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portfolio 2013 KRYSTIE ORTENCIO


Krystie Ortencio LEED AP

626.589.0648 | krysortencio@gmail.com | krystieortencio.com EDUCATION

COMPUTER SKILLS

Master of Architecture (M.Arch I)

Proficient in: AutoCAD Sketchup InDesign Illustrator Photoshop Revit Architecture

California State Polytechnic University, Pomona 2013_Current GPA: 3.75

Bachelor of Science, Landscape Architecture California State Polytechnic University, Pomona 2008_Magna Cum Laude

Experience with: Rhino 3dsMax Maya

EXPERIENCE

Architectural Intern

Botanical Division Volunteer

04/2012 - 06/2012 HOAG Memorial Hospital, Newport Beach 06/2011 - 09/2011 Children’s Hospital of Orange County (CHOC)

03/2009 - 12/2009

Jacobs Project Management Co.

The Huntington Library San Marino, CA

Draftsman

Landscape Designer

01/2010 - 1/2011

06/2007 - 01/2009

for Kathleen Sonnert, Landscape Irrigation Auditor Santa Monica, CA

EPT Design, Inc. Pasadena, CA

Intern/Model Builder

Landscape Intern

06/2010 - 08/2010

06/2006 - 09/2006

Melinda Taylor and Associates Los Angeles, CA

TKD & Associates, Inc. Rancho Mirage, CA

ACHIEVEMENTS & HONORS

TRAVELS

2013 2012 2011 2009 2007 2006 2005 2004

Independent travels (2012)

Graduate Presidential Fellowship Scholarship Featured portfolio in Portfolio Design, 4th Ed. by Harold Linton Colin Lewis Hotaling Memorial Scholarship LEED Accredited Professional Certification 1st Place, Cal Poly Pomona Library Art Competition Golden Key Honour Society Academic Recognition Alpha Lambda Delta Honor Society Academic Recognition 1st Place, VICA Regional Drafting Competition

London, Paris, Switzerland New York & Chicago

Cal Poly Pomona Italy Study Abroad Program (2007)

Florence, Venice, Perugia, San Gimignano, Pienza, Cortona, Pisa London, Paris, Germany, Switzerland, Greece, Egypt


[1] DESIGN PROJECTS

NCHS Mission Mesa Pediatrics Clinic Interfacially Sublime Exposition Park Lennox High School Mount Baldy Residence K-MOK Museum Systematic Progression Naturally Optimistic Forcelines

[2] PROFESSIONAL WORK Built Models Digital Residential Model Coronado Island Marriott Resort SM Landscape Grant Projects

[3] ART & GRAPHICS Polaroid Analysis Sketchbook Charcoal Drawings Gesture Drawings


NCHS Pediatrics Clinic Oceanside, CA Hofu Wu_Winter 2013

DESCRIPTION: The design of this project was proposed to Boulder Associates (Healthcare architectural firm located in Irvine) as a concept for their client NCHS Mission Mesa. The goal was to replace their existing health facility with a pediatrics clinic providing a new program of approximately 13,000 sqft that would serve to provide healthcare to children and teens for mostly lower income families in the area. PEDIATRICS BUILDING

DEMOLISH

PEDIATRICS BUILDING

COMMUNITY PARK

WOMEN’S HEALTH CENTER

CURRENT

PROPOSED

FUTURE

Existing building layout of Mission Mesa Medical Center. Pediatrics center located at corner of Mission and Mesa. Elongated building to be demolished.

Utilize existing triangulated grid to propose new form for site design and building layout. Community Park contains future expansion area.

Convert part of community park into space for Women’s Health Center.


1

1 2

3 Courtyard

5

4 6

1

4

Clinical Pod #1 & #2

Clinical Pod #1 & #2 Clinical Pod Pod Work Stations (15+1) Circulation Exam Rooms Nurse Visit/Triage Room Consult/Health Edu. Room Med. Stor./Equip. Holding Vitals (Scales) Clean Utility/Injection Prep Patient Toilets Semi-Private Work Area Private Office

Support

Support Space Receiving General Storage Environmental Services Plumbing Electrical Technology (IT) Trash/Medical Waste

2

Public Areas

3

Shared Clinical

5

Administration

6

Staff Space

Public Areas Lobby/Vestibule Waiting Well Kid Wait Sick Kid Wait Kids Play Teen Area Circulation Public Toilets

Administration Reception Reception Station Storage Work Counter Circulation Site Supervisor Financial Counseling/CAA Office

Shared Clinical Space Procedure Room RN Pediatrics Supervisor Group Visit Lactation Room Soiled Utility Soiled Utility/Specimen Collection POC/Rapid Process Lab Specimen Toilet

Staff Space Staff Lounge Seats Kitchenette Circulation Staff Toilet Shower/Toilet Lockers Coat Closet (Clean/Soiled) Circulation


INTERFACIALLY SUBLIME New York City, New York Irma Ramirez & Andy Wilcox_Fall 2012

DESCRIPTION: KNOWLEDGE is the most vital component to survival and the collective advancement of humans. This design proposes to continually encourage the interactive gaining of knowledge through a private program of workspaces and research facilities and also encourage the interactive sharing of knowledge through means of public program including an accessible library, museum, and workstations. THE DESIGN of the building is separated into three components representing the PAST, PRESENT, and FUTURE methods of gaining and sharing knowledge. The design of the landscape reflects the patterns created from the skyscraper by mimicking the building characteristics to form an inviting public space both to compliment the neighboring United Nations building as well as a space for action interactivity. _ Conceptual Design Team Members, 7 weeks: George Kutnar Kristen Tuerk Kenny Sperling _ Final Project, 3 weeks: Individual


EXPOSITION PARK Los Angeles, California George Proctor_Spring 2012

Site Location

Expo Park, Los Angeles, CA

Site Analysis

Existing circulation and buildings

Museum of Physics & Archeology Floor Plans

DESCRIPTION: Originally presented as a powerpoint presentation with overhead projector, this project rethinks the use of space at Exposition Park in Los Angeles. By intersecting the two adjacent street grids the design result creates programmatic areas of Museums, Sports, Commercial and Parking. (Groupmate: Sungmin Park)

Programming

Spatial organization of program

Concept Planning

Further articulation of urban design


4

2

1

3

7

5

1

Museum of Natural History

2

Rose Garden

3

California Sciences

4

Elementary School

5

African American Museum

6

Colliseum

7

Proposed Commercial Area

8

Proposed Physics & Archeology Museum

6

8

Site Design Plan

Exposition Park Urban Design


LENNOX ACADEMY LENNOX, CA High School Programming and Design Kip Dickson_Winter 2012

HAWTHORNE BLVD

DESCRIPTION The site of this project is located in Lennox, CA, near LAX Airport. As a charter high school, this project aims to encourage lower income students to continue their education in college through a focused study in either math, science or technology. The entrance to the building was placed at the corner of Hawthorne Blvd and Imperial Highway.

IMPERIAL HWY


The design of the main building is comprised of two juxtaposed cubes that are connected through a central atrium with exposed staircase. The atrium is lit with skylights providing light for the open plan library that is distributed among all four levels of the building.


PROGRAM LEGEND

Classrooms Library Administration Cafeteria Commercial Support Restrooms Gym Lobby Lockers Auditorium GreenRoof

Level 3 &4

Level 2

Level 1


MOUNTAIN RETREAT HOUSE Mount Baldy, California Judith Sheine_Fall 2011

DESCRIPTION A two-story retreat home for one person in Mount Baldy, California. This house has an entrance at the back of the house between the levels, allowing for access to the kitchen and overhanging porch below and to the bedroom and green roof above.

