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SKBJ

Columbus, Indiana

Museum of Innovation


Table of Contents

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I. Mission Statement III. Columbus - City History - Client Analysis - Site Analysis - Demographic Analysis - Climate Analysis II. Program - Spatial Diagram - Room Sq. Ft. - Time Chart - Archive - View Framing - Light Study - Object Displays - Codes IV. Precedent - Spatial Organization in Other Museums - Archeology Museum of Alava - Bloch/ Atkins Museum V. Innovation - Map VI. Summary - Sources

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Executive summary

The clients’ vision entails a builidng as a place for learning, living, enlightment whether that is spiritually or intellectually. A place for understanding the human empirical knowledge and intellectual process. The CCF would like a Museum that brings forth objects not only of innovation however objects of design, art and culture that speaks a narative to Columbus’ history without subtracting or displacing the nearby architecture. To be viewed by a wide array of audiences. At the same time the museum should remain, responsable, environmentally concsious, energy efficient, conservative, and econnomically viable to truly stand as a center peice to Columbus and didactical towards the world.

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Vision Statement

SKBJ Architects fully understands your concerns, as stated in the ‘Vision Statement.’ It is our belief as drivers of the design for such a space we must do so in five main areas. Those of which are providing an experience for the people whom are projected to use the museum both local and from far, young and old. Secondly providing a thought provoking experience with the placement of exhibition spaces, giving a stimulus for not only the art and the work inside but their interaction with it. Our approach to designing a room is not to show out ability of design but, what would make centerpieces and other exhibition works to be viewed in the “right light” as to highten the expereince and make the trip worth while. Forth, to be environmentally innovative and incorporate innovation with the building in terms of time, space and energy. The thought provoking question of “why” in our programmatic decision is how does this contribute to the ocerall experience of Innovation. Lastly we make the place interactive for all to participate in.

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Columbus

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Columbus

1820’s – After the settlers started arriving, early industries started to develop. Grist mills, woolen mills, saw mills and distilleries were established along the main streams utilizing the flowing water as a source of power. Flatboats were used on the streams to transport goods to southern markets. Flatboats would drift downstream to the Wabash, Ohio and Mississippi Rivers and go as far south as New Orleans. 1844 – First railroad came to town from Madison arriving on the 4th of July(Madison and Indianapolis Railroad) going through the middle of town across Washington Street. 1850 – Ulrich Block building is built at 4 and Franklin and is one of the oldest commercial buildings in the downtown area. It was remodeled in 1891 to face 4th Street. It has been home to many Columbus businesses. The exterior has been restored to its 1891 look.

1867 – Cerealine Mill building built along Jackson Street (it is now part of the Cummins Corporate HQ building). 1874 – Bartholomew County Courthouse (designed by Isaac Hodgson). 1877 – Original Lincoln School built at 430 2nd Street (Designed by Isaac Hodgson who was also the architect of the County Courthouse). Renovated as office space in 1986 and is now called Lincoln 1882 – Cerealine Flakes invented (a Square. dried corn product, it was one of the first nationally marketed breakfast cereals). The flakes were also used in 1888 - Reeves Pulley Company founded by the baking and beer making. Reeves brothers. They manufactured pulleys and variable speed transmission systems for factory power setups – Clessie Cummins is born. 1895 – Columbus City Hall is constructed at 5th and Franklin. Designed by Charles F. Sparrell. This corner was formally the site of John Storey’s milling business which had been lost in a fire. It contained the police station, city offices and a farmers market in the basement.

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Columbus

1905 – Clessie Cummins quits school at the age of 16. Went to work for the Reeves Brothers.

1917 – Original County Hospital was built on the current site alongside Haw Creek

1908 – Clessie Cummins becomes W.G. Irwin’s chauffeur and mechanic 1908 – Commercial Park is built on the former Railroad Square property where First Christian church now sits. 1919 – Cummins Engine Company founded by Clessie Cummins and William Glanton Irwin (Clessie Cummins was originally the chauffeur for the Irwin family). 1925 – Armory Building built at 7th and Franklin 1919 – Cummins Engine Company founded by Clessie Cummins and William Glanton Irwin (Clessie Cummins was originally the chauffeur for the Irwin family).

1931 – A Cummins diesel-powered race car finished 12th at the Indy 500 completing the entire race with no pit stops.

1941 - Indiana University began offering classes in Columbus – Fire Station #1 relocated to corner of 11th and Washington. The building is a very stylish art deco design by Leighton Bowers.

