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ISSUE NO. 1 // VOLUME NO. 1 // FEBRUARY 2018

EDUCATOR'S DIGEST A TALE OF FOUR CITIES

EXPLORING MULTICULTURALISM Students from different cities share stories about the impact of their high school's environment has made towards their academic pursuits.


STNETNOC FO ELBAT

03

Editor's Purpose

04

By the Numbers

05

Background

06

Demographics

07

Student

Characteristics

08

Teachers

09

College Applications


ESOPRUP 'SROTIDE

SCHOOL INEQUALITIES In the world we live in today, educational equity is a big issue in California public schools. Students come from all different backgrounds yet are expected to learn and be tested in the same environment. In Southern California, what our educational systems call ‘equity’ is not accurate. Through these interviews, we hope you can realize the differences in how upbringing has a positive and negative effect on children’s knowledge on multiculturalism, achievement in school, and opportunities presented.

This issue focuses on four different college students who have come from different backgrounds, both educationally and socioeconomically. We asked them all the same questions in hopes of finding where their differences lie and how they all ended up coming together at UC Irvine. Does coming from a certain socioeconomic educational background have an effect on a student’s future success or failure? What challenges will students from a low SES background face? Are students from higher SES educational backgrounds set up for success? Our main goal was to understand the differences in experience and inequities encountered by underrepresented or marginalized groups in the U.S, which is the main concept of our Education 124 class.

MEKLIT IYOB-TESSEMA ASIA MALONE-DYSON KATHERINE PHAM


BY THE NUMBERS: EDUCATIONAL INQUALITY

2 grades lower are

attend schools

the test scores of

students in the

where test scores

black students

gifted scholars

are below the

compared to their

program are black

national average

white peers

or Latino

30 minutes is the

15% less funding

amount of time low-

per student in

income students

districts with

lose schooling due

students of color

to socioeconomic hardships

39% chance

50%  of

Less than

Less than

3 out 10

50% of Latino students attended segregated schools in CA, NY and TX

10 fewer days of

students low SES

LAUSD high school

school students from

schools faced

graduates have

high-poverty schools

obstacles that took

completed courses

had compared to

time away from

for CSU/UCs

their low-poverty

learning

neighbors

Sources: https://news.stanford.edu/2016/04/29/local-education-inequities-across-u-srevealed-new-stanford-data-set/ https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/08/magazine/education-by-the-numbers.html http://blueprint.ucla.edu/feature/unequal-schools-generations-of-poverty/

SREBMUN EHT YB

1 out of 6 students


SPECIFIC HIGH SCHOOL STATISTICS In this issue, we will be focusing on the following high schools: Obtained through School Accountability Report Card (SARC) (CA Dept of Education) - API out of 1000

Katella High School (Anaheim, California):

- 16.9% Socioeconomically Disadvantaged

- 82.9% Socioeconomically Disadvantaged

- 79.2% Graduates Who Completed All Courses

- 31.2% Graduates Who Completed All Courses

Required for UC/CSU Admission

Required for UC/CSU Admission

- 913 Governor's

- 731 Governor's

Academic Performance Index (API)

Academic Performance Index (API)

- Student Interviewed: Janelle Vo (Class of 2015)

- Student Interviewed: Devin Rankin (Class of 2016)

Gretchen A. Whitney High School (Cerritos, California): - 19% Socioeconomically Disadvantaged

South East High School (South Gate, California):

- 87.6% Graduates Who Completed All Courses

- 95.2% Socioeconomically Disadvantaged

Required for UC/CSU Admission

- 45.5% Graduates Who Completed All Courses

- 993 Governor's

Required for UC/CSU Admission

Academic Performance Index (API)

- 689 Governor's

- Student Interviewed: Isabelle Lee (Class of 2017)

Academic Performance Index (API) - Student Interviewed: Jorge Mora (Class of 2015)

University High School

Katella High School

South East High School

DNUORGKCAB

University High School (Irvine, California):


DID YOUR HIGH SCHOOL HAVE STUDENTS FROM DIVERSE BACKGROUNDS (ETHNICALLY AND SOCIOECONOMICALLY)? Isabelle Lee: In terms of ethnic diversity, my school was pretty

of the high schools we focused on. After doing further research,

much mostly Asian so I came back from a non-diverse school.