Formwork

Concrete pour

Land Infill

Framing, Flooring


A

B

D

C

E

F

3 A 3.1

2

A 4.1

GLAZING

EXTERIOR WALL 24' - 0"

CONCRETE RETAINING WALL

3' - 6"

4' - 4"

RAILING

4' - 9"

KITCHEN 63 SF

STORAGE 29 SF

3

4' - 1"

4' - 1"

2

2' - 0"

7' - 1"

2' - 0"

1

4' - 5"

4

A 3.1

20' - 6"

10' - 5"

20' - 6"

PATIO 114 SF

LIVING ROOM 151 SF

10' - 5"

2

A 3.1

1

A 4.1

4 4' - 0"

4' - 1"

UP

5 4' - 5"

CONCRETE STAIRS

7' - 1"

3' - 6"

4' - 4"

4' - 9"

GLAZING

STEEL COLUMN 1

A 3.1

Project North

1

True North

LEVEL 1 1/4" = 1'-0"

A

B

C

D

E

F

3

A 3.1

2

A 4.1 CONCRETE RETAINING WALL

19' - 4"

2' - 0"

1

3

EXTERIOR WALL 3' - 6"

STORAGE 16 SF

4' - 4"

BATHROOM 59 SF

4' - 1"

2

7' - 1"

6' - 5"

4' - 5"

DN

4 A 3.1

2

10' - 1"

BEDROOM 129 SF

10' - 5"

20' - 6"

A 3.1

1

A 4.1

5 CONCRETE STAIRS

4' - 0"

4' - 0"

4

4' - 5"

10' - 7"

4' - 4"

GLAZING

STEEL COLUMN 1

A 3.1

Project North

2

LEVEL 2 1/4" = 1'-0"

True North


K-MOK MUSEUM LITTLE TOKYO, LOS ANGELES Museum Programming and Design Axel Schmitzberger_Winter 2011

ROOF

DN

F2

UP

DN

F3

F1

SITE PLANS

N

UP

D


DESCRIPTION Residing in Little Tokyo, Los Angeles, the K-MOK museum features artifacts from the 1950s that were part of John Kaneda’s robot toy collection.

The design of this museum focuses on the dynamic relationship between visitors and their connection to the artifacts displayed. The visitor walks to a hallway of the lobby then up a grand staircase to the amazing display of Kaneda’s prized possession - a sculptural robot 30 feet

in height that was once displayed outside on 1st street. This sculptural item, along with various other classic robot remnants, has thus been preserved in the sanctity of the museum upon Kaneda’s death in 2002.


temporary gallery administrative area

permanent gallery

permanent gallery

cafe & kitchen

courtyard, barden, amphitheater

classrooms

temporary gallery main entrance & lobby museum store

support areas

PROGRAMMING DIAGRAM


SYSTEMATIC PROGRESSION Systems & Composition Bill Adams_Fall 2010

1 DESCRIPTION This presentation is a compilation of three progressive steps: 1) The subtraction of a rectangular prism from an existing system, 2) the use of the system from the first step to create a space around a void, and 3) learning from the evolution of the first two steps to create an exhibition space overlooking the ocean. The diagrams and drawings illustrate the design of this exhibition space produced as a result of systematic progression.

2


1 (detail)

3


NATURALLY OPTIMISTIC SHOSHONE, CA Creating a Self-Sustaining Community Andy Wilcox_Spring 2008

DESCRIPTION Taking minute details and capturing individual moments to expand an occupant’s experience exposes positive potential in the landscape. By researching specific interest topics and creating systems that reflect the site itself, the landscape can be constructed as accordingly to create a visionary, self-sustaining desert ecology.

NV CA

I

RESEARCHED OBSERVATIONS Shoshone is a small town in the Death Valley region with a population of about 50 people. Earthquakes have been prevalent in this area, causing mountain ranges to rise and valleys to sink, thus creating what is seen today.

II

PHASING POSSIBILITIES By providing the four essential needs for survival (water, food, shelter, and energy) the small town of Shoshone can be sustained throughout the prevalence of the constantly changing landscape in which earthquake activity shifts the land. Moderation will occur and Shoshone will eventually be able to grow and survive in the future.


Water

III

Food Shelter Energy

CONSTRUCTIVE DEVELOPMENT The four survival phases are seen in action here, providing people with water in shelters and for agriculture grown on site, providing people with food from the agricultural fields and with energy for shelters. This energy produced by solar panels will then give back to the other phases. (See simplified diagram of systems)


Faulting in the Death Valley region has caused the exposure of valuable minerals for mining. See section below.

Population of 70 people at present day Tecopa (1830)

1000

100

Major earthquakes of Death Valley Chronological listing of minor earthquakes in California from the early 1800s to present day.

DATA

NATURALLY OPTIMISTIC_FINAL PRESENTATION 90�X30� Shoshone Caves, Dublin Gulch Founded in 1910 Mojave Earthquake July 11, 1992

Calico Earthquake March 18, 1997

Camp grounds saved for incoming visitors will be a means of shelter. Other shelter proposals will be to make the Dublin Gulch tufa formations available once again for use when population rises. New shelters made of the same tufa material are proposed as a natrual housing formation. These will inquire the support of food, water and energy.

Shelter

Energy

tufa formations

solar energy

3

The vast skies and endless horizons of this land provides the opportunity for energy to be soaked in from the sun by the use of solar panels. These energy sources will eventually give all power needs of Shoshone, allowing the ability to pump water by more machinery and farm land mechanically and provide neccessities for the proposed shelters. Energy feeds back to the rest of the phases.

4

The rise and fall of ghost towns in the Death Valley area caused a shift in population. Only a few mines of what once were prosperous towns are still active today.

Shoshone Founded April 18, 1910

shoshone Death Valley Nat. Park Founded February 11, 1933

SYSTEMS

6.1 Joshua Tree 7.2 Cape Mendocino 6.5 Cape Mendocino 6.6 Cape Mendocino 7.3 Landers 6.2 Big Bear 6.1 Big Pine 6.7 Northridge 6.9 Mendocino Fracture Zone

agriculture

33 58.00 116 19.00 40 20.00 124 14.00 40 26.00 124 36.00 40 23.00 124 35.00 34 12.00 116 26.00 34 12.00 116 50.00 37 9.00 117 50.00 34 13.00 118 32.00 40 27.00 125 54.00

Food

4 23 450 4 25 1806 4 26 741 4 26 1118 6 28 1157 6 28 1505 5 17 2320 1 17 1230 9 01 1515

Joshua Tree Earthquake April 22, 1992

Direction of water

1992 1992 1992 1992 1992 1992 1993 1994 1994

2000

1986 7 20 1429 37 34.00 118 26.00 5.6 Chalfant Valley 1986 7 21 1442 37 32.00 118 26.00 6.2 Chalfant Valley 1986 7 31 722 37 28.00 118 22.00 5.2 Chalfant Valley 1987 10 1 1442 34 3.00 118 5.00 5.8 Whittier Narrows 1987 11 24 153 33 4.00 115 47.00 6.2 Elmore Ranch fault 1987 11 24 1316 33 1.00 115 51.00 6.6 Superstition Hills 1989 10 18 0004 37 2.19 121 52.98 7.1 Loma Prieta 1991 8 16 2226 41 38.00 125 52.00 6.3 W. of Crescent City 1991 8 17 1929 40 17.00 124 14.00 6.2 Punta Gorda 1991 8 17 2217 41 41.00 126 3.00 7.1 W. of Crescent City

Water is pumped at 500-1000 Liters/minute in Shoshone and is discharged in multiple locations. Water runoff feeds the adjacent Amargosa River. Why not use this water to water potential agricultural fields for on-site food production? Water can also be used to support the needs of visitors by being pumped into restrooms or shelters. Future water pumping demands will be met by the production of more energy through solar power.