1942 – Purdue University began offering classes in Columbus. – First Christian Church built at 531 5th Street (designed by Eliel Saarinen). Started the modern era of architecture in Columbus and is one of the first modern churches in the United States. Designated as a Nat ional Historic Landmark.

1954 – Irwin Union-Bank opens new building on Washington Street (designed by Eero Saarinen, original landscaping by Dan Kiley). Designated as a National Historic Landmark. 1954 – Interstate 65 constructed on West side of Columbus

1953 – Cummins Foundation Architecture Program is started by J. Irwin Miller to encourage innovative architecture in public schools and other buildings.

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Columbus

1957 – Formal Architecture Program set up within the Cummins Foundation to pay architecture design fees for Columbus schools. It was later expanded to include other public buildings. 1957 – Formal Architecture Program set up within the Cummins Foundation to pay architecture design fees for Columbus schools. It was later expanded to include other public buildings. – J. Irwin Miller family home completed (designed by Eero Saarinen). Designated as a National Historical Landmark

1960 – Mabel McDowell Adult Elementary School is built at 2700 McKinley Avenue (designed by John Carl Warnecke). It is now an adult education center. Designated as a National Historic Landmark.

1967 – Lincoln Elementary School is built at 750 Fifth Street (designed by Gunnar Birkerts). Now Columbus Signature Academy.

1968 – Cummins Engine Technical Center built at 1900 McKinley Avenue (designed by Harry Weese, landscaping by Dan Kiley.).

1969 – Cleo Rogers Memorial Library (designed by I.M. Pei) built at 536 5th Street. Cleo Rogers was the librarian from 19361964. – L. Frances Smith Elementary School built at 4505 Waycross Drive (designed by John M. Johansen).

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Client Analysis

Board of Directors: Kevin Martin President Mission: with a long heritage of enriching the Bartholemew County community through visual art and design experiences, promotes free visual art and design exhibits that collectively engage all Bartholemew County residents. CMAD, in collaboration with other local arts organizations, seeks local and national

March Rothbart Treasurer Sharon Beach Vice President, Curation Committee Ben Hill Andy Miller Deb Perr

display unigue exhibits in venues Arthur Smith throughout Bartholemew County. Purpose: Programs: Steve Spaulding The Columbus Museum of Art & Design has as its Art Collections primary and general purpose the promotion and Preservation Beth Stroh encouragement of the understanding of art. In learnConservation ing to understand art, we learn to understand Exhibitions ourselves and our world, and we are stimulated to Education positive, creative, productive thinking. Music To realize this goal, the Columbus Museum of Art & Drama Design is committed to providing for all who visit our Poetry exhibits, the young and the mature, the novice as well Dance as the expert, a broad range of art programs of the Film Other Expressions highest quality.

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Client Analysis

Collection Eliel Saarinen Eero Saarines Dan Kiley John Warnecke Harry Weese I.M. Pei Cesar Pelli James Polshek Richard Meier Robert Venturi Kevin Roche Romaldo Giurgola

Storage

The Archive documents the history and development of Architecture within the city of Columbus. It stores the collection of 3,275 drawing sets as well as photo’s and Randy Royer other media that explain historical President narrative of the way the building and design profession impacts the make-up of the city. The archive collects important works of major architects, however, it needs additional space for it’s collection

blueprints sketches Construction Documents Architects’ Letter Photographs Models Magazine articles Board minutes Videotapes

Steve Risting Vice President

Rhonda Bolner Treasurer

Mission The mission of the Columbus Indiana Architectural Archives is to collect, conserve, preserve, and promote the use of records that document the architecture, engineering, and arts associat ed with the built environment of Columbus.

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Secretary

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Client Analysis

Chairman Tom Linebarger states that the ten years will be a decade of accelerated growth and Cummins Inc. is ready for the trajectory. Cummins has achieved praisworthy success since it’s start in 1919. A engine company from Indiana which saw little comercial succes made a breakthrough with the creation of the first diesel-powered automobile. Since then they have grown internationally with a reputation for innovation and integrity.

Products engines fuel systems controls air handling filtration emission solutions power generation systems

Tom Linebarger Chairman and CEO

Values

Pamela Carter President Distribution Business

Motivating people to act like owners working together.

Ignacio L. Garcia President - Corporate Manufacturing

Integrity Innovation Delivering Superior Results Corporate Responsibility Diversity Global Involvement Our Mission

Partnering with our customers to make sure that they succeed. Demanding that everything we do leads to a cleaner, healthier, safer environment. Creating wealth for all stakeholders.

