Page 1

DIISCOV VERY Y TO INNO OVATIION

Th National N ti l Science S i The Foundation’s Small Business Programs Jesus Soriano, MD, PhD, MBA Program Director Director, SBIR/STTR Industrial Innovation & Partnerships Division Engineering Directorate N i National l Science S i F Foundation d i 703-292-7795 jsoriano@nsf.gov 1


DIISCOV VERY Y TO INNO OVATIION

National Science Foundation National Science Board

Office of the Inspector General Office of Cyberinfrastructure

Director

$6.9 B

Dr. Subra Suresh

Office of International g g Science and Engineering Office of the General Counsel

Directorate for Biological Sciences

Directorate for Engineering $762 M

Division of Industrial Innovation and Partnerships

Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering

Directorate for Geosciences

Directorate for Ed Education ti and d Human Resources

Directorate for Mathematical and Physical Sciences

Directorate for Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences

$162 M Commercialization focus (SBIR/STTR: ď ž$140 M FY 2012)

Office of Legislative g and Public Affairs Office of Equal Opportunity Programs Office of Integrative Activities Office of Polar Programs

Office of Budget, Finance, and Award Management Office of Information and Resource Management

2


DIISCOV VERY Y TO INNO OVATIION

NSF by the Numbers FY 2011 $6.9 billion Appropriations (does not include special or donated funds) 1,875

Colleges, universities, and other institutions receive NSF funding

51,600

Proposals evaluated through a competitive merit review process

11,200

Competitive awards funded

262 000 262,000

Proposal reviews conducted

276,000

Estimated number of people supported directly by NSF (researchers, postdoctoral fellows, trainees, teachers, and students)

44,000

St d t supported Students t d by b NSF Graduate G d t Research R h Fellowships F ll hi since 1952

3


DIISCOV VERY Y TO INNO OVATIION

Di t t ffor E i i Directorate Engineering

Emerging Frontiers in Research and Innovation (EFRI) Sohi Rastegar

Engineering Education and Centers (EEC) Theresa Maldonado

Office of the Assistant Director Th Thomas P Peterson t

Deputy Assistant Director Kesh Narayanan

Chemical, Bi i i Bioengineering, Environmental, and Transport Systems (CBET) John McGrath

Civil, Electrical, Mechanical, and Communications, Manufacturing and Cyber Innovation Systems (CMMI) (ECCS) Steven McKnight Robert Trew

Senior Advisor for Nanotechnology Mihail Roco

I d ti l Industrial Innovation and Partnerships (IIP) G Grace W Wang

4


DIISCOV VERY Y TO INNO OVATIION

Industrial Innovation and Partnerships Division Director Grace Wang

Academic Partnerships

Small Business Partnerships

Donald Senich Grant Opportunities for Academic Liaison with Industry Donald Senich

Industry/University Cooperative R h Centers C t Research Rathindra DasGupta Larry Hornak

Program Support Manager Amanda May

Operations Specialist Greg Misiorek

Einstein Fellows Robert Pauley Mark Supal

Analysts Alex Schwarzkopf, Kevin Simmons

Experts/Special Topics George Vermont Greg Baxter

Innovation Cluster Cheryl Albus

Partnerships for Innovation: Building Innovation Capacity Sara Nerlove

Partnerships for Innovation: Accelerating Innovation Research Karlene Hoo

I-Corps Errol Arkilic, R. DasGupta

Joe Hennessey Nanotechnology, Advanced Material & Manufacturing (NM) Ben Schrag Biological and Chemical Technology (BC) Prakash Balan, Ruth Shuman, Jesus Soriano Electronics, Information & Communication Technology (EI) Juan Figueroa, Glenn Larsen, Murali Nair Education Applications (EA) Glenn Larsen

5


DIISCOV VERY Y TO INNO OVATIION

IIP Vision & Mission IIP Vision & Mission • Vision ‐ To To be the pre be the pre‐eminent eminent federal resource driving the  federal resource driving the expansion of our nation’s innovation capacity by  stimulating partnerships among industry, academe,  investors, government, and other stakeholders investors, government, and other stakeholders

• Mission ‐ IIP will enhance our nation’s economic competitiveness  by catalyzing the transformation of discovery into  societal benefits through stimulating partnerships and societal benefits through stimulating partnerships and  promoting learning environments for innovators

6


SBIR S

i-Co orps

PFI I /UCR RC

GOA ALI ERC C

Eng. E

NS SF overalll

Supplements

Resourc ces Invested ($))

