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COULD PERSONAL RAPID TRANSIT BE COMING TO THE UPSTATE? Heated debate over Paris Mt. development PAGE 14

SEE UPSTATE BUSINESS JOURNAL INSIDE

GREENVILLEJOURNAL GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM • Friday, April 5, 2013 • Vol.15, No.14

WATER &

POWER Fifth-grader works to make a difference PAGE 15

‘Peter Pan’ takes flight at Woodmont PAGE 27

While Duke Energy continues its effort to relicense Lakes Keowee and Jocassee, community stakeholders want their voices heard PAGE 8

GREG BECKNER / STAFF

A couple paddles the waters of Lake Jocassee in the mountains of upstate South Carolina.

Children ages 3-14 are invited to join us for all kinds of fun as they learn about animals! We have several different themes this year so your child can experience more! *An extended stay and play option is available! Camps begin on June 10, 2013. For more information call 864-467-4850 or visit us at www.greenvillezoo.com


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Despite what you may have heard about lending in today’s unstable financial environment, the credit union continues to lend responsibly. As your not-for-profit alternative to banks, Greenville Federal Credit Union offers low loan rate services.

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42˚ A storm system will leave our “area just in time for the weekend

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Worth Repeating They Said It Quote of the week

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Ben Turetzky, executive director of the Friends of Lake Keowee, on Duke Energy’s relicensing drive for Lakes Keowee and Jocassee.

“Those people have been snakebit one time.” County Councilman Sid Cates on the residents of Paris Mountain, who are expressing concern over a new condo complex after being plagued by wastewater issues caused by a previous development.

“This time, it will be much darker, much more complex, much more frightening, much more grounded in reality. If Neverland is a dream, he’s a nightmare.” “It’s obvious kids can make a difference. Kids can do anything an adult can do.” Stone Academy fifth-grader Rachel Kaup, founder of the “Make the World a Better Place Club.”

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Actor and director Will Ragland on his new approach to playing Captain Hook in “Peter Pan,” his second time in the role.

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Brings Bladeless Cataract Surgery to Spartanburg! The surgeons of Palmetto Eye & Laser Center are excited to introduce the state-of-art, FDA approved, LenSX laser to Spartanburg for precise, customized, and BLADELESS cataract surgery. If you have cataracts, now is the best time in history to have them removed. We offer premium, customized and LASER OPTIMIZED cataract procedures for our patients including the latest in lens implant technology. With these enhanced procedures many patients experience the best vision of their lives following cataract surgery. If you are ready to put your cataracts behind you, now is the time to see one of our highly skilled surgeons to discuss BLADELESS LASER OPTIMIZED CATARACT SURGERY. Don’t Let Cataracts Slow You Down! Call today for an appointment.

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JOURNAL NEWS

Zoo master plan nearly complete

Martha Franks Baptist Retirement Community Laurens, South Carolina

Study shows zoo has $9.4 million annual economic impact

We Made A Great "I'm Glad MyChoice! Mom Now Your Turn! Is It’s Secure!"

By CINDY LANDRUM | staff CINDY LANDRUM / STAFF

Lions and tigers and bears, oh my. And all of those will be in the Greenville Zoo collection, according to a new master plan that should be approved by June. Consultants have said the plan could cost $60 million to implement and take at least 10 years to implement. “We want to be smart about it,” said Elizabeth Geer, chairwoman of the board of Friends of the Zoo, a nonprofit organization focused on supporting the Greenville Zoo. Friends of the Zoo is close to hiring a consultant to complete a feasibility study and plan for phased fundraising for the zoo improvements, Geer said. A study completed by Clemson University’s Strom Thurmond Institute put the zoo’s local economic impact at $9.4 million per year. According to the study, commissioned

by Friends of the Greenville Zoo, yearly attendance is between 250,000 and 300,000 visitors. The study said the zoo resulted in approximately 151 jobs within its market. “I think that surprised a lot of people,” Geer said. “We’ve been the little zoo for so long.” The zoo’s impact on the county’s economy from 2012 to 2025 is projected to average $11.3 million and 193 jobs. The study calculated that the zoo will result in $4.2 million in aggregated disposable household income each year and that local governments would

average $573,000 per year in net revenue. The proposed master plan includes an open-air tiger exhibit with a training wall and glass viewing area, a new entrance plaza, a new educational facility, a native Blue Ridge section with black bear, red wolf, otter, eagles, fox, wild turkey and other species, as well as a tropical rainforest indoor exhibit and an aquarium with penguins, a new restaurant and an expanded orangutan area. Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.