we found that higher-income neighborhoods such as Irvine and

One reason why this might have happened was that the area

Cerritos have fewer numbers of Latinos and African-Americans

surrounding my school was primarily filled with well-off Asian

compared to lower-income neighborhoods such as Anaheim

neighborhoods. There was a lot more diversity in terms of

and South Gate.

people’s socioeconomic backgrounds (though I don’t know to what extent) but I can definitely say that there was definitely

Jorge Mora: My school was not ethnically nor

a lot more balance in that area.

socioeconomically diverse. 98% of all students in my high school were Hispanic/Latino and the remaining 2% were of African-

Janelle Vo: Yes but no. We had a lot of diversity but at the

American descent. In terms of socioeconomic status, I would

same time, we did not have enough. The Asian community was

say that most people were from families in the lower or lower

extremely concentrated at my high school. However, we did

middle class. The one thing that I do think my high school lacked

have a lot of variation between the Asian ethnicities, i.e.

was a more diverse group of students from different

Korean, Chinese, Vietnamese, Cambodia, etc. The

backgrounds.

socioeconomic backgrounds were less diverse. I struggle to say that because I knew of quite a few peers who were

Devin Rankin: My high school was not very ethnically and

coming from families within the lower SES backgrounds

socioeconomically diverse. The school was and is composed of

however as a majority stands most of the students came from

about 90% Hispanic students. A majority of the students come

the Irvine background. This meaning that a majority of

from families of very low income. We can see this through the

students came from households from the middle to upper

80% of students who are eligible for free or reduced lunch.

middle ranges.

Jorge Mora

Janelle Vo

Devin Rankin

Isabelle Lee

SCIHPARGOMED

We wanted to compare the ethnic and socioeconomic makeup


Jorge Mora: The students at my school were actually not too

Janelle Vo: The majority of students from my high school were

fond of the whole college idea. Out of my graduating class of

extremely academically driven. Most students had goals of going

450 students, only 50% attended any higher education

to big well-known universities. If not the famous East Coast

institution whether it was a private, a UC, a Cal State, and even

colleges, the top “feeder schools” that graduates ended up

community college. Although it was 50%, only about 22% of that

enrolling would include: UC Berkeley, USC, and a number of

50% were going to attend a four-year university. So our school

other UC schools. Even those who did not expect to go to a 4

had a rather lower percentage of students who were going to

year out of high school were prepared to go to a junior college

attend college. A lot of students I know are now working a full-

then transfer to a 4 year. If I had to give a rough approximation, I

time job because they decided that college was not for them. I

would say only 1-2% of the student body may not have had

thought that there was definitely room for improvement in

college in mind, but even that feels too high.

getting more people to apply and attend any college institution.

Devin Rankin: Coming from a low socioeconomic area there

Isabelle Lee: The students here were a lot more competitive and driven than what you would normally find in a regular high school.

was definitely a mix of students. I knew people who were

With the top of the top is selected from elementary/middle

dedicated to the military from day one, people who were going

schools in our areas, it created a culture in which we always had

straight into the workforce, people trying to get into the best

to “do more” and always made you feel that you are good

universities, and people just getting by to attend community

enough could be better. We were just so driven by academics

college. Where I am from, I do not believe that a majority of

through each other, the school culture, ourselves, and our parents

students had their divided attention to aspirations of attending

that it just made a school where you had to keep doing better

college. I feel as though this stemmed from family situations,

and better. You would see people pulling all-nighters, applying

ideologies within the family, and much more.A majority of the

to internships early on, and students who talked about their

people I know now are in the workforce.

accomplishments on a daily basis and it just felt very overwhelming at times because there was always someone better than you or someone who had their life figured out.

Made in Partnership With:

UCI

SCITSIRETCARAHC TNEDUTS

WHAT WERE THE TYPE OF STUDENTS LIKE FROM YOUR SCHOOL (BEHAVIOR/COLLEGE MOTIVATED)?


