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KRITHIKA MOHAN L a n d s c a p e A r c h i t e c t u r e P o r t f o l i o 2 0 17

krithikam@outlook.com +1 (267)-678-8164


Landscape Architecture to me is the glue that ties different disciplines together. The works that inspire me bridge the gap between planning, stewardship and the human experience. Over the course of my studies, I have begun to view the built environment as a playground that merges different functions of a place into an integrated system.


KRITHIKA MOHAN

krithikam@outlook.com +1 (267)-678-8164

EDUCATION

COURSEWORK

Bachelor of Landscape Architecture

August 2013 - May 2018

Iowa State University Ames, IA

Transforming Schoolyards through Community Engagement & Design-Build Landscape Parametrics & Design Computing GPS & GIS for Mapping

Student Exchange Program

February-June 2017

University of Western Australia Perth, WA

SKILLS Photoshop

EXPERIENCE September 2017-May 2018 Research Intern Redefining Prison Environment, Iowa State University Assist with research, surveys and design development of ongoing projects. August-October 2016 & 2017 Peer Mentor Design Collaborative, Iowa State University Guided new students, facilitated orientation class and assisted with grading assignments.

Indesign

Rhinoceros

Illustrator

Grasshopper

ArcGIS

TerraSync

AutoCAD

Processing

LANGUAGES English (Proficient) Hindi (Indermediate)

aa

Tamil (Native) Marathi (Elementary)

CONFERENCES Student Panel September 19 2017 IA ASLA Fall 2017 Conference, Granger, IA Presented on interdisciplinary experience of “Outdoors and Wellness”

DESIGN COMPETITIONS October 2017 2018 Better Philadelphia Challenge Team Entry - Philadelphia’s Next Park+Way May 2016

SketchUp

Co-Author May 31-June 3 2017 EDRA 48 Madison, Madison, WI Contributed to Voices of Place: Empower, Engage, Energize

Land Art Generator Initiative Team Entry - LAGI Biennial Competition

Student Design Charrette November 11-14 2016 Healthcare Design EXPO Houston, TX Identified and addressed issues with accessibility to healthcare facilities

PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS Student ASLA Member

American Society of Landscape Architects

Student AILA Member

Australian Institute of Landscape Architects

LEADERSHIP President - SSLA IA Chapter

Student Society of Landscape Architecture Fall 2017- Spring 2018

Secretary - Design Council

ACHIEVEMENTS

College of Design Fall 2015- Fall 2017

Career Days Leadership Award College of Design Spring 2016

Dean’s List

College of Design Fall 2015, 2016 & 2017

INTERESTS Mixed Media Video Art

Microvolunteering Traveling

Fencing Dancing


CONTENTS

2 4 6

OUTDOOR ST(R)EAM PL AYSCAPE

PHIL ADELPHIA’S NEXT PARK-WAVE

OTHER WORK


COMMUNIT Y CARE CLINIC

THE KINGSTON EXPERIENCE

POCKETS OF RESTORATION

1 3 5


1

COMMUNITY CARE CLINIC AIA-AAH STERIS Student Design Charrette Healthcare Design Conference at Houston, Texas November 11-14 2016

The Challenge

Left to Right: Prof. Cameron Campbell, Yutao Hu, Catie McClurg, Richelle Reding, Krithika Mohan, Andrew Meyer and Prof. Jihyun Song.

Metro Lines Proposed Lines Existing Lines

Poverty >26% 10-26% <10%

Homeless Facilities

N

Accessibility to healthcare facilities is an important facet of urban outreach clinics. Texas Medical Center has program support for outpatient clinics, behavioral health clinics and minor procedure. However, they want to bridge the gap between the existing facilities and urban health of surrounding communities. The 48 hour student design charrette hosted by WHR Architects was held to envision “Transportation Health” for Memorial Hermann Health System. Iowa State University’s interdisciplinary team composed of students studying architecture, interior design, urban design and landscape architecture came up with an alternative solution in addition to proposing a support clinic close to a transportation hub.


Care Car- Reach Respond


ENTRY PLAZA

CHILDREN’S PLAY AREA

SENSORY GARDEN TRANSPORTATION HUB

The proposed design attempts to engage its surroundings through a dynamic pedestrian bridge and triage that connects to the transportation hub. The building’s form is juxtaposed through slices and movement to engage with the exterior.


CHILDREN’S PLAY AREA

SENSORY GARDEN

The exterior facade of the building wraps around the courtyards created by the slices. In addition to these spaces, we also proposed an entry plaza, children’s play area and a sensory garden to complement the interior spaces.

