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Objective Simply put, architecture is the carefully designed structure of a space, and an architect is invariably the maker of meaningful spaces. Yet, architecture as I understand it, is a silent raconteur of the journey of the spirit, nature, and the space weaving its way through different thresholds of the inside, outside and the inbetween. Verem Villa, Goa. “Like a trail that a snail leaves in its wake as it inches forward, over the years an architect leaves behind a body of work, generated by the attitudes he gradually accumulates towards the agendas he deals with. � - Charles Correa

I express my sincere desire to work with your studio and get exposed to a diverse spectrum of works and ideas in the field of Architecture and design, and to help me further develop ideas which can be constructed and utilized or experienced in a meaningful way. I vow to apply, increase and supplement my knowledge, and excel alongside the organization.


curriculum vitae

krithika samavedula architect designer compulsive doodler

interests Doodling, Comics, Reading, Backpacking, Cycling, Writing, Photography

Skill set

+91 9972187510

Software: AutoCad, Sketchup, Photoshop, Illustrator, CorelDraw, InDesign, MS Office, Prezi.

A- 308, Nipuna Heritage Apartments, 11th B Cross Virupakshapura, Bangalore - 560 097.

Physical: Manual Drafting, Sketching, Photography, Model Making.

5th November, 1993

Languages: English, Hindi, Telugu, Kannada

krithika.s93@gmail.com


Education

2011 - 2016

Bachelor of Architecture

2009 - 2011

12 th C.B.S.E

1999 - 2009

10 th I.C.S.E

B.M.S. College of Engineering, Bangalore

Venkat International Public School, Bangalore

Presidency School, Bangalore

C.G.P.A - 8.87

92%

93%

Work experience March 2017current

Jr Architect- Pradeep Sachdeva Design Associates, New Delhi

Jan 2016 Sep 2016

Internship- Charles Correa Foundation, Panaji, Goa

Aug 2015 Dec 2015

Internship- Monsoon Designs, Bangalore, Karnataka

June 2015

Involved in design and execution of Mala Lane Redevelopment (Phase 3 and Phase 1), Presentation graphics for Anganwadi Prototype Model and Design guidelines, Design development and analysis for Heritage Wayfinding signage Prototype for Panjim, and Production graphics for Z-Axis 2016.

Design development, preparation of presentation drawings, working drawings and study models.

Design of Community Center in bamboo, Thrikkaipetta, Kerala as part of a one month workshop in Wayanad conducted by Ar. Kirtee Shah, In:Ch, Sangaru and Uravu NGO.

Nov 2013

Hampi Craft Diaries, Kanakagiri, Karnataka

Documentation and analysis of Kattigay- a dying neem wood craft in the Hampi region.

Awards

Aug 2015

NIASA Thesis Awards, 2015

Awarded at Zonal Level. Thesis Published in NIASA Thesis Awards ‘15 Book.


Graduate Thesis

01

Semester 6 Studio

02

Semester 4 Studio

03

Heritage Conservation

04

Uravu Workshop

05

Semester 9

06

Semester 10

07

Mundane

08

Embracing tribal roots Adivasi Empowement Center, Jagdalpur Lessons under Mango trees Residential School Campus, Nelamangala

C O N T E N T S

Re-engage Youth Facilitation Center, Gavipuram Sultan’s Solitude Adaptive Reuse of Tipu Sultan’s Armory, Bangalore The Bamboo People A Community Center, Wayanad Internship Monsoon Designs, Bangalore Internship The Charles Correa Foundation, Panaji Re-kindle, Re-new Product Design Musings

09

Leaky Microns Doodle Diaries


01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09


architect ure projects


Graduate Thesis

01

Embracing tribal roots Adivasi Empowement Center, Jagdalpur

Aim: To study and analyse the relationship between tribal cultures and architecture; to reduce the stigma against alternate materials such as bamboo and mud ;to create a strong architectural identity for the Bastar region; Revival of ancient Tribal art forms by creating a common platform for interaction between the craftsmen and designers.

