverability. A new gearbox will include neutral and reverse. The braking system is going to see some changes, and the controls are going to be moved forward to make the 4-hour long endurance test portion of the competition more comfortable for the driver.

Working through all the changes on a limited budget gives club members a chance to apply classroom lessons in real world situations, according to club secretary Paul Bentz, junior in Mechanical Engineering Technology, Hope. But perhaps former club president Alan Downie, senior in Mechanical Engineering Technology, Salina, identified one of the most useful things club members learn:

“patience.” It takes patience to design an entire car from the tires up. It takes patience to rework the entire plan when something goes wrong. And it takes patience to build support. “If somebody walked in here with $10,000 they could pick the color of the car and have their name on the hood. Heck, we’d probably let them do that for $5,000,” said Broberg, only partly joking. “But if somebody walked in here with a set of sparkplugs or a couple of axles, we’d sure take them.”

k-state salina timeline By: Rebecca Van Allen 1966

Kansas legislature approves the use of former air base land for the Schilling Institute to offer two-year associate degrees in engineering technology. Administrative offices are located in downtown Salina until the campus was ready. Hank M. Neely is president.

1969 Our name changes to Kansas Technical Institute when the college is put under the State Board of Education.

8

Beyond

Students in the engineering technology program designed the first Cat Cannon nine years ago when the T-shirt shooter that Willie the Wildcat had been using just couldn’t get the shirts high enough to reach fans in the stadium’s upper deck.

“Sitting with your knees in your ears isn’t the greatest way to spend four hours,” said Luke Broberg, junior in Mechanical Engineering Technology, Salina.

1965

But even with all of the safety features in place, club members don’t get to shoot T-shirts at games until their second year.

Sending Wildcat spirit to new heights at home football games takes teamwork, nerves of steel and being very precise at folding T-shirts.

The current version of the Cat Cannon -Cat Cannon 4.0 -- was the brainchild of Kyle Jensen ’08 and Steve Goodman ’09 and was introduced two years ago.

Photo: Trista Gorrell

As the team builds the car, they are also preparing for competition. In addition to the endurance event they receive points for their design report, an evaluation of the design, a cost report and the total production cost. The car itself is judged on it’s acceleration, suspension and traction, maneuverability, and either a rock crawl or pulling event. The team is also thinking about putting in a bid to host the competition in the future. “It would be great if we could host it and have the home turf advantage,” said Tipton.

1968

The administration moves to campus and The first class graduate from Schilling 113 students start the first official classes Institute. There were 10 graduates and the governor attended the ceremony. in the fall of ’66.

1972 KTI’s first varsity sports team is formed. They play soccer. By 1978, a men’s basketball team and a women’s volleyball team are formed.

Cat Cannon 4.0 can shoot a shirt the length of a football field, and, with a little tweaking, the machine is capable of launching a shirt three times that distance, according to Cat Cannon Club members. The club is responsible for the care and upkeep of the cannon, which features a revolverstyle loading system, making the shooting process much safer than previous versions that required a student to load the cannon from the end of the barrel, using a stick. The current cannon is made of metal rather than the previous PVC pipe and runs off of a program logic controller rather than the previous manual systems. It’s also completely air-pressure driven, using air canisters regulated to only use up to 200 pounds per square inch of the available 3,000 pounds per square inch of pressure.

1976 Kansas legislature transferscontrol of the college from the Board of Education to the State Board of Regents.

“Even though all you have to do is punch in the pressure and hit fire, it takes nerves of steel to shoot the Cat Cannon,” said T.J. Hearn, senior in Computer Systems Engineering Technology, Stafford, and president of the Cat Cannon Club. “It’s even more nerve-racking to shoot our Mini-Cannon at basketball games.”

off shirts from their seats,” said Hearn. “We also have talked about making the cylinder rotation more smooth and creating wireless driving controls.” The Cat Cannon sponsors include Weis Fire and Safety Equipment Company - who provides air tanks for every game, K-State Salina’s Student Governing Association, GeoProbe, and Premier Pneumatics.

Both cannons will begin the redesign process beginning in January when Josh Dreiling, senior in Mechanical Engineering Technology, Wichita, begins his senior design project. The mini cannon’s compression chamber will be revamped to a system similar to a paintball gun. When Dreiling is done the larger cannon will be able to shoot all six rounds at once, Gatling gun-style. The operator will be able to set the angle of the barrel to automatically adjust and program the machine to automatically fire. The Cat Cannon will have better driving controls and a new paint job, too. But the club has even bigger dreams than that. “If we had the resources we’d love to use the wireless firing controls to create an application that would let us take a smart phone into the stands and let fans shoot

1977 KTI students take a ski trip. K-State Salina still has a Ski Club that organizes as trip over the winter break.

Photo: Michael Oetken

See how good you are at shooting shirts to fans! Play the Cat Cannon game at www.ksucatcannon.com.

1981 Members of the Civil Club build concrete canoes, which they took to Manhattan for competition. Today, the Concrete Canoe Club still races in Manhattan.

1983 Ground is broken for Technology Center, intended to be the “campus hub.”

Fall 2010 9


student life

campus organizations

Cat Canon

Ready. Aim. Breathe. Fire

Operation : Baja

The mission: win the international Baja SAE competition The plan: completely rebuild the Baja SAE car The budget: $10,000 “There will be about 100 schools from around the world at the competition in Pittsburg (Kan.) at the end of May,” said club president Colin Tipton, junior in Mechanical Engineering Technology, Munden. “Brazil brings the top three teams from their country’s competition.” The team gets to build a car one year and make alterations the next. This is a build year. After spending several months analyzing the previous car’s weak points they have plans to build twice the car on half the budget. “Our previous car cost us $17,000 to build but we’re really going to have to scale back our spending while making an even better car,” said Dustin Turner, junior in Mechanical Engineering Technology, El Dorado. The new design will have more efficient weight distribution and will have improved maneuverability. A new gearbox will include neutral and reverse. The braking system is going to see some changes, and the controls are going to be moved forward to make the 4-hour long endurance test portion of the competition more comfortable for the driver.

Working through all the changes on a limited budget gives club members a chance to apply classroom lessons in real world situations, according to club secretary Paul Bentz, junior in Mechanical Engineering Technology, Hope. But perhaps former club president Alan Downie, senior in Mechanical Engineering Technology, Salina, identified one of the most useful things club members learn:

“patience.” It takes patience to design an entire car from the tires up. It takes patience to rework the entire plan when something goes wrong. And it takes patience to build support. “If somebody walked in here with $10,000 they could pick the color of the car and have their name on the hood. Heck, we’d probably let them do that for $5,000,” said Broberg, only partly joking. “But if somebody walked in here with a set of sparkplugs or a couple of axles, we’d sure take them.”

k-state salina timeline By: Rebecca Van Allen 1966

Kansas legislature approves the use of former air base land for the Schilling Institute to offer two-year associate degrees in engineering technology. Administrative offices are located in downtown Salina until the campus was ready. Hank M. Neely is president.

1969 Our name changes to Kansas Technical Institute when the college is put under the State Board of Education.

8

Beyond

Students in the engineering technology program designed the first Cat Cannon nine years ago when the T-shirt shooter that Willie the Wildcat had been using just couldn’t get the shirts high enough to reach fans in the stadium’s upper deck.

“Sitting with your knees in your ears isn’t the greatest way to spend four hours,” said Luke Broberg, junior in Mechanical Engineering Technology, Salina.

1965

But even with all of the safety features in place, club members don’t get to shoot T-shirts at games until their second year.

Sending Wildcat spirit to new heights at home football games takes teamwork, nerves of steel and being very precise at folding T-shirts.

The current version of the Cat Cannon -Cat Cannon 4.0 -- was the brainchild of Kyle Jensen ’08 and Steve Goodman ’09 and was introduced two years ago.

Photo: Trista Gorrell

As the team builds the car, they are also preparing for competition. In addition to the endurance event they receive points for their design report, an evaluation of the design, a cost report and the total production cost. The car itself is judged on it’s acceleration, suspension and traction, maneuverability, and either a rock crawl or pulling event. The team is also thinking about putting in a bid to host the competition in the future. “It would be great if we could host it and have the home turf advantage,” said Tipton.

1968

The administration moves to campus and The first class graduate from Schilling 113 students start the first official classes Institute. There were 10 graduates and the governor attended the ceremony. in the fall of ’66.

1972 KTI’s first varsity sports team is formed. They play soccer. By 1978, a men’s basketball team and a women’s volleyball team are formed.

Cat Cannon 4.0 can shoot a shirt the length of a football field, and, with a little tweaking, the machine is capable of launching a shirt three times that distance, according to Cat Cannon Club members. The club is responsible for the care and upkeep of the cannon, which features a revolverstyle loading system, making the shooting process much safer than previous versions that required a student to load the cannon from the end of the barrel, using a stick. The current cannon is made of metal rather than the previous PVC pipe and runs off of a program logic controller rather than the previous manual systems. It’s also completely air-pressure driven, using air canisters regulated to only use up to 200 pounds per square inch of the available 3,000 pounds per square inch of pressure.

1976 Kansas legislature transferscontrol of the college from the Board of Education to the State Board of Regents.

“Even though all you have to do is punch in the pressure and hit fire, it takes nerves of steel to shoot the Cat Cannon,” said T.J. Hearn, senior in Computer Systems Engineering Technology, Stafford, and president of the Cat Cannon Club. “It’s even more nerve-racking to shoot our Mini-Cannon at basketball games.”

off shirts from their seats,” said Hearn. “We also have talked about making the cylinder rotation more smooth and creating wireless driving controls.” The Cat Cannon sponsors include Weis Fire and Safety Equipment Company - who provides air tanks for every game, K-State Salina’s Student Governing Association, GeoProbe, and Premier Pneumatics.

Both cannons will begin the redesign process beginning in January when Josh Dreiling, senior in Mechanical Engineering Technology, Wichita, begins his senior design project. The mini cannon’s compression chamber will be revamped to a system similar to a paintball gun. When Dreiling is done the larger cannon will be able to shoot all six rounds at once, Gatling gun-style. The operator will be able to set the angle of the barrel to automatically adjust and program the machine to automatically fire. The Cat Cannon will have better driving controls and a new paint job, too. But the club has even bigger dreams than that. “If we had the resources we’d love to use the wireless firing controls to create an application that would let us take a smart phone into the stands and let fans shoot

1977 KTI students take a ski trip. K-State Salina still has a Ski Club that organizes as trip over the winter break.

Photo: Michael Oetken

See how good you are at shooting shirts to fans! Play the Cat Cannon game at www.ksucatcannon.com.

1981 Members of the Civil Club build concrete canoes, which they took to Manhattan for competition. Today, the Concrete Canoe Club still races in Manhattan.