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Do your kids a favor. You checked for monsters under her bed, sent her to the best school and helped her buy her first car. Now, do her one more favor… Making funeral, cemetery or cremation plans in advance is truly a gift to those you leave behind. Your children won’t need to guess what you would have wanted or worry about many expenses at a difficult time.

CELEBRATE EARTH DAY with the City of Greenville

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The City of Greenville will host a phone book drive at the North Greenville Recycling & Education Center (514 Rutherford Road) on Monday, April 22 from 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. We’ll have refreshments, giveaways and information about our recycling programs and events, so drop off your old phone book(s) and celebrate Earth Day with us!

Call (866) 948-PLAN (7526) or visit FourStepPlan.com.

City of Greenville Public Works 360 S. Hudson St., Greenville 29601 For more info: recycle.greenvillesc.gov J33

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APRIL 5, 2013 |12/14/12 THE JOURNAL 11:51 AM5


JOURNAL NEWS

OPINION VOICES FROM YOUR COMMUNITY, HEARD HERE

FROM THE EDITORIAL DESK

A test of leadership Legislators face a troubling message in the news that barely a third of eligible state taxpayers signed on for the free year of credit monitoring that formed the state’s first response to last fall’s unprecedented security breach at the Department of Revenue. Some taxpayers may have chosen to arm themselves privately against the cyberthieves who pulled off the largest hacking of a state agency in national history. But it’s reasonable to assume those who let Sunday’s deadline pass remain unprotected against the day thieves cash in – as they inevitably will – on the unencrypted data pilfered so easily from DOR servers. The sum of what they stole remains staggering: 3.8 million Social Security numbers, 387,000 credit and debit card numbers and 657,000 business tax filings – all because one DOR staffer clicked a link in a phishing email. That click triggered malware that allowed hackers to happily plunder 44 DOR computer systems for four weeks before the Secret Service discovered the breach and alerted the state. Expert investigations and multiple legislative hearings have explored how the hackers could enjoy that month of fun undetected. The answer – state agencies permitted to handle cybersecurity as seriously (or cavalierly) as they pleased – has concentrated the state’s leadership on the need for reform. That’s the good news. The bad news is the mounting cost. The Associated Press recently compiled just a partial list of what the state has managed to spend – and accomplish – so far. Six months post-hacking, the cleanup has cost $25 million and counting, the news service found. The single largest bill – $12 million – went to Experian for the free year of credit monitoring. Computer expert Mandiant Corp. received $840,000 to investigate the breach and how to plug the hole. The solution – encrypted data and a two-password login system – is now in progress at DOR. The dual login was installed in January ($12,000), and encryption should be completed late this month ($4 million). Meanwhile, a Raleigh company just began a three-year, agency-by-agency assessment of state computer systems that will cost the state $3 million, the AP said. Its first report is due May 1. Legislatively, a bill moving through the Senate would centralize computer security duties across state government and extend free credit monitoring by up to a decade. The bill creates an identity theft unit and various oversight committees of unknown cost. Meanwhile, the proposed House budget sets aside $25 million to cover various cybersecurity improvements and at least one more year of credit monitoring. Whatever the Legislature finally approves is only a “down payment on a long process,” said Senate Finance Committee Chairman Hugh Leatherman. He’s right. But that process also requires a culture shift on which every other change depends – which is why this AP interview with new DOR director Bill Blume is so disturbing. Since his arrival in January, DOR staff has been trained to recognize phishing emails and given strict protocols to avoid them, Blume told AP reporter Seanna Adcox. Despite that, 14 staffers have been disciplined to date – including unpaid suspensions and layoffs – for continuing to click on malicious links. As Blume recognizes, the only possible response to such baffling indifference is job loss. Governmental carelessness has already put South Carolina taxpayers at a lifetime risk of identity theft. Ensuring the culture change necessary to prevent anything like it from ever happening again is a test of leadership for every agency head and officeholder in this state.