FLOOR 1

FLOOR 2


2

OUTDOOR ST(R)EAM PLAYSCAPE Transforming Schoolyards: Earlham Community Schools Collaborators: Casey Ludwig, Nicklas Olthoff, Jenna Niday, Yanni Yang, Bailey Aldridge Fall 2017

The Challenge Earlham Community Schools asked us to create design solutions through community engagement and develop a comprehensive master plan tailored towards STEM, environmental education and imaginative play. STEM is a curriculum framework that focuses on educating students in four specific disiplines: Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics. This framework creates a foundation for student learning through applied sciences, but excludes art education and imaginative play. Our challenge is to design for multi-generational play while supplementing the existing STEM and outdoor learning curriculum with hubs in three identified sites.

ADAPTIVE INNOVATIVE RESOURCEFUL

Streams weave and interact with one another before joining a body of water. We envision the Earlham Schoolyard to be a body of knowledge that begins and interacts with several streams. With the courtyard being a point of origin, the streams of learning whirl out to the community.

Naturalized Playscape

The Courtyard

Early Childhood Education

We propose adaptive, innovative and resourceful learning environments that promote ST(R)EAM education- Science, Technology, Reading, Engineering, Art and Mathematics.


The Intent The Masterplan for Earlham Schoolyard improvements aims to engage with Earlham Community School District stakeholders, including faculty, parents, community members, city officials, and most importantly, students. Through a series of community engagement meetings, facilitated by Bambi Yost and ISU students, design solutions will be derived from the feedback and ideas the group receives at each meeting. The intention of this process is to ensure that all ages of the Earlham community have a voice in the progression of this schoolyard project.

PRELIMINARY VISUALIZATION OF THE COURTYARD


1

5

2

4

1 Bioretention Basin & Stormwater Education 2 Bioswale & Prairie Discovery 3 Kickball Area

3

4 Outdoor Classroom 5 Adventure Play Mounds

Vision Statement To transform the outdoor learning spaces of Earlham Elementary school through adaptive, innovative and resourceful living systems.

Goals - Integrate ST(R)EAM education in the courtyard space of the Earlham Community School. - Encourage students, teachers and community members to engage in naturalized play. - Introduce stormwater practices in a fun and approachable way.

I

I P

Naturalized Playscape

I I I

The proposed playscape is meant to complement the existing playground while redirecting drainage. Eco-revelatory design strategies are adapted by designing the stormwater educational regions in layers. The playscape is envsioned as a discovery labyrinth that engages the outdoor space horizontally and vertically.

100

50

0

100 Feet

Section A-Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; reveals the grade change, some of the programming in the space, and spacial relation of this space with the school and N Chestnut Avenue from north to south.

Source: Esri, DigitalGlobe, GeoEye, Earthstar Geographics, CNES/Airbus DS, USDA, USGS, A


Playstructures embedded into the mounds can turn this site into a playful labyrinth that encourages children to explore their environment. These mounds would be graded with the existing site grade taken into consideration. The topsoil would be used from existing soil collected from on site construction. Prairie planting and the play mounds form the outdoor “rooms” that can be used for environmental education on seasonal play interest.

Plant List: Overstory: American Yellowwood, Cladrastis kentukea Serbian Spruce, Picea omorika

Understory: Witch-hazel, Hamamelis virginiana Shadblow Serviceberry, Amelanchier canadensis PJM Rhodedendron, Rhodedendron PJM

Perennial: Rose Milkweed, Asclepias incarnata Black-eyed Susan, Rudbeckia hirta Canada Wildrye, Elymus canadensis Purple Coneflower, Echinacea purpurea Sideoats Grama, Bouteloua curtipendula Smooth Blue Aster, Symphyotrichum laeve

Ground Cover: Scotch Moss, Sagina subulata ‘Aurea’ Periwinkle, Vinca minor


3

THE KINSTON EXPERIENCE Parking & Connections Kingston Village, Cedar Rapids Collaborator: Dewayne Goldmon Fall 2016

The Challenge Following the flood in 2008, a series of planning documents have been prepared by the city of Cedar Rapids and their partners for future development. These documents include the 2008 Redevelopment Plan, 2009 Architectural Reconnaisance Plan, 2013 Kingston Village Plan, 2014 Concept Plan for Cedar Rapids Greenways, 2015 Flood Control Plan, 2016 Mt Vernon Plans and 2016 Envision Cedar Rapids documents. Most of these documents were created in reaction to the 2008 flood, hence, some of the history of the city is lost among the efforts. Until the Envision Cedar Rapids document was prepared, most of the efforts were focused on downtown Cedar Rapids. This neglects neighboring communities across the river.