1983 Ground is broken for Technology Center, intended to be the “campus hub.”

Fall 2010 9


student life

Flight Team

SIFE

Returning to national competition summer 2011

Students in Free Enterprise keeping busy

Aero Center might need more trophy cases by the time Flight Team gets home from the national competition for the second consecutive year, especially if they place as highly as they did at the regional level. Flight Team is headed to the National Intercollegiate Flight Association’s SAFECON competition in May 2011 after taking second at the Region VI competition, Oct. 18-22, hosted by K-State Salina. Region VI includes teams from Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, Oklahoma, and Texas. The trophies they collected during the awards ceremony included the Safety Award that is given to one team that demonstrates safety in all aspects of the competition. They also placed first overall in flying events and fifth overall in ground events. SAFECON competitions feature flight events and ground events that test the teams’ abilities in all aspects of flight. Contestants placing in the top 20 in each event earn points for their team. The results of each event contribute to the teams’ overall scores. The team earned 33 top 20 finishes with 19 of them in the top 10.

Individual victories included 1st, 8th, 10th and 15th placements in Short-field Landing and first and fourth in Power-off Landing. In the Aircraft Preflight Inspection event, team members placed 2nd and 14th and in Aircraft Recognition there were 2nd, 13th and 15th place rankings. The Ground Trainer event had Wildcats in the 3rd, 11th, and 20th places; 8th place in Simulated Comprehensive Aircraft Navigation and 10th and 13th in Manual Flight Computer Accuracy. Teams of two K-State participants earned 3rd, 5th, 7th, 12th and 16th places in Message Drop and 11th, 12th, and 19th in Navigation.

Coffee, light bulbs, and rats don’t appear to have much in common. And they probably wouldn’t if K-State Salina’s Students In Free Enterprise chapter wasn’t working on projects that involve each of those things, while also finding time to win the Walgreens Wrangle for the second consecutive year. After several painting sessions, the Coffee Bar in the library has undergone a transformation that left warm colors and coffee inspired décor on the walls. The team partners with the library staff to sell their fairtrade coffee and muffins. Partnering with the local Quality Inn, the team was awarded a grant from Sam’s Club to apply towards an environmental sustainability project. They are working

with the hotel to replace all the light bulbs and toilets with more energy-efficient products. “The toilets will be taken to a place in Wichita that will recycle them,” said SIFE president Kristin Scheele, senior in Technology Management, Odell, Neb. “’Cats for Rats” is also keeping SIFE busy. The team is planning a series of fundraisers to support the HeroRAT program. The program trains rats to sniff out landmines and pulmonary tuberculosis. According to the program’s website, the animals helped find 169 mines, 181 unexploded ordinance, and 3,871 small arms and ammunition last year, benefitting 44,457 people in the Gaza Province of Mozambique and bringing the total of land recovered since the start of the program to more than 1.3 million square

As the team prepares to head to Columbus, Ohio for Nationals, they are planning their annual fly-in breakfast the morning of Open House, April 16. More information about the fly-in and other activities will be on K-State Salina’s website as the day approaches.

meters. The site also said that the rats detected 620 cases of tuberculosis in 2009, helping prevent more than 9,000 cases of tuberculosis transmission. Training one rat costs approximately $7,000. SIFE is also helping area high school students understand the importance of a budget through a life-size game of “LIFE” as well as continuing to prepare for the national competition that will be held in Minneapolis, Minn., May 10-12.

SIFE members celebrate the grand reopening of the coffee bar in teh library with Dean Kuhlman and Lee Young, a former SIFE business advisory board member who was instrumental in getting the coffee bar started.

Team members ranked 2nd and 5th in Top Pilot and 4th, 10th, and 18th in both Top Scoring Contestant and Top Scoring Male Contestant.

1984 The Remote Control Modeling Club is formed. They built six models between 1984 and 1991 and would fly them at the old Salina airport.

1988 Construction begins on the library addition of Technology Center.

10

Beyond

1985

1986

Governor John Carlin joins KTI President Tom Creech at the Technology Center ribbon cutting.

Mechanical engineering students build a car. Perhaps that was the beginning of the Baja SAE club?

1988 Our name changes to Kansas College of Technology.

1989 KCT gets its first FAX machine and two CD-ROM stations.

1990 Students attend Casino Night, still a K-State Salina tradition.

1989

1990

Professional pilot students lose their shirttails after their first solo flights.

Residence Hall opens.

1991 On April 25, Governor Joan Finney approves the merger between KCT and Kansas State University. On May 2, the senate bill is recorded in the state register, and KCT officially becomes Kansas State University-Salina, College of Technology. The name is eventually changed to College of Technology and Aviation to reflect the two prominent programs on campus.

Fall 2010

11


student life

Flight Team

SIFE

Returning to national competition summer 2011

Students in Free Enterprise keeping busy

Aero Center might need more trophy cases by the time Flight Team gets home from the national competition for the second consecutive year, especially if they place as highly as they did at the regional level. Flight Team is headed to the National Intercollegiate Flight Association’s SAFECON competition in May 2011 after taking second at the Region VI competition, Oct. 18-22, hosted by K-State Salina. Region VI includes teams from Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, Oklahoma, and Texas. The trophies they collected during the awards ceremony included the Safety Award that is given to one team that demonstrates safety in all aspects of the competition. They also placed first overall in flying events and fifth overall in ground events. SAFECON competitions feature flight events and ground events that test the teams’ abilities in all aspects of flight. Contestants placing in the top 20 in each event earn points for their team. The results of each event contribute to the teams’ overall scores. The team earned 33 top 20 finishes with 19 of them in the top 10.

Individual victories included 1st, 8th, 10th and 15th placements in Short-field Landing and first and fourth in Power-off Landing. In the Aircraft Preflight Inspection event, team members placed 2nd and 14th and in Aircraft Recognition there were 2nd, 13th and 15th place rankings. The Ground Trainer event had Wildcats in the 3rd, 11th, and 20th places; 8th place in Simulated Comprehensive Aircraft Navigation and 10th and 13th in Manual Flight Computer Accuracy. Teams of two K-State participants earned 3rd, 5th, 7th, 12th and 16th places in Message Drop and 11th, 12th, and 19th in Navigation.

Coffee, light bulbs, and rats don’t appear to have much in common. And they probably wouldn’t if K-State Salina’s Students In Free Enterprise chapter wasn’t working on projects that involve each of those things, while also finding time to win the Walgreens Wrangle for the second consecutive year. After several painting sessions, the Coffee Bar in the library has undergone a transformation that left warm colors and coffee inspired décor on the walls. The team partners with the library staff to sell their fairtrade coffee and muffins. Partnering with the local Quality Inn, the team was awarded a grant from Sam’s Club to apply towards an environmental sustainability project. They are working

with the hotel to replace all the light bulbs and toilets with more energy-efficient products. “The toilets will be taken to a place in Wichita that will recycle them,” said SIFE president Kristin Scheele, senior in Technology Management, Odell, Neb. “’Cats for Rats” is also keeping SIFE busy. The team is planning a series of fundraisers to support the HeroRAT program. The program trains rats to sniff out landmines and pulmonary tuberculosis. According to the program’s website, the animals helped find 169 mines, 181 unexploded ordinance, and 3,871 small arms and ammunition last year, benefitting 44,457 people in the Gaza Province of Mozambique and bringing the total of land recovered since the start of the program to more than 1.3 million square

As the team prepares to head to Columbus, Ohio for Nationals, they are planning their annual fly-in breakfast the morning of Open House, April 16. More information about the fly-in and other activities will be on K-State Salina’s website as the day approaches.

meters. The site also said that the rats detected 620 cases of tuberculosis in 2009, helping prevent more than 9,000 cases of tuberculosis transmission. Training one rat costs approximately $7,000. SIFE is also helping area high school students understand the importance of a budget through a life-size game of “LIFE” as well as continuing to prepare for the national competition that will be held in Minneapolis, Minn., May 10-12.

SIFE members celebrate the grand reopening of the coffee bar in teh library with Dean Kuhlman and Lee Young, a former SIFE business advisory board member who was instrumental in getting the coffee bar started.

Team members ranked 2nd and 5th in Top Pilot and 4th, 10th, and 18th in both Top Scoring Contestant and Top Scoring Male Contestant.

1984 The Remote Control Modeling Club is formed. They built six models between 1984 and 1991 and would fly them at the old Salina airport.

1988 Construction begins on the library addition of Technology Center.

10

Beyond

1985

1986

Governor John Carlin joins KTI President Tom Creech at the Technology Center ribbon cutting.

Mechanical engineering students build a car. Perhaps that was the beginning of the Baja SAE club?

1988 Our name changes to Kansas College of Technology.

1989 KCT gets its first FAX machine and two CD-ROM stations.

1990 Students attend Casino Night, still a K-State Salina tradition.

1989

1990

Professional pilot students lose their shirttails after their first solo flights.

Residence Hall opens.

1991 On April 25, Governor Joan Finney approves the merger between KCT and Kansas State University. On May 2, the senate bill is recorded in the state register, and KCT officially becomes Kansas State University-Salina, College of Technology. The name is eventually changed to College of Technology and Aviation to reflect the two prominent programs on campus.

Fall 2010

11


student life

UAS, Solar Boat, & Rocketry Club

By land, air, and sea, K-State Salina students enjoy the college experience through student organizations It’s not just fishermen who join the Solar Boat Club, but having an interest in electrical engineering helps. Students spend the year making adjustments and improvements to the boat to prepare it for the Solar Splash competition each spring. The team has brought home several awards and trophies over the last few years and at this year’s competition they took fourth place overall and second in visual presentation. While the Solar Boat Club focuses on performing in the water, the Unmanned Aircraft Systems Club set their sights on the sky.

Students in UAS, Solar Boat, and Rocketry club work on projects throughout the semester

Converting a model airplane into an unmanned aviation system, then taking it to a national competition isn’t particularly easy, but that’s not stopping the UAS club. They have partnered with the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics chapter on the Manhattan campus to build the system that they will take to the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International’s Seafarer competition at Patuxent River Naval Air Station, Md., in June.

Four students from the engineering technology department and three from the aviation department have begun work on the airframe by reinforcing the body of a model airplane made of balsa and MonoKote. A carbon fiber box will be built around part of the airframe to help protect the Piccolo autopilot system and camera inside. The systems also need to be as light as possible, as the total aircraft can weigh no more than 55 pounds.

“It’s not rocket science.” During competition, the students will fly the UAV at altitudes between 100 and 750 feet to earn points for their flight plan accuracy and their ability to observe and describe targets on the ground. They will also give a short presentation over a report on the building process and the aircraft’s specs.

1995

While all students involved with the club will have the opportunity to use the ground system, only students who have taken the appropriate classes can fly the UAV. The High-Powered Rocketry Club, however, doesn’t have restrictions on who can be a pilot. After all, “it’s not rocket science,” said Van Hockersmith, senior in Aviation Maintenance, Manhattan. But they are concerned about aerodynamics, making sure the electronic system that deploys the rocket’s parachute at a specific altitude is working, and weight and balance. They often lathe nosecones for the rockets out of balsa rather than buying styrofoam ones because they are stronger and lighter. Evan Beckman ’85, ’08, Instructor of Aviation Maintenance, started the club in 2003. The club travels to a field in Argonia where they have the appropriate clearance to shoot their rockets about once a month. They are also in the early stages of designing a 20’ tall rocket. “We want to set a height record,” said Beckman.