An equal-opportunity epidemic Each day in my practice, I counsel patients about their weight and the chronic diseases that are associated with being overweight.  Only a small percentage of my patients take immediate action by eating healthier, exercising more frequently and generally taking more control of their lives. The results are often not rapid and may often require many office visits. Obesity is at epidemic proportions in our community. Three out of five adults in S.C. are overweight or obese. In 2000, approximately 55.8 percent of whites in S.C. were overweight or obese while minorities accounted for rates as high as 72.3 percent. In 2010, 64.1 percent of whites were overweight or obese compared to nearly 75.7 percent of African Americans. But – by working together and taking small steps – we can truly make changes on an individual, family and even community-wide level. To help fight the enemy, you have to know the enemy – that’s why, as a physician, I’m thrilled that this month’s Greenville Health System Minority Health Summit will focus on the topic of obesity and what we can do to fight it. The seventh annual Minority Health Summit will be Saturday, April 13, at the BI-LO Center from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. This year’s keynote speakers include Dr. Benjamin Carson, a renowned pediatric neurosurgeon; Cullen Jones, an Olympic gold medalist swimmer; and Dr. Ann Kulze, a wellness and nutrition expert. Weight is a very difficult and very sensitive topic to discuss. It’s usually the product of a lifetime of unhealthy habits that are often very difficult for some to correct. As a physician, my goal is to educate my patients about the health risks associated with increased weight as well as focus on strategies to aid in weight reduction. Obesity has a direct  effect on overall health.  It increases the risk of high blood pressure, diabetes, elevated cholesterol, heart disease, stroke and cancers like breast, colon and prostate. Individuals who are obese have 60 percent higher odds of arthritis, 90 percent higher odds of heart disease, 5.6 times the odds of developing diabetes and 40 percent higher odds of heart attack. We also are seeing similar health issues in children who are overweight. Current studies

IN MY OWN WORDS by DANA RAY, M.D.

suggest  that  the current generation of children will be the first in our country’s history to actually live fewer years than their parents. Obesity also has a tremendous economic impact locally and nationally. In 2000, the total cost of obesity in the U.S. was over $100 billion. In 2003, obesity-related health cost for adults in S.C. totaled over $1 billion. Over half of this was paid by tax dollars through Medicare and Medicaid. It is estimated that within five to six years, the treatment of obesity-related health issues may cost our state over $5 billion. But it doesn’t have to be that way. The fight against obesity and its longterm effects begins with education, proper nutrition and physical activity. Increase your daily consumption of vegetables, fruits and lean proteins. Decrease your daily intake of foods that are high in fats and carbohydrates.  Increase routine physical activities. Individuals need to strive for 1½ to 2½ hours per week of physical activity that may include such activities as walking, yard work, weight training, swimming or biking.  Work with your doctor to determine a weight-loss goal, to set some calorie parameters and to plan an appropriate exercise program. In order to improve the overall health of our community, we all have to do a little more. This is our goal for Greenville. We challenge the people of this great city to be the leaders of our state and of our nation in this fight against obesity. Programs such as the Minority Health Summit are instrumental in achieving this goal. Dana Ray, M.D., is an internal medicine physician with Greenville Health System’s Cypress Internal MedicinePatewood. He is board certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine. His interests are cardiovascular disease, hypertension and diabetes. For more information, visit ghs.org or cypressinternalmedicine.com.

IN MY OWN WORDS FEATURES ESSAYS BY RESIDENTS WITH PARTICULAR EXPERTISE WHO WANT TO TELL READERS ABOUT ISSUES IMPORTANT TO THEM. THE JOURNAL ALSO WELCOMES LETTERS TO THE EDITOR (MAXIMUM LENGTH OF 200 WORDS). PLEASE INCLUDE ADDRESS AND DAYTIME PHONE NUMBER. ALL LETTERS WILL BE CONFIRMED BEFORE PUBLICATION. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO EDIT ALL LETTERS FOR LENGTH. PLEASE CONTACT EXECUTIVE EDITOR SUSAN SIMMONS AT SSIMMONS@GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM.

6 THE JOURNAL | APRIL 5, 2013


JOURNAL NEWS

OPINION VOICES FROM YOUR COMMUNITY, HEARD HERE

Health Events JONATHAN MILLER / CONTRIBUTING

Reasons for Blurred Vision Wed., April 10 • Noon-1 p.m. • GHS Life Center® Join Catherine Baston, MD, of GHS’ Carolina’s Eye Care to learn causes of blurred vision. Lunch provided. Free; registration required. Minority Health Summit Sat., April 13 • 11 a.m.-2 p.m. • BI-LO Center Speakers include renowned pediatric neurosurgeon Benjamin Carson, MD; U.S. Olympic swimmer Cullen Jones; and nutrition/wellness expert “Dr. Ann.” Free; registration required. Parking is $5. Food available for purchase.