DIISCOV VERY Y TO INNO OVATIION

Industrial Innovation and Partnerships

Industry

------II-B---------------------

Investors “Ditch” of death Valley of death

Foundations Small Business University Discovery

Development

Commercialization


DIISCOV VERY Y TO INNO OVATIION

• A public-private partnership to support the translation of NSF basic (academic) research into the development of technologies, products and processes • Increasing Network Opportunities: to create a national network of scientists, engineers, innovators, business leaders and entrepreneurs building on existing NSF grantee events • Supporting NSF Strategy: by “reaching out to communities that play complementary roles in the innovation process and are essential to ensuring the impact of NSF Investments.” *

* 2011 NSF Strategic Plan

8


DIISCOV VERY Y TO INNO OVATIION

I-Corps Projects j are Team-Based • Team Composition: – E Entrepreneurial t i lL Lead: d P Post-doc t d or St Student d t to move it forward – I-Corps Mentor: Domain-relevant volunteer guide – PI: Researcher with current or previous award Credit: © 2011 JupiterImages Corp.

• Program Outcomes

ti i network t k off Mentors/Advisors M t /Ad i – F Functioning – Scientist and Engineers trained as Entrepreneurs – Increased impact of NSF-funded basic •30 Hours of Curriculum  research •$50,000 per award  9

$ , • F&A $5,000 maximum • 25 awards in FY2011 • 100 awards in FY2012


DIISCOV VERY Y TO INNO OVATIION

Program Details (Eligibility) g ( g y) • Academic PI: Previous NSF award in last 5 years • Must have II-Corps Corps team in place at initial contact • Must be available for off off-site site Workshops and on-site Curriculum (entire team) • Serious time commitment – Consistent with start-up mentality

10

Credit: © 2011 JupiterImages Corp.


DIISCOV VERY Y TO INNO OVATIION

NSF SBIR Program g • Seeks to fund transformational, gametransformational game changing technologies • Strong focus on commercialization • Powerful P f l translation t l ti ttooll • Encourages ties to private sector • High-leverage for post-academic effort

11


DIISCOV VERY Y TO INNO OVATIION

IA

IA = Innovation Accelerator

IA


DIISCOV VERY Y TO INNO OVATIION

Doing g Business with NSF • NSF is not the Final Customer • NSF is not buying your product gy topics: p • NSF has broad market-driven technology You identify the problem/opportunity, propose the technological solution, and d i your business devise b i strategy t t • NSF wants to see you commercialize your h successfully f ll research • NSF provides incentives to encourage you to find i investment t t $$

13


DIISCOV VERY Y TO INNO OVATIION

SBIR Phase I Proposals Topic Distribution (2011) ~ 1900 small company company proposals

Calls for Proposals every 6 months 14


DIISCOV VERY Y TO INNO OVATIION

Funding g Success Rates • Phase I: 10-15% (historical); currently 15% • Phase IB: 30% • Phase II: 30 30-45% 45% (historical); currently 40% • Phase IIB: 20% (historical) ( )

15


DIISCOV VERY Y TO INNO OVATIION

Program Information profit Small Business • Applicant must be a for for-profit (500 or fewer employees) located in the U.S. • At least 51% U.S.- owned by individuals and independently operated • PI’s primary employment is with small business during the project • Two Solicitations per year – June and December

16


DIISCOV VERY Y TO INNO OVATIION

Current SBIR Solicitation (FY 2013) • Small Business Innovation Research P Program Phase Ph I Solicitation S li it ti • Released in March • Full Proposal Deadline: June 19, 2012 • Due by 5 p.m. proposer's local time

17


DIISCOV VERY Y TO INNO OVATIION

Current SBIR Solicitation Four Program Research Topics • Biological & Chemical Technologies (BC) • Electronics, Information & Communication Technologies C i i T h l i (EI) • Nanotechnology, Advanced Materials, and Manufacturing (NM) • Education Applications (EA) Solicitation Deadline: June June, 19 2012 18


DIISCOV VERY Y TO INNO OVATIION

Differences Compared to NIH SBIR Program • Early-stage technology development focus, but not basic research • No disease focus or interest • Prefer platform technology, where applicable • NSF does not support clinical trials, or FDA p submission expense

19


DIISCOV VERY Y TO INNO OVATIION

Funding Criteria  Must be high-risk, high-payback innovation

 Demonstrate strategic partnerships with y, research collaborators,, customers,, industry, and/or equity investors  NSF does NOT fund: – Evolutionary optimization of existing products and processes or modifications to broaden the scope of an existing product, process or application – “Market” research of technologies

