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BFA in Art Eduction

Art & Art History at Chicago


BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS IN ART EDUCATION Art Ed | 2


Welcome The BFA in Art Education program provides the requirements for Illinois state teacher licensure and the experiences needed for students to become effective teachers/artists/researchers at the high school level in Chicago’s diverse public schools and communities. The program cultivates the study and making of art in a variety of ways that are rooted in local cultures, histories of activism, and democratic participation in the public sphere. BFA in Art Education students will develop their own artistic practice and consider how a rigorous process of art making can be shared with their students. We believe that an engaged and engaging art education links students’ life experiences to experiences of contemporary art, media, and cultural forms. In addition to studio courses, seminars on the practice and theory of art education foster an awareness of collaborative strategies of teaching, learning, and art making. Student teachers gain rich experience and mentorship working with licensed art teachers in Chicago Public Schools. As the only public university in the city of Chicago offering a dedicated pathway into high school art teaching, UIC’s BFA in Art Education program is committed to preparing students to become successful artists, teachers, and leaders in their communities. Upon completion of the BFA in Art Education program requirements, students will be prepared to apply for the Illinois Professional Educator License endorsed in Visual Arts for grades 9 through 12 needed to teach high school art.

Benito Juarez Community Academy students visiting the National Museum of Mexican Art

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Faculty Karyn Sandlos

Associate Professor of Art & Education Program Head, BFA in Art Education

ksandl3@uic.edu ksandl3@uic.edu http://artandarthistory.uic.edu/profile/karyn-sandlos

Art Faculty

Dianna Frid Beate Geissler Doug Ischar Silvia Malagrino Matthew Metzger Dan Peterman Sabrina Raaf Jennifer Reeder Jen Delos Reyes Laurie Jo Reynolds Deborah Stratman Nate Young Additional courses taught by faculty in UIC’s College of Education

Contacts Amanda Grant

Academic Advisor, Art & Art History agg@uic.edu 312.355.0979

UIC College of Architecture, Design, & the Arts 208 Jefferson Hall 929 West Harrison St. Chicago, IL 60607

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“Imagination is the capacity to think of things as if they could be otherwise.� Maxine Greene

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William Estrada, Mobile Street Art Cart, 2018 www.werdmvmntstudios.com

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Becoming a High School Art Teacher: It’s Not a Straight Line 8 by Karyn Sandlos

Academics 10 BFA in Art Education Program Overview and Degree Requirements 10 BFA in Art Education Sample 4-year plan 12 Transfer Students 14 Academic Advising 15

Applying to the BFA in Art Education 16 Pre-Art Education 16 BFA in Art Education 17 Application and Portfolio Review Requirements 18

UIC Council on Teacher Education (CTE) 20 Overview 20 Conceptual Framework Summary and Forms 21 Milestones 22 Student Teaching 24 edTPA 25

Supporting Your Studies 28 BFA in Art Education requirements and costs 28 Grow Your Own Illinois Program 29

Resources on Campus 30 UIC Museums and Galleries 30 Cultural Centers at UIC 30

Resources in the Community 31 Building Your Professional Art Educator Network in Chicago 31 Chicagoland Museums and Galleries 32 Illinois and National Art Education Associations 32

Resources and Readings 33 Who should I follow on social media? 33 Art Education Websites and Databases 33 Readings 34 Art Ed | 7


Becoming a High School Art Teacher:

It’s Not a Straight Line

From Syllabus: Notes from An Accidental Professor, copyright Lynda Barry

Karyn Sandlos Artist and educator Lynda Barry (2015) sees learning to draw as much more than a technical exercise in mark making. If we keep our hand in motion as we draw, Barry suggests, drawing becomes a place to explore and come up with ideas. Barry writes, “The trick seems to be this: consider the drawing as a side effect of something else: a certain state of mind that comes about when we gaze with open attention” (p. 22). Drawing, and art making in general, can bring us back to the basics of noticing

how we see and relate to the world around us. Research in art education shows us that at a certain age, often in high school, students stop drawing because they think they can’t master the technique. The drawing process can rouse our inner critic: I’ll never get it right. My art isn’t good enough. At this crucial moment, students often decide that art is not for them (Lowenfeld and Brittain, 1987). People who return to the arts later in life find they have a lot to unlearn about what is acArt Ed | 8


ceptable, what is good, and what is true. The process of unlearning what we think we know or believe about drawing does not follow a linear path. It’s not a straight line. Learning to become a high school art teacher is also an unlearning. At the same time as students are gaining a great deal of practical experience and professional knowledge, they are developing deeper understandings of the historic and systemic structures that shape public education in the United States today. A teacher preparation program is a place for students to wrestle with their own educational experience, with issues of power and inequality, and with the critical, life-changing possibilities that an education in the arts can bring. UIC’s BFA in Art Education program recognizes that students entering the teaching profession in the 21st C do so at a time of tremendous uncertainty. Given the realities of inequality, institutionalized abuse of power, hyper-mediation of information, and threats to the environment, the way forward is anything but clear. The BFA in Art Education program will introduce you to a rich array of methods, strategies, and resources for art education as a practice of participation in the public sphere. Eve Ewing (2017), Chicago-based writer and artist, captures a sense of art making as an education in democratic possibilities: Art creates pathways for subversion, for political understanding

and solidarity among coalition builders. Art teaches us that lives other than our own have value. Like the proverbial court jester who can openly mock the king in his own court, artists who occupy marginalized social positions can use their art to challenge structures of power in ways that would otherwise be dangerous or impossible. Art education has the potential to engage and unsettle us, to make us question what we think we know or believe, to change our minds, and to re-shape our realities. Catalyzing discussion and debate about contemporary social issues, art education gets people making and thinking and talking about the issues that affect us on a daily basis. Becoming a high school art teacher is a pathway into doing critical, meaningful, and life-changing work in schools and communities with young people. At UIC, this pathway is open to all, including students of color, LGBTQ and gender non-conforming students, students with disabilities, and culturally diverse and multilingual students. In our program, you will learn to use your knowledge, background, and experience to make a unique contribution to the profession. With a BFA in Art Education, you can become an artist, an educator, and a change-maker, all at the same time. Ask us how.

Barry, L. (2015). Syllabus: Notes from an Accidental Professor. Drawn & Quarterly. Ewing, Eve. (2017, April 6). Why Authoritarians Attack the Arts. The New York Times. https://www.nytimes.com/2017/04/06/opinion/why-authoritarians-attack-the-arts.html Lowenfeld, V., and Brittain, W.L. Creative and Mental Growth(8th ed.). (1947/1987). New Jersey: Prentice Hall Inc. Art Ed | 9


Academics BFA in Art Education Program Overview & Degree Requirements For the degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts in Art Education, a total of 132-133 semester hours is required. The Professional Educator License for Secondary Education with a Visual Arts Endorsement is not automatically awarded upon successful completion of degree requirements. Before the license is issued, the candidate must file an application for the Illinois PEL with the UIC Council on Teacher Education. The candidate must also pass a series of examinations required by the Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE). See the Council on Teacher Education website for more information. http://cte.uic.edu/milestones/

After completing the Art First Year Program, students who meet or exceed a minimum 2.50/4.00 cumulative GPA and a 3.00/4.00 GPA in art courses may submit an application and portfolio to the Pre-Art Education Program.

Admission into the Pre-Art Education Program does not guarantee placement in the Art Education Professional Core sequence. At the end of the sophomore year at UIC (or transfer students who have completed first year course work and have a minimum of 60 or more hours applicable to the Art Education degree), students submit an application and portfolio as well as complete an interview with the Program Head of Art Education. Successful applicants will be enrolled in the Professional Art Education Core sequence.