Dear Editor, I enjoyed Cindy Landrum’s article in the March 15 Greenville Journal (“Parking problem?”), as I have been one of those circling the block for a parking place on Main Street. However, my aggravation with parking has to do with event pricing. I really resent the fact that garages around event sites jack up their prices to $10. When I have paid $50-$100 for a ticket, it is very annoying to be gouged for parking when that same space is inexpensive normally. I go to the Peace Center regularly and usually park in the River Street parking area instead of the garage across the street from the Peace Center. All of this leaves a bad taste for parking in the garages any time. Thanks for the great articles in the Greenville Journal – a must-read every week.

The Facts About Blood Cancers Tues., April 16 • 12:15-1:15 p.m. • Patewood Medical Campus Learn who is at risk for blood cancers as well as signs and treatments from GHS oncologist Suzanne Fanning, DO. Lunch provided. Free; registration required. Oral Cancers Screening Fri., April 19 • 1-4 p.m. • Patewood Medical Campus GHS’ Greenville ENT is hosting a free screening for oral cancers. Registration required; call 454-4368. Living Well With Parkinson’s Disease Summit Sat., May 4 • 9 a.m.-noon • Hilton Greenville This event offers education and support for those living with Parkinson’s disease and their caregivers. Free; registration required.

C. Barnett Simpsonville

Don’t Have a Stroke Tues., May 7 • Noon-1 p.m. • Caine Halter Y Find out who is at risk for stroke as well as signs and treatments from GHS neurologist Gregory Gardziola, DO. Lunch provided. Free; registration required. To register, for more information or to see a full schedule of events, please visit ghs.org/healthevents or call 1-877-GHS-INFO (447-4636).

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JOURNAL NEWS

Duke continues lake relicensing drive Community stakeholders weigh in on drought levels, conservation concerns for Lakes Keowee and Jocassee By CHARLES SOWELL | staff

Duke Energy is entering the home stretch in their relicensing drive for Lakes Keowee and Jocassee, a huge undertaking that has lasted from the summer of 2009 to date. March 11, 2011, was the official kickoff of the process with the filing of the Notice of Intent and Pre-Application Document with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. What will come out of the process within weeks is an agreement-inprinciple that will define the relationship of Duke and stakeholders. FERC granted the Keowee-Toxaway Project a 50-year license in 1966 that expires in 2016. The application for the new license, which would be granted for 30-50 years, is due with FERC in August 2014. “A diverse stakeholder group like this brings diverse priorities and opinions,” said Erin Culbert, a Duke spokeswoman. “The agreement-in-principle will not be ideal for all stakeholders, including Duke Energy, which is exactly the point. However, the stakeholder team’s agreement will be the best possible outcome to balance all these interests and to locally shape what’s in the new federal license.” CONCERNS FLOW BEYOND MOUNTAINS

The Keowee/Jocassee projects are nestled in the mountainous northwest corner of the state. They are best known for their roles in Duke’s electricity generation with 868 megawatts of hydro capacity, not including the capacity of Oconee Nuclear Station, a tremendous 2,538 megawatts. The three-reactor plant would not exist were it not for the lakes, which supply cooling water for the reactors. Keowee is artificially kept near full pool during drought periods to ensure cooling, and Jocassee is often pulled down as much as 30 feet to keep Keowee nearly bank full. Five feet is as much as that lake may be lowered due to Nuclear Regulatory Commission fiat. Water issues raised in the relicensing process have reach far beyond the mountains. Lake Keowee provides about half the water supply to the Greenville Water System; Pickens County depends on Keowee for a significant portion of its water, as do

8 THE JOURNAL | APRIL 5, 2013

various small towns in the area. Outflow from Keowee feeds the Seneca River that, with the Tugaloo River of Georgia, joins together to form the mighty Savannah River in Lake Hartwell. The Savannah River is one of the largest and longest rivers in the East. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has three huge reservoirs along the river. Each virtually laps at the feet of the others’ dams. Hartwell, the largest Corps lake, comes within a few hundred yards of the Keowee dam and the Oconee Nuclear Station. “During the height of the recent series of droughts, the city of Savannah and county water systems along the coast came within a whisker of being shut down because of salt water intrusion due to low flow in the river,” said Wes Cooler, who represents the South Carolina Wildlife Federation in talks with Duke over the relicensing. Cooler is prohibited from discussing the issues he advocates with Duke in any detail. SEEKING MIDDLE GROUND

Ben Turetzky, executive director of the Friends of Lake Keowee, who represents homeowners along the lake’s boundary, said, “Nothing is settled in this until everything is settled.” That is to say that until the stakeholders representing more than 30 groups and associations sign off on Duke’s mediation offers and the power company also signs – nothing is set. The signing-off process will start during the next few months, with pencils down on proposals coming in the fall. There will be a stakeholder team open house on May 22 from 4 until 8 p.m. at the Clemson University Maddren Center, where the public can learn more about the contents of the non-binding