1

1981 4 26 1209 33 8.00 115 39.00 6.0 Westmorland 1981 9 4 1550 33 40.00 119 7.00 5.9 N. of Santa Barbara Island 1981 9 30 1153 37 35.00 118 52.00 5.8 Mammoth Lakes 1983 5 2 2342 36 14.00 120 19.00 6.5 Coalinga 1983 7 22 239 36 14.00 120 25.00 5.7 Coalinga 1984 4 24 2115 37 19.00 121 39.00 6.1 Morgan Hill 1984 9 10 314 40 23.00 127 9.00 6.7 Mendocino Fracture Zone 1984 11 23 18 8 37 27.00 118 36.00 5.7 Round Valley 1985 8 4 12 1 36 8.00 120 10.00 5.9 North Kettleman Hills 1986 7 8 920 34 0. 116 36.00 6.0 North Palm Springs

Ghost Towns / Mining Districts

Major and Minor earthquakes shaping the future of the land

Population decrease less minerals, not enough resources

Opportunities for Agriculture few people take advantage

Homes and Shelters built accomodates population increase

Population increase result of mineral exposure

Water seeps through faults availability of water increases

Major earthquake shaping the future of the land

Population Fluctuations

1976 11 26 1119 41 18.00 125 42.00 6.3 W. of Orick 1979 8 6 17 5 37 7.00 121 31.00 5.7 Coyote Lake 1979 10 15 2316 32 36.00 115 18.00 6.5 Imperial Valley 1980 01 24 1900 37 50.00 121 47.00 5.8 Livermore 1980 5 25 1633 37 36.00 118 50.00 6.1 Mammoth Lakes 1980 5 25 1649 37 39.00 118 54.00 5.9 Mammoth Lakes 1980 5 25 1944 37 33.00 118 49.00 5.8 Mammoth Lakes 1980 5 27 1450 37 29.00 118 48.00 6.0 Mammoth Lakes 1980 6 9 328 32 12.00 115 5.00 6.4 Victoria, B.C. 1980 11 8 1027 41 7.00 124 40.00 7.2 W. of Eureka

pumping water

3 23 710 39 36.00 118 1.00 6.3 Dixie Valley, Nevada 6 23 1435 39 5.00 118 49.00 6.1 Schurz, Nevada 8 9 739 40 19.00 127 4.00 6.2 W. of Cape Mendocino 6 28 426 36 0. 120 30.00 6.0 Parkfield 8 7 1736 31 48.00 114 30.00 6.3 Gulf of California 9 12 1641 39 25.00 120 9.00 6.0 Truckee 4 9 228 33 11.00 116 8.00 6.5 Borrego Mountain 6 26 142 40 14.00 124 16.00 5.4 Punta Gorda 2 9 14 0 34 25.00 118 24.00 6.5 San Fernando 2 21 1445 34 4.00 119 2.00 5.2 Point Mugu

6.1

Water

1959 1959 1960 1966 1966 1966 1968 1968 1971 1973

Occurances of Water, Food, Shelter, and Energy in Shohone, relative to phasing sysstem.

1954 11 25 1116 40 16.00 125 38.00 6.5 W. of Cape Mendocino 1954 12 16 11 7 39 19.00 118 12.00 7.1 Fairview Peak, Nevada 1954 12 16 1111 39 30.00 118 0. 6.8 Dixie Valley, Nevada 1954 12 21 1956 40 56.00 123 47.00 6.6 E. of Arcata 1956 2 9 1432 31 45.00 115 55.00 6.8 San Miguel, B.C. 1956 2 9 1524 31 45.00 115 55.00 6.1 San Miguel, B.C. 1956 2 14 1833 31 30.00 115 30.00 6.3 San Miguel, B.C. 1956 2 15 120 31 30.00 115 30.00 6.4 San Miguel, B.C. 1956 10 11 1648 40 40.00 125 46.00 6.0 W. of Cape Mendocino 1956 12 13 1315 31 0. 115 0. 6.0 W. shore, Gulf of California

Landers Earthquake June 28, 1992

35 23.00 118 51.00 6.1 Bakersfield 35 44.00 121 12.00 6.0 Bryson 35 0. 119 1.00 5.9 W. of Wheeler Ridge 33 17.00 116 11.00 6.2 Arroyo Salada 39 25.00 118 32.00 6.6 Rainbow Mountain, Nevada 39 18.00 118 30.00 6.4 Rainbow Mountain, Nevada 39 35.00 118 27.00 6.8 Stillwater, Nevada 39 30.00 118 30.00 6.3 Stillwater, Nevada 31 30.00 116 0. 6.0 W. of Santo Tomas, B.C. 31 30.00 116 0. 6.3 W. of Santo Tomas, B.C.

7.4

1952 7 29 7 3 1952 11 22 746 1954 1 12 2333 1954 3 19 954 1954 7 6 1113 1954 7 6 22 7 1954 8 24 551 1954 8 31 2220 1954 10 24 944 1954 11 12 1226

6000

1947 4 10 1558 34 59.00 116 33.00 6.4 Manix 1948 12 4 2343 33 56.00 116 23.00 6.5 Desert Hot Springs 1948 12 29 1253 39 33.00 120 5.00 6.0 Verdi, Nevada 1949 3 25 456 41 18.00 126 0. 6.2 W. of Eureka 1949 5 2 1125 34 1. 115 41.00 5.9 Pinto Mountain 1951 10 8 410 40 15.00 124 30.00 6.0 W. Of Cape Mendocino 1951 12 26 046 32 48.00 118 18.00 5.9 San Clemente Island 1952 7 21 1152 35 0. 119 1.00 7.7 Kern County earthquake 1952 7 21 12 5 35 0. 119 0. 6.4 Kern County 1952 7 23 038 35 22.00 118 35.00 6.1 Kern County

7.1

1941 5 13 16 1 40 18.00 126 24.00 6.0 W. of Cape Mendocino 1941 7 1 750 34 22.00 119 35.00 5.9 Carpenteria 1941 9 14 1643 37 34.00 118 44.00 5.8 Tom's Place 1941 9 14 1839 37 34.00 118 44.00 6.0 Tom's Place 1941 10 3 1613 40 24.00 124 48.00 6.4 W. of Cape Mendocino 1942 10 21 1622 33 3.00 116 5. 6.5 Fish Creek Mountains 1942 12 3 944 39 42.00 119 18.00 5.9 N. of Wadsworth, Nevada 1945 5 19 15 7 40 24.00 126 54.00 6.2 W. of Cape Mendocino 1945 9 28 2224 41 54.00 126 42.00 6.0 W. of Crescent City 1946 3 15 1349 35 44.00 118 3.00 6.3 Walker Pass