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Students entering the Professional Art Education Core are required to apply for candidacy with the UIC Council on Teacher Education. ONE of the following tests must be taken and passed before applying for candidacy: The Test of Academic Proficiency (TAP), SAT or ACT + writing. The Visual Arts Content Area Test (Art 6–12) must be passed before the candidate is allowed into practice teaching. The edTPA must be passed prior to applying for the teaching license. For information on application procedures and testing schedules, contact the Council on Teacher Education located at 1333 S. Halsted, Suite 205. Students are required to maintain a 2.50/4.00 cumulative GPA and 3.00/4.00 Art GPA throughout the curriculum. For information on admission to the Art Education major, current portfolio deadlines, and submitting a successful portfolio, see the UIC School of Art and Art History website. http://artandarthistory.uic.edu/art-ed To earn a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Art Education degree from UIC, students need to complete university, college, and school degree requirements. Students should consult the College of Architecture, Design, and the Arts section for additional degree requirements and college academic policies.

BFA in Art Education students also complete all requirements stipulated by the Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE). https://www.isbe.net/Pages/Licensure.aspx

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Transfer Students

UIC Loves Transfer Students!

Inter-collegiate transfers We welcome transfers into the School of Art & Art History. Anyone who is presently a student at UIC and wishing to transfer to the School must complete an application form. (These are readily available in 208 Jefferson Hall.) Admission is based on GPA, no portfolio is required. The minimum GPA is a 2.75/4. For more information, please visit the School of Art & Art History’s website: http://artandarthistory.uic.edu/content/school-art-arthistory-transfer-students

Transfer Students from Other Colleges & Universities Admission to the School of Art & Art History is based on the GPA from your transfer institution, and a personal statement. Transfer students will be given a Degree Audit Report at orientation, which will explain what courses are being accepted for credit. Portfolio review for advanced standing in the School of Art & Art History is available to transfer students with a minimum of 15 credits in art courses. For more information, contact the College of Architecture, Design, and the Arts Office of Student Affairs at (312) 996-3351. PLEASE NOTE: The School of Art & Art History will require a portfolio review upon completion of the first-year program before entry into the Art and Art Education majors. Portfolios will be reviewed in April, and students will be admitted into the major during the fall semester only. Please contact the school or go to the website http://artandarthistory. uic.edu for information regarding the dates and times for this review.

For more information, please see the Undergraduate Catalogue for the College of Architecture, Design & the Arts https://catalog.uic.edu/ucat/colleges-depts/architecture-design-arts/#d19 and the Office of Admissions Transfer Guide (https:// admissions.uic.edu/undergraduate/undergraduate-requirements-deadlines/transfer-requirements/transfer) Art Ed | 14


Academic Advising

Students in the Pre-Art Education year receive academic advising to help them decide if the BFA in Art Education is the right fit for their academic and professional goals. Students in the BFA in Art Education Major receive academic advising throughout the duration of the program. Faculty mentors and academic advisors who have specialized knowledge about the program meet with each candidate every semester to assess and guide their progress. We work closely with candidates to ensure their success in all areas of the licensure program. If you have questions or would like to make an appointment for academic advising, please contact:

Amanda Grant

Academic Advisor for the College of Architecture, Design and the Arts agg@uic.edu

Karyn Sandlos

Program Head of the BFA in Art Education arted@uic.edu

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Applying to the BFA in Art Education Careers in art education and teaching are rich and rewarding. Typically, students who receive a professional teaching license pursue a full-time teaching position in Chicago Public Schools (CPS). BFA in Art Education students also use the professional teaching license to apply for positions in museums and galleries, non-profit and after school programs, and even teaching abroad. The starting salary for Chicago Public School teachers is $50,000, and full-time positions come with health care and benefits, sick days, and ongoing professional development. Best of all, students who pursue a professional license in art teaching can give back to their school communities by engaging in critical, meaningful, and life-changing work with young people every day.