“Nothing is settled in this until everything is settled.” Ben Turetzky, executive director of the Friends of Lake Keowee

PHOTOS BY GREG BECKNER / STAFF

A bass boat passes by homes on the shore of Lake Keowee. (Below) The waters of Lake Jocassee in the mountains of upstate South Carolina.

agreement-in-principle. When that happens, everyone will know what Duke will agree to and what the company will be willing to furnish in the way of land, agreements and money. It is a big deal for the stakeholders. Turetzky, for example, hopes to find a middle ground on the drought lake level for Keowee. Duke has plans to draw the lake down by as much as 10 feet during prolonged drought. Before that can happen, Duke will have to rework the cooling water intakes for the nuclear plant and get the OK from the NRC. Keowee lakeside property owners don’t relish the thought of high and dry boat docks and restrictions on water withdrawals. The lake is home to some of the most exclusive communities in the region. It is a millionaire’s lake, with two Cliffs communities and several others with astronomical home prices. “We’d also like to see something done

to preserve the islands in the lake,” Turetzky said. “No one is really sure of what can be done, but they are a scenic wonder and one of the best features of that body of water.” NINE TIMES TRACT AT STAKE

One of the biggest winners in negotiations with Duke might well be the conservation community, Cooler and Turetzky agreed. “There is a pretty good chance that Upstate Forever could get the Nine Times Tract,” Turetzky said. Nine Times is split into two parcels of land. The southern side is held by The Nature Conservancy, which acquired the 500-acre property from Duke before the Great Recession. The 1,600-acre northern side of the property is one of the crown jewels of the mountains; the last large undeveloped stretch of land left in the area after the state Department of Natural Resources


JOURNAL NEWS

“The agreement will not be ideal for all stakeholders, including Duke Energy, which is exactly the point. However, the stakeholder team’s agreement will be the best possible outcome to balance all these interests.”

Physician News

Duke spokeswoman Erin Culbert

JAZZ& WINE

purchased the 33,000-acre Jocassee Gorges for $54 million from Duke in 1997. “If they could get that part of Nine Times into a conservation easement, it would be tremendous,” Cooler said. “The place is a wonderful bear habitat and home to many rare and endangered plant species. By combining with other public lands in the area, it would make a natural migration route for black bears coming out of the gorges.”

Nine Times is also part of the Lake Keowee watershed, although it does not touch on the lake. At this time of year, Nine Times is beginning to display plants like the faded trillium (Trillium discolor), which exists only in the Keowee basin and at Stevens Creek Heritage Preserve on the McCormick/Edgefield County line. Contact Charles Sowell at csowell@communityjournals.com.

FRIDAY, APRIL 26 at the TD Stage at the Peace Center Tickets are $60 per adult ($65 at the door) $30 per person for students (21 and older); seniors (60 and over); and military* * IDs will be checked at the door. Each ticket includes appetizers, food & wine tastings, dessert tasting (from 6-8 pm), and live jazz (from 6:30-10 pm). After 8 pm, a cash bar and cash food concessions will be open. Ticket locations: The Ronald McDonald House, Horizon Records and Divine Desserts by Andrea.

reedyriverjazzandwinefestival.org SPECIAL THANKS TO OUR SPONSORS

 CertusBank  GSA Coop  Larkin’s on the River  TOWN Magazine  Charter Media  Acumen IT  Marchant Company  Red Hype  Impact pbs  The Preserve at Verdae  Calicaro Wines  Schreiber Wines  Heather Burgess Photography  Indexx Printing  Taylors Window & Screen  Divine Desserts by Andrea  Palmcrest Distributors  Southern Wine & Spirits  Country Vintner  Henderson Gallery  Six & Twenty Distillery Contact the Ronald McDonald House for sponsorship opportunities.