7.3

1934 12 30 1352 32 15.00 115 30.00 6.5 Laguna Salada, B.C. 1934 12 31 1845 32 0. 114 45.00 7.0 Colorado R. delta 1935 2 24 145 31 59.00 115 12.00 5.3 Colorado R. delta 1936 6 3 915 40 0. 125 30.00 5.9 W. of Cape Mendocino 1937 3 25 1649 33 24.00 116 16.00 6.0 Buck Ridge 1940 2 8 8 5 39 45.00 121 15.00 6.0 Chico 1940 5 19 436 32 44.00 115 30.00 7.1 Imperial Valley 1940 12 7 2216 31 40.00 115 5.00 5.5 Colorado R. delta 1941 2 9 944 40 42.00 125 24.00 6.6 W. of Cape Mendocino 1941 4 9 1708 31 0.00 114 0.00 5.3 Gulf of California

37 30.00 118 45.00 6.0 Bishop region 34 42.00 120 48.00 7.3 SW of Lompoc 40 45.00 124 30.00 6.4 Eureka 38 45.00 118 0. 7.2 Cedar Mountain, Nevada 38 46.00 117 44.00 5.9 Cedar Mountain, Nevada 33 37.00 117 58.00 6.3 Long Beach 39 4.00 119 20.00 6.1 Yerington, Nevada 38 18.00 118 24.00 6.3 Excelsior Mountain, Nevada 36 0. 120 30.00 6.0 Parkfield 41 15.00 125 45.00 6.5 W. of Eureka

1927 9 18 2 7 1927 11 4 1350 1932 6 6 844 1932 12 21 610 1933 1 5 651 1933 3 11 154 1933 6 25 2045 1934 1 30 2016 1934 6 8 447 1934 7 6 2248

5.3

41 0. 126 0. 6.0 W. of Eureka 41 0. 125 30.00 7.3 W. of Eureka 36 0. 120 30.00 6.3 Parkfield 40 30.00 124 30.00 7.2 Cape Mendocino 34 0. 117 18.00 6.0 San Bernardino region 41 30.00 125 0. 6.0 W. of Eureka 34 18.00 119 48.00 6.3 Santa Barbara 36 37.00 122 21.00 6.1 Monterey Bay 36 33.00 122 11.00 6.1 Monterey Bay 40 45.00 126 0. 6.0 W. of Cape Mendocino

5.7

1922 1 2 26 931 1922 1 31 1317 1922 3 10 1121 1923Darwin 1 22 9(59) 4 1923 7 23 730 1925 6 4 12 2 1925 6 29 1442 1926 10 22 1235 1926 10 22 1335 1926 12 10 838

Conceptual grid laid on top of axonometric view of Shoshone. Used to represent land use among the four phases.

1915 6 2 23 359 32 48.00 115 30.00 6.0 Imperial Valley 1915 6 2 23 456 32 48.00 115 30.00 5.9 Imperial Valley 1915 10 3 652 40 30.00 117 30.00 7.3 Pleasant Valley, Nevada 1915 11 21 013 32 0. 115 0. 7.1 Volcano Lake, B.C. 1915 12 31 1220 41 0. 126 0. 6.5 W. of Eureka 1916 2 3 5 3 41 0. 117 48.00 5.9 N. of Pleasant Valley, Nevada 1916 10 23 244 34 54.00 118 54.00 5.3 Tejon Pass region 1916 11 10 911 35 30.00 116 0. 6.1 S. of Death Valley 1918 4 2 21 2232 33 48.00 117 0. 6.9 San Jacinto 1918 7 15 023 41 0. 125 0. 6.5 W. of Eureka

1908 11 4 837 36 0. 117 0. 6.0 Death Valley region 1909 10 2 29 645 40 30.00 124 12.00 5.8 Cape Mendocino 1910 3 11 652 36 54.00 121 48.00 5.8 Watsonville 1910 3 19 011 40 0. 125 0. 6.0 W. of Cape Mendocino 1910 5 15 1547 33 42.00 117 24.00 5.5 Glen Ivy Hot Springs 1910 8 5 131 42 0. 127 0. 6.6 W. of Crescent City 1911 7 1 22 0 37 15.00 121 45.00 6.5 Calaveras fault n (250) Ryan 1914 2 18 1817 39 30.00 119 48.00 5.5 Truckee region 1914 4 2 24 834 39 30.00 119 48.00 6.0 Truckee region 1915 5 6 12 9 40 0.00 126 0. 6.2 W. of Cape Mendocino

Rhyloite hy (1)

1899 7 2 22 2032 34 18.00 117 30.00 5.75 Lytle Creek region 1899 12 2 25 1225 33 48.00 117 0. 6.4 San Jacinto and Hemet 1901 3 3 745 36 0. 120 30.00 6.4 Parkfield l 527 (675) 31 30.00 115 0.00 6.6 Colorado R. delta region 1903Rhyloite 12 24 1903 6 11 1312 37 24.00 121 54.00 5.5 San Jose 1903 8 3 649 37 18.00 121 48.00 5.5 San Jose 1906 4 18 1312 37 42.00 122 30.00 8.25 Great 1906 earthquake 1906 4 19 030 32 54.00 115 30.00 6.2 Imperial Valley 1906 4 2 23 910 41 0. 124 0. 6.4 Arcata 1907 9 2 20 154 34 12.00 117 6.00 5.3 San Bernardino region

1893Harrisburg 5 19 035 (300) 34 6.00 119 24.00 5.75 Pico Canyon g 1894 7 3 30 512 34 18.00 117 36.00 6.0 Lytle Creek region o region 1894 9 3 30 1736 40 18. 123 42. 6.0 Cape Mendocino g 1894 10 2 23 23 3 32 48.00 116 48.00 5.75 E. of San Diego a 1896 8 17 1130 36 42.00 118 18.00 6.0 SE Sierra Nevada 1897 6 2 20 2014 37 0. 121 30.00 6.25 Gilroy 1898 3 3 31 743 38 12.00 122 24.00 6.5 Mare Island 1898Bonnie 4 15 7 39 12.00Lila 123 6.5 Mendocino (100), C.48.00 Mine (300), Skidoo (500), Lee (500), Lila C. Mine (300), Rhyolite (6,000) n 7Claire 1899 4 16 1340 41 0. 126 0. 7.0 W. of Eureka 1899 7 6 2010 37 12. 121 30. 5.75 Morgan Hill

1889 9 3 30 520 37 12. 118 42. 5.75 Bishop region Ballarat a (400) 1890 2 9 12 6 33 24.00 116 18.00 6.5 San Jacinto or EElsinore fault region (?) 1890 4 2 24 1136 36 54.00 121 36.00 6.25 Pajaro Gap c 1890 7 2 26 940 40 30.00 124 12.00 6.25 Cape Mendocino 1891 7 3 30 1410 32 0. 115 0. 6.0 Colorado R. delta rregion a, B.C. 1892 2 2 24 720 32 33.00 115 38.00 7.0 Laguna Salada, 1892 4 19 1050 38 24.00 122 0. 6.5 Vacaville 1892 4 2 21 1743 38 30.00 121 54.00 6.25 Winters 1892 5 2 28 1115 33 12.00 116 12.00 6.5 San Jacinto orr Elsinore fault region (?) 1892 11 1 13 1245 36 48.00 121 30.00 5.75 Hollister

3 6 2145 36 54. 121 12. 5.75 Hollister 9 5 1230 34 12.00 119 54.00 6.25 Santa Barbaraa Channel n 12 28 730 41 6. 123 36. 5.75 Klamath Mountains a 32 26 40 37 6. 122 12. 6.0 Santa Cruz Mountains 13 31 545 40 24. 120 36. 5.75 Susanville 4 12 4 5 36 24.00 121 0. 6.25 S. Diablo Range e 6 3 1048 39 12.00 119 48.00 6.5 Carson City, Neveda region 42 29 448 39 42.00 120 42.00 6.0 Mohawk Valleyy 5 19 1110 38 0. 121 54.00 6.25 Antioch 62 20 6 0 40 30.00 120 42.00 6.0 Susanville

Owens Valley at Lone Pine 1872

1882 1883 1884 1884 1885 1885 1887 1888 1889 1889

Shoshone is a small town in the Death Valley region with a population of a little over fifty people. Earthquakes have been prevalent in this area, causing mountain ranges to rise and valleys to sink, thus creating what is seen today. Mining districts scattered in this area because of the exposed minerals.