Pre-Art Education BFA students - are you thinking you might want to become a high school art teacher? Do you have questions about what that would mean for your degree program and your future career plans? We can help! Applying to Pre-Art Education year gives students a year to figure out whether to apply to the BFA in Art Education major. If you are accepted to Pre-Art Education, you will receive information and academic advising to help you decide if the BFA in Art Education is the right fit for you. At the end of the Pre-Art Education year, students can decide to apply to the BFA in Art Education OR continue with the BFA degree. Students who meet the following criteria may apply to the Pre-Art Education year: 1. 2. 3. 4.

Cumulative GPA of 2.5/4 or higher Cumulative GPA in Art courses of 3.0/4 or higher Sophomore standing (completion of at least 30 credit hours) Completion of First Year Art Foundations Program (6 courses - at least 3 core courses completed and current registration in the remaining three) Art Ed | 16


The Pre-Art Education application and portfolio review process takes place during the spring semester. Admission into the Pre-Art Education year does not guarantee placement into the Art Education Program. Students who are not accepted into the Pre-Art Education year will receive specific suggestions of coursework to be taken and of skills, dispositions, and knowledge bases to be improved upon should the student choose to reapply the following year. For information about how to apply, please visit: http://artandarthistory.uic.edu/art-ed

BFA in Art Education Major Students apply to the BFA in Art Education Program during the Spring semester of the Pre-Art Education year. Students may apply to the BFA in Art Education Program if they meet the following criteria:

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Cumulative GPA of 2.5/4 or higher Cumulative GPA in Art courses of 3.0/4 or higher Sophomore standing (completion of at least 30 credit hours) Completion of a minimum of four Art major courses Completion of sufficient coursework to graduate by designated graduation year Passing score on SAT, ACT + writing, or TAP test

Students who meet the above criteria may submit an application, portfolio, writing sample, and proof of passing score on the SAT, ACT + writing, or TAP test to the Art Education Program. Entering the program in fall, BFA in Art Education majors take courses in the theory and practice of art education, upper level studio art, and education courses in UIC’s College of Education. The BFA in Art Education results in a Professional Educator License Endorsed in Visual Arts for grades 9 through 12. All program requirements, including Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) requirements, student teaching, and the edTPA must be successfully completed before the student can apply for the Professional Educator License. Art Ed | 17


Application & Portfolio Guidelines for Pre-Art Education & the BFA in Art Education Major We are looking at whether you are developing the artistic range necessary to be a dynamic, engaging high school teacher who can teach a range of media and contemporary art practices. For instance, if you are primarily a painter, you will want to show examples of your paintings AND your work in photography and/or digital media. We are also looking at your ability to articulate what your art practice is about. What themes and/or issues are you exploring? What personal, social, and/or cultural connections are you making? What do you want other people to see or experience in your work? In your portfolio, include examples of your abilities in at least three of the following areas: drawing, painting, sculpture, printmaking, photography, digital media, timebased work, performance, artist- in-residence, etc. Please plan to include examples of artworks you created in your UIC courses. You are also welcome to show examples of your creative practice outside of your course work, such as pages from artist journals, zines, or protest signs. Examples of your creative practice on social media can include blogging, creating Snapchat Geofilters, developing code, and/or curating YouTube channels or Instagram feeds. Present a portfolio that shows depth as well as breadth of knowledge. Be sure to include samples showing your full range of art making skills and your conceptual focus.

Elizabeth Cardona, Mask Series, UIC BFA Program

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We want to see more than just a demonstration of skills in various areas. We are assessing the depth of your understanding of committed, contemporary artistic practice. We also want to see examples of artworks that demonstrate your ability to investigate significant themes and ideas that matter to you. Examples should demonstrate how you are making personal and cultural connections through your art making practice; for instance, works that touch on cultural heritage or contemporary social issues. If applicable, you may include documentation of art education projects you have been involved with in public space, or in schools or communities.