1997

The college takes possession of the College Center, providing a central location for many student services.

2001 K-State at Salina celebrates “A Decade of Development,” with ten years of growth since the merger. In that time, enrollment increased by more than 50 percent, and the number of credit hours taken each semester grew even more.

12 Beyond

Dean Dennis Kuhlman moves to the College of Technology and Aviation and continues in his leadership position today.

2005 K-State Salina hosts Steve Fossett, Sir Richard Branson, and the Virgin Atlantic GlobalFlyer built by Burt Rutan and Scaled Composites. Fossett and Global Flyer break the Absolute World Record for the fastest nonstop unrefueled circumnavigation.

Greek Life

Salina campus now hosts active social sorority and fraternity “Greek” is not a word often associated with K-State Salina but it’s more a verb than a noun in the case of Phi Delta Theta – the social fraternity on campus. The Phi Delts play a major roll in campus leadership whether it’s in Student Governing Association or the executive boards of student organizations. They have led many volunteer efforts in the community including the annual Trick-Or-Treat So Others Can Eat and Box Village, each of which bring attention to the homeless population in Salina. The fraternity helps new students move into the residence halls every year and sponsors many student

On the Record

events including a semi-formal dance. All of this is in addition to their work for the ALS Association. Kappa Sigma Alpha, the new sorority, plans to be just as involved on campus and in the community as their male counterparts. The sorority aims to “enrich the lives of the women on campus by providing sisters with an opportunity to develop skills that allow for the best possible college experience through sisterhood and social connections, professional development, campus involvement, and community service,” according to their mission statement.

Student news organization continues to report No matter what a student organization is doing, one group of students is on hand to cover it all. On The Record, the monthly news magazine, covers recent campus events, features students’ creative writing and illustrations, and provides an outlet for student voices to be heard.

On the Record can be viewed online at http://issuu.com/ontherecord

Otakats

The sorority has stayed busy since the induction ceremony in September with weekly meetings, social gatherings, helping with Trick-Or-Treat So Others Can Eat and decorating bras to help with the community’s breast cancer awareness campaign.

Family Studies & Human Services Interest Group

New campus major finding a place in student life Some organizations are more civic minded than mechanically minded. The Family Studies and Human Services Interest Group raised nearly $300 for the Salina Area United Way with their pancake breakfast fundraiser at New Student Orientation. In the year since the organization began, students in the FSHS Interest Group have also collected school supplies and winter clothing for families in need.

Bringing Japanese culture to the Salina campus Some student organizations, like the Otakats, are purely for fun. The Otakats gather to watch Japanese animation each week. They sponsored Otafest, a week of events that brought anime to the Tech Center through an origami workshop, a quiz to find out which character you would be, and how the art is a part of everyday life. Club members plan to attend Naka-Kon, an anime convention in Kansas City, Mo., in February.

If a student has an interest not served by one of the 35 student organizations on campus, they are encouraged to start one.

2006

2008

K-State Salina is asked to assist Fossett twice more as he sets the Absolute Distance Without Landing Record and the Absolute Distance Over a Closed Circuit records. Fossett and the GlobalFlyer hold three of the seven absolute world records of airplanes.

The Unmanned Aircraft Systems program begins to develop, merging engineering technology programs with aviation programs.

2009 The Student Life Center is completed, fulfilling a student body need identified more than 20 years prior.

Fall 2010

13


student life

UAS, Solar Boat, & Rocketry Club

By land, air, and sea, K-State Salina students enjoy the college experience through student organizations It’s not just fishermen who join the Solar Boat Club, but having an interest in electrical engineering helps. Students spend the year making adjustments and improvements to the boat to prepare it for the Solar Splash competition each spring. The team has brought home several awards and trophies over the last few years and at this year’s competition they took fourth place overall and second in visual presentation. While the Solar Boat Club focuses on performing in the water, the Unmanned Aircraft Systems Club set their sights on the sky.

Students in UAS, Solar Boat, and Rocketry club work on projects throughout the semester

Converting a model airplane into an unmanned aviation system, then taking it to a national competition isn’t particularly easy, but that’s not stopping the UAS club. They have partnered with the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics chapter on the Manhattan campus to build the system that they will take to the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International’s Seafarer competition at Patuxent River Naval Air Station, Md., in June.

Four students from the engineering technology department and three from the aviation department have begun work on the airframe by reinforcing the body of a model airplane made of balsa and MonoKote. A carbon fiber box will be built around part of the airframe to help protect the Piccolo autopilot system and camera inside. The systems also need to be as light as possible, as the total aircraft can weigh no more than 55 pounds.

“It’s not rocket science.” During competition, the students will fly the UAV at altitudes between 100 and 750 feet to earn points for their flight plan accuracy and their ability to observe and describe targets on the ground. They will also give a short presentation over a report on the building process and the aircraft’s specs.

1995

While all students involved with the club will have the opportunity to use the ground system, only students who have taken the appropriate classes can fly the UAV. The High-Powered Rocketry Club, however, doesn’t have restrictions on who can be a pilot. After all, “it’s not rocket science,” said Van Hockersmith, senior in Aviation Maintenance, Manhattan. But they are concerned about aerodynamics, making sure the electronic system that deploys the rocket’s parachute at a specific altitude is working, and weight and balance. They often lathe nosecones for the rockets out of balsa rather than buying styrofoam ones because they are stronger and lighter. Evan Beckman ’85, ’08, Instructor of Aviation Maintenance, started the club in 2003. The club travels to a field in Argonia where they have the appropriate clearance to shoot their rockets about once a month. They are also in the early stages of designing a 20’ tall rocket. “We want to set a height record,” said Beckman.

1997

The college takes possession of the College Center, providing a central location for many student services.

2001 K-State at Salina celebrates “A Decade of Development,” with ten years of growth since the merger. In that time, enrollment increased by more than 50 percent, and the number of credit hours taken each semester grew even more.

12 Beyond

Dean Dennis Kuhlman moves to the College of Technology and Aviation and continues in his leadership position today.

2005 K-State Salina hosts Steve Fossett, Sir Richard Branson, and the Virgin Atlantic GlobalFlyer built by Burt Rutan and Scaled Composites. Fossett and Global Flyer break the Absolute World Record for the fastest nonstop unrefueled circumnavigation.

Greek Life

Salina campus now hosts active social sorority and fraternity “Greek” is not a word often associated with K-State Salina but it’s more a verb than a noun in the case of Phi Delta Theta – the social fraternity on campus. The Phi Delts play a major roll in campus leadership whether it’s in Student Governing Association or the executive boards of student organizations. They have led many volunteer efforts in the community including the annual Trick-Or-Treat So Others Can Eat and Box Village, each of which bring attention to the homeless population in Salina. The fraternity helps new students move into the residence halls every year and sponsors many student

On the Record

events including a semi-formal dance. All of this is in addition to their work for the ALS Association. Kappa Sigma Alpha, the new sorority, plans to be just as involved on campus and in the community as their male counterparts. The sorority aims to “enrich the lives of the women on campus by providing sisters with an opportunity to develop skills that allow for the best possible college experience through sisterhood and social connections, professional development, campus involvement, and community service,” according to their mission statement.

Student news organization continues to report No matter what a student organization is doing, one group of students is on hand to cover it all. On The Record, the monthly news magazine, covers recent campus events, features students’ creative writing and illustrations, and provides an outlet for student voices to be heard.

On the Record can be viewed online at http://issuu.com/ontherecord

Otakats

The sorority has stayed busy since the induction ceremony in September with weekly meetings, social gatherings, helping with Trick-Or-Treat So Others Can Eat and decorating bras to help with the community’s breast cancer awareness campaign.

Family Studies & Human Services Interest Group

New campus major finding a place in student life Some organizations are more civic minded than mechanically minded. The Family Studies and Human Services Interest Group raised nearly $300 for the Salina Area United Way with their pancake breakfast fundraiser at New Student Orientation. In the year since the organization began, students in the FSHS Interest Group have also collected school supplies and winter clothing for families in need.

Bringing Japanese culture to the Salina campus Some student organizations, like the Otakats, are purely for fun. The Otakats gather to watch Japanese animation each week. They sponsored Otafest, a week of events that brought anime to the Tech Center through an origami workshop, a quiz to find out which character you would be, and how the art is a part of everyday life. Club members plan to attend Naka-Kon, an anime convention in Kansas City, Mo., in February.

If a student has an interest not served by one of the 35 student organizations on campus, they are encouraged to start one.

2006

2008

K-State Salina is asked to assist Fossett twice more as he sets the Absolute Distance Without Landing Record and the Absolute Distance Over a Closed Circuit records. Fossett and the GlobalFlyer hold three of the seven absolute world records of airplanes.

The Unmanned Aircraft Systems program begins to develop, merging engineering technology programs with aviation programs.

2009 The Student Life Center is completed, fulfilling a student body need identified more than 20 years prior.

Fall 2010

13


campus profiles

holly & jeremy williams

les kinsler

By: Rachel Skybetter

By: Trevor Davis

Nontraditional students make time for family, passions Holly Williams is a standard overachiever. Like many college students she dutifully attends classes at K-State Salina, participates in a variety of organizations, looks for part-time work and even studied abroad in Italy last summer. But college student is just one of the many hats that the 26-year-old wears. She’s the wife of K-State student Jeremy Williams, a mom to their two young children and a caretaker to her mother, who has multiple sclerosis. Both Holly and Jeremy worked full-time jobs after high school. After growing tired of losing and looking for jobs, they decided that they were ready to go to college despite the challenges of raising children at the same time. Life as nontraditional students is tricky, but the Williamses have it down to a science. “I have multiple calendars throughout the house. I have electronic ones that go off to tell me that I have things to do,” Holly said. “It’s definitely a puzzle – fitting the pieces and the times together.”

Their day begins at 6:30 a.m. when they feed and dress their 7-year-old daughter, Shinobi, and 3-year-old son, Brock. The family tries to squeeze as much face time as possible in those crucial morning hours, because they won’t see each other the rest of the day. Jeremy, 29, drives to the Manhattan campus three days a week for English classes and also works a part-time job. Holly spends her days doing classwork, catering to her family’s needs and spending time with her children when they aren’t in school. What do Holly and Jeremy do in the moments that they get to be with each other? “We just cling to each other,” Holly said. Holly hopes to graduate from K-State Salina in December 2011 with a bachelor’s degree from the family studies and human services program. She hopes to work for a nonprofit organization and dreams of making a difference. “I think that’s why I involve myself so much in campus life,” said Holly, who dedicates many valuable hours to community service on top of school activities. “I feel like I have to be doing something to make a difference or to take a stand.”

Jeremy also made his mark at K-State Salina. He organized the Creative Writing Alliance and also was involved in the school’s anime club, based around the Japanese form of animation. “They’re both very highly motivated. They’re not just here to get a piece of paper – to earn a degree,” said Associate Professor Patricia Ackerman, who has worked with the Williamses in and out of the classroom. “They’re here to learn, and that’s evident in their activities and in their classroom participation.” Both Holly and Jeremy recognize the chaos that their nontraditional lives have brought them, but they are driven by their children and their children’s futures. “We want them to see that it’s really hard having kids and it’s really hard trying to balance all of this. Hopefully, they’ll be smart and after high school they’ll go directly to college and not have to worry about balancing all of this,” Holly said. “But that’s also why I went to Italy, because I hope that when they go to school, they experience college fully and that includes traveling abroad.”