GHS welcomes these new doctors & sites! Midwifery (New Site & Staff) Barbara Davenport, CNM Greenville Midwifery Care 35 Medical Ridge Dr. Greenville, 455-1600 Orthopaedic Surgery C. Curtis Elliott, MD Steadman Hawkins Clinic of the Carolinas–Medical Center Powdersville Greenville, 631-2799 (in collaboration with Baptist Easley)

Pediatrics K. Ford Shippey III, MD, MS Sleep Medicine/Center for Pediatric Sleep Disorders Greenville, 454-5660 Spartanburg, 573-8732 Psychiatry J. David Moore, MD The Brownell Center Greenville, 455-8431

NEW OFFICE SITES Hand Surgery Steadman Hawkins Clinic of the Carolinas 6 Doctors Drive Greenville, 797-7300 Pediatric Gastroenterology Pediatric Sleep Medicine 1650 Skylyn Dr., Ste. 240 Spartanburg, 573-8732 Surgical Specialists–Anderson This new office at 105 Broadbent Way houses these GHS offices: • Bariatric Surgery, 226-2290 • Colon & Rectal Surgery, 226-2290 Surgical Specialists–Greenwood This office at 105 Vinecrest Ct. houses these GHS offices: • Bariatric Surgery, 227-8932 • Breast Health, 227-8932 • Endovascular/Vascular Surgery, 227-8932

Vascular Surgery John Eidt, MD Vascular Health Alliance Greenville, 454-VASC (8272) Proceeds will benefit

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APRIL 5, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 9


JOURNAL NEWS

ENVISION SC PRESENTS: JUDGE ALEX SANDERS “We have the greatest generation of students now in our schools if we just don’t stifle them or fail to educate them.” – Judge Alex Sanders Judge Alex Sanders can literally cover all bases. He’s a former chief judge of the South Carolina Appeals Court, a past president of the College of Charleston, co-founder of the Charleston School

ABOUT ALEX SANDERS HOMETOWN: Columbia, S.C. EDUCATION: B.S., University of South Carolina; LLM., University of Virginia; J.D. University of South Carolina School of Law OCCUPATION: Lawyer (retired), professor, essayist OTHER NOTABLES: Former chief judge of South Carolina Court of Appeals, 19th president of College of Charleston, co-founder and chairman of the board of Charleston School of Law, noted baseball enthusiast. WEBSITE: polisci.cofc.edu/about/facultystaff-listing/sanders-alex.php

of Law and its current chairman of the board. He is also a noted lecturer, documentary film producer, and, if that wasn’t enough, a baseball essayist, who’s even been invited to Cooperstown to read some of his work. Between his juggling acts of responsibilities, Judge Sanders gladly sat down with the College of Charleston’s own Dr. Brian McGee to discuss, among many things, his complex relationship with South Carolina, his vision for the state, and what he believes South Carolina must address in order to reach its desired levels of success. MCGEE: As you look back at South Carolina over the last 30 years, what striking changes have you seen in the state? JUDGE SANDERS: Unfortunately, precious few. Of course there have been superficial changes. We make more money. We have taller buildings. Our race relations no

longer deteriorate to confrontations in the street; although that may be right around the corner. The progress in that area, sometimes I think is entirely superficial. There’s a Sanders long way to go to truly socially integrate South Carolina and to make real progress economically and culturally. Do you see that progress being interrelated in that we have to make progress in terms of race relations and diversity in order to make economic gains for all of our citizens? Yes, but there’s more to it than that. What we all strive for is a livable society, right? And that means fairness. And in terms of economic progress, what we lack – what we woefully lack and no one

can dispute – is schools. Education is the engine for progress and South Carolina is woefully deficient in that area. From public education to the institutions of higher education. And it is a sad thing to observe, particularly if you do love South Carolina. Just compare us to the progress of North Carolina, Georgia; there isn’t any reason why we can’t be equal to those states, but we are not. As much as we would like to say that we are, we are not. For example, where is the Charlotte for South Carolina? Where is the Atlanta? Compare the schools of those two states to South Carolina. And even those schools in the area of public education are not paradigms of virtue, but they’re so far superior to South Carolina, they’re not even comparable. We don’t have a University of North Carolina. Or a Duke. Or even a University of Georgia. Or an Emory. We just don’t have them. You’ve been a higher education leader for years. You helped to grow the

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JOURNAL NEWS College of Charleston; to make the College of Charleston a prominent, nationally ranked institution. You’ve been a force of progress in this area. Where do you think we need to go with higher education in order to get the same kind of achievements they have in Georgia and North Carolina? Well, we need two things. One is we need money and the other is we need imagination, and we’ve been lacking in both. You referred to the fact that the college grew when I was president. Actually, that was the least of what I tried to do. It grew of its own. … But the college still needs to be recognized by the people of South Carolina as worthy of financial support – adequate financial support. For our students coming into our colleges and universities, what advice would you give them? I would advise these students to stay in South Carolina. There’s more to accomplish here than there is in many other places, though it may require a little more work here than other places. Exercise that imagination. Try not to do what we’ve always done. We know that education is impor-

tant to you. What else do we need to do to make South Carolina the “World-Class” state in every important aspect so that we’re not looking up at other states and other states are following our lead? Get on the right side of history for a change. Want to elaborate on that? Take down the Confederate flag and take it out of our heads. Move forward instead of backwards. Dr. Brian McGee is chief of staff and senior policy advisor in the office of the president of the College of Charleston. McGee previously served as chair of the college’s department of communication. He is a professor of communication and a faculty associate in the women’s and gender studies program at the College of Charleston, where he has been a faculty member since 2004.