Elizabeth Cardona, Mask Series, UIC BFA Program

Applicants to Pre-Art Education and the BFA in Art Education major are required to submit a writing sample in the form of a short essay about why you want to become a high school art teacher. The essay is an opportunity to think and write about your own experience as a high school student, the teachers and art educators who influenced you, and/or why you think art education is important to students, schools, and communities today.

Elizabeth Cardona, Mask Series, UIC BFA Program

To access the application form, and for more information about the content of the digital portfolio, the essay requirement, and the criteria for the portfolio review, please visit: http://artandarthistory. uic.edu/art-ed

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UIC Council on Teacher Education (CTE) For students, the council:

Overview The Council on Teacher Education (CTE) within the Office of the Provost and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs supports students and faculty in over twenty Illinois educator and school personnel preparation programs at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC). CTE oversees the programs that prepare students for licensure in pre-kindergarten through twelfth grade school settings by the Illinois State Board of Education. The Council is responsible for the coordination of professional education curricula and serves as a liaison between the University of Illinois at Chicago and the Illinois State Board of Education. In addition, the Council serves as a liaison between the University and school service personnel.

• • • • • • •

Provides general information and support to students who are interested in professional education programs Offers educational seminars Conveys information about state-mandated tests Processes applications for admission to candidacy for certification Facilitates student teaching placements Connects campus units with professional education programs Reviews transcripts to ensure that the students meet teacher certification requirements Processes applications for professional certificates

Benito Juarez Community Academy

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CTE Conceptual Framework Summary UIC Educators Are Committed UIC educators are committed to the democratic ideal of developing each studentʼs full human potential. They dedicate themselves to the continuing development of their own abilities to educate all students in the face of social and educational inequalities rooted in race, class, language, gender, disability, and other social differences. They understand and value the cultural and linguistic wealth of each studentʼs community; collaborate with other professionals and community members to support student success; and assess their own growth in achieving the highest goals of the profession.

UIC Educators Are Knowledgeable Educators are knowledgeable about the content of their field, human growth and development, and the creation of rich learning environments. They understand as well how these elements intersect to support student learning. But knowledge alone is not sufficient. UIC educators also reflect critically on what they know, questioning common assumptions, taking into account competing perspectives, and remaining open to growth and change.

UIC Educators Are Effective UIC educators are competent practitioners who demonstrate the complex skills of professionals in their fields. This competence is developed as candidates work collaboratively with more experienced mentors who help them reflect on and refine their practice in intensive, school-based experiences. As candidates assume increasingly greater responsibility in these practical settings, they come to understand that they are learning a craft that can never be mastered.

CTE website forms: •

UIC CTE Handbook of Secondary Education

Information and forms for applying to Candidacy

Information and forms on Field Service Logs

Information and forms for applying for a Student Teaching placement

CTE Petition Forms

Council on Teacher Education 1333 S. Halsted St. Suite 205 (M/C 134) Chicago, IL 60607

Hours of operation: Mon – Fri 8:30AM-5PM Drop-ins & appointments welcome! Art Ed | 21


Milestones All University of Illinois at Chicago students pursuing Educator Preparation Programs are required to complete academic and non-academic requirements. Refer to the Academic Catalogue for a complete list of all academic requirements. The non-academic requirements include:

Milestone 1: Admission to Candidacy Milestone 2: Admission to Student Teaching Milestone 3: Initiate Licensure

Pearl Williams, Senn High School

The BFA in Art Education Program Coordinator and the CTE will communicate with you about important dates and deadlines on an ongoing basis. Please read our emails! BFA in Art Education students are responsible for meeting all Milestone deadlines and completing all academic and non-academic requirements. Art Ed | 22


“Art education invites all people into the category of the artist.” Therese Quinn