Marya Rose VP - General Counsel and Corporate Secretary

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Theodore (Tim) M. Solso Former Chairman and CEO

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Client Analysis

The City Council in Columbus continues to strive to develope the city. The Downtown Columbus Development Plan is one of the

Development Plan

opporitunities, and plans for the cities development at large.

Downtown Development Goals

Kristen Brown Mayor

Luann Welmer Clerk/treasurer

Enhance Columbus’ regional appeal by directing appropriate development towards Downtown. Remove barriers to future quality Downtown development initiatives Pursue “vibrant urbanity” by coverging markets to shape Downtown into an engaging streetscape experience that encourages repeat visits by residents and visitors Broaden Downtown’s roles as a housing market and neighborhood service center.

Jef Logston Exective Director of Admissions

Reinforce the existing physical fabric of Downtown to better comdistricts, gateways, gathering places and relationships to surrounding neighborhoods

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Client Analysis

IUCA+D specializes in teaching art and design using the city as a “living laboratory� for the study, evaluation and understanding of and integrated, comprehensive design.

T. Kelly Wilson Associate Professor

The Indiana University Center for Art and Design Columbus started October 31, 2011. The Center host cources for both degree and non As well as serving upper level courses for students of graphic design, interior design, and fashion design, the courses are also available for Columbus residents and employees for continued learning and career development.

Kevin Lair Assistant Professor

Classes currently take place at IU Bloomington and there is a pontential need fro additional space within Columbus for lectures, presentations and workshops.

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Columbus

City Zoning

200ft

Site

100m

The breakdown of the city zoning allows for the understanding the general location and placement of buildings. This shows the proximity of the residential area and the central downtown area of the city and how abrupt the transition is within the city and site location due to the different city codes of building that are on the peremeter of a certain zone.

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Columbus

Public Transit

Site

200ft 100m

Major roads Bus routes / stops Bike routes/ racks The breakdown of the city transportation within the city and near to the site is to see the flow of traffic and type of transportation around the site. The map shows that multiple major bus routes are within a block of the site allowing residents to be able to get there without too much hassle. Another vital part of this map is the proximity of the bike route

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Columbus

Nearby structures

Educational / religous facilities Hotels / Bed and breakfast Restaurants Visitor center / commons Site

Architecture Landmarks

200ft 100m

This is meant tounderstand what types of buildings are close to the site and allows to see what part of the site could be more appealing to draw a larger crowd to the site.

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Columbus

Survey

These surveys of the city shows what the people of Columbus feel about what direction the city is trying to go towards. Most of them support the arts and what they are trying to do especially as a place for learning and to sharpen .skills

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Columbus

Nearby Educational Facilities

36 schools in the city of Columbus 27 Elementry scools 2 Middle Schools 2 High Schools 14 colleges

PK - 6 7-8 9-12

1,695 3,544

6,924

Due to the want to create an educational facility, learning the amount of schools in proximity o the city to target the kids in the area. This would become a place for hands on and advanced learning of historical items and how they worked.

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Columbus

Climate

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Wind Frequency

Average Wind Temperature

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Columbus

Climate

Summer

Wind Frequency

Average Wind Temperature

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Columbus

Climate

Autumn

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Average Wind Temperature

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Columbus

Climate Winter

Wind Frequency

Average Wind Temperature

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Average Rainfall

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Climate

Columbus

Plant Heardiness and Temperature Climate Zoning

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Wind Power Zoning

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Program

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Program

The purpose of our proposal is the ability to create an interactive learning experience of present and past objects that has helped shape the city of Columbus. The interactive nature of this structure is to help further an understanding of objects that has shaped and further improve the city of Columbus and the world. In order to do so we felt like we needed ceratin rooms that would aid in accomplishing this feat. An auditorium is vital to the program due to the ability to have guest speakers. These would help people to understand why and how these objects are so vital to improving the way of life. To help emphasize a place for gathering and social interaction within the building and spaces to draw people to the area, the use of a cafe in the front is vital. The cafe would be a place to draw in people to the structure and help create a curiosity to our building espescially with the interactive spaces. The interactive lab would be placed near the front of the structure for people to be able to see in and wonder what people are doing. We want this place to just experiment what they have learned through the experiences within the spaces or a place to work if the dont have access to the equipement normally.