1872 4 3 1215 37 0. 118 12.00 6.25 Owens Valley w (2000) Darwin 1872 4 11 19 0 37 30.00 118 30.00 6.75 Owens Valley 1872 5 3 1 0 33 0. 115 0. 5.75 Imperial Valley (?) 1872 11 1 12 0 0 39 0. 117 0. 6.0 Austin, Nevada region (?) 1873 11 2 23 5 0 42 0. 124 0. 6.75 Crescent City 1875 1 2 24 1200 40 42. 120 30. 6.0 Honey Lake 1875 11 1 15 2230 32 30.00 115 30.00 6.25 Imperial Vly tto Colorado R. delta o 1878 5 9 425 40 6.00 124 0. 6.0 Punta Gorda region 1881 2 2 011 36 0. 120 30.00 5.75 Parkfield n Valley 1881 4 10 10 0 37 24.00 121 24.00 6.0 W. San Joaquin

Conceptual bar graph showing the uses of the four phases.

1865 10 8 2046 37 0.00 122 00.00 6.5 S. Santa Cruz Mountains 1866 7 15 0630 37 30.00 121 18.00 6.0 W. San Joaquin Valley 1868 5 30 510 39 18.00 119 42.00 6.0 Virginia City, Nevada 1868 10 21 1553 37 42.00 122 6.00 7.0 Hayward fault a 1869 12 2 27 155 39 24.00 119 42.00 6.25 Olinghouse fault, Nevada e 1869 12 2 27 10 0 39 6.00 119 48.00 6.0 Carson City, Nevada region 1870 2 17 2012 37 12.00 122 6.00 6.0 Los Gatos n 1871 3 2 21 5 40 24.00 124 12.00 6.0 Cape Mendocino 1872 3 2 26 1030 36 42.00 118 6.00 7.6 Owens Valley 1872 3 2 26 14 6 36 54.00 118 12.00 6.75 Owens Valley

1856 2 15 1325 37 30.00 122 18.00 5.5 San Francisco Peninsula 1857 1 9 16 0 35 42.00 120 18.00 8.25 Great Fort Tejon earthquake 1857 9 3 3 5 39 18.00 120 0. 6.25 W. Nevada or E. Sierra Nevada 1858 11 26 835 37 30.00 121 54.00 6.25 San Jose region 1858 12 16 10 0 34 0. 117 30.00 6.0 San Bernardino region 1860 3 15 19 0 39 30.00 119 30.00 6.5 Carson City, Nevada region 1861 7 4 011 37 48.00 122 0. 5.75 San Ramon Valley 1862 5 27 20 0 32 42.00 117 12.00 6.0 San Diego region 1864 2 26 1347 37 6.00 121 42.00 6.0 S. Santa Cruz Mountains 1864 3 5 1649 37 42.00 122 0. 5.75 E. of San Francisco Bay

1769 7 28 0 0 34 0.00 118 0.00 6.0 Los Angeles Basin 1800 11 22 2130 33 0. 117 18.00 6.5 San Diego region 1808 6 24 0 0 37 48.00 122 30.00 6.0 San Francisco region 1812 12 8 15 0 34 22.00 117 39.00 7.0 Wrightwood 1812 12 21 19 0 34 12.00 119 54.00 7.0 Santa Barbara Channel 1827 9 24 4 0 34 0. 119 0. 5.5 Los Angeles region 1836 6 10 1530 37 48.00 122 12.00 6.75 Hayward Valley 1838 6 0 0 0 37 36.00 122 24.00 7.0 San Francisco Peninsula 1852 11 29 20 0 32 30.00 115 0. 6.5 Volcano Lake, B.C. 1855 7 11 415 34 6.00 118 6.00 6.0 Los Angeles region

Researched Observations Phasing Possibilities

By providing the four essential needs of any place that allows people to survive (water, food, shelter, and energy), the small town of Shoshone can be sustained even throughout the prevalence of the constantly changing landscape in which earthquake activity shifts the land either for the good or bad. These four things will moderate the occurances seen in the bar graph and Shoshone will eventually be able to grow and survive in the future.

Major and Minor earthquakes

Existing Water use areas Future Water u

Hector Mine Earthquake October 16, 1999 Food produced on site will require less need for importation of outside goods. Availability of food on-site will attract visitors and create a need for more shelter areas as population increases. The introduction of an agricultural system will create a rise in future demand of food production. The energy created from solar panels will meet this demand.

Enough energy produced on site by solar panels will help power more efficient water pumping systems.

2 Food will be produced at a more efficient speed with enough energy to power machinery.

S


38 49.00 119 37.00 6.0 Carter's Station, Nevada Shelters will have electricity and other power to house visitors.

Current Shelter areas

Future Shelter areas

The introduction of more shelters for visitors increases the need for energy including lights and processes that speed up the process of water and food for this area.

Current Energy use areas

3 6 2145 36 54. 121 12. 5.75 Hollister 9 5 1230 34 12.00 119 54.00 6.25 Santa Barbara Channel 1 28 730 41 6. 123 36. 5.75 Klamath Mountains 3 26 40 37 6. 122 12. 6.0 Santa Cruz Mountains 1 31 545 40 24. 120 36. 5.75 Susanville 4 12 4 5 36 24.00 121 0. 6.25 S. Diablo Range 6 3 1048 39 12.00 119 48.00 6.5 Carson City, Neveda region 4 29 448 39 42.00 120 42.00 6.0 Mohawk Valley 5 19 1110 38 0. 121 54.00 6.25 Antioch 6 20 6 0 40 30.00 120 42.00 6.0 Susanville

Energy production areas

1889 9 30 520 1890 2 9 12 6 1890 4 24 1136 1890 7 26 940 1891 7 30 1410 1892 2 24 720 1892 4 19 1050 1892 4 21 1743 1892 5 28 1115 1892 11 13 1245

1882 1883 1884 1884 1885 1885 1887 1888 1889 1889

1872 4 3 1215 37 0. 118 12.00 6.25 Owens Valley 1872 4 11 19 0 37 30.00 118 30.00 6.75 Owens Valley 1872 5 3 1 0 33 0. 115 0. 5.75 Imperial Valley (?) 1872 11 12 0 0 39 0. 117 0. 6.0 Austin, Nevada region (?) 1873 11 23 5 0 42 0. 124 0. 6.75 Crescent City 1875 1 24 1200 40 42. 120 30. 6.0 Honey Lake 1875 11 15 2230 32 30.00 115 30.00 6.25 Imperial Vly to Colorado R. delta 1878 5 9 425 40 6.00 124 0. 6.0 Punta Gorda region 1881 2 2 011 36 0. 120 30.00 5.75 Parkfield 1881 4 10 10 0 37 24.00 121 24.00 6.0 W. San Joaquin Valley