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Student Teaching In the final (spring) semester of the BFA in Art Education program, in ART 484 and 485: Educational Practice with Seminar 1 and 2, students will spend 15 weeks in a high school art classroom full time. Working closely with a mentor teacher, you will prepare and implement curriculum and lesson plans that are engaging, rigorous, critical, and relevant for your students. During student teaching, you will attend a once-weekly evening seminar at UIC, where you will receive support and guidance from your UIC faculty supervisor. The mentor teacher and faculty supervisor will observe you multiple times during student teaching and provide you with ongoing support and feedback. Student teaching is among the most rewarding and challenging experiences of any teacher preparation program. You will have the opportunity to try out ideas for lesson plans and projects, trouble shoot and revise, and discover what it means to engage students and deepen their learning. You will not have time to work during the final semester of student teaching, so it’s important to plan accordingly. During student teaching, you will learn how to create a classroom community, how to build rapport with high school students, and how to see students’ knowledge and experiences as a resource for their learning. At the same time, you will learn how to draw on your own unique knowledge and experience as an artist, student, and teacher – including understanding that there are times when the teacher does not know everything. Learning to be comfortable with uncertainty is part of the creative and critical work of becoming a teacher. Prior to entering student teaching, BFA in Art Education students must complete all requirements for Milestone 2: Admission to Student Teaching

Photo credit: MisterJayEm 2012

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edTPA edTPA is a portfolio-based assessment system that is used in teacher preparation programs in many states throughout the U.S. There are three tasks: Planning, Instruction, and Assessment. The edTPA portfolio consists of a unit plan, assessments, and evidence of student learning. Candidates are also required to submit video documentation of their teaching.

Students in the BFA in Art Education program will complete and submit the edTPA during student teaching. While you will receive support and guidance to prepare for the edTPA in your preparation program, please note that the edTPA portfolio is submitted externally for review and scoring.

For more information about edTPA, please visit: http://www.edtpa.com/Home.aspx

Making Good Choices: A Support Guide for edTPA Candidates is an excellent resource to help you understand the edTPA and prepare for the portfolio submission. (https://www.edtpa.com/ Content/Docs/edTPAMGC.pdf)

Photo credit: Jeff Zonline

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Passing the edTPA Candidates who DO NOT successfully complete the edTPA portfolio submission on their first attempt, within three points under the current edTPA cut score, must submit all or parts of the edTPA portfolio a second time during the course of the program. Candidates who successfully complete the edTPA portfolio submission within three points under the current edTPA cut score may choose from the following two options:

1.

Be recommended for the one-year, els/pidu provisional license.

2.

Re-take all or parts of the edTPA a second time during the course of the program.

Students who choose to be recommended for the one-year, els/pidu provisional license will be advised that they will need to make a second edTPA submission within a year post-graduation, independent of program support.

Candidates who do not pass the edTPA within three points below the current cut score after two attempts may graduate without being recommended for licensure.

Photo Credit: Storm9

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Supporting Your Studies Additional Cost of Illinois Educator Preparation Programs What are the additional costs associated with the BFA in Art Education program?

Students pursuing an Approved Illinois Educator or School Personnel Preparation Program are responsible for all fees associated with the degree and non-degree program requirements. Breakdown of Additional Costs of Educator Preparation Programs: http://cte.uic.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/51/2018/04/Additional-Cost-ofEducator-Preparation-Programs.pdf)

Roman Susan Art Gallery, Rogers Park, Chicago, romansusan.org

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Grow Your Own Illinois program Grow Your Own Teachers Illinois (GYO’s) mission is to support community members to become certified teachers in their neighborhood schools in order to improve the educational outcomes for students. GYO grew from the work of Chicago community organizations in low-income neighborhoods who identified high teacher turnover and a cultural disconnect between the students and teachers as key barriers to sustained school improvement and student achievement. GYO was created to train and retain certified teachers of color committed to staying in high needs schools in the communities where they live. GYO provides financial assistance and wrap around supports to aid its candidates in completing a traditional teacher certification program. For more information: http://www.growyourownteachers.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=210&Itemid=534&lang=en