2008 FLOOD MAP

Kingston Village needs proactive planning specific Floodmap

to the neighborhood and designed at the human scale. This project envisions parts of the Kingston neighborhood as it would be experienced by a pedestrian. It also works towards establishing an identity for Kingston Village and a strong bond between their districts and those of downtown Cedar Rapids.

PARKING AND CIRCULATION

Parking & Connections Urban form


LEGEND POINTS OF INTEREST EXISTING PARKING 5 MINUTE WALK RADIUS

0’

200’

400’

800’

By mapping the five minute walking distances and bus routes, we were able to establish our areas of interests. We observed vehicular frequency at first, second and third avenue to establish street hierarchy. First avenue remains as the major vehicular access through the neighborhood. Parts of the second avenue is envisioned as a pedestrian mall. Third avenue is envisioned as a cultural district that connects Kingston Village to Cedar Rapids.

LEGEND POINTS OF INTEREST PROPOSED PEDESTRIAN ACCESS VEGETATIVE BUFFER PROPOSED BIOSWALE

0’

200’

400’

800’


LEGEND NO PARKING ZONE PEDESTRIAN BIKE

0’

100’

200’

400’

RD

3

AVENUE STRATEGIG PLAN


Kingston Village is envisioned as a greater part of Cedar Rapids rather than just a community needing revival. With successful neighborhoods such as NewBo and Czech Village in the vicinity, there is a need to come up with design solutions that integrate and complement the context while redefining Kingston Village as a neighborhood. The third avenue plan establishes pedestrian hierarchy through this neighborhood while preserving its history and culture. These series of sections uses the complete streets policy and existing transportation routes to propose pedestrian interventions that use tactical urbanism.


4

PHILADELPHIAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S NEXT PARK-WAVE EXISTING COMBINED SEWER AREA

SCHUYLKILL RIVER WATERSHED

BEN FRANKLIN PARKWAY

DELAWARE DIRECT WATERSHED

VERTICAL

GARDEN S

PACES

SCULPTURAL GATEW AYS

FOOD TRUCKS

REVEAL WATERWAYS

EXISTING SEWERAGE

OVERFLOW FROM RAIN GARDEN


Better Philadelphia Challenge 2018- Team Entry Collaborators: Shan He, Xinman Liu & Eric Lawrence Fall 2017

PROPOSED BIKE ROUTES

POP-UP GARDEN

GREEN MEDIAN Reimaging the streetscape for Lehigh avenue STORMWATER DRAIN


5

POCKETS OF RESTORATION Therapeutic Gardens for Correctional Officers Collaborators: Maria Novacek & Jessica Wordel Fall 2016

Purpose Correctional officers experience a high level of physical stress and emotional fatigue during their shifts every day. They are required to be constantly alert in a bleak environment during eight hour shifts every day. The recent staff suicide rates have increased considerably and has stirred a change in the Iowa Department of Corrections to take better care of their employees. The purpose of this project is to explore contemporary issues related to workplace stress and develop landscape design interventions that apply several techniques used to cope with that stress. This project focuses on improving the experience of working in Iowa Medical and Classification Center by proposing nature-based interaction within the facility. Issues with safety, maintenance and accessibility are the key challenges identified and addressed through the following research questionIn what ways can therapeutic gardens alleviate work stress levels in correctional environments? Observations made through field trips to the site and survey data collection inform the design interventions in this project. Site investigation and research done in collaboration with graduate students and faculty in the Department of Occupational Therapy from Western Michigan University was used to develop the design proposal discussed in this project.

EXISTING GARDEN Outside the fence

SMOKING AREA Outside the fence MAIN ACCESS Single Entry

MEDICAL FACILITY Staff and Offenders

ENCLOSED AREA Partially private

MAIN ROOFTOP Private

ROOFTOP Indirect access

Jigsawed units connected by corridors make this site very challenging. While the facility has yard and recreation spaces, the staff do not get the opportunity to use anything outdoors. IMCC gets about 150 visitors visitors per week, and the staff faces a lot of inconsistency as people transfer frequently. The medical facility in turn faces the repurcussions as the number of special needs offenders grows everyday. Single access into the facility is a huge challenge for this site, but several opportunities as seen here could make the proposed design a reality.