India is a land of diversities. It has a diverse terrain, climate, vegetation, people and culture. Some of the most ancient cultures and traditions were born here and a significant minority continue to practise them till date Yet,indigenous practices, agricultural occupations, ancient tribal crafts are being erased by the advent of modern technology. In a time where our cities are entangled in a web of concrete, we slowly turn towards these ancient tribal practices to draw solutions for the ever-growing plethora of environmental concerns. With the adivasi practices edging vulnerable zones, there emerges a strong need for their conservation and revival. The proposed project is an Adivasi Empowerment Center in Jagdalpur for the adivasis of Bastar, Chhattisgarh.


Understanding Bastar <Documentation>

Adivasis have an active, colurful public life with weekly haat markets, independent thought and skill schools called the ghotuls, the sacred spaces of the gudi, and extravagant chariot festivals. The structures that form these vibrant spaces of interaction are made of timber, mud, thatch and tarpaulinmaterials that can be easily found and procured in the tense regions of Bastar. Bastar tribal crafts can be easily recognised by their rawness and richness of material used, stark, elongated proportions of the form and simple, angular lines, much like the communities themselves.


Tribal cultures are very well de fined.Murals and sculptural reliefs of tribal life are major dominants of aesthetics. Indoor spaces are utilised mainly for private activities like sleeping and cooking. Most of the day activities happen outside. Outdoor spaces are crucial elements of strong social binding and community living. Mud, bamboo, timber and bricks are materials used for construction, although the technique is still primitive and temporary. These materials are deemed as ‘poor man’s materials’ and are not easily accepted by the modern generation, who want concrete ‘pakka’ homes. Thus, it is essential to rebuild people’s trust on local materials and construction technology by removing the social stigma attached to it. This can be achieved by experimenting with these materials on a larger scale project such as a public building.

11


Site Analysis

Macro analysis: Why Jagdalpur? Proximity to tribal villages.

Tribal belt of India

Proximity of tribal Villages to Jagdalpur

Culturally significant to the Tribes, Jagdalpur is also the Commercial headquarter of Bastar region. Lesser naxal influence. Site lies on the popular tourist corridor and is easily accessible by communities and tourists alike.

Meso Analysis: Surroundings

Surrounding land use

Noise Analysis

Traffic Analysis

The noise due to traffic movement is buffered by dense thicket of trees on the site. The site edge can be treated for pedestrian movement. Roads get clogged during the 75 day annual Dusshera Procession from August- October.

Micro Analysis: the site

Site Contours 12

Site Vegetation

Site Climate

Gradual slope of 6m through the site. Soil condition: loamy soil, rich in iron high water table due to proximity of Indravati river. Sub tropical savanna type of climate; hot summers and pleasant winters. preffered building orientation: N-S shaded regions for outdoor activities. increase in humidity during monsoon due to proximity to the river.


Beginning of an Architectural vakya, the Concept.

The Inspiration:

The Common Thread:

The Tribal Life:

The exaggerated proportions, predominant linearity and simplistic geometry of the bronzes and Iron crafts of Bastar is subtly articulated in the overall planning of various spaces of the center and their form development, rather than superficial facade treatments which fades away with time.

The traditional bracing technique used by the tribal craftsmen to build the culturally and religiously significant Dusshera Chariot is adopted as the unifying element which recurs as the wall element in the design.It establishes an architectural identity to the center.

Use of locally available materials along with some mundane elements of the tribal lifestyle such as their coarse woven fabric, simple basket weaves, thriving life along the river, etc. are translated into an architectural dialogue that expresses the unique tribal culture of this region. 13


Design Proposalthe site plan

Master Plan at +4.5M 14

Two linear axes intersect at a node of transition to break monotony in the linearity. Existing green buffer is kept undisturbed, yet active through the Haat Bazaar. Central pathways with buildings on either side symbolise a typical street system coherent to the tribal villages of Bastar and provide shade throughout the day. The residential zone is kept in proximity to the workshop area and away from public eyes.