What’s Right in Health Care Innovative Peace House Opens The Peace House, a hospitality home for patients and families in extended therapy at GHS’ Roger C. Peace Rehabilitation Hospital, opened in March. The Peace House serves residents who live outside a 25-mile radius from Roger C. Peace along with wounded veterans who require ongoing rehabilitation services. To learn more, visit peacehouseproject.org. Research Accreditation GHS has received full five-year accreditation by the Association for the Accreditation of Human Research Protection Programs, Inc., a global group that serves as the “gold seal” for high-quality standards in research programs. GHS offers 670+ clinical trials—more than any other healthcare system in S.C.—including several first-in-human trials through its Institute for Translational Oncology Research. Healthcare Organization of the Month GHS’ Patewood Memorial Hospital was named April 2013 Healthcare Organization of the Month by Studer Group, which implements evidencebased leadership systems to help organizations produce outstanding results. This national award is presented monthly to an organization that stands out from its peers and is an example of what is right in health care. Quality Awards for Spine Surgery and Hip/Knee Replacements BlueCross BlueShield of SC recognized GHS’ Patewood Memorial Hospital as a Blue Distinction Center for quality in both spine surgery and in knee and hip replacement. In addition, GHS’ Greer Memorial Hospital was recognized for knee and hip replacement surgery, and GHS’ Greenville Memorial Hospital was recognized for spine surgery.

ghs.org 130221GJ

APRIL 5, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 11


JOURNAL NEWS

Furman football complex on schedule Pearce-Horton Football Complex to open in late fall

12 THE JOURNAL | APRIL 5, 2013

3 12 15 1889

– wins in 2012.

– conference championships won.

By CINDY LANDRUM | staff

Charlie Pearce wasn’t a star football player at Furman University, but he played a big role in making sure Sonny Horton was. Horton led an undefeated Greenwood High team to the state championship in 1947, and was heavily recruited by schools such as Tennessee, Georgia and Clemson. But he decided to attend Furman, thanks to his admiration of Pearce and his dating Pearce’s daughter, Keeter, whom he would later marry. Future Paladin players will likely be influenced by Pearce and Horton to attend Furman. The Pearce-Horton Football Complex is currently under construction and is expected to open in late fall. The Hortons provided a major gift to Furman for the $12 million facility.

Furman football by the numbers

– players who have signed professional football contracts since 2000.

The 44,000-square-foot complex will serve as the new home to the Furman football program and will include a president’s box, club seating and a new press box. Furman football coach Bruce Fowler told Abe Hardesty of furmanpaladins. com that the complex helped recruiting. Associate athletic director for athletic development Ken Pettus told furmanpaladins.com that the new complex will give Furman facilities comparable to the rest of the Southern Conference and Football Championship Subdivision schools. “The new facility shows our fan base, alum-

ni and recruits that we are serious about returning the Paladins to national prominence,” Pettus told furmanpaladins.com. “This beautiful building could not have been realized without the generosity of devoted alumni such as the Hortons and many others.” Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.

– year Furman played the first organized football game in South Carolina.

1988

– year Furman won the NCAA I-AA national championship, the first private school to do so.