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Program Spacial Distribution

Space % sq. m. 6.5 260 Circula on Display 22.75 910 Educa on 22.75 910 Auxilary 13 520 3.5 140 Mechanical Servant 5.25 210 140 Back Circula on 3.5 Services 22.75 910

Major Spaces Circula on Services Display Back Circula on Servant Mechanical Auxilary

Educa on

Programatic Connectivity

Cafeteria

entrance

lobby/landing

Giftshop

Archive

Exhibit

Restora

Back C

FrontCirculation

Presentation Class/Seminar

Staff

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Spacial Breakdown

Cafeteria

Gi shop

Class/Seminar

Mechanical Janitorial Administra ve Staff

Presenta on

Back Circula on Dock Receiving/Handling Other

Events

Restora on

Archive

Storage

Rota ng Perminant

ation

Storage

Entrance Lobby Front Circula on

Handling/Recieving

Dock

Circulation

Administrative

Janitorial

Mechanical

space % sq. m Entrance 1.3 Lobby 3.25 Front Circula on1.95 Perminant 9.1 9.1 Rota ng Archive 4.55 Events 11.375 Presenta on 6.825 Class/Seminar 4.55 Cafeteria 9.1 3.9 Gi shop Mechanical 3.5 Janitorial 2.1 Administra ve 1.575 Staff 1.575 Back Circula on 3.5 Dock 2.275 6.825 Receiving/Handling Restora on 6.825 Storage 6.825

52 130 78 364 364 182 455 273 182 364 156 140 84 63 63 140 91 273 273 273

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Program

Museum Square Footages Innovative Industrial Objects 8,000 Columbus Art And Design Collection 1,500 Rotation Art Exhibit 1,500 Architectural Archives 3,500 Community Room 1,500 Meeting Room 1,500 Education Area 1,000 Administrative Support 1,000 Janitorial Support 1,500 Storage 2,000 Café 1,500 Shop 1,500 Auditorium 4,000 Total Square Footage Without Parking Garage 30,000

To To To To To To To To To To To To To To

10,000 3,000 2,500 5,000 1,500 2,000 1,500 1,500 2,000 2,500 2,000 2,000 4,500 40,000

Square Feet Square Feet Square Feet Square Feet Square Feet Square Feet Square Feet Square Feet Square Feet Square Feet Square Feet Square Feet Square Feet Square Feet

Parking Garage

40,000 To

80,000 Square Feet

Total Square Footage With Parking Garage

70,000 To

120,000 Square Feet

Museum Building Hours Monday Through Friday 8:00 AM 9:00 10:00 11:00

12:00 PM 1:00 2:00 3:00 4:00 5:00 6:00 7:00 8:00 9:00 10:00 11:00

12:00 AM 1:00 2:00 3:00 4:00 5:00 6:00 7:00

8:00 AM 9:00 10:00 11:00

12:00 PM 1:00 2:00 3:00 4:00 5:00 6:00 7:00 8:00 9:00 10:00 11:00

12:00 AM 1:00 2:00 3:00 4:00 5:00 6:00 7:00

Museum Innovative Industrial Objects Columbus Art And Design Collection Rotation Art Exhibit Architectural Archives Community Room Meeting Room Education Area Administrative Support Janitorial Support Café Shop Auditorium Parking Garage Saturday and Sunday Museum Innovative Industrial Objects Columbus Art And Design Collection Rotation Art Exhibit Architectural Archives Community Room Meeting Room Education Area Administrative Support Janitorial Support Café Shop Auditorium Parking Garage

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Program

Archives Our visit to the archival storage, to the archival display space in the library, and the private storage and work space in the basement of the library. Taking on accounts of the people that work there many spaces are not provided for them that they noted down. Amongst them are the private o ce spaces that were well intertwined with spaces they could access the public and the storage spaces. Another noted thing was a workshop space was missing and was much needed for the restoration of work. Lastly looking at the 12’ by about 20’ space used to display only about 2 architectural projects were able to be displayed in such a space, which can be directly didactic to the oorplan. Before visiting the archive I was usure of how the space worked with ratios of workers to people view the archived work. Office for the workers within the archive 2-3 people

30”

93”

56”

Place for the models to get repaired and showed Roughly 30 models

Storage for the shipping containers

Need enough desks for 3-6 scholars to study the drawings

72”

16”

30”

Stacked three high for convenience and able to see the drawings in the drawers Need space for atleast 80 of them

54”

42”

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Program

View Framing

Understanding the view frames from certain points helps tosee what parts will be the most recognizable fromfarther out within the city to help draw people to the space.