Section S2

Aeriel View

The social lifestyle of the Bastar tribes involves constant community interaction. Thus, a Haat bazar acts as an informal platform for social interaction amongst the tribes. The public interface transitions into a semi public zone through a menhir gallery. The intersection of the two axes is the second transition court from semi-public to private zones.

Section S1 15


Establishing a Cultural Identity- The face of the Center, The Haat

16


Unit Plan

The Haat is an important space for social gathering, commercial trading and leisure amongst the members of the tribal communities. The site edge is treated as a Haat bazar to establish a cultural identity and bring a familiar and vibrant outlook to the adivasi center, so that it is inviting and less intimidating to the tribals. Section BBâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

Bastar Dusshera is the most important festival for the adivasis. It involves the tedious process of chariot making with sal wood, and chariot pulling for 75 days. Rituallistically, the chariot is abandoned after the festival, never to be used again. Section AA

Thus, as a tribute to the craftsmen and their ancient craft, the wooden bracing elements of the chariot can be reclaimed and used as structural members for shop units of the haat bazaar. 17


Shedding Inhibitions, The Gallery

Plan of the gallery and administration block

The only solid element within the strucutre is a brick display wall. The south facade of the gallery is infilled with timber jali screens whereas the north facade is partially infilled with woven fabric of vibrant colors depicting the cheerful and active social life and festive nature of the tribal communities. 18

Designed to give the visitor the essence of tribal culture, the gallery exhibits tribal elements by including it as part of the building itself. It is approached by a stark exposed brick wall, symbolising the misconception of tribes being â&#x20AC;&#x153;reserved and mysterious or exoticâ&#x20AC;?. The abrupt transition from the outside to the inner courtyard filled with light symbolises the true cheerful nature of tribals known only to few. The main gallery hall is a transperent skeleton of timber framework of the chariot bracing element, which establishes the significance of the Bastar chariot and the community spirit.


Section through the Gallery and Admin

Section through the Gallery

View from OAT

Fabric woven by hill Maria tribe for clothing is used as cladding material which filters light from its loosely woven threads. The idea is to use mundane elements from day to day life of the tribals as aesthetic wall elements for the gallery. This also provides an interactive outlook to the visitors and tourists coming to the gallery to experience the tribal culture in a tactile way. 19


learn- unlearn at the craft workshops

Plan of the Workshop area

View of the Vishwakarma Temple 20

The craft workshops for students are designed as subterranean structures to reduce heat gain during summer and keep it undisturbed from noise due to public activity in the site. The kilns required for bronze and iron casting, are shared by the two workshops and oriented towards the predominant wind direction. A water body separates the dry area and the kiln area. This acts as a source for water required for making moulds, and keeps the temperature bearable during summers. The site comprises of loamy soil rich in iron content. Hence, the walls are made of stabilised earth blocks from earth dug on site. Timber is abundantly available in the forests of bastar. Poly carbonate sheet for roof with timber truss.


Top: Section through the Dhokra (Bell Metal craft) Workshop Middle: Longitudinal Section through all the craft workshops Left: View of the Khasta Workshop 21


campus planning


Studio 6

02

Lessons under Mango Trees A Residential School, Nelamangala

â&#x20AC;&#x153;That the powerful play goes on and you may contribute a verse WHAT WILL YOUR VERSE BE?â&#x20AC;? -Dead Poets Society A home away from home, a school in the woods, lessons under the trees and learning in the courtyards. The central idea of the design is to blur the boundaries between open spaces and flexible classrooms to allow informal and formal learning in the same setting; and to help students interact with nature in a healthy manner.A central pedestrian pathway interspersed with squares lead to different activity zones such as the cultural zone, academic zone, etc. By keeping a single motorised loop along the plot boundaries, and service points accessible from this path only, the campus is made completely pedestrian friendly.