Becoming a GYO Teacher Candidate Pre-Art Education students and BFA in Art Education majors can apply to become a Grow Your Own Illinois (GYO) teacher candidate. GYO offers financial support and tuition reimbursement, and helps students prepare for the Illinois Basic Skills Test (SAT, ACT + Writing, or TAP). GYO also provides ongoing support during the teacher preparation program, and once the candidate enters the teaching profession. The deadline for GYO applications is in Sept of the fall semester. How to apply: http://www.growyourownteachers.org/apply

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Resources on Campus A public research university located on Chicago’s west side, UIC is a great place to become an art educator. UIC is home to the Jane Addams Hull-House Museum, a national historic landmark committed to social engagement, and Gallery 400, a dynamic, cutting edge contemporary art gallery right here on campus. UIC’s Centers for Cultural Understanding and Social Change are a collaborative group of seven centers with distinct histories, missions, and locations that promote the wellbeing of and cultural awareness about underrepresented and underserved groups at UIC. The Centers focus on racial and cultural equity; disability issues; gender, sexuality, and women’s leadership. Their collective purpose is to expand cultural understanding by providing opportunities for intercultural engagement among students, faculty, staff, and Chicago communities. And of course, we have access to Chicago, a city that has a rich history of activism and community engagement through education and the arts. The BFA in Art Education program will give students the experiences and resources necessary to become artists, creators, scholars, makers, innovators, and teachers. We will emphasize intellectual curiosity, creative problem solving, community building, and the unleashing of radical imaginations.

UIC Museums and Galleries Jane Addams Hull House Museum https://www.hullhousemuseum.org/ Gallery 400 http://gallery400.uic.edu/ Latino Cultural Center “El Despertar de las Américas” Mural https://latinocultural.uic.edu/mural/

UIC Centers for Cultural Understanding and Social Change https://diversity.uic.edu/who-we-are/centers-for-cultural-understandingand-social-change/ Art Ed | 30


Resources in the Community Building Your Professional Art Educator Network in Chicago UIC’s BFA in Art Education Program will get you out into the city – into schools, museums, galleries, and neighborhoods. Through participation in Chicago Teachers Union meetings, curriculum fairs, conferences, after school programs, art education exhibitions, and protests, you will learn about the local, state, and national organizations that form a network of professional support and advocacy for public education and the arts. You will learn about the role of art and education in democratic societies, and the local, state, and national structures of governance that shape public education historically, and today. You will meet professionals in the field, make new friends and colleagues, and position yourself within the field of art education in the public sphere. Chicago is a hub of activity for art educators. Below are a few examples of local resources, but this is by no means an exhaustive list.

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Chicagoland Museums and Galleries Art Institute of Chicago Crown Family Educators Resource Center (free printing and workshops for art teachers!): http://www.artic.edu/learn/teachers-pre-k-12/crown-family-educator-resource-center Museum of Contemporary Art (MCA) Education Department (sample lesson plans!): https://mcachicago.org/Learn/Teachers National Museum of Mexican Fine Art (teacher professional development workshops!): http://nationalmuseumofmexicanart.org/

Chicagoland Social Justice Education Resources Chicago Teachers Union (CTU): https://www.ctunet.com/ Teachers for Social Justice Chicago (TSJ): http://www.teachersforjustice.org/

Illinois and National Art Education Associations As a student in the BFA in Art Education program you will have opportunities to attend and present your work at the annual Illinois Art Education Association (IAEA) conference, and the National Art Education Association (NAEA) conference. These organizations provide a platform for leadership, research, and advocacy for art education and foster professional dialogue in the art education field. BFA in Art Education students who become members of IAEA and NAEA will receive discounts on conference fees and publications. Illinois Art Education Association: https://ilaea.org/ National Art Education Association: https://www.arteducators.org/ Art Ed | 32


Resources & Readings Who should I follow on social media? UIC BFA in Art Education program UIC School of Art & Art History Eve L. Ewing https://eveewing.com/ Diane Ravitch http://dianeravitch.com/ The Black Youth Project Chicago (BYP) http://blackyouthproject.com/ Bill Ayers https://billayers.org/ Lynda Barry http://thenearsightedmonkey.tumblr.com/