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Program

These diagrams distinguish the relative human scale considering building height and distance .5 Meter Distance

2 Meter Distance

5 Meter Distance 7.5 Meter Distance 10 Meter Distance 20 Meter Distance 50 Meter Distance 80 Meter Distance 100 Meter Distance

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Program

Lighting has its limitations in Museums. Certain exhibits need natural light to show the works on exhibits as best as possible. However, many works of art can be degraded, so natural lighting in this case would be unwanted. There are pros and cons to different types of Lighiting:

Daylighting +Free +Orients occupants to the outside +Allows for full viewing of the full color spectrum. -difficult to control - high levels of UV radiation difficult to eliminate -It is variable

Tungsent Light +Gives off warm light that can be adusted +admits little UV radiation +very adaptable -gives off a lot of heat - color temp is difficult to control

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Program

Fiber optics +percise beam of light +doesn’t produce heat -cables aren’t very flexible

Flourescent Lighting +Cheap to run Efficient +readily obtainable -cannot be dimmed -limited variety of flourescents that would be suitable for display

Lighting inside Show cases +Protects the display piece -Heat building up may occur from

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Program

Light Requirements Sensitive collections Including textiles, watercolors, photographs and other papers

Visible light Maximum: 50 lux (5 footcandles)

Less sensitive collections Including oil paintings, wood and leather

Maximum: 150 lux (15 footcandles)

Least sensitive collections Including most metal, ceramics, stones and glass

Maximum: 300 lux (30 footcandles)

Ultraviolet (UV) light Ideal: 0 - 10 microwatts per lumen Maximum: 75 microwatts per lumen Ideal: 0 - 10 microwatts per lumen Maximum: 75 microwatts per lumen Ideal: 0 - 10 microwatts per lumen Maximum: 75 microwatts per lumen

Sensitive Collection 50 lux (5 footcandles)

Less Sensitive Collection 150 lux (15 footcandles)

Least Sensitive Collection 300 lux (30 footcandles)

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Program

Object Size Ratio

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Program

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Program

Object Display

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Program

Object Display Types Interactive open -can see all around and possibly interact with the object if offered

In wall -can only see one part of the object but has the most security and protection from people and environment

Cased -can see all around but not interact or see underneath

Hanging -allow for movemant all around and under the item but can not see the top

Floor -can see all around and top but not undereath

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Program

Object Floor Plan We weanted to see how objects fit within a given space so we had laid out a 6m by 6m display corner with the object in the center. It helped to show how much space would be there to allow for movement and standing around the object.

1m 1m

Large object displayed Able to hold one large object in the middle of a room

Space around for interaction

Item

Small object displayed Able to hold four smaller objects within the room

1m 1m

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Program

Code diagrams

Spaces: -Occupancy loads // +Classrooms +Auditoriums +restaurants -Exiting // -Accesibility// -Zoning CDS -Noise classification STC sound transmission Class -Hallway widths requirements// -Protrusions into walkways // -Restrooms requirements -Water fountains requirements -Parking regulations// -Loading dock regulations -signage//

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Program

1003.2 Ceiling height. The means of egress shall have a ceiling height of not less than 7 feet 6 inches (2286 mm) . Protruding objects are permitted to extend below the minimum ceiling height required by Section 1003.2 provided a minimum headroom of 80 inches (2032 mm) shall be provided for any walking surface, including walks, corridors, aisles and passageways. Not more than 50 percent of the ceiling area of a means ofegress shall be reduced in height by protruding objects. Exception: Door closers and stops shall not reduce headroom to less than 78 inches (1981 mm). A barrier shall be provided where the vertical clearance is less than 80 inches (2032 mm) high. The leading edge of such a barrier shall be located 27 inches (686 mm) maximum above the floor. tixE Exit

1008.1.1.1 Projections into clear width. There shall not be projections into the required clear width lower than 34 inches (864 mm) above the floor or ground. Projections into the clear opening width between 34 inches (864 mm) and 80 inches (2032 mm) above the floor or ground shall not exceed 4 inches (102 mm).

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Program

1004.8 Outdoor areas. Yards, patios, courts and similar outdoor areas accessible to and usable by the building occupants shall be provided with means ofegress as required by this chapter. The occupant load of such outdoor areas shall be assigned by the building official in accordance with the anticipated use. Where outdoor areas are to be used by persons in addition to the occupants of the building, and the path of egress travel from the outdoor areas passes through the building, means of egress requirements for the building shall be based on the sum of the occupant loads of the building plus the outdoor areas. Exceptions: 1. Outdoor areas used exclusively for service of the building need only have one means ofegress. 2. Both outdoor areas associated with Group R-3 and individual dwelling units of Group R-2.