CITY COUNCIL

FROM THE APRIL 1 MEETING

Two races in Greenville’s next municipal election will be contested. Incumbent Democrat Gaye Sprague, a civil engineer completing her first term as Greenville City Council, and Republican Matt Foster, a business development manager for M33 Integrated Solutions and a political newcomer, will square off for the council’s at-large seat. Mayor Pro Tem David Sudduth has no opposition for the District 4 seat while Lillian Brock Flemming is unopposed for the District 2 seat. Two Democrats filed to run for a seat on the Greenville Water Commission: David Langenhaus, an engineer with reservoir experience, and Kristen Wyche, who is working on a master’s degree in city planning. The winner of the June 11 primary will face Deb Sofield, the water commission’s current chair. During Monday’s City Council work session, Doug Webster, the chairman of the city’s Green Ribbon Committee, floated some ideas to make Greenville greener. Developing a multi-use trail within the power line corridor from Stone Avenue to Pleasantburg Drive as part of the “gateway corridor west” was one of the recommendations. The committee recommended development of a program that encourages private sector incentives for supporting public transportation, especially downtown, Webster said. Other recommendations included identification of future electric-car charging stations, hosting annual weekend events in Greenville for owners of electric vehicles, selection of city fleet replacement vehicles based on life-cycle costs, mitigation of the remaining methane gas at the closed Mauldin Road landfill and identification of future uses for the site, and implementation of a use-based residential trash pickup service and pricing model that incentivizes recycling, composting and reduction of household waste. Several public art projects are in the works for Greenville, members of the city’s Art in Public Places Commission told council members. A Peg Leg Bates sculpture is planned for East Washington and Spring streets near the site of the old Liberty Theatre where Bates performed early in his career. Five murals by Stone Academy fifth-graders are planned for Stone Avenue over the next five years. And finally, the city’s Youth Commission plans to customize each level of the Poinsett Garage with Greenville landmarks such as the Liberty Bridge, the Greenville Zoo and the downtown skyline. If the project goes well, themed art could be placed in other city garages. The next regular meeting of the Greenville City Council is Monday, April 8 at 5:30 p.m. in Council Chambers on the 10th floor of Greenville City Hall.


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journal news

Heated debate over Paris Mountain development Blacks Drive rezoning also halted By april a. morris | staff

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On Monday, Greenville County Council’s Planning and Development Committee took up the rezoning request to put a condo complex on Paris Mountain, resulting in a noisy confrontation between local homeowners and developer Eric Kaufmann. Eric Kaufmann and Greenfields Consortium have requested rezoning in Paris Mountain’s Environmentally Sensitive District-Paris Mountain (ESD-PM) to a Flexible Review District (FRD) to build Altera, a condo complex that would house 74 units on approximately five of 45 acres. Initial approval has been given for Kaufmann to build a development that includes 74 single-family homes. The committee opted to return the request to the Planning Commission for further consideration at its April 24 meeting. Residents have objected, citing concerns about a planned on-site wastewater treatment plant and increased traffic on Altamont Road. Concerns about wastewater linger because of the on-site treatment plant built for Altamont Forest that was abandoned in the late 1990s and resulted in sewage spilling into a feeder creek for one of Paris Mountain State Park’s lakes. Councilman Fred Payne wanted to give the Planning Commission more time to review the plans because it did not give a recommendation to the committee. “The Planning Commission had a tough decision to make and did not make it,” he said. “We need to give them a chance to get more information and have 30 days to get it and allow for additional public input.” During the meeting, there was no public input time and council members encouraged attendees to talk with Kaufmann outside the room to arrange a dialogue – resulting in a hallway confrontation and shouting on both sides. Kaufmann said he was open to meeting with residents, but wanted them to choose several representatives rather than resorting to a “mob mentality.” Homeowners eventually agreed to the meeting, which is planned for later this month. Paula Gucker, assistant county administrator for Community Planning, Develop-

ment and Public Works, said Kaufmann’s initial development was approved with the condition that no final plat be recorded until a preliminary engineering report on the wastewater treatment plant is approved by the Appalachian Council of Governments (ACOG), Renewable Water Resources (ReWa) and the SC Department of Health and Environmental Control’s (DHEC) Bureau of Water. “I’m concerned about that waste and those people (on Paris Mountain) have been snakebit one time; they don’t deserve a prototype,” said Councilman Sid Cates. “Kaufmann feels like this is best for the mountain, but until ACOG, ReWa, DHEC, county council and the people up there are satisfied, I can’t see it moving forward.” In other business, a tight 6-5 vote on Tuesday night resulted in denial of a FRD rezoning for a plot of land on Blacks Drive, which had also garnered much public opposition. Reichert Consulting had asked to rezone the area to build 54 units on the approximately 10-acre parcel, having reduced the density from 75 units. Lottie Gibson, Dan Rawls, Fred Payne, Joe Dill and Joe Baldwin voted in favor of the rezoning while Xanthene Norris, H.G. “Butch” Kirven, Willis Meadows, Sid Cates, Jim Burns and Bob Taylor voted against. Liz Seman was absent. Kirven said he was at first in favor of the rezoning, but after considering residents’ opposition and how such a development would change the neighborhood at this time, he voted against it. “We’ve heard overwhelming opposition to this zoning change, and that has been determined and persistent and consistent,” he said. Both Taylor and Cates commented that they could not support the rezoning. Peggy Saxon, a Blacks Drive resident since 1976, said she