Figureground and circulation

Master Plan 24

Zoning


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3d Model

Plan of the Primary and Middle School

Section A A

The primary and middle schools are essentially outward looking spaces arranged around a large open space that doubles up as a common, secure play area/ outdoor activity area and enables interaction between children of different age groups.

Section B B 25


View of the Open air theatre

Plan of the Cultural block and high School

Section AA

Section B B 26


Ground floor plan: Sports Block

Indoor games

Gym Swim Pool

Section through the pool

Elevation 27


Context design


Studio 4

03

Re-engage Youth Facilitation Center, Gavipuram


Massing

Circulation

A silent, dense neighbourhood in an otherwise busy precinct of Basavangudi, the site in Gavipuram bears cultural and religious importance in semblance to the heritage Shiva cave temple nearby governed by a central axis visually connecting the two heritage sites.

Ground Floor Plan 30

The aim of the project is to design a Youth Facilitation Center which conducts vocational training programmes for the youth of Gavipuram who majorly belong to the working class of the society, and to keep in mind, the context of the site and to integrate the existing elements of the site such as the Temple, the ancient peepal trees and the kattes(traditional platforms for seating) .


Elevation

Offices

Cafe

Section through the library

library

Admin

Courtyard

Classroom

Workshop Court

Section through the temple katte and the workshop spaces 31


Heritage conservation


It was one of the four armouries Tipu Sultan built over 200 years ago, when he waged a long, relentless war against the British. This is where the Tiger of Mysuru, who introduced rocket artillery to the world, stored his cache of ammunition.

Heritage Conservation

04

Sultan’s Solitude Adaptive Re-use of Tipu Sultan’s Armory, Bangalore

Context: then and now Situated in a remote, visually disconnected location in the fort complex, its location away from the main entry to the fortified complex reflects the idea that the structurewas intended to be hidden. The armoury now lies hidden in a bylane near Kalasipalyam police station, behind Bangalore Medical College Research Institute — in the heart of KR Market, its existence still unknown to many!


Existing Plan with defunct structures

In the last few decades, there have been a lot of developments around the site. The major influences on the Armory are by the following: 1.A defunct school building built in the mid 1970â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. 2.The intended info-center that is now illegally inhabited and occasionally a polling booth. Design: Proposed Site Plan of the Armory

Site Section 34

The Surrounding buildings engulf the Armory and visually disconnect it from the neighborhood. The existing circulation pattern is accentuated by creating multiple vistas to create a visual link between the Armory and its surroundings. A moat is introduced around the structure to monumentalise the Armory and add to the serenity of the space.


Longitudinal Setion through the Armory

Proposed Plan of Sultanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Solitude

Legend:

Street Redevelopment plan

Cross Section

1 - Informal Seating 2 - Stage 3 - Entry 4 - Platform 5 - Meditation space 6 - Trapezoidal fenestration 7 - Vents for circulation 35


Workshop

05

The Bamboo People Bamboo Community Center, Thrikkaipetta

Team credits: Krithika, Abhijeet, Sachin

The site for the community center is a 1100sqm (25 cents) plot located in Thrikkaipetta. Characteristic of the hilly terrain of Wayanad, the site is a sloping land with a rock bed in the center, banana plantations on either sides and five large trees. Bamboo as primary material for construction, and a total built area of less than 450sqm was the main requirement.

Thrikkaipetta is a village like no other. Nestled admist the lush green hills of wayanad, the village community comprises of a unique combination of traditional as well as forward thinkers. as a result, community activities like workshops, training, frequent meetings and discussions amongst the members etc. take place. The members of the village keep the community children on the forefront by organising activities like bird watching, organic farming, craft workshops, jackfruit festival etc. Brief: A community center which provides a platform for iinteraction amongst the members of the village and outsiders. The community center comprises of a multi-purpose hall for workshops and training, a library, outdoor games courts, a performance theater and a bird observatory.