Future Energy use areas

37 12. 118 42. 5.75 Bishop region 33 24.00 116 18.00 6.5 San Jacinto or Elsinore fault region (?) 36 54.00 121 36.00 6.25 Pajaro Gap 40 30.00 124 12.00 6.25 Cape Mendocino 32 0. 115 0. 6.0 Colorado R. delta region 32 33.00 115 38.00 7.0 Laguna Salada, B.C. 38 24.00 122 0. 6.5 Vacaville 38 30.00 121 54.00 6.25 Winters 33 12.00 116 12.00 6.5 San Jacinto or Elsinore fault region (?) 36 48.00 121 30.00 5.75 Hollister

inquires

inquires

inquires

supports

Dublin Gulch, former mining district, will be used once again to house visitors. New formations will be made from economic earnings from food production and increasing visitors.

DESIGN 37 30.00 118 45.00 6.0 Bishop region 34 42.00 120 48.00 7.3 SW of Lompoc 40 45.00 124 30.00 6.4 Eureka 38 45.00 118 0. 7.2 Cedar Mountain, Nevada 38 46.00 117 44.00 5.9 Cedar Mountain, Nevada 33 37.00 117 58.00 6.3 Long Beach 39 4.00 119 20.00 6.1 Yerington, Nevada 38 18.00 118 24.00 6.3 Excelsior Mountain, Nevada 36 0. 120 30.00 6.0 Parkfield 41 15.00 125 45.00 6.5 W. of Eureka

1927 9 18 2 7 1927 11 4 1350 1932 6 6 844 1932 12 21 610 1933 1 5 651 1933 3 11 154 1933 6 25 2045 1934 1 30 2016 1934 6 8 447 1934 7 6 2248

35 23.00 118 51.00 6.1 Bakersfield 35 44.00 121 12.00 6.0 Bryson 35 0. 119 1.00 5.9 W. of Wheeler Ridge 33 17.00 116 11.00 6.2 Arroyo Salada 39 25.00 118 32.00 6.6 Rainbow Mountain, Nevada 39 18.00 118 30.00 6.4 Rainbow Mountain, Nevada 39 35.00 118 27.00 6.8 Stillwater, Nevada 39 30.00 118 30.00 6.3 Stillwater, Nevada 31 30.00 116 0. 6.0 W. of Santo Tomas, B.C. 31 30.00 116 0. 6.3 W. of Santo Tomas, B.C.

3 23 710 39 36.00 118 1.00 6.3 Dixie Valley, Nevada 6 23 1435 39 5.00 118 49.00 6.1 Schurz, Nevada 8 9 739 40 19.00 127 4.00 6.2 W. of Cape Mendocino 6 28 426 36 0. 120 30.00 6.0 Parkfield 8 7 1736 31 48.00 114 30.00 6.3 Gulf of California 9 12 1641 39 25.00 120 9.00 6.0 Truckee 4 9 228 33 11.00 116 8.00 6.5 Borrego Mountain 6 26 142 40 14.00 124 16.00 5.4 Punta Gorda 2 9 14 0 34 25.00 118 24.00 6.5 San Fernando 2 21 1445 34 4.00 119 2.00 5.2 Point Mugu

33 58.00 116 19.00 40 20.00 124 14.00 40 26.00 124 36.00 40 23.00 124 35.00 34 12.00 116 26.00 34 12.00 116 50.00 37 9.00 117 50.00 34 13.00 118 32.00 40 27.00 125 54.00 38 49.00 119 37.00

6.1 Joshua Tree 7.2 Cape Mendocino 6.5 Cape Mendocino 6.6 Cape Mendocino 7.3 Landers 6.2 Big Bear 6.1 Big Pine 6.7 Northridge 6.9 Mendocino Fracture Zone 6.0 Carter's Station, Nevada 1995 2 19 403 40 37.00 125 54.00 6.6 W. of Eureka 1995 9 20 2327 35 46.00 117 38.00 5.5 Ridgecrest 1996 7 24 2016 41 47.04 125 54.66 5.7 W. of Eureka 1997 1 22 717 40 16.32 124 23.64 5.7 Punta Gorda 1999 8 1 1606 37 23.40 117 4.80 5.7 Scotty's Junction, Nevada 1999 10 16 947 34 35.64 116 16.26 7.1 Hector Mine 2000 3 16 1520 40 23.16 125 16.74 5.9 Mendocino Fracture Zone 2003 12 22 1916 35 41.98 121 5.84 6.5 San Simeon 2004 9 28 1715 35 48.90 120 22.44 6.0 Parkfield

4 23 450 4 25 1806 4 26 741 4 26 1118 6 28 1157 6 28 1505 5 17 2320 1 17 1230 9 01 1515 9 12 1223

supports

1992 1992 1992 1992 1992 1992 1993 1994 1994 1994

1986 7 20 1429 37 34.00 118 26.00 5.6 Chalfant Valley 1986 7 21 1442 37 32.00 118 26.00 6.2 Chalfant Valley 1986 7 31 722 37 28.00 118 22.00 5.2 Chalfant Valley 1987 10 1 1442 34 3.00 118 5.00 5.8 Whittier Narrows 1987 11 24 153 33 4.00 115 47.00 6.2 Elmore Ranch fault 1987 11 24 1316 33 1.00 115 51.00 6.6 Superstition Hills 1989 10 18 0004 37 2.19 121 52.98 7.1 Loma Prieta 1991 8 16 2226 41 38.00 125 52.00 6.3 W. of Crescent City 1991 8 17 1929 40 17.00 124 14.00 6.2 Punta Gorda 1991 8 17 2217 41 41.00 126 3.00 7.1 W. of Crescent City

1981 4 26 1209 33 8.00 115 39.00 6.0 Westmorland 1981 9 4 1550 33 40.00 119 7.00 5.9 N. of Santa Barbara Island 1981 9 30 1153 37 35.00 118 52.00 5.8 Mammoth Lakes 1983 5 2 2342 36 14.00 120 19.00 6.5 Coalinga 1983 7 22 239 36 14.00 120 25.00 5.7 Coalinga 1984 4 24 2115 37 19.00 121 39.00 6.1 Morgan Hill 1984 9 10 314 40 23.00 127 9.00 6.7 Mendocino Fracture Zone 1984 11 23 18 8 37 27.00 118 36.00 5.7 Round Valley 1985 8 4 12 1 36 8.00 120 10.00 5.9 North Kettleman Hills 1986 7 8 920 34 0. 116 36.00 6.0 North Palm Springs

1976 11 26 1119 41 18.00 125 42.00 6.3 W. of Orick 1979 8 6 17 5 37 7.00 121 31.00 5.7 Coyote Lake 1979 10 15 2316 32 36.00 115 18.00 6.5 Imperial Valley 1980 01 24 1900 37 50.00 121 47.00 5.8 Livermore 1980 5 25 1633 37 36.00 118 50.00 6.1 Mammoth Lakes 1980 5 25 1649 37 39.00 118 54.00 5.9 Mammoth Lakes 1980 5 25 1944 37 33.00 118 49.00 5.8 Mammoth Lakes 1980 5 27 1450 37 29.00 118 48.00 6.0 Mammoth Lakes 1980 6 9 328 32 12.00 115 5.00 6.4 Victoria, B.C. 1980 11 8 1027 41 7.00 124 40.00 7.2 W. of Eureka