One faculty’s commitment to higher expectations When Austin Niehaus applied for a job at Salina-based Kasa Industrial Controls Inc., he listed a favorable reference: Les Kinsler. The CEO instantly recognized the name because he, too, had Kinsler as a math professor.

Part of that effort is the recent opening of the 33,000-square-foot Student Life Center southeast of the College Center. Students now can interact, study, play and exercise at the center. Kinsler is hopeful that it will help attract and retain new K-Staters.

Since Kinsler started teaching on the K-State Salina campus 30 years ago, many students have taken Kinsler’s math, science and computer programming courses. Kinsler has seen the campus transform from a technical college to a branch of K-State and has focused on attracting and retaining students through activities, advising and new buildings.

Students who considered K-State Salina but ultimately attended another school once said in surveys that they didn’t choose the Salina campus because there wasn’t a student union. The new Student Life Center gives K-State Salina the gathering place campus faculty, administrators, staff and students have wanted for decades.

Niehaus, the information technology manager at Kasa Industrial Controls Inc., graduated in May 2005 with a degree in computer systems technology and took Kinsler’s courses throughout the program. “It was nice to have that continuation with one professor from my entry-level courses to advanced classes,” he said. “Les was always interested in making the class material relevant and interesting.” Kinsler is mild-mannered and modest, Niehaus said. “He’s quick to celebrate you as a student, but when it comes to himself he’s very humble and reserved yet very talented,” he said. Niehaus said he considers Kinsler a personal mentor, and they have lunch together about once a month to maintain their friendship. Kinsler is a member of a retention committee that aims to improve the learning and campus life environment at the college. “We don’t have Aggieville and the sports teams right next to campus like in Manhattan,” Kinsler said. “We’ve had to work really hard to develop that true college environment that is our own in Salina.”

14

Beyond

Originally called Schilling Institute and later the Kansas Technical Institute, the college merged with K-State in 1991.

“Expect a great deal, and try to help students achieve that.”

“We really needed to be part of a bigger umbrella,” Kinsler said. “We were too small to exist on our own. Thirty years ago, of course the culture was very different. We were more of a daytime campus.” One thing hasn’t changed: Kinsler remains committed as ever to his students. “I try to push students and expect a great deal out of them,” Kinsler said. “If you don’t have high expectations, you won’t get much output from a student. That’s really my teaching philosophy: Expect a great deal, and try to help students achieve that.”

bio box Les Kinsler

Who: Computer Systems Technology Professor; he has been teaching at K-State Salina since 1980 Education: Bachelor’s degree in mathematics and physics from Emporia State University; master’s degree in computer science from Wichita State University Family: Married to Ann for 38 years; four children

Award winner: Kinsler was named 2009-2010 K-State Salina outstanding academic advisor by students Proudest accomplishments: “I think my greatest impact on the campus is probably that I’ve been active in the different stages of our retention effort during the last 15 years, and I’ve helped develop the computer systems curriculum, changing it from an associate degree to a bachelor’s degree.” Hobbies: He’s rebuilding a 1930 roadster and 1949 Chevy pickup.

Fall 2010

15


campus profiles

holly & jeremy williams

les kinsler

By: Rachel Skybetter

By: Trevor Davis

Nontraditional students make time for family, passions Holly Williams is a standard overachiever. Like many college students she dutifully attends classes at K-State Salina, participates in a variety of organizations, looks for part-time work and even studied abroad in Italy last summer. But college student is just one of the many hats that the 26-year-old wears. She’s the wife of K-State student Jeremy Williams, a mom to their two young children and a caretaker to her mother, who has multiple sclerosis. Both Holly and Jeremy worked full-time jobs after high school. After growing tired of losing and looking for jobs, they decided that they were ready to go to college despite the challenges of raising children at the same time. Life as nontraditional students is tricky, but the Williamses have it down to a science. “I have multiple calendars throughout the house. I have electronic ones that go off to tell me that I have things to do,” Holly said. “It’s definitely a puzzle – fitting the pieces and the times together.”

Their day begins at 6:30 a.m. when they feed and dress their 7-year-old daughter, Shinobi, and 3-year-old son, Brock. The family tries to squeeze as much face time as possible in those crucial morning hours, because they won’t see each other the rest of the day. Jeremy, 29, drives to the Manhattan campus three days a week for English classes and also works a part-time job. Holly spends her days doing classwork, catering to her family’s needs and spending time with her children when they aren’t in school. What do Holly and Jeremy do in the moments that they get to be with each other? “We just cling to each other,” Holly said. Holly hopes to graduate from K-State Salina in December 2011 with a bachelor’s degree from the family studies and human services program. She hopes to work for a nonprofit organization and dreams of making a difference. “I think that’s why I involve myself so much in campus life,” said Holly, who dedicates many valuable hours to community service on top of school activities. “I feel like I have to be doing something to make a difference or to take a stand.”

Jeremy also made his mark at K-State Salina. He organized the Creative Writing Alliance and also was involved in the school’s anime club, based around the Japanese form of animation. “They’re both very highly motivated. They’re not just here to get a piece of paper – to earn a degree,” said Associate Professor Patricia Ackerman, who has worked with the Williamses in and out of the classroom. “They’re here to learn, and that’s evident in their activities and in their classroom participation.” Both Holly and Jeremy recognize the chaos that their nontraditional lives have brought them, but they are driven by their children and their children’s futures. “We want them to see that it’s really hard having kids and it’s really hard trying to balance all of this. Hopefully, they’ll be smart and after high school they’ll go directly to college and not have to worry about balancing all of this,” Holly said. “But that’s also why I went to Italy, because I hope that when they go to school, they experience college fully and that includes traveling abroad.”

One faculty’s commitment to higher expectations When Austin Niehaus applied for a job at Salina-based Kasa Industrial Controls Inc., he listed a favorable reference: Les Kinsler. The CEO instantly recognized the name because he, too, had Kinsler as a math professor.

Part of that effort is the recent opening of the 33,000-square-foot Student Life Center southeast of the College Center. Students now can interact, study, play and exercise at the center. Kinsler is hopeful that it will help attract and retain new K-Staters.

Since Kinsler started teaching on the K-State Salina campus 30 years ago, many students have taken Kinsler’s math, science and computer programming courses. Kinsler has seen the campus transform from a technical college to a branch of K-State and has focused on attracting and retaining students through activities, advising and new buildings.

Students who considered K-State Salina but ultimately attended another school once said in surveys that they didn’t choose the Salina campus because there wasn’t a student union. The new Student Life Center gives K-State Salina the gathering place campus faculty, administrators, staff and students have wanted for decades.

Niehaus, the information technology manager at Kasa Industrial Controls Inc., graduated in May 2005 with a degree in computer systems technology and took Kinsler’s courses throughout the program. “It was nice to have that continuation with one professor from my entry-level courses to advanced classes,” he said. “Les was always interested in making the class material relevant and interesting.” Kinsler is mild-mannered and modest, Niehaus said. “He’s quick to celebrate you as a student, but when it comes to himself he’s very humble and reserved yet very talented,” he said. Niehaus said he considers Kinsler a personal mentor, and they have lunch together about once a month to maintain their friendship. Kinsler is a member of a retention committee that aims to improve the learning and campus life environment at the college. “We don’t have Aggieville and the sports teams right next to campus like in Manhattan,” Kinsler said. “We’ve had to work really hard to develop that true college environment that is our own in Salina.”

14

Beyond

Originally called Schilling Institute and later the Kansas Technical Institute, the college merged with K-State in 1991.

“Expect a great deal, and try to help students achieve that.”

“We really needed to be part of a bigger umbrella,” Kinsler said. “We were too small to exist on our own. Thirty years ago, of course the culture was very different. We were more of a daytime campus.” One thing hasn’t changed: Kinsler remains committed as ever to his students. “I try to push students and expect a great deal out of them,” Kinsler said. “If you don’t have high expectations, you won’t get much output from a student. That’s really my teaching philosophy: Expect a great deal, and try to help students achieve that.”

bio box Les Kinsler

Who: Computer Systems Technology Professor; he has been teaching at K-State Salina since 1980 Education: Bachelor’s degree in mathematics and physics from Emporia State University; master’s degree in computer science from Wichita State University Family: Married to Ann for 38 years; four children

Award winner: Kinsler was named 2009-2010 K-State Salina outstanding academic advisor by students Proudest accomplishments: “I think my greatest impact on the campus is probably that I’ve been active in the different stages of our retention effort during the last 15 years, and I’ve helped develop the computer systems curriculum, changing it from an associate degree to a bachelor’s degree.” Hobbies: He’s rebuilding a 1930 roadster and 1949 Chevy pickup.

Fall 2010

15


alumni profiles

alan cordel K-State Alumni Fellow 2010 Alan Cordel loved aviation so much that it took him five years to propose to his girlfriend. Both relationships are still going well. Alan Cordel is the chief pilot for Kansas City Life Insurance Company in Kansas City, Mo., where he began his career 33 years ago as a co-pilot/mechanic on the company’s aircraft after graduating from K-State Salina in 1977 with an associate’s degree in aeronautical technology and an airframe and powerplant mechanics license. He was promoted to chief pilot in 1985, overseeing the two-aircraft, fiveperson flight department. During Cordel’s tenure at Kansas City Life, his department completed International Business Aviation Council registration ensuring international standards of organizational, maintenance, operational, training and security requirements that are based on international standards and industry best practices. Only 200 companies worldwide have achieved this recognition. He became one of approximately 150 aviation professionals to achieve Certified Aviation Manager accreditation from the National Business Aviation Association in 2004. Cordel was just as busy when he was a student at Kansas Technical Institute. “I’d go to class until 3 or 4 and then go to Flower Aviation and work there until about 10,” he said. “I’d get my flying hours in at night after work and on the weekends when I wasn’t working.” He also had a part time job painting and cleaning up the classrooms and dorms. When he found out that his dorm is now the Salina Rescue Mission, he laughed. “It could probably have been considered the same thing back then.” 16

Beyond

But that didn’t mean he didn’t enjoy it. “Dorm life was fun. There were a group of us who always hung out together.” He also liked the professionalism of his classes. “The instructors were good and had experience and we had a lot of students who were back in school after their military time in Vietnam.” Perhaps it was that professionalism that led Cordel to tell students, “everything you do in life reflects on you, your family, your profession, and the company you work for.” The family that he represents includes his wife, LoLeeta, a social worker for the Shawnee Mission School district and their daughter Angela, a 5th grade teacher. But it might have never happened if he had listened to Bill Gross. As Alan recalls it, he met LoLeeta in the spring of 1977 when she came back from the East Coast. They had spent time together with mutual friends. One day he asked Bill if he thought LoLeeta would say yes to a date. Bill didn’t think so. Alan asked anyway. LoLeeta said yes, perhaps because she didn’t realize at first that it was a date and was expecting more people to show up at the restaurant. He proposed several years later and they married in 1982. They have lived in Shawnee, Kan., for the past 33 years. Cordel earned both a bachelor’s degree in 1991 and two master’s degrees in 1997 from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University via distance classes. He has served on an advisory committee for Aviation Maintenance Journal and Dassault Aviation and recently completed a term as Kansas City Life Insurance Company’s Quarter Century Club President. It’s clear that Cordel has enjoyed the path that led to him being chosen as K-State Salina’s 2010 Alumni Fellow. As he told students, “if you aren’t excited, stay at home.”