Aerial View

The design of the community center was conceptualized to integrate the existing site features like rock boulders and terrain. The surface rock boulder at the entrance of the site acts as the entrance pavillion to the center. The sides of the rock act a swalls for the cafe and the workshop area. The idea was to create a form which integrated the traditional sloping roof with a contemporary outlook. The places are designed to be interactive and playful.

37


BIRD OBSERVATORY +5900

LIBRARY

ENTRANCE 4317

+3400

THREAD:220 mm RISER:200 mm

PANTRY

1972

+900

WORKSHOP

Section B B

6000

12061

BIRD OSERVATORY

+5900

2000

TOILET PORCH

4925

LIBRARY

PANTRY

+3400

1000 1920

1925

2050

UP

1925

TOILET

PANTRY

HALL

2650 +900

1674

+850

+/- 0

Section A A

38

Basement Floor Plan


West Elevation WORKSHOP

5071

LIBRARY ENTRANCE PAVILLION

3128

DN

4250

South Elevation

North Elevation

3412

Ground Floor Plan

BAMBOO TRUSS BAMBUSA BAMBOO 4' DIA

PLASTERING INTERIOR 15mm

BAMBOO BEAMS BRANDISSI BAMBOO 3' DIA

BAMBOO BEAMS BRANDISSI BAMBOO 3' DIA

CHICKEN MESH BAMBOO COLOUMN BAMBUSA BAMBOO 4' DIA

MUD AND LIME PLASTER 60 mm

East Elevation

Detail 39


Semester 9

06

Internship Monsoon Designs, Bangalore

Project team: Rosemary Joy, Krithika S, Thanmayi Reddy. Role: Preparation of working drawings, sketchup models and detailing.


PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

General notes 1. All dimensions and levels are metric. 2. All dimensions are between unfinished surfaces. 3. All dimensions are between unfinished surfaces. 4. All drawings are to be read in conjunction with structural drawings. 5. All dimensions are to be read and not scaled. 6. All dimensions and levels shall be checked at site 7. All discrepancies, if any, shall be brought to the Architects' notice before further execution

Schedule of Openings Name

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

ED1 ED2 ED3 ED4 ED5 GDW GW W1 W2 W3 W4 W5 W6 EW1 EW2 EW3 EW4 EW5 EW6 EW7

Size Description DOORS 900X2100 5300X3030 2420X3030 1800X2100 900X2250 800X2250 850X2100 900X3030 900X3030 2700X3030 900X2060 830X2060 810X2060 870X2060 880X2060 1000X2250 1730X2100 1200X2250 WINDOWS 2500X1100 2210X2880 1000X1100 800X1700 1000X600 1200X1850 510X1660 750X1660 900X560 870X570 860X560 900X1660 2130X600

No. 1 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 D6 D9 DW1

1 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

N

PROJECT TITLE

Nivasa Client - Vaishali & Dushyanth Ganjam Drawing Name - Ground Floor Plan Drawing No - MD.NIV.01.01 Sheet no.: 1

Revision no.: 0

Scale: 1:100

Date: 16.09.2015

Drawn by: Rosemary Joy

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

This document is the property of Monsoon Design, any use not authorised by us, and/or, copying, duplicating, handing over to third parties either in full or in part without permissions is laible to claims.

mo sign densoon

Checked by: DR

12

2, Banaswadi Main Road, Cooke Town, Bangalore - 560 005 Tel: (91)80 41621740 e-mail: office@monsoondesign.in

WORKING DRAWINGS- Nivasa Residence, Bangalore

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT use not authorised by us, and/or, copying, duplicating, handing over to third parties either in full or in part without permissions is laible to claims.