1959 1959 1960 1966 1966 1966 1968 1968 1971 1973

1954 11 25 1116 40 16.00 125 38.00 6.5 W. of Cape Mendocino 1954 12 16 11 7 39 19.00 118 12.00 7.1 Fairview Peak, Nevada 1954 12 16 1111 39 30.00 118 0. 6.8 Dixie Valley, Nevada 1954 12 21 1956 40 56.00 123 47.00 6.6 E. of Arcata 1956 2 9 1432 31 45.00 115 55.00 6.8 San Miguel, B.C. 1956 2 9 1524 31 45.00 115 55.00 6.1 San Miguel, B.C. 1956 2 14 1833 31 30.00 115 30.00 6.3 San Miguel, B.C. 1956 2 15 120 31 30.00 115 30.00 6.4 San Miguel, B.C. 1956 10 11 1648 40 40.00 125 46.00 6.0 W. of Cape Mendocino 1956 12 13 1315 31 0. 115 0. 6.0 W. shore, Gulf of California

1952 7 29 7 3 1952 11 22 746 1954 1 12 2333 1954 3 19 954 1954 7 6 1113 1954 7 6 22 7 1954 8 24 551 1954 8 31 2220 1954 10 24 944 1954 11 12 1226

1947 4 10 1558 34 59.00 116 33.00 6.4 Manix 1948 12 4 2343 33 56.00 116 23.00 6.5 Desert Hot Springs 1948 12 29 1253 39 33.00 120 5.00 6.0 Verdi, Nevada 1949 3 25 456 41 18.00 126 0. 6.2 W. of Eureka 1949 5 2 1125 34 1. 115 41.00 5.9 Pinto Mountain 1951 10 8 410 40 15.00 124 30.00 6.0 W. Of Cape Mendocino 1951 12 26 046 32 48.00 118 18.00 5.9 San Clemente Island 1952 7 21 1152 35 0. 119 1.00 7.7 Kern County earthquake 1952 7 21 12 5 35 0. 119 0. 6.4 Kern County 1952 7 23 038 35 22.00 118 35.00 6.1 Kern County

1941 5 13 16 1 40 18.00 126 24.00 6.0 W. of Cape Mendocino 1941 7 1 750 34 22.00 119 35.00 5.9 Carpenteria 1941 9 14 1643 37 34.00 118 44.00 5.8 Tom's Place 1941 9 14 1839 37 34.00 118 44.00 6.0 Tom's Place 1941 10 3 1613 40 24.00 124 48.00 6.4 W. of Cape Mendocino 1942 10 21 1622 33 3.00 116 5. 6.5 Fish Creek Mountains 1942 12 3 944 39 42.00 119 18.00 5.9 N. of Wadsworth, Nevada 1945 5 19 15 7 40 24.00 126 54.00 6.2 W. of Cape Mendocino 1945 9 28 2224 41 54.00 126 42.00 6.0 W. of Crescent City 1946 3 15 1349 35 44.00 118 3.00 6.3 Walker Pass

1934 12 30 1352 32 15.00 115 30.00 6.5 Laguna Salada, B.C. 1934 12 31 1845 32 0. 114 45.00 7.0 Colorado R. delta 1935 2 24 145 31 59.00 115 12.00 5.3 Colorado R. delta 1936 6 3 915 40 0. 125 30.00 5.9 W. of Cape Mendocino 1937 3 25 1649 33 24.00 116 16.00 6.0 Buck Ridge 1940 2 8 8 5 39 45.00 121 15.00 6.0 Chico 1940 5 19 436 32 44.00 115 30.00 7.1 Imperial Valley 1940 12 7 2216 31 40.00 115 5.00 5.5 Colorado R. delta 1941 2 9 944 40 42.00 125 24.00 6.6 W. of Cape Mendocino 1941 4 9 1708 31 0.00 114 0.00 5.3 Gulf of California

41 0. 126 0. 6.0 W. of Eureka 41 0. 125 30.00 7.3 W. of Eureka 36 0. 120 30.00 6.3 Parkfield 40 30.00 124 30.00 7.2 Cape Mendocino 34 0. 117 18.00 6.0 San Bernardino region 41 30.00 125 0. 6.0 W. of Eureka 34 18.00 119 48.00 6.3 Santa Barbara 36 37.00 122 21.00 6.1 Monterey Bay 36 33.00 122 11.00 6.1 Monterey Bay 40 45.00 126 0. 6.0 W. of Cape Mendocino

1922 1 26 931 1922 1 31 1317 1922 3 10 1121 1923 1 22 9 4 1923 7 23 730 1925 6 4 12 2 1925 6 29 1442 1926 10 22 1235 1926 10 22 1335 1926 12 10 838

1915 6 23 359 32 48.00 115 30.00 6.0 Imperial Valley 1915 6 23 456 32 48.00 115 30.00 5.9 Imperial Valley 1915 10 3 652 40 30.00 117 30.00 7.3 Pleasant Valley, Nevada 1915 11 21 013 32 0. 115 0. 7.1 Volcano Lake, B.C. 1915 12 31 1220 41 0. 126 0. 6.5 W. of Eureka 1916 2 3 5 3 41 0. 117 48.00 5.9 N. of Pleasant Valley, Nevada 1916 10 23 244 34 54.00 118 54.00 5.3 Tejon Pass region 1916 11 10 911 35 30.00 116 0. 6.1 S. of Death Valley 1918 4 21 2232 33 48.00 117 0. 6.9 San Jacinto 1918 7 15 023 41 0. 125 0. 6.5 W. of Eureka

1908 11 4 837 36 0. 117 0. 6.0 Death Valley region 1909 10 29 645 40 30.00 124 12.00 5.8 Cape Mendocino 1910 3 11 652 36 54.00 121 48.00 5.8 Watsonville 1910 3 19 011 40 0. 125 0. 6.0 W. of Cape Mendocino 1910 5 15 1547 33 42.00 117 24.00 5.5 Glen Ivy Hot Springs 1910 8 5 131 42 0. 127 0. 6.6 W. of Crescent City 1911 7 1 22 0 37 15.00 121 45.00 6.5 Calaveras fault 1914 2 18 1817 39 30.00 119 48.00 5.5 Truckee region 1914 4 24 834 39 30.00 119 48.00 6.0 Truckee region 1915 5 6 12 9 40 0.00 126 0. 6.2 W. of Cape Mendocino

34 18.00 117 30.00 5.75 Lytle Creek region 33 48.00 117 0. 6.4 San Jacinto and Hemet 36 0. 120 30.00 6.4 Parkfield 31 30.00 115 0.00 6.6 Colorado R. delta region 37 24.00 121 54.00 5.5 San Jose 37 18.00 121 48.00 5.5 San Jose 37 42.00 122 30.00 8.25 Great 1906 earthquake 32 54.00 115 30.00 6.2 Imperial Valley 41 0. 124 0. 6.4 Arcata 34 12.00 117 6.00 5.3 San Bernardino region

Water is then diverted to feed future shelters for visitors. Toilets, sinks and showers are available.