Baron’s aviation career going in circles The K-State Alumni Fellows Program, sponsored by the Dean’s Council, the President’s Office and the Alumni Association, recognizes alumni who have distinguished themselves in their careers. Beginning 1983 the program has brought successful alumni back to campus to meet with students and faculty and share their expertise in the classroom and at informal settings. K-State Salina began participating in the program in 1993. Fellows are chosen by each college to return as distinguished guests and as mentors, friends and counselors. They are honored in recognition of the ultimate measure of a university – not curricula, facilities or programs, but the quality of its alumni.

College of Technology & Aviation 1993 Robert Christian Miller ‘68 1994 William R. Ballou ‘69 1995 Melvin Bergkamp ‘70 1996 Russell Savage ‘68 1997 T. A. Mindrup ‘69, ‘73 1998 Jay Alfred Parker ‘82 1999 Shahzad “Shah” Bhatti ‘83 2000 Douglas L. Oliphant ‘83, ‘90 2001 Julie Martin Maher ‘84 2002 Melvin Kejr ‘79 2003 Roger Fortmeyer ‘74 2004 Rex Eberly ‘83, ‘84 2005 Justin C. “Reggie” Redetzke ‘96 2006 Terry L. Krause ‘86, ‘01 2007 Jennifer A. Johnson ‘83 2008 Robert “Bob” Moeder ‘71 2009 Robert J. Kuhn ‘72 2010 Alan L. Cordel ‘77

Know someone deserving of the Alumni Fellow honor? Send your nomination to alumni@salina.k-state.edu

For most people, birthdays are celebrated with cake and balloons. Janelle Baron celebrates hers with check rides. Baron ’09 celebrated her 23rd birthday by passing her Airline Transport Pilot check rides for both single engine and multiengine airplanes – the highest certification a civilian can earn. She celebrated her 17th birthday by taking her check ride for a private pilot license. “I really wanted to take the ATP on my birthday,” Baron said. “It was like coming full circle.” Baron grew up in Colorado Springs next to the Air Force Academy watching F-16 Thunderbirds. During high school she babysat for a family who introduced her to flying. “The mom was a member of the Pikes Peak 99s. She paid for my first flying lesson,” Baron said. “The 99s drove me to the airport for my lessons because I wasn’t old enough to drive myself and they let me borrow their books. They even gave me two scholarships.” Baron is now a member of the Pikes Peak 99s, herself.

Baron went from taking lessons to teaching lessons when she became a certified flight instructor for K-State in January 2007. “I’ve had students that started with me to get their private pilot’s and we’ve gone all the way through to getting their Certified Flight Instructor-Multi-Engine Instrument rating,” she said. “It’s a little weird, but very rewarding.” Baron’s aviation experience is about to come full circle in another way. She’s going to fly the F-16s she used to watch as a child.

to part-time depending on their needs and my career goals. I could definitely stay with them for 20 years or more.” “My family doesn’t really have ties to aviation or the military, so they were a little surprised when I told them I wanted to fly fighters for the Air Force. They support me all the way, but when I first told my dad I wanted to fly fighters he said, ‘And I want to be the lead guitarist in a rock and roll band. Sometimes those things never happen.’” Sometimes they do.

Baron is a 2nd Lieutenant after attending Academy of Military Science in Montgomery, Ala. She is now in Pueblo, Colo., for introductory flight screening. She will continue to travel around the country as she goes through pilot training in a T6 and a T38, fighter fundamentals, water and land survival schools, and the F-16C qualification course. Baron will end up in Des Moines, Iowa, to serve in the Iowa Air National Guard. “I’ll spend two years there full-time,” she said. “After that I’ll either stay full-time or go

Photo by Dave Mayes

Gilliland “on track” to make mark on construction engineering industry Clayton Gilliland ’90 was recently honored as one of the Top 20 Under 40 by Mountain States Construction Magazine, which included individuals in construction and design from Utah, Idaho, and Montana. Gilliland has been a project manager at Stacy and Witbeck Inc. in Salt Lake City, Utah, for the past 10 years. He is currently managing the construction of a $500 million, 45-mile-long commuter rail system that will take about four years to complete.

project manager. Some of Gilliland’s other major projects include light rail expansion, commuter rail projects, and earthquake response. But one project stands out in Gilliland’s mind as the turning point in his career.

“Our work includes all the heavy civil improvements – earthwork, trackwork, structures, etc. – required to build the system,” he said. “My typical day includes some field observation, but primarily focuses on various planning, and coordination tasks – essentially communicating with all team members to help keep the work on track.”

“The Interstate Max light rail project in Portland, OR was particularly satisfying because it was one of the larger projects our company had built, and included widely varied scopes of work. It was on that job that I was given significant increased responsibility,” he said.

This isn’t the first major project Gilliland has undertaken. The past twenty years have given him lots of experience, beginning as laborer and moving up the ladder to

He looks forward to continuing to make his mark on the construction

engineering technology industry. “In my opinion, the biggest challenge our industry faces is replacing the skill and work ethic of the dedicated, resourceful, innovative and talented heavy construction professionals that went before us.” Clayton Gilliland is more than capable of meeting that challenge.

Courtesy Photo

Fall 2010

17


alumni profiles

alan cordel K-State Alumni Fellow 2010 Alan Cordel loved aviation so much that it took him five years to propose to his girlfriend. Both relationships are still going well. Alan Cordel is the chief pilot for Kansas City Life Insurance Company in Kansas City, Mo., where he began his career 33 years ago as a co-pilot/mechanic on the company’s aircraft after graduating from K-State Salina in 1977 with an associate’s degree in aeronautical technology and an airframe and powerplant mechanics license. He was promoted to chief pilot in 1985, overseeing the two-aircraft, fiveperson flight department. During Cordel’s tenure at Kansas City Life, his department completed International Business Aviation Council registration ensuring international standards of organizational, maintenance, operational, training and security requirements that are based on international standards and industry best practices. Only 200 companies worldwide have achieved this recognition. He became one of approximately 150 aviation professionals to achieve Certified Aviation Manager accreditation from the National Business Aviation Association in 2004. Cordel was just as busy when he was a student at Kansas Technical Institute. “I’d go to class until 3 or 4 and then go to Flower Aviation and work there until about 10,” he said. “I’d get my flying hours in at night after work and on the weekends when I wasn’t working.” He also had a part time job painting and cleaning up the classrooms and dorms. When he found out that his dorm is now the Salina Rescue Mission, he laughed. “It could probably have been considered the same thing back then.” 16

Beyond

But that didn’t mean he didn’t enjoy it. “Dorm life was fun. There were a group of us who always hung out together.” He also liked the professionalism of his classes. “The instructors were good and had experience and we had a lot of students who were back in school after their military time in Vietnam.” Perhaps it was that professionalism that led Cordel to tell students, “everything you do in life reflects on you, your family, your profession, and the company you work for.” The family that he represents includes his wife, LoLeeta, a social worker for the Shawnee Mission School district and their daughter Angela, a 5th grade teacher. But it might have never happened if he had listened to Bill Gross. As Alan recalls it, he met LoLeeta in the spring of 1977 when she came back from the East Coast. They had spent time together with mutual friends. One day he asked Bill if he thought LoLeeta would say yes to a date. Bill didn’t think so. Alan asked anyway. LoLeeta said yes, perhaps because she didn’t realize at first that it was a date and was expecting more people to show up at the restaurant. He proposed several years later and they married in 1982. They have lived in Shawnee, Kan., for the past 33 years. Cordel earned both a bachelor’s degree in 1991 and two master’s degrees in 1997 from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University via distance classes. He has served on an advisory committee for Aviation Maintenance Journal and Dassault Aviation and recently completed a term as Kansas City Life Insurance Company’s Quarter Century Club President. It’s clear that Cordel has enjoyed the path that led to him being chosen as K-State Salina’s 2010 Alumni Fellow. As he told students, “if you aren’t excited, stay at home.”

Baron’s aviation career going in circles The K-State Alumni Fellows Program, sponsored by the Dean’s Council, the President’s Office and the Alumni Association, recognizes alumni who have distinguished themselves in their careers. Beginning 1983 the program has brought successful alumni back to campus to meet with students and faculty and share their expertise in the classroom and at informal settings. K-State Salina began participating in the program in 1993. Fellows are chosen by each college to return as distinguished guests and as mentors, friends and counselors. They are honored in recognition of the ultimate measure of a university – not curricula, facilities or programs, but the quality of its alumni.

College of Technology & Aviation 1993 Robert Christian Miller ‘68 1994 William R. Ballou ‘69 1995 Melvin Bergkamp ‘70 1996 Russell Savage ‘68 1997 T. A. Mindrup ‘69, ‘73 1998 Jay Alfred Parker ‘82 1999 Shahzad “Shah” Bhatti ‘83 2000 Douglas L. Oliphant ‘83, ‘90 2001 Julie Martin Maher ‘84 2002 Melvin Kejr ‘79 2003 Roger Fortmeyer ‘74 2004 Rex Eberly ‘83, ‘84 2005 Justin C. “Reggie” Redetzke ‘96 2006 Terry L. Krause ‘86, ‘01 2007 Jennifer A. Johnson ‘83 2008 Robert “Bob” Moeder ‘71 2009 Robert J. Kuhn ‘72 2010 Alan L. Cordel ‘77

Know someone deserving of the Alumni Fellow honor? Send your nomination to alumni@salina.k-state.edu

For most people, birthdays are celebrated with cake and balloons. Janelle Baron celebrates hers with check rides. Baron ’09 celebrated her 23rd birthday by passing her Airline Transport Pilot check rides for both single engine and multiengine airplanes – the highest certification a civilian can earn. She celebrated her 17th birthday by taking her check ride for a private pilot license. “I really wanted to take the ATP on my birthday,” Baron said. “It was like coming full circle.” Baron grew up in Colorado Springs next to the Air Force Academy watching F-16 Thunderbirds. During high school she babysat for a family who introduced her to flying. “The mom was a member of the Pikes Peak 99s. She paid for my first flying lesson,” Baron said. “The 99s drove me to the airport for my lessons because I wasn’t old enough to drive myself and they let me borrow their books. They even gave me two scholarships.” Baron is now a member of the Pikes Peak 99s, herself.