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

41


PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

General notes 1. All dimensions and levels are metric. 2. All dimensions are between unfinished surfaces. 3. All dimensions are between unfinished surfaces. 4. All drawings are to be read in conjunction with structural drawings. 5. All dimensions are to be read and not scaled. 6. All dimensions and levels shall be checked at site 7. All discrepancies, if any, shall be brought to the Architects' notice before further execution

Schedule of Openings Size

D1 D7 D8 D4 ED1 ED2

900X2100 1000X2100 1800X3000 1800X2100 900X2060 830X2060

W7 W8 W9 W10 W11 W12 W13 EW1 EW2 EW3

1800X2850 4000X2850 800X2250 2700X2850 400X1350 2500X3000 2650X1950 510X1660 750X1660 900X560

Description DOORS

WINDOWS

5 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT N

PROJECT TITLE

Nivasa Client - Dushyanth Ganjam Drawing Name - First Floor Plan Drawing No - MD.NIV.01.02 Sheet no.: 2

Revision no.: 0

Scale: 1:100

Date: 16.09.2015

Drawn by: Rosemary Joy

mo sign densoon PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT This document is the property of Monsoon Design, any use not authorised by us, and/or, copying, duplicating, handing over to third parties either in full or in part without permissions is laible to claims.

No.

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

Name

This document is the property of Monsoon Design, any use not authorised by us, and/or, copying, duplicating, handing over to third parties either in full or in part without permissions is laible to claims.

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

General notes

Revisions

Schedule of Openings

Legend

Project Title

WORKING DRAWINGS- Nivasa Residence, Bangalore

Nivasa

42

Drawing No - MD.NIV.02.01

1. All dimensions and levels are metric.

Rev No. Date

Description

Name

Size

Description

No.

2. All dimensions are between unfinished surfaces.

3. All dimensions are between unfinished surfaces. 4. All drawings are to be read in conjunction with structural drawings. 5. All dimensions are to be read and not scaled.

Client - Vaishali & Dushyanth Ganjam Drawing Name - Section AA, Section BB Sheet no.:4

Revision no.: 0

Scale - 1:100 Drawn by:Rosemary

6. All dimensions and levels shall be checked at site 7. All discrepancies, if any, shall be brought to the Architects' notice before further execution

mo d

nsoon esign

Date:28.10.2014 Checked by:DM 12

2, Banaswadi Main Road, Cooke Town, Bangalore - 560 005 Tel: (91)80 41621740 e-mail: office@monsoondesign.in

Checked by: DR

12

2,

Banaswadi Main Road, Cooke Town, Bangalore - 560 005 Tel: (91)80 41621740 e-mail: office@monsoondesign.in

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT


WORKING DRAWINGS- Sohum Residence, Bannerghata 43


Semester 10

07

Internship Charles Correa Foundation, Panaji


Project Team: Ruturaj Parikh, Sudharsha Preethi, Krithika S Role: Preparation of typical drawings of trenches and nodes for phase 2, phase 3. Design of sublic spaces and seating for phase 3. Sketchup models.

The precinct of Mala in Panaji is one of the oldest heritage quarters to have developed as a settlement when the Portuguese capital moved to Panaji. With a small grain size, the houses and streets of Mala have a unique urban fabric representing an Indo-Portuguese culture typical in its architecture, character, scale and quality of urban environment.There are many difficulties in retrofitting the area with modern infrastructure. Owing to the weak financial health of the area, the incidents of upgradation and renovation are few and far apart. The precinct was divided in three sectors. Basic amenities of organising and laying sewage and stormwater lines became the priority, followed by reconstruction of steps in the hilly terrain and carving out simple public spaces and where possible. 45


CLEAR WIDTH OF TRENCH

600

80 50

80mm DEPTH SHOT-BLASTED PAVER-BLOCKS ON 50mm SAND COURSE

300

R.C.C. TRENCH COVER (900mm WIDTH)

100

CLEAR DEPTH OF TRENCH

200

P.C.C TRENCH WALLS DONE WITH SHUTTERING ONLY ON THE INSIDE (150mm WIDTH & 500mm DEPTH)