Food provides the neccessities of people visiting and staying in the shelters provided

1899 7 22 2032 1899 12 25 1225 1901 3 3 745 1903 1 24 527 1903 6 11 1312 1903 8 3 649 1906 4 18 1312 1906 4 19 030 1906 4 23 910 1907 9 20 154

1893 5 19 035 34 6.00 119 24.00 5.75 Pico Canyon 1894 7 30 512 34 18.00 117 36.00 6.0 Lytle Creek region 1894 9 30 1736 40 18. 123 42. 6.0 Cape Mendocino region 1894 10 23 23 3 32 48.00 116 48.00 5.75 E. of San Diego 1896 8 17 1130 36 42.00 118 18.00 6.0 SE Sierra Nevada 1897 6 20 2014 37 0. 121 30.00 6.25 Gilroy 1898 3 31 743 38 12.00 122 24.00 6.5 Mare Island 1898 4 15 7 7 39 12.00 123 48.00 6.5 Mendocino 1899 4 16 1340 41 0. 126 0. 7.0 W. of Eureka 1899 7 6 2010 37 12. 121 30. 5.75 Morgan Hill

Future Agriculture areas

1865 10 8 2046 37 0.00 122 00.00 6.5 S. Santa Cruz Mountains 1866 7 15 0630 37 30.00 121 18.00 6.0 W. San Joaquin Valley 1868 5 30 510 39 18.00 119 42.00 6.0 Virginia City, Nevada 1868 10 21 1553 37 42.00 122 6.00 7.0 Hayward fault 1869 12 27 155 39 24.00 119 42.00 6.25 Olinghouse fault, Nevada 1869 12 27 10 0 39 6.00 119 48.00 6.0 Carson City, Nevada region 1870 2 17 2012 37 12.00 122 6.00 6.0 Los Gatos 1871 3 2 21 5 40 24.00 124 12.00 6.0 Cape Mendocino 1872 3 26 1030 36 42.00 118 6.00 7.6 Owens Valley 1872 3 26 14 6 36 54.00 118 12.00 6.75 Owens Valley

Existing Food areas

1856 2 15 1325 37 30.00 122 18.00 5.5 San Francisco Peninsula 1857 1 9 16 0 35 42.00 120 18.00 8.25 Great Fort Tejon earthquake 1857 9 3 3 5 39 18.00 120 0. 6.25 W. Nevada or E. Sierra Nevada 1858 11 26 835 37 30.00 121 54.00 6.25 San Jose region 1858 12 16 10 0 34 0. 117 30.00 6.0 San Bernardino region 1860 3 15 19 0 39 30.00 119 30.00 6.5 Carson City, Nevada region 1861 7 4 011 37 48.00 122 0. 5.75 San Ramon Valley 1862 5 27 20 0 32 42.00 117 12.00 6.0 San Diego region 1864 2 26 1347 37 6.00 121 42.00 6.0 S. Santa Cruz Mountains 1864 3 5 1649 37 42.00 122 0. 5.75 E. of San Francisco Bay

use areas

1769 7 28 0 0 34 0.00 118 0.00 6.0 Los Angeles Basin 1800 11 22 2130 33 0. 117 18.00 6.5 San Diego region 1808 6 24 0 0 37 48.00 122 30.00 6.0 San Francisco region 1812 12 8 15 0 34 22.00 117 39.00 7.0 Wrightwood 1812 12 21 19 0 34 12.00 119 54.00 7.0 Santa Barbara Channel 1827 9 24 4 0 34 0. 119 0. 5.5 Los Angeles region 1836 6 10 1530 37 48.00 122 12.00 6.75 Hayward Valley 1838 6 0 0 0 37 36.00 122 24.00 7.0 San Francisco Peninsula 1852 11 29 20 0 32 30.00 115 0. 6.5 Volcano Lake, B.C. 1855 7 11 415 34 6.00 118 6.00 6.0 Los Angeles region

1995 2 19 403 40 37.00 125 54.00 6.6 W. of Eureka 1995 9 20 2327 35 46.00 117 38.00 5.5 Ridgecrest 1996 7 24 2016 41 47.04 125 54.66 5.7 W. of Eureka 1997 1 22 717 40 16.32 124 23.64 5.7 Punta Gorda 1999 8 1 1606 37 23.40 117 4.80 5.7 Scotty's Junction, Nevada 1999 10 16 947 34 35.64 116 16.26 7.1 Hector Mine 2000 3 16 1520 40 23.16 125 16.74 5.9 Mendocino Fracture Zone 2003 12 22 1916 35 41.98 121 5.84 6.5 San Simeon 2004 9 28 1715 35 48.90 120 22.44 6.0 Parkfield

1994 9 12 1223

Agriculture expands improved methods increase production

Solar energy production success all energy is produced on-site

Some shelters destroyed but visitors still enjoy natrual systems

Population able to remain high resources are plentiful and properous

Water availability remains high runoff and seeping water is used

Major earthquake further land changes

Solar energy recognized as helpful on-site energy production

Population increase result of mineral exposure and availability of resources

More Homes and Shelters built and reused with availability of more resources

Opportunities for Agriculture more water allows on-site agriculture

Population remains low after tectonic activity

The four survival phases are seen in action here, providing people with water in shelters and for agriculture grown on site, providing people with food from the agricultural fields, providing people with energy to light their rooms at night. This energy produced by solar panels will give back to the other phases which will involve the pumping of more water and the production of food grown on site, and other energy needs for future visitors to come.

Constructive Development

Moderation line

The plentiful water, either runoff or water pumped from the ground, feeds agricultural fields. Section

Former shelters of Dublin Gulch used again to house visitors and to give them an experience of the mining past

Agricultural fields grown on site. With the expansion of these fields, Shoshone will be able to produce all food on site for visitors and residents.

Solar Panels on top of shelter formations

Water

Food

Shelter

Energy

Energy from solar panels above tufa formations powers essentials inside shelters for visitors.

All food will be grown on site from dispersed agricultural fields which will be watered regularly by water runoff and the plentiful water pumped onto the site.

Water runoff will be drawn to certain areas of the site rather than creating puddle masses beside the road. This provides visitors with the future possibility of using these areas for swimming pools if not reflection pools.

Naturally Optimistic krystie ortencio

LA402L


BUILT MODELS

MELINDA TAYLOR & ASSOCIATES 2010

DESCRIPTION High-end residential foam board models (2). Built for presentation to clients and progressive undersetanding of site within existing context to design hardscape and landscape elements. Alterations were done to models according to needs or interests of clients. All aspects of site and landscape materials were modeled to realistic details of project.


CORONADO ISLAND MARRIOTT RESORT EPT DESIGN 2008

DESCRIPTION: These drawings were sent to clients for approval and further review during the design development stage. The details on the opposite page are various drawings part of the construction documents package. CONTRIBUTION: Drawing and rendering of plan and elevation, creation of 3D couple’s spa model, development of pool and spa details, responsible for updates and revisions.

5 Spa and fitness entry plan

5 Spa and fitness entry elevation


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MarriottCoronado Island Coronado, California

Landscape Plan Prepared for: Client Name 26 August 2008

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ege Courtyards

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POLAROID ANALYSIS

Documentation and Composition of a Polaroid 600 Land Camera Axel Schmitzberger_Winter 2011


PRESENTATION & LAYOUT Digital & Print


SKETCHBOOK Pencil and Pen Sketches



KO Portfolio 2013