Baron went from taking lessons to teaching lessons when she became a certified flight instructor for K-State in January 2007. “I’ve had students that started with me to get their private pilot’s and we’ve gone all the way through to getting their Certified Flight Instructor-Multi-Engine Instrument rating,” she said. “It’s a little weird, but very rewarding.” Baron’s aviation experience is about to come full circle in another way. She’s going to fly the F-16s she used to watch as a child.

to part-time depending on their needs and my career goals. I could definitely stay with them for 20 years or more.” “My family doesn’t really have ties to aviation or the military, so they were a little surprised when I told them I wanted to fly fighters for the Air Force. They support me all the way, but when I first told my dad I wanted to fly fighters he said, ‘And I want to be the lead guitarist in a rock and roll band. Sometimes those things never happen.’” Sometimes they do.

Baron is a 2nd Lieutenant after attending Academy of Military Science in Montgomery, Ala. She is now in Pueblo, Colo., for introductory flight screening. She will continue to travel around the country as she goes through pilot training in a T6 and a T38, fighter fundamentals, water and land survival schools, and the F-16C qualification course. Baron will end up in Des Moines, Iowa, to serve in the Iowa Air National Guard. “I’ll spend two years there full-time,” she said. “After that I’ll either stay full-time or go

Photo by Dave Mayes

Gilliland “on track” to make mark on construction engineering industry Clayton Gilliland ’90 was recently honored as one of the Top 20 Under 40 by Mountain States Construction Magazine, which included individuals in construction and design from Utah, Idaho, and Montana. Gilliland has been a project manager at Stacy and Witbeck Inc. in Salt Lake City, Utah, for the past 10 years. He is currently managing the construction of a $500 million, 45-mile-long commuter rail system that will take about four years to complete.

project manager. Some of Gilliland’s other major projects include light rail expansion, commuter rail projects, and earthquake response. But one project stands out in Gilliland’s mind as the turning point in his career.

“Our work includes all the heavy civil improvements – earthwork, trackwork, structures, etc. – required to build the system,” he said. “My typical day includes some field observation, but primarily focuses on various planning, and coordination tasks – essentially communicating with all team members to help keep the work on track.”

“The Interstate Max light rail project in Portland, OR was particularly satisfying because it was one of the larger projects our company had built, and included widely varied scopes of work. It was on that job that I was given significant increased responsibility,” he said.

This isn’t the first major project Gilliland has undertaken. The past twenty years have given him lots of experience, beginning as laborer and moving up the ladder to

He looks forward to continuing to make his mark on the construction

engineering technology industry. “In my opinion, the biggest challenge our industry faces is replacing the skill and work ethic of the dedicated, resourceful, innovative and talented heavy construction professionals that went before us.” Clayton Gilliland is more than capable of meeting that challenge.

Courtesy Photo

Fall 2010

17


class notes Stay Connected

We love to hear about what our alumni are doing! Catch up with a few of your former classmates below. Janelle Baron ’09 was

AJ Huerter ’08 launched

James Martin ’05 was

Alumni Relations

commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant in the United States Air Force in October.

785-826-2642 alumni@salina.k-state.edu salina.k-state.edu/alumni

Paul Bijonowski ’10 was

wastedti.me, a website featuring the best time killers the internet has to offer, in August.

featured in Professional Pilot’s October cover story of Perdue Farms, Inc., where he is a pilot. Martin recently passed his ATP and BE40 checkrides.

Natalie Blair

Dean’s Office

Dennis Kuhlman 785-826-2601

Development Mark Friesen 785-826-2609

hired as a Design Engineer for The Bradbury Company Inc., Moundridge, in May.

Tom ’01 and Jessica Karcz

Brendan Compton ’10

Brett Knudsen ’09 was hired

was hired as a Tranportation/ Delivery/Production Test Pilot for Hawker Beechcraft Corporation, Wichita, in June.

Mike Drach ’09 joined

Career Services 785-826-2623

Continuing Education

National Oilwell Varco, Houston, Texas, as part of their Next Generation program.

785-826-2633

Lindsey (Boeckman) ’07 and Kenton ’07 Dreiling

Admissions

had a daughter, Lillian Jo, in May. Lindsey was hired as an Admissions Rep for K-State Salina in August.

785-826-2640 800-248-5782 (toll free in Kansas)

K-State Alumni Association 800-600-ALUM (2586) 785-532-6260 k-state.com

Website:

salina.k-state.edu

Facebook:

facebook.com/alumnikstatesalina

Twitter:

twitter.com/kstatesalina

YouTube:

Kate Fraser ’09 was hired as Manager of Operations for General Aviation Manufacturers Association, Washington, D.C., in January.

had a son, Thomas “Landon” in June. as an Engineering Technician by Black and Veatch, Kansas City, Mo., in September.

Heath Larson ’05 was hired as a Sales Demonstration Pilot for Hawker Beechcraft Corporation, Wichita, in August.

Chris ’06 and Robin (Mikols) ‘07 Laws had a son, Theodore Vincent, in August. Chris became a First Officer for Omni Air International, Tulsa, Okla., in January and Robin was hired as the Operations Officer for Wichita MidContinent Airport in April.

Hall Lewallen ’10 received

Kevin Giefer ’00 is a pilot

an internship as a Demo Pilot for Hawker Beechcraft Corporation in Wichita.

for Southwestern Energy Company, Houston, Texas.

Nick Mallare ’09 was hired as a Software Engineer for Adknowledge, Kansas City, Mo., in July.

Jacob Mitchem ’10 was hired as the Stanton County Airport Manager, Johnson.

Ryan Reid ’06 is the Outside Sales Representative for the Eastern Region for MidContinent Instruments, Wichita. Monica (Chester) ’05 and Tim Riggs became parents of Tenley Elizebeth-Sue in October.

Danny Sheehy ’10 was hired as an Air Evac Lifeteam Pilot in May. Robert Sweeney ’10 was hired as an Aerial Mapping Pilot for Air Associates of Kansas, Overland Park, Kan., in June.

Benjamin Woodruff ’09 was hired as a Flight Instructor and Charter Pilot for Stout Flying Service, Lewiston, Idaho, in July.

K-State Salina receives first deferred gift from alumni Lee and Beverly Gatton, Overland Park, are the first K-State Salina alumni to support their alma mater with a deferred gift . Lee Gatton graduated from K-State Salina when it was known as Kansas Technical Institute in 1971 with a degree in Electronic Engineering Technology. When he returned to teach computer engineering at his alma mater from 1984 to 1986, Beverly went back to school to earn a degree in Data Processing Technology. She graduated in 1986. “K-State Salina was pivotal in our careers and we wanted to give back to the place that started everything for us,” said Lee Gatton. Lee retired after spending 35 years as a software engineer and web developer. He now develops software for home robotics.

Both Gattons are still involved with K-State Salina. Both Lee and Beverly sit on the Computer Systems Engineering Technology Advisory Board and Lee also sits on the Electronics & Computer Engineering Technology Advisory Board. “The Gattons’ generosity will allow K-State Salina to pursue opportunities to grow and plan,” said Dennis Kuhlman, dean of K-State Salina. “Knowing that this resource will be available down the road helps us prepare for the future.” The Gattons’ gift has been designated for the Dean’s Excellence Fund, used to support the college’s growth.

Photo: Heather Wagoner

The Gattons with Dean Dennis Kuhlman at K-State Salina’s CatTown event before K-State played the University of Central Florida

Beverly is an IT project manager for Fidelity Information Services which is a leading global provider of software services to financial institutions.

We want to know what you are doing! Drop us a line at alumni@salina.k-state.edu or join our Facebook group

youtube.com/kstatesalina

your information Name: _________________________________________ Email: ____________________________ Address: _________________________________________________________________________ City, State, Zip: ___________________________________________________________________ Phone: ________________________________________ Graduation Year: __________________

Philanthropic contributions to K-State are coordinated by the Kansas State University Foundation. The foundation staff works with university partners to build lifelong relationships with alumni, friends, faculty, staff and students through involvement and investment in the university.

Current Employer: _____________________________________________ 18

Beyond

Send your information to alumni@salina.k-state.edu or Alumni Relations, 2310 Centennial Rd., Salina, KS 67401.

Fall 2010

19


class notes Stay Connected

We love to hear about what our alumni are doing! Catch up with a few of your former classmates below. Janelle Baron ’09 was

AJ Huerter ’08 launched

James Martin ’05 was

Alumni Relations

commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant in the United States Air Force in October.

785-826-2642 alumni@salina.k-state.edu salina.k-state.edu/alumni

Paul Bijonowski ’10 was

wastedti.me, a website featuring the best time killers the internet has to offer, in August.

featured in Professional Pilot’s October cover story of Perdue Farms, Inc., where he is a pilot. Martin recently passed his ATP and BE40 checkrides.

Natalie Blair

Dean’s Office

Dennis Kuhlman 785-826-2601

Development Mark Friesen 785-826-2609

hired as a Design Engineer for The Bradbury Company Inc., Moundridge, in May.

Tom ’01 and Jessica Karcz

Brendan Compton ’10

Brett Knudsen ’09 was hired

was hired as a Tranportation/ Delivery/Production Test Pilot for Hawker Beechcraft Corporation, Wichita, in June.

Mike Drach ’09 joined

Career Services 785-826-2623

Continuing Education

National Oilwell Varco, Houston, Texas, as part of their Next Generation program.

785-826-2633

Lindsey (Boeckman) ’07 and Kenton ’07 Dreiling

Admissions

had a daughter, Lillian Jo, in May. Lindsey was hired as an Admissions Rep for K-State Salina in August.

785-826-2640 800-248-5782 (toll free in Kansas)

K-State Alumni Association 800-600-ALUM (2586) 785-532-6260 k-state.com

Website:

salina.k-state.edu

Facebook:

facebook.com/alumnikstatesalina

Twitter:

twitter.com/kstatesalina

YouTube:

Kate Fraser ’09 was hired as Manager of Operations for General Aviation Manufacturers Association, Washington, D.C., in January.

had a son, Thomas “Landon” in June. as an Engineering Technician by Black and Veatch, Kansas City, Mo., in September.

Heath Larson ’05 was hired as a Sales Demonstration Pilot for Hawker Beechcraft Corporation, Wichita, in August.

Chris ’06 and Robin (Mikols) ‘07 Laws had a son, Theodore Vincent, in August. Chris became a First Officer for Omni Air International, Tulsa, Okla., in January and Robin was hired as the Operations Officer for Wichita MidContinent Airport in April.

Hall Lewallen ’10 received

Kevin Giefer ’00 is a pilot

an internship as a Demo Pilot for Hawker Beechcraft Corporation in Wichita.

for Southwestern Energy Company, Houston, Texas.

Nick Mallare ’09 was hired as a Software Engineer for Adknowledge, Kansas City, Mo., in July.

Jacob Mitchem ’10 was hired as the Stanton County Airport Manager, Johnson.

Ryan Reid ’06 is the Outside Sales Representative for the Eastern Region for MidContinent Instruments, Wichita. Monica (Chester) ’05 and Tim Riggs became parents of Tenley Elizebeth-Sue in October.

Danny Sheehy ’10 was hired as an Air Evac Lifeteam Pilot in May. Robert Sweeney ’10 was hired as an Aerial Mapping Pilot for Air Associates of Kansas, Overland Park, Kan., in June.

Benjamin Woodruff ’09 was hired as a Flight Instructor and Charter Pilot for Stout Flying Service, Lewiston, Idaho, in July.