Art & Education Websites and Databases UIC Spiral Workshop https://naea.digication.com/Spiral/What_is_Spiral_Workshop ART 21: Art in the 21st Century https://art21.org/ Mammalian Diving Reflex http://mammalian.ca/ Nicole Marroquin https://www.nicolemarroquin.com/ Rethinking Schools https://www.rethinkingschools.org/ Justseeds https://justseeds.org/ c-2.4-0.3-4.8-0.1-7,0.9c-2.9,1.3-5.1,3.2-6.6,6c-0.9,1.7Art Ed | 33


Readings Ayers, W., and Tanner, R.A. (2010). To teach: The journey, in comics. New York: Teachers College Press. Branham, R. (2016). “What’s so great about art, anyway?”: A teacher’s odyssey. New York: Teachers College Press. Delpit, L. (2012). “Multiplication is for white people”: Raising expectations for other people’s children. New York: The New Press. Desai, D., Hamlin, J., and Mattson, R. (2010). History as art, art as history: Contemporary art and social justice education. New York: Routledge. Douglas, K., & Jaquith, D. (2009). Engaging learners through artmaking: Choice- based art education in the classroom. New York, NY: Teachers College Press. Efland, A. (1990). A history of art education: Intellectual and social currents in teaching the visual arts. New York, NY: Teachers College Press. Eisner, E., & Day, M. (Eds.) (2004). Handbook of research and policy in art education. Mahwah, NJ: National Art Education Association.

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Ewing, E.L. (2018). Ghosts in the schoolyard: Racism and school closings on Chicago’s south side. University of Chicago Press. Greene, M. (1995). Releasing the imagination: Essays on education, the arts, and social change. Jossey-Bass. Gude, O. (2013, January). New school art styles: The project of art education. Art Education, 66(1), 6-15. Gude, O. (2009). Art education for democratic life. Art Education, 62(6), 6-11. Gude, O. (2004). Postmodern principles: In search of a 21st century art education. Art Education, 53(1), 6-14. Helguera, P. (2011). Education for socially engaged art: A materials and techniques handbook. New York: Jorge Pinto Books. Lampert, N. (2013). A people’s art history of the United States: 250 years of activist art and artists working in social justice movements. New York and London: The New Press. Meiners, E.R. (2016). For the children?: Protecting innocence in a carceral state. University of Minnesota Press. O’Donnell, D. (2018). Haircuts by children, and other evidence for a new social contract. Toronto: Coach House Books. Quinn, T., Hochtritt, L., and Ploof, J. (Eds.) (2012). Art and social justice education: Culture as commons. New York: Routledge. Quinn, T., and Meiners, E. (2009). Flaunt it!: Queers organizing for public education and justice. New York: Peter Lang Publishing Inc. Ravitch, D. (2016). The death and life of the great American school system: How testing and choice are undermining education. Basic Books. Stovall, D.O. (2017). Born out of struggle: Critical race theory, school creation, and the politics of interruption. SUNY Press. Sturken, M., & Cartwright, L. (2017). Practices of looking: An introduction to visual culture, 3rd edition. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Front cover: Senn High School Images courtesy of Hunter Atha, Paulina Camacho, Ricardo Garcia, Casey Murtaugh, Jen Delos Reyes, Karyn Sandlos Handbook design: Hunter Atha, hunteratha.com Art Ed | 35


“ The teacher is of course an artist. What the educator does in teaching is to make it possible for the students to become themselves. “ Paulo Freire

School of Art & Art History Art Education

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UIC BFA in Art Education Handbook 2018-19  

The BFA in Art Education program provides the requirements for Illinois State teacher licensure and the experiences needed for students to b...

UIC BFA in Art Education Handbook 2018-19  

The BFA in Art Education program provides the requirements for Illinois State teacher licensure and the experiences needed for students to b...

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