20


DIISCOV VERY Y TO INNO OVATIION

NSF Merit Review Process • Intellectual Merit • Quality of the Research

• Broader Impact Commercialization Potential • Typically reviewed by external experts in panel meetings • Experts come from Academia/Industry/Government Labs 21


DIISCOV VERY Y TO INNO OVATIION

Review Criteria (I)

• Intellectual Merit – A sound approach to establish technical & commercial i l ffeasibility ibilit – Technical Team qualifications q – Sufficient access to resources – Reflects “state-of-the-art”

22


DIISCOV VERY Y TO INNO OVATIION

Review Criteria (II) p • Broader/ Commercial Impact (Commercialization Plan) – The company’s compan ’s strategic vision ision – The market opportunity pp y – The company/team – The product features and benefits compared to the competition – Financing and revenue model 23


DIISCOV VERY Y TO INNO OVATIION

NSF SBIR Program Benefits • Phase I Grantees Workshop – Assistance Preparing a quality Phase II proposal

• Phase IB – Early investment match

• Phase Ph II Grantees G t Conference C f – Networking Opportunities

• TECP and Phase IIB – Commercialization Incentive Supplements

• Commercialization Assistance ( (connects t grantees t with ith partners) t ) - Phase I Commercialization Planning Assistance - Phase II Innovation Accelerator - Matchmaker

• Student/Teacher/Minority Partnerships Supplements 24


DIISCOV VERY Y TO INNO OVATIION

SBIR Program Outcomes I l NSF Ph II C i li i T ki S d Dr. George Vermont D G V Internal NSF Phase II Commercialization Tracking Study –

 40% of the companies successful  Success is Revenues > $0.5M in 5 years, or $1M in 8 years

 Full successes return about $9 in revenue for every $1 invested by NSF in that project.  Sizeable acquisitions leverage this number significantly.  Half of all successful projects report company or technology acquired 12 years after award.

 Academia is a major j source of the successful projects. p j  20% of the successes are (or were) operating under license from a University.  Estimated that over 50% of the successes have academic roots in a faculty member and/or Ph.D. thesis.

 Financial support by a major company intimately involved in the business area, increases the success factor from 40% to 65%


DIISCOV VERY Y TO INNO OVATIION

Matchmaker Program: Connecting Industry with SBIR Grantees  NSF - Innovation Accelerator (IA): a Public Private Partnership  $110M in private investments for NSF grantees  Identify/build relationships with potential customers and strategic partners

 Other forms of IA assistance to NSF Funded Companies p  Assist with business negotiations/valuations  Help with business strategy  Strengthen management team  Raise capital  Help form Board of Directors


DIISCOV VERY Y TO INNO OVATIION

NSF Matchmaker Program P ti i t Participants • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Adobe Air Liquide Alcan Ashland Archer Daniels Midland AS&E Ball Aerospace Bayer Boeing Cabot Microelectronics Champion Chevron Crown Cytec Industries

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Delphi Essilor Goodyear IDEX J&J COSAT Kraft Lockheed Martin Lord Monsanto Newell Rubbermaid Pall P&G Pfizer Praxair PPM Technologies Physic Ventures

• • • • • • • • • • • • •

Roche Diagnostics Rohm and Haas Schlumberger Sharp Shell Sherwin Williams Siemens TTB Sigma‐ Aldrich Swagelok TEVA Unilever W Weyerhauser h Xerox

27


DIISCOV VERY Y TO INNO OVATIION

Top Reasons to Seek SBIR Funding • Provides funding for technologies on a path toward commercialization • Pro Provides ides “pre “pre-seed” seed” funding f nding to demonstrate proof-of-concept • Not N t a lloan/no / repaymentt • Provides validation, recognition, visibility • May be leveraged to attract investment/partnerships • Allows small business to retain IP • Values/encourages/facilitates partnerships, partnerships which enable success

28


DIISCOV VERY Y TO INNO OVATIION

NSF SBIR/STTR Home Page: http://www http:// http://www.nsf.gov/eng/iip/sbir/ www www.nsf.gov/eng/iip/sbir/ nsf gov/eng/iip/sbir/ (or Google: “NSF SBIR”)

Jesus Soriano, MD, PhD, MBA Jesus Soriano MD PhD MBA jsoriano@nsf.gov 29

06-01am_0800_JesusSoriano_OverviewOfNSFSBIRSTTRProgram  

OVATI ION Y TO IVERY I SCOV Program Director, SBIR/STTR Industrial Innovation & Partnerships Division Engineering Directorate N i l S i...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you