K-State Salina receives first deferred gift from alumni Lee and Beverly Gatton, Overland Park, are the first K-State Salina alumni to support their alma mater with a deferred gift . Lee Gatton graduated from K-State Salina when it was known as Kansas Technical Institute in 1971 with a degree in Electronic Engineering Technology. When he returned to teach computer engineering at his alma mater from 1984 to 1986, Beverly went back to school to earn a degree in Data Processing Technology. She graduated in 1986. “K-State Salina was pivotal in our careers and we wanted to give back to the place that started everything for us,” said Lee Gatton. Lee retired after spending 35 years as a software engineer and web developer. He now develops software for home robotics.

Both Gattons are still involved with K-State Salina. Both Lee and Beverly sit on the Computer Systems Engineering Technology Advisory Board and Lee also sits on the Electronics & Computer Engineering Technology Advisory Board. “The Gattons’ generosity will allow K-State Salina to pursue opportunities to grow and plan,” said Dennis Kuhlman, dean of K-State Salina. “Knowing that this resource will be available down the road helps us prepare for the future.” The Gattons’ gift has been designated for the Dean’s Excellence Fund, used to support the college’s growth.

Photo: Heather Wagoner

The Gattons with Dean Dennis Kuhlman at K-State Salina’s CatTown event before K-State played the University of Central Florida

Beverly is an IT project manager for Fidelity Information Services which is a leading global provider of software services to financial institutions.

We want to know what you are doing! Drop us a line at alumni@salina.k-state.edu or join our Facebook group

youtube.com/kstatesalina

your information Name: _________________________________________ Email: ____________________________ Address: _________________________________________________________________________ City, State, Zip: ___________________________________________________________________ Phone: ________________________________________ Graduation Year: __________________

Philanthropic contributions to K-State are coordinated by the Kansas State University Foundation. The foundation staff works with university partners to build lifelong relationships with alumni, friends, faculty, staff and students through involvement and investment in the university.

Current Employer: _____________________________________________ 18

Beyond

Send your information to alumni@salina.k-state.edu or Alumni Relations, 2310 Centennial Rd., Salina, KS 67401.

Fall 2010

19


campus news Faculty Awards Marchbanks Memorial Award for Teaching Excellence

Joel Matthews

Counselor and Instructor of Psychology

Rex and Jean McArthur Family Faculty Fellow Award

Fred Guzek

Associate Professor of Business

Presidential Award for Undergraduate Teaching Excellence

Patricia Ackerman Students moving into Residence and Harbin Halls this fall were surprised with student lounge makeovers.

Associate Professor of Language Arts

Jason Braun ’05, former coordinator of residence life, helped develop the new look.

Photo: Ashley Flowers

UAS Program receives $2.76M grant from AFOSR K-State Salina’s Unmanned Aircraft Systems Program will develop mission planning, operations, and a disaster training center under a follow-on grant from the U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research in Arlington, Va. The $2.76 million grant, which runs through May 2013, brings the total awards for unmanned activity to $3.14 million from the AFOSR. The Applied Aviation Research Center will conduct the work through the UAS Program Office. “This second phase of funding allows us to expand our program by establishing UAS operational capability,” said Kurt Barnhart, aviation department head and the grant’s principal investigator. “The first phase focused on developing processes and procedures for UAS evaluation on behalf of the Kansas National Guard. This funding provides personnel and equipment to continue the mission. Projects include developing autoflight capability, sensor integration for intelligence gathering, airport wildlife mitigation research, and wireless power transmission research.”

Career Services

Part of the grant will be used for multiple unmanned aerial vehicle platforms for training and search and rescue including an Aerosonde 4.7 and a Wolverine 3 helicopter.

After a decade of service to K-State Salina students, Lucy Kollhoff has left her position as Director of Career and Employment Services to pursue another opportunity.

The Applied Aviation Research Center was established in March 2008. The center, which Barnhart directs, began as a cooperative venture of K-State Salina, the Salina Airport Authority and the Salina Area Chamber of Commerce. The center anticipates another $6 million in UAS funding from current applications.

Angela Hayes, Alumni Career Services Consultant on the Manhattan campus, will assist K-State Salina alumni while a new director is found. She can be reached at 785-532-3392 or ahayes@k-state.com.

The UAS Program Office partners closely with military organizations and the private sector to focus on developing unmanned flight in the national air space and training UAS pilots and operators. K-State is establishing criteria for UAS flight operations, including activity at the National Guard’s Smoky Hill Weapons Range and eventually at the Herington UAS flight facility. The program office establishes policies and procedures to enable both military and civilian organizations to fly and test at local facilities, Barnhart said.

Planter gets facelift The Sustainability Group has filled the large planter on the east side of Technology Center with new ecoscaping featuring an aluminum K-State Salina logo surrounded by rock and native plants. Evan Beckman ‘85, ‘08; Tony Hoover ‘84; and Alan Hoover ’92 were leaders in the new design and labor. Anyone interested in learning more about the Sustainability Group can contact Beckman at ebeckman@k-state.edu

20

Beyond

A CAT Community member participates in a contest during “Minute to Win it,” one of the group’s monthly activities

CAT Community A new program at K-State is taking learning in the classroom to the residence halls. The Connecting Across Topics Community at K-State is a learning community that takes a dynamic, interdisciplinary approach to the first year of college. Students in a CAT Community are enrolled in at least one common course and share a one-hour Connections Seminar. The program is designed to help students draw links between disciplines, share resource information available on campus, develop camaraderie between students in different curriculum majors, and create friendships that will extend beyond graduation. The members of the CAT Community have a student mentor who also lives in the halls and organizes social activities for the group.

Fall 2010

21


campus news Faculty Awards Marchbanks Memorial Award for Teaching Excellence

Joel Matthews

Counselor and Instructor of Psychology

Rex and Jean McArthur Family Faculty Fellow Award

Fred Guzek

Associate Professor of Business

Presidential Award for Undergraduate Teaching Excellence

Patricia Ackerman Students moving into Residence and Harbin Halls this fall were surprised with student lounge makeovers.

Associate Professor of Language Arts

Jason Braun ’05, former coordinator of residence life, helped develop the new look.

Photo: Ashley Flowers

UAS Program receives $2.76M grant from AFOSR K-State Salina’s Unmanned Aircraft Systems Program will develop mission planning, operations, and a disaster training center under a follow-on grant from the U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research in Arlington, Va. The $2.76 million grant, which runs through May 2013, brings the total awards for unmanned activity to $3.14 million from the AFOSR. The Applied Aviation Research Center will conduct the work through the UAS Program Office. “This second phase of funding allows us to expand our program by establishing UAS operational capability,” said Kurt Barnhart, aviation department head and the grant’s principal investigator. “The first phase focused on developing processes and procedures for UAS evaluation on behalf of the Kansas National Guard. This funding provides personnel and equipment to continue the mission. Projects include developing autoflight capability, sensor integration for intelligence gathering, airport wildlife mitigation research, and wireless power transmission research.”

Career Services

Part of the grant will be used for multiple unmanned aerial vehicle platforms for training and search and rescue including an Aerosonde 4.7 and a Wolverine 3 helicopter.

After a decade of service to K-State Salina students, Lucy Kollhoff has left her position as Director of Career and Employment Services to pursue another opportunity.

The Applied Aviation Research Center was established in March 2008. The center, which Barnhart directs, began as a cooperative venture of K-State Salina, the Salina Airport Authority and the Salina Area Chamber of Commerce. The center anticipates another $6 million in UAS funding from current applications.

Angela Hayes, Alumni Career Services Consultant on the Manhattan campus, will assist K-State Salina alumni while a new director is found. She can be reached at 785-532-3392 or ahayes@k-state.com.

The UAS Program Office partners closely with military organizations and the private sector to focus on developing unmanned flight in the national air space and training UAS pilots and operators. K-State is establishing criteria for UAS flight operations, including activity at the National Guard’s Smoky Hill Weapons Range and eventually at the Herington UAS flight facility. The program office establishes policies and procedures to enable both military and civilian organizations to fly and test at local facilities, Barnhart said.

Planter gets facelift The Sustainability Group has filled the large planter on the east side of Technology Center with new ecoscaping featuring an aluminum K-State Salina logo surrounded by rock and native plants. Evan Beckman ‘85, ‘08; Tony Hoover ‘84; and Alan Hoover ’92 were leaders in the new design and labor. Anyone interested in learning more about the Sustainability Group can contact Beckman at ebeckman@k-state.edu

20

Beyond

A CAT Community member participates in a contest during “Minute to Win it,” one of the group’s monthly activities

CAT Community A new program at K-State is taking learning in the classroom to the residence halls. The Connecting Across Topics Community at K-State is a learning community that takes a dynamic, interdisciplinary approach to the first year of college. Students in a CAT Community are enrolled in at least one common course and share a one-hour Connections Seminar. The program is designed to help students draw links between disciplines, share resource information available on campus, develop camaraderie between students in different curriculum majors, and create friendships that will extend beyond graduation. The members of the CAT Community have a student mentor who also lives in the halls and organizes social activities for the group.

Fall 2010

21


campus donors Private gifts help our students and faculty thrive as well as allow K-State Salina to sustain standards of excellence. We cannot rely simply on grants or higher tuition rates — our future stems from cooperative partnerships with the people who care most about our university. When people who are passionate about K-State care enough to share their resources, you have philanthropy. And it’s philanthropy that can make the difference between a dream that comes true and a dream that never gets a chance.