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Program

Means of Egress

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Program

1006.2 Illumination level. The means ofegress illumination level shall not be less than 1 foot-candle (11 lux) at the walking surface. Exception: For auditoriums, theaters, concert or opera halls and similar assembly occupancies, the illumination at the walking surface is permitted to be reduced during performances to not less than 0.2 foot-candle (2.15 lux), provided that the required illumination is automatically restored upon activation of a premises' fire alarm system where such system is provided. 1006.3 Illumination emergency power. The power supply for means ofegress illumination shall normally be provided by the premises' electrical supply.

Lighitng 1205.2 Natural light. The minimum net glazed area shall not be less than 8 percent of the floor area of the room served. 1205.2.1 Adjoining spaces. For the purpose of natural lighting, any room is permitted to be considered as a portion of an adjoining room where onehalf of the area of the common wall is open and unobstructed and provides an opening of not less than onetenth of the floor area of the interior room or 25 square feet (2.32 m2), whichever is greater.

3.88sqft

8 percent of 243sqft would be 19.44 sqft

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Program

1007.3 Stairways. In order to be considered part of an accessible means of egress, an exit access stairway as permitted by Section 1016.1 or exit stairway shall have a clear width of 48 inches (1219 mm) minimum between handrails and shall either incorporate an area of refuge within an enlarged floor-level landing or shall be accessed from either an area ofrefuge complying with Section 007.6 or a horizontal exit. 1007.6 Areas of refuge. Every required area of refuge shall be accessible from the space it serves by an accessible means of egress. The maximum travel distance from any accessible space to an area ofrefuge shall not exceed the travel distance permitted for the occupancy in accordance with Section 1016.1. Every required area ofrefuge shall have direct access to a stairwaywithin an exit enclosure complying with Sections 1007.3 and 1022 or an elevator complying with Section 1. A stairwayserving an area ofrefuge is not required to be enclosed where permitted in Sections 1016.1 and1022.1. 1007.6.1 Size. Each area of refuge shall be sized to accommodate one wheelchair space of 30 inches by 48 inches (762 mm by1219 mm) for each 200 occupants or portion thereof, based on the occupant load of the area of refuge and areas served by the area of refuge. Such wheelchair spaces shall not reduce the required means ofegress width. Access to any of the required wheelchair spaces in an area of refuge shall not be obstructed by more than one adjoining wheelchair space. 1007.6.2 Separation. Each area ofrefuge shall be separated from the remainder of the story by a smoke barriercomplying with Section 710 or a horizontal exit complying with Section 1025. Each area ofrefuge shall be designed to minimize the intrusion of smoke.

Wheelcahir space

minimum clear width

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minimum clear width

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Program

Means of egress doors shall be readily distinguishable from the adjacent construction and finishes such that the doors are easily recognizable as doors. Mirrors or similar reflecting materials shall not be used on means of egress doors. Means of egress doors shall not be concealed by curtains, drapes, decorations or similar materials. 1008.1.1 Size of doors. The minimum width of each door opening shall be sufficient for the occupant load thereof and shall provide a clear width of 32 inches (813 mm). Clear openings of doorways with swinging doors shall be measured between the face of the door and the stop, with the door open 90 degrees (1.57 rad). W The maximum width of a swinging door leaf shall be 48 inches (1219 mm) nominal.

48� max

32� min

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Program

ACCESSIBLE PARKING SPACES TOTAL PARKING OF ACCESSIBLE SPACES 1 to 25 26 to 50 51 to 75 76 to 100 101 to 150 151 to 200 201 to 300 301 to 400 401 to 500

REQUIRED MINIMUM NUMBER SPACES PROVIDED

:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

501 to 1,000 2% of total 1,001 and over 20, plus one for each 100, or fraction thereof, over 1,000 Accessibilty

Accessibilty

1010.2 Slope. Ramps used as part of a means of egress shall have a running slope not steeper than one unit vertical in 12 units horizontal (8-percent slope). The slope of other pedestrian ramps shall not be steeper than one unit vertical in eight units horizontal (12 .5-percent slope).

SECTION 1106 PARKING AND PASSENGER LOADING FACILITIES 1106.1 Required. Where parking is provided, accessibleparking spaces shall be provided in compliance with Table 1106.1, except as required by Sections 1106.2 through 1106.4. Where more than one parking facility is provided on a site, the number of parking spaces required to be accessible shall be calculated separately for each parking facility. Exception: This section does not apply to parking spaces used exclusively for buses, trucks, other delivery vehicles, law enforcement vehicles or vehicular impound and motor pools where lots accessed by the public are provided with an accessible passenger loading zone.

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Program

Mezzanines and Balonies SECTION 1019 EGRESS BALCONIES 1019.1 General. Balconies used for egress purposes shall conform to the same requirements as corridors for width, headroom, dead ends and projections. 1019.2 Wall separation. Exterior egress balconies shall be separated from the interior ofthe building by walls and opening protectives as required for corridors. Exception: Separation is not required where the exterior egress balcony is served by at least two stairsand a dead-end travel condition does not require travel past an unprotected opening to reach a stair. 1019.3 Openness. The long side of an egress balcony shall be at least 50 percent open, and the open area above the guards shall be so distributed as to minimize the accumulation of smoke or toxic gases.

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Program

Amount of Exits SECTION 1015 EXIT AND EXIT ACCESS DOORWAYS 1015.1 Exits or exit access doorways from spaces. Two exits or exit access doorways from any space shall be provided where one of the following conditions exists: 1. The occupantloadof the space exceeds one of the values in Table 1015.1. Where a building contains mixed occupancies, each individual occupancy shall comply with the applicable requirements for that occupancy. Where applicable, cumulative occupant loads from adjacent occupancies shall be considered in accordance with the provisions of Section 1004.1.

1015.1.1 Three or more exits or exit access doorways. Three exits or exit access doorways shall be provided from any space with an occupant load of 501 to 1,000. Four exits or exit access doorways shall be provided from any space with an occupant load greater than 1,000.

= 100 people

x4

1014.3 Common path of egress travel. In occupancies other than Groups H-l, H-2 and H-3, the common path of egress travelshall not exceed 75 feet (22 860 mm). For common path of egress travel in Group A occupancies and assembly occupancies accessory to Group E occupancies having fixed seating, see Section 1028.8.

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Program

Access TABLE 1108.2.2.1 ACCESSIBLE WHEELCHAIR SPACES CAPACITY OF SEATING MINIMUM REQUIRED NUMBER OF IN ASSEMBLY AREAS WHEELCHAIR SPACES 4 to 25 26 to 50 51 to 100 101 to 300 301 to 500 501 to 5,000 5,001 and over

1 2 4 5 6 6, plus 1 for each 150, or fraction thereof, between 501 to 5,000 36 plus 1 for each 200, or fraction thereof, over 5,000

(4) SECTION 2904. Number of occupants of each sex: The required water closets, lavatories, and showers or bathtubs shall be distributed equally, Drinking fountains are necessary in museums 1 drinking fountain per 1,000 occupants (5) SECTION 2905. Employee toilet facilities. Are deemed to be necessary structures under the same ownership, lease, or control, shall be a maximum travel distance of five hundred (500) feet(one hundred fifty-two (152) meters) from the employees’ regular working area. The restrooms may be public facilities. Indiana Administrative Code Page 33 Access for cleaning: Plumbing fixtures shall be installed so as to afford access for cleaning both the fixture and area around the fixture. Unless conditions such as freezing or structural impairment restricts, all pipes from Unless conditions such as freezing or structural impairment restricts, all pipes from fixtures shall be routed to the nearest wall. Section 2908. Convenience and function: Fixtures shall be set level and in alignment with reference to adjacent walls. Water closets, lavatories, and bidets shall not be set closer than 15 inches on center to any side wall, partition, vanity or other obstruction nor closer than 30 inches. Clearance in front of the water closet or bidet to any wall, fixture, or door shall not be water closet compartments shall not be less than 30 inches wide and 60 inches deep. There shall be 18 inches of clearance infront of a lavatory to any wall fixture, or door.

:

= 100 people

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People

to water fountains 52 #


Program

In Conclusion to the IBC

Looking at the different codings requirements it does inform what the architecture will become. For example having an patio serving both the general public and workers would require an emergency exit. This dictates the architecture because one would and unsightly egress stairs to be locate to the back of the museum out of view. Taken that the back of the museum would be the best place to place it there must be enough space, atleast 20’ of space between the exit and the next building with may ential changing where the patio may be. Placing the patio in the front wouldn’t allow for the same privacy and the viewing of a paid for exhibit, but instead it would have to be accessible to all. Looking at the door requirements to the amount people, this would have to inform a limit to the space and area.

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Precedents

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Precidents

The different Spatial Syntax:

1. The ChronoLogical Arrangement the type of which that is usally used in museums that are displaying work that is supposed to be viewed in some type of order or where it may be imperative to ones viewing experience to have a controlled experience.

2. The Podlike or Matrix Arrangement This type of arrangement offers a much more interactive experience with the architecture rather than the exhibits. Ones priority on making this buidling must be set. Secondly, although enivronmental stimulus keeps a buiding alive in ones eyes the downfall is the potential for the Museum goer to become disoriented and may have an unpleasant view of the exhibits.

3. The Open Space type Museum The Felipe Science Museum an example of the open floor plan Museum. It makes much sense as this is a museum that houses large objects and scultures related to the sceinces. Secondly this type of space syntax is used where interaction in provocted by the displays or where the user is intended to define the experience

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Precidents

Archaeology museum of Alava, Spain Architect: Francisco Mangado Completed 2009 Cost 9,000,000

The items displayed here range from palaeolithic arrowheads to imposing Roman sculptures, fruits of archaeological excavtions from the surrounding area, Pais Vasco ( Basque Country). Display cases are contained in narrow perimeter zones around 2m wide, and thier depths create the reveals in the eternal skin. The backstage areas accommodate services paraphernelia and can be accessed by museum staff through ‘secret’ doors. Light wells to illuminate the whole building exhibits without directlight in the space

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Precidents

Nelson Atkins Museum the original museum is a museum designed to look of antiquity and the Bloch addition is a building designed based around a lens and the scope of these lens. The Bloch Museum addition has a fritted glass paneling system that glows in the night. The Nelson Atkins has an atrium dining space near the entrance same with the Bloch museum, also the Bloch museum has more exits.

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Innovation

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Innovation Map Biological

Evolution

New Phenomena

Cons Market Based

Uncon

Innovation

Technological

Consc Science Based

Uncon

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Innovation

Market Opporitunity

scious

nscious

Market Discovery

Research & Development

Technological Desire

cious

Design & Engineering

nscious

Technological Discovery

Manufacturing

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Summary

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The Take on the Visiting Columbus Being able to visit Columbus and being able to talk to the Locals has been an informa design for a museum. Looiking at the people who live in the area, the facilities available to the city and the tempo of the city we can come to the conclusion on, time of operation, spatial design of how the building is view from outside, the work environment for people running the museum.

should go about desiging the many aspects of a museum. Walking into the entrance ing from a lobby into a presentation place, even to a place where a wedding could be held. From all the museum we were able to visit, the Indianapolis Museum of Art, Chicago Museum of Sceince it was evident that a gift shop is available before the entry into the Museum.

For the work environment we saw from the Figge Art Museum, the director saw it imperative for a place of place where in workers could meet around a cooler and talk informally, allowing information to change hands and work to be done day to day rather than week to week depending on if one is able to get a scheduled appointments with another co-worker. This what SKBJ is all about, having the architecture allow for the business to perpetuate itself just simply by the way inwhich it is built. Getting more into the program the Figge Art Museum director described how the front of the museum needs a plaza, to and needs to be transparent either literaly or metaphorically as to what is going on in the inside. From research we gathered that the main reseason hindering new commers form entering the museum is because they aren’t able to discern what the buiding is about.

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http://www.worldwideforklifts.com/pdffiles.html http://www.thc.state.tx.us/public/upload/publications/Basic%20Guidelines% 20for%20the%20Preservation%20of%20historic%20artifacts%202013.pdf http://www.wrhs.org/Research/Preservation_Information http://www.wbdg.org/design/auditorium.php http://www.ucop.edu/risk-services/_files/labdesign_guide.pdf http://www.columbuzz.net/index.php/permalink/3162.html http://www.google.com/url?sa=i&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=images&cd=&docid=VP6afha4O ArhMM&tbnid=y8q6DPF9ppEnKM:&ved=0CAQQjB0&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.centuryhous e.org%2Fnewsletr%2FSprg2000%2Fgrengrst.html&ei=IINLUrvlOoaa9gTy_4CoCA&bvm=bv.53 371865,d.aWc&psig=AFQjCNGtRHp4fG0Zw_wykKCfnLXnOVYetA&ust=1380766847206649 http://columbusin.proboards.com/thread/57?page=2 http://www.cummins.com/ http://www.columbus.in.gov/columbus-transit/ http://www.columbus.in.gov/linkservid/8394BDD8-BC30-5BDD-7FF81D3953B04A0B/showMeta/0/ http://www.columbus.in.gov/cityofcolumbus/assets/File/CAD%20Strategic%20Plan%20(low% 20resolution).pdf Autodesk. Ecotect. Computer software. Download Center. Vers. 32 Bit. Autodesk, 2011. Web. 01 Oct. 2013. <https://students.autodesk.com/?nd=download_center>. Gehl, Jan. "Cities for People." Cities for People. Washington, DC: Island, 2010. 34-40. Print. International Building Code 2009. [Country Club Hills, Ill.]: International Code Council, 2009.

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Final book skbj columbus