200

PARTITION MADE OF TWO BRICKS LAID ON THE EDGE, WITH ONE BELOW THE RUBBLE SURFACE RUBBLE SOLING BELOW AND BETWEEN TRENCH WALLS

500

ELECTRICITY LINES TELECOM. + CABLE TV CONDUIT (50mm DIA) WATER SUPPLY PIPE

150 275

150 100

75 900

250

150 100

TYPICAL SECTION THROUGH SERVICES TRENCH ON THE WIDER LANE

CLEAR WIDTH OF TRENCH

500

REDEVELOPMENT OF LANES IN MALA, PANAJI

TYPICAL SECTION THROUGH SERVICES TRENCH 80mm DEPTH SHOT-BLASTED DETAIL PAVER-BLOCKS ON 50mm SAND COURSE

by Charles Correa Foundation |24th JUNE, 2015 80 50 100 CLEAR DEPTH OF TRENCH

D.01

R.C.C. TRENCH COVER (800mm WIDTH)

200

P.C.C TRENCH WALLS DONE WITH SHUTTERING ONLY ON THE INSIDE (150mm WIDTH & 500mm DEPTH)

200

PARTITION MADE OF TWO BRICKS LAID ON THE EDGE, WITH ONE BELOW THE RUBBLE SURFACE RUBBLE SOLING BELOW AND BETWEEN TRENCH WALLS

300 500

ELECTRICITY LINES TELECOM. + CABLE TV CONDUIT (50mm DIA) WATER SUPPLY PIPE

150 150 100

225 75 200 800

150 100

TYPICAL SECTION THROUGH SERVICES TRENCH ON THE NARROWER LANE

50 DIAMETER FLEXIBLE PVC SLEEVE

mm

REDEVELOPMENT OF LANES IN MALA, PANAJI

CLEAR WIDTH OF TRENCH

600

S3 00

by Charles Correa Foundation |23rd JUNE, 2015 200

REMOVABLE R.C.C. TRENCH COVER

(900mmSECTION X 400mm) THROUGH SERVICES TRENCH TYPICAL DETAIL

RA

DIU

80mm DEPTH SHOT-BLASTED PAVER-BLOCKS ON 50mm SAND COURSE

80 50

D.02

200 430

ADDITIONAL LAYER OF BRICK AT THE TRENCH NODES TO KEEP MINIMUM REQUIRED DISTANCE BETWEEN THE DIFFERENT SERVICE LINES

230

200

RUBBLE SOLING BELOW AND BETWEEN TRENCH WALLS

150

ELECTRICITY LINES TELECOM. + CABLE TV CONDUIT (50mm DIA) WATER SUPPLY PIPE

150 100

275

75 900

250

50 DIAMETER PVC SLEEVES IN P.C.C. TRENCH WALLS TO LAY THE SERVICE LINES PAVER BLOCKS

P.C.C TRENCH WALLS DONE WITH SHUTTERING ONLY ON THE INSIDE (150mm WIDTH)

100

SECTION S2 SHEET D.04

80 50

100

CLEAR DEPTH OF TRENCH

300

230

150 100

HOUSE WALL

46

REDEVELOPMENT OF LANES IN MALA, PANAJI by Charles Correa Foundation |26th JUNE, 2015

SECTION S2 SCALE - 1:15

TYPICAL SECTION THROUGH SERVICES TRENCH NODES DETAIL

D.04

REDEVELOPMENT OF LANES IN MALA, PANAJI by Charles Correa Foundation |26th JUNE, 2015

TYP


80MM SHOT BLASTED PAVER-BLOCKS 50MM SAND COURSE PRE-CAST TRENCH COVER (400mm X 800mm) INSPECTION CHAMBER LID (600MM WIDE) PAVER BLOCK EMBEDDED IN P.C.C 1200 MIN