Platinum Circle

Bronze Circle

American Airlines Jan Burton Cessna Foundation Inc Randy and Lynda Hassler Dennis and Carol Kuhlman Premier Pneumatics Inc Spirit Aerosystems Verla Nesbitt Joscelyn Foundation Conni Williams

Bill and Jo Harbin The Boeing Company Textron Charitable Trust The Mildred and Rolland Middlekauff Foundation

Ackerman Welding Patricia and Donald Ackerman AT&T Foundation Terrie Boguski BP Foundation Inc Butler Manufacturing Company Foundation ExxonMobil Foundation Bill and Elaine Gross Hoelscher Inc Daniel Mathewson Steve Nordhus Philips Lighting Company Alan and Beverly Rohr Alyson and Travis Rome Kale Tarrant Wes Teel The Bank of Tescott Weis Fire and Safety Equipment Inc

Silver Circle

Schilling Circle

Marcia and Robert Anderson Kenneth and Iralee Barnard Bennington State Bank Bergkamp Incorporated ChevronTexaco Consolidated Printing Stationery Co Inc Alan and Loleeta Cordel First Bank Kansas Helen Graves Ted and Doris Harder KASA Industrial Controls Inc Gary and Katherine Kaufman Charles May Rex and Jean McArthur Frank and Emma McBride Monte and Doris Miller Roger and Sissy Morrison Steve Otter Van and Sharon Pooler Rocking M Radio Inc Salina Rotary Club Society of Manufacturing Engineers Mary Stark Jeff and Jolene Stubblefield Karl and Connie Stutterheim UMB Bank NA Salina Vortex Corp Phyllis Wilbur Will Reno Benefit Fund

Carol and David Ahlvers Tom and Roxanne Bell Mu Chen and Wei-Ming Lee Bill and Jaclyn Chestnut Allison Cole John and Debbie Divine Great Plains Manufacturing Inc Bill and Annie Grevas Daniel and Meg Hewes Limbo Inc Julie and Kevin Maher Ronald and Linda Powell ProFab Mfg Inc Kirk and Noel Schulz Students in Free Enterprise Ron and Mary Summers

$10,000+

Gold Circle $5,000-$9,999

$1,000-$4,999

22

Beyond

$500-$999

$250-$499

CenturyCat Circle $100-$249

Amber Waves Inc Rod and Cecelia Anderson Paul Angle Kurt and Anita Barnhart Edward and Shirley Bay Sandra and Bret Blickenstaff Joshua and Emily Brungardt Chris and Roxie Davis David and Shawn Delker Linda and Donald Doll

Scott Emley Terry and Sallie Force Roger and Sherry Fortmeyer Mark Friesen Girl Scouts of Kansas Heartland Inc Sue and Frederick Guzek Lupe and Joey Harding Keith and Debra Houghton Tom Huber Rhonda and Fred Huser Kevin and Kelly Janousek Terry and Kelley Kearn Saeed Khan Bernard and Mary King Leslie and Ann Kinsler Edward and Charlotte Macy Dave and Katie Mayes Robert and Marsha Moeder David Nilson Doug and Renee Oliphant Thomas and Callie Pratt Reid Rains Douglas and Lynae Reith Justin Ruder Kathy and Daniel Sanders Tammy Savage Dixie and Jim Schierlman J D and Martha Shippy Andrew and Lisa Smith Todd and Jalue Smith Solomon State Bank BJ and Jimmy Splichal Alysia Starkey Robert and Lynn Symington Jaci Walsh Barb Willoughby

Dave and Barb Button Matthew and Courtney Christopher Computer Automated Services ConocoPhillips Corey Cook Michael Cote Raju Dandu Judy and Kenneth Dechant Paul and Kathleen Deitering Scott and Sara Doberer Diane and Paul Edwards Michael and Jennifer Evans Dawn and Stan Feldkamp John and Cindy Fredrick Lee and Beverly Gatton Ora and Sylvia Griggs Larry Hadachek Jody Hadley and Leslie Schroeder-Hadley David and Debra Hammond Chris and Sheila Heinen Jerry and Bernetta Hlad Brice Hultgren and Nancy Milleret Hultgren Ted and Jennifer Johnson Kurt and Ange Jones Tom and Jessica Karcz Max and Kelli Kniffen Max and Kaleen Knopp Lucy and Michael Kollhoff

Eugene and Annice Lawson Jessica and Nathan Lee Robert and Rita Macy Douglas and Mindy Markham Ronald and Kathleen Matteson Roger Matthew Frank Meier Howard and Jane Meier Robert and Becky Miller Dan and Bonnie Mongeau Dan and Debbie Newton Paul and Mary Nold Jung Oh Cindy Paquette PepsiCo Foundation John and Mary Pinder Steve and Teresa Pistora Kenneth and Pamela Post Steve and Teresa Reavis Donald and Margaret Reinert Henry Riffel Rhonda Riffel David and Terri Rimovsky Michael and Martha Rogers Russell and Christi Rohlfing R J Romberger Rodney and Mari Root Ryan and Aggie Schamberger

Hal and Collette Scheuerman Mark and Judy Schrock Joseph and Marie Shobe Gary and Lee Shrader Deanna Sims Todd Smalley Don and Martha Smith Susan and Joseph Smith Shannon and Kelly Snedden Mark and Keri Stevens Jeffrey Stolzenburg Gary and Glenda Taddeo Steve and Margaret Thompson Tim and Ginger Thummel Paul and Cindy Trimble Teri VanWey Sandra Vink Don and Laura Von Bergen Jon and Karen Watkins Mike and Debra Wendt Aaron Westerman Andrew and Heather Wilber Larry and Linda Wilken Joy Winter Gary and Jane Wise

Wildcat Circle Gifts Above $25

Gordon and Stacy Abell Advanced Micro Devices Curtis and Marjorie Beane Evan and Jeanne Beckman Merle and Ann Bell Heidi Blackburn Dick and Leah Blanchard Don and Margaret Blecha Steven and Patricia Booth John and Diane Booze Bradley and Jill Boyer BRB Services Mike and Valori Bukaty Button Farms Fall 2010

23


campus donors Private gifts help our students and faculty thrive as well as allow K-State Salina to sustain standards of excellence. We cannot rely simply on grants or higher tuition rates — our future stems from cooperative partnerships with the people who care most about our university. When people who are passionate about K-State care enough to share their resources, you have philanthropy. And it’s philanthropy that can make the difference between a dream that comes true and a dream that never gets a chance.

Platinum Circle

Bronze Circle

American Airlines Jan Burton Cessna Foundation Inc Randy and Lynda Hassler Dennis and Carol Kuhlman Premier Pneumatics Inc Spirit Aerosystems Verla Nesbitt Joscelyn Foundation Conni Williams

Bill and Jo Harbin The Boeing Company Textron Charitable Trust The Mildred and Rolland Middlekauff Foundation

Ackerman Welding Patricia and Donald Ackerman AT&T Foundation Terrie Boguski BP Foundation Inc Butler Manufacturing Company Foundation ExxonMobil Foundation Bill and Elaine Gross Hoelscher Inc Daniel Mathewson Steve Nordhus Philips Lighting Company Alan and Beverly Rohr Alyson and Travis Rome Kale Tarrant Wes Teel The Bank of Tescott Weis Fire and Safety Equipment Inc

Silver Circle

Schilling Circle

Marcia and Robert Anderson Kenneth and Iralee Barnard Bennington State Bank Bergkamp Incorporated ChevronTexaco Consolidated Printing Stationery Co Inc Alan and Loleeta Cordel First Bank Kansas Helen Graves Ted and Doris Harder KASA Industrial Controls Inc Gary and Katherine Kaufman Charles May Rex and Jean McArthur Frank and Emma McBride Monte and Doris Miller Roger and Sissy Morrison Steve Otter Van and Sharon Pooler Rocking M Radio Inc Salina Rotary Club Society of Manufacturing Engineers Mary Stark Jeff and Jolene Stubblefield Karl and Connie Stutterheim UMB Bank NA Salina Vortex Corp Phyllis Wilbur Will Reno Benefit Fund

Carol and David Ahlvers Tom and Roxanne Bell Mu Chen and Wei-Ming Lee Bill and Jaclyn Chestnut Allison Cole John and Debbie Divine Great Plains Manufacturing Inc Bill and Annie Grevas Daniel and Meg Hewes Limbo Inc Julie and Kevin Maher Ronald and Linda Powell ProFab Mfg Inc Kirk and Noel Schulz Students in Free Enterprise Ron and Mary Summers

$10,000+

Gold Circle $5,000-$9,999

$1,000-$4,999

22

Beyond

$500-$999

$250-$499

CenturyCat Circle $100-$249

Amber Waves Inc Rod and Cecelia Anderson Paul Angle Kurt and Anita Barnhart Edward and Shirley Bay Sandra and Bret Blickenstaff Joshua and Emily Brungardt Chris and Roxie Davis David and Shawn Delker Linda and Donald Doll

Scott Emley Terry and Sallie Force Roger and Sherry Fortmeyer Mark Friesen Girl Scouts of Kansas Heartland Inc Sue and Frederick Guzek Lupe and Joey Harding Keith and Debra Houghton Tom Huber Rhonda and Fred Huser Kevin and Kelly Janousek Terry and Kelley Kearn Saeed Khan Bernard and Mary King Leslie and Ann Kinsler Edward and Charlotte Macy Dave and Katie Mayes Robert and Marsha Moeder David Nilson Doug and Renee Oliphant Thomas and Callie Pratt Reid Rains Douglas and Lynae Reith Justin Ruder Kathy and Daniel Sanders Tammy Savage Dixie and Jim Schierlman J D and Martha Shippy Andrew and Lisa Smith Todd and Jalue Smith Solomon State Bank BJ and Jimmy Splichal Alysia Starkey Robert and Lynn Symington Jaci Walsh Barb Willoughby

Dave and Barb Button Matthew and Courtney Christopher Computer Automated Services ConocoPhillips Corey Cook Michael Cote Raju Dandu Judy and Kenneth Dechant Paul and Kathleen Deitering Scott and Sara Doberer Diane and Paul Edwards Michael and Jennifer Evans Dawn and Stan Feldkamp John and Cindy Fredrick Lee and Beverly Gatton Ora and Sylvia Griggs Larry Hadachek Jody Hadley and Leslie Schroeder-Hadley David and Debra Hammond Chris and Sheila Heinen Jerry and Bernetta Hlad Brice Hultgren and Nancy Milleret Hultgren Ted and Jennifer Johnson Kurt and Ange Jones Tom and Jessica Karcz Max and Kelli Kniffen Max and Kaleen Knopp Lucy and Michael Kollhoff

Eugene and Annice Lawson Jessica and Nathan Lee Robert and Rita Macy Douglas and Mindy Markham Ronald and Kathleen Matteson Roger Matthew Frank Meier Howard and Jane Meier Robert and Becky Miller Dan and Bonnie Mongeau Dan and Debbie Newton Paul and Mary Nold Jung Oh Cindy Paquette PepsiCo Foundation John and Mary Pinder Steve and Teresa Pistora Kenneth and Pamela Post Steve and Teresa Reavis Donald and Margaret Reinert Henry Riffel Rhonda Riffel David and Terri Rimovsky Michael and Martha Rogers Russell and Christi Rohlfing R J Romberger Rodney and Mari Root Ryan and Aggie Schamberger

Hal and Collette Scheuerman Mark and Judy Schrock Joseph and Marie Shobe Gary and Lee Shrader Deanna Sims Todd Smalley Don and Martha Smith Susan and Joseph Smith Shannon and Kelly Snedden Mark and Keri Stevens Jeffrey Stolzenburg Gary and Glenda Taddeo Steve and Margaret Thompson Tim and Ginger Thummel Paul and Cindy Trimble Teri VanWey Sandra Vink Don and Laura Von Bergen Jon and Karen Watkins Mike and Debra Wendt Aaron Westerman Andrew and Heather Wilber Larry and Linda Wilken Joy Winter Gary and Jane Wise

Wildcat Circle Gifts Above $25

Gordon and Stacy Abell Advanced Micro Devices Curtis and Marjorie Beane Evan and Jeanne Beckman Merle and Ann Bell Heidi Blackburn Dick and Leah Blanchard Don and Margaret Blecha Steven and Patricia Booth John and Diane Booze Bradley and Jill Boyer BRB Services Mike and Valori Bukaty Button Farms Fall 2010

23


K-State Salina

Office of Alumni Relations 2310 Centennial Road Salina, KS 67401-8196

CHANGE SERVICE REQUESTED

Nonprofit Organization

U.S. POSTAGE PAID

Permit #525 Manhattan, Kan. 66502

Beyond 2011  

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