WHY ROOFTOP? As offenders have limited to no access to the rooftop, it provides a great opportunity for officers to get some privacy. The rooftop design heavily focuses on the concept of prospect-refuge theory by providing movable seating that can be used for outdoor gatherings or quiet afternoon breaks in solitude. The fluid nature of this design makes the site programming fairly open-ended and easy to merge.

VISUAL BUFFER

ADMINISTRATION & VISITORS

AUDIO BUFFER

We generated few questions for the staff at Iowa Medical and Classification Center to get a better understanding of their daily needs and stress levels. Some of these questions directly address various potential barriers, and we hope to get an insight of their view of a therapeutic garden in a workplace.

TIME OUTSIDE

Iowa Medical & Classification Center Oakdale (Johnston County) Medium Security

Gathering

Correctional Facilities Cities 918 Offenders

OFFENDER - STAFF RATIO December 2016 938 Capacity

Current count

Resting area

12

DAILY STATISTICS

585

0

Medical/Segregation

565 Staff

108

Oakdale Forensic Psychiatric Hospital

25

15 December 2016

384 233

190

Others

STAFF DEMOGRAPHICS

Resting area Water features that create â&#x20AC;&#x153;roomsâ&#x20AC;?

Prefer not to respond

Male

Female

56-65 years

46-55 years

36-45 years

14 26-35 years

18-25 years

53

The primary reason for a rooftop design is accessibility. Our observations suggest that officers and staff get fifteen minute breaks during their shifts. Creating a rooftop garden at the main building would provide an opportunity to spend time outside.

65+ years

Entrance

279


6 Moving landscape {Processing code} Water flow1; Water flow2; Water flow3; Water flow4; Water flow5; Water flow6; //Declare six objects float x; float y; float a = 100; int B; //Declare variables void setup () { size (1600, 900); colorMode(HSB, 100, 100, 100); //Changing HSB ranges for this program B = color(180, 10, 50); //Assigning background color //Construct water ripple objects flow1 = new Water(color(0), 100, 900, 3); flow2 = new Water(color(0), 150, 850, 6); flow3 = new Water(color(0), 200, 800, 10); flow4 = new Water(color(0), 100, 750, 12); flow5 = new Water(color(0), 100, 650, 16); flow6 = new Water(color(0), 100, 600, 20); } void draw () { background(B); //Run water ripples flow1.move(); flow1.display(); flow2.move(); flow2.display(); flow3.move(); flow3.display(); flow4.move(); flow4.display(); flow5.move(); flow5.display(); flow6.move(); flow6.display(); //Moving Moon Loop fill(100); ellipse(a, 100, 100, 100); a++; if (a > width) { a = 0; } } //Define Class Water class Water { color c; float xpos; float ypos; float xspeed; Water(color tempC, float tempXpos, float tempYpos, float tempXspeed) { c = tempC; xpos = tempXpos; ypos = tempYpos; xspeed = tempXspeed; } //Static water void display() { //Shadows stroke(0); fill(0); ellipseMode (CENTER); ellipse (xpos, ypos, 7500, 100); //Lighter toned water stroke(70); fill(70); ellipse (xpos, ypos, 2500, 100); } //Dynamic water void move() { xpos = xpos + xspeed; if (xpos > width) { xpos = 0; } } }

OTHER WORK Programming is a powerful tool for landscape architecture! I began learning to code on Processing last year and have started to work on HTML, CSS and Javascript. I am also experimenting with Grasshopper for Rhino. The following is one of my explorations on Processing-


This mixed-media exploration was created using recycled paper, cardboard and fabric. It was showcased at the Biorenewables Reseach Lab for the 2016 ISU Biorenewables Art Competition.

Ephemeral Gesture The landscape around us is ephemeral. Human impact is comparable to the seasonal shift seen in nature. As citizens of various ecosystems, it is our responsibility to care for our surroundings. While we live in a resilient environment, we need to monitor our short term and long term impacts in the natural and built environment. This mixed media piece is intended to evoke a sense of mystery for our frequently neglected environments- edges. A creative site analysis of the ISU cemetery led to a greater understanding of the edges and buffers between man and nature. The â&#x20AC;&#x153;white woodsâ&#x20AC;? seen in this piece is the threshold of change. How we treat the edges and their layers may make or break the health of our ecosystems. Multiple layers in this piece is a symbol of how we can work with nature to revive our neglected environments using our resources responsibly.


Nebinger School Design-build ISU students and students from George W. Nebinger at Philadephia built this outdoor classroom in a day. This started a series of community led design-build projects at the school.


Landscape Architecture Portfolio 2017 - Krithika Mohan  
Landscape Architecture Portfolio 2017 - Krithika Mohan  
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