WERE YOUR HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS KNOWLEDGEABLE AND HAVE ENOUGH TRAINING IN THEIR TOPIC AREAS? Isabelle Lee: I felt that a good amount/majority of my

knowledgeable and did a great job with the material they

teachers were knowledgeable and had training in their topic

were teaching. However, it might be a bit bias because I only

areas but I and so have some of my friends had teachers who

took Honors and AP classes, so I felt like I was always in a class

either did not teach the material at all, taught really badly, did

of students who cared and who did good in terms of grades

not understand their subject to well, or did not understand

and test scores. I had teachers with degrees from UCLA,

students’ levels of knowledge. What I mean by the last one is

Juilliard, Berkeley, and other top-ranked schools. The classes I

that they often thought we already knew a certain topic and

took in high school definitely prepared me for classes I am

taught us a harder topic that was based off this topic, so thus,

currently taking at UCI. I don’t know if it was just luck or not,

we all struggled in certain classes. Majority of our teachers

but I would say I was blessed with the teachers I had in high

were really good though and always were willing to help with

school.

appointments if you reached out to them.

Devin Rankin: A majority of the teachers did have knowledge

Janelle Vo: Yes, most of my high school teachers at least had

and training in their subjects with a couple of exceptions. For

their masters in their topic areas. We even had a few teachers

example, when a new AP class was implemented some

who had their doctoral degrees in their subjects. Having said

teachers just took on the role but did not have all of their

that, they were a handful of teachers who did seem like they

memory refreshed or were learning it for the first time

did not have the proper training or knowledge. The few

themselves. I believe that all of the material they were

“underprepared” teachers stood out a lot since the school’s

teaching was not too in depth, but a lot of the problems came

teachers were primarily held to a high standard.

from the teaching dynamic through passion, personality, and enthusiasm. I felt as though more training was needed in character development.

Sponsored by:

SREHCAET

Jorge Mora: The teachers at my high school were definitely


We wanted to see how students from high and low SES schools

Isabelle Lee: I felt a lot more thankful knowing that my school

felt when applying to colleges and what type of helped they

had our college counselors, regular counselors, and was also

received in order. We observed the type of help they received,

super thankful for a couple of friends who had gone through this

whether it was from their parents, siblings or schools.

process and helped answer a lot of questions/revise my essays. There were certain classes in which the teachers would let seniors

Jorge Mora: I would say that my high school prepared me

work on their essays in class and the college counselor was there

pretty well for the college application process. Since my junior

(but appointments were very very hard to get), and there was a

year in high school, our college counselor would get in contact

college essay prep class over the summer so I felt that they did

with us every couple of months to get us mentally prepared. As

their job.

soon as my senior year came along, our college counselor would personally help us with the application, the personal statement,

Janelle Vo: I was very well prepared. Most of my preparation

and held other workshops to further assist us in whatever we

came from having older siblings who already went through the

needed. I would say that I am thankful that our school’s college

application process so they were able to walk me through current

counselor was so dedicated because being a first-gen student, I

standards. However, my school played a big part in preparing me

do not think I would have done as well on any of my college

to write essays and teaching the senior class how to approach

applications.

the application process. They showed us the Common App. They had information sessions about how to properly graduate high

Devin Rankin: I did not believe that the college application

school and what colleges look for in high school students. They

process was too difficult. I do believe that the college counselor

taught us how to make college goals sheets and other useful

did a great job preparing me for some processes that I did not

points. College was the goal for my school. Check in’s for goal

fully comprehend. I did not have any help from my parents, but I

tracking began late sophomore year if not beginning our junior

did from my older siblings.

year.

Jorge Mora

Isabelle Lee

Devin Rankin

Janelle Vo

SNOITACILPPA EGELLOC

HOW WELL-PREPARED (FROM YOUR PARENTS OR HIGH SCHOOL) WERE YOU FOR THE COLLEGE APPLICATION PROCESS?


UNTIL WE GET EQUALITY IN EDUCATION, WE WON'T HAVE AN EQUAL SOCIETY. SONIA SOTOMAYOR

EDUCATION 124 PROJECT  

Katherine Pham Meklit Iyob-Tessema Asia Malone-Dyson

EDUCATION 124 PROJECT  

Katherine Pham Meklit Iyob-Tessema Asia Malone-Dyson

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