600

P.C.C 900

R.C.C TRENCH

TRENCH WALLS IN 150MM THK P.C.C OR 230MM THK MASONRY FILL WITH P.C.C HDP PIPE FOR WATER SUPPLY (CLAMPED TO TRENCH WALL) PVC CONDUIT FOR ELECTRIC CABLES RUBBLE PACKING EXISTING EDGE

REDEVELOPMENT OF LANES IN MALA, PANAJI by Charles Correa Foundation |5th FEB, 2016

LONGITUDINAL SECTION THROUGH THE STAIRCASE (SECTOR 3)

47


Child Friendly Anganwadis of Goa The intent of the project is to propose and implement with patronage of government agencies- a vision and strategy to generate ideal Anganwadi models for health and nutrition for mother-care and childcare.

Project Team: Anubhuti Chandna, Krithika S Role: Preparation of as-built drawings, presentation drawings of the model Anganwadi. Preparation of graphics for Anganwadi Design Guideline document.

48


49


Integrated Heritage Wayfinding System, Panjim Project Team: Ankush Chandran, Krithika, Parth Role: Documentation and analysis of existing signage, design and costing estimation of prototype signage model.

The aim of the project is to create a signage system for Panaji that would: • Be integrated with the identity of the city; • Aid in easy mobility between heritage and cultural nodes; • Provide information on the city and city landmarks; • Establish a predictable and accessible signage prototype; • Integrate local establishments in the visitors’ path. 50

The city of Panaji is a largely walkable city, with a plethora of historical as well as cultural landmarks spread throughout the city. However, there is an absence of a consistent and predictable wayfinding system for visitors to engage with these landmarks. This project is an effort to integrate the various landmarks as well as local points of interest into an adaptive signage system that can be replicated all over the city and possibly other parts of Goa. The existing signage around the city fails to provide a reliable source of information on the city heritage. Majority of the existing signage do not provide relevant information for wayfinding or are dysfunctional owing to clutter, lack of accessibility and a clear line of sight.


1. Selection of Pilot area

2. Identification of landmarks and nodes

3. Identification of local landmarks.

4. Type of Signage feasible at each location identified.

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5. Identification of Content of the signage in each location

6. Design of Prototype for different types of signages.

Floor Mounted 52

Column mounted

Wall Mounted


BRANDING CAP

DIRECTION PANEL MOUNTING PIVOT MOUNTING POST

PANEL FRAMES

FLOOR ANCHOR PLATE

In order to seamlessly integrate the signage into Panajiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s context, the design of the prototype must aim to respect the design language of the city and avoid being a crass addition to the already cluttered environs. The system must be able to progressively disclose the information required instead of packing in too much or too little information at one location. The design is also obligated to respond to the evolving city and its needs.The prototype has been designed keeping in mind the fact that the needs of each of the locations,as well as the possible mounting scenarios vary from location to location. While some locations may offer ground space for installation, others may only offer surfaces like walls or columns. The actual orientation of the panels during installation also differs from place to place.

MODULARITY IN DESIGN

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Design and doodles


Mundane

08

Re-kindle, Re-new Product design


Re-kindle / ri:kInd(e)l/ Verb Begin to burn again. Re-kindle is a bollard made of mundane items- an old handmade khadi saree draped over two wooden beading frames tied together by a random pattern of cotton threads with a dull, soothing flame of light glowing inside. 56


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390 430

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EXISTING CHAIR

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460 505

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Re-new/ old? /rIâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;nju:/ Verb

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To give fresh life or strength to. A chair built out of a chair. An existing old chair is given a new perspective while keeping its original essence intact. Yet, the question to ponder over is that if the chair has had all its parts replaced, is it infact still the same chair?

480

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Musings

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Leaky Microns


TRAVEL DIARIES

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THE WINDOW STORIES

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THANK YOU.

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B.Arch Portfolio  

A collection of my architecture academic work. 2011-2016.

B.Arch Portfolio  

A collection of my architecture academic work. 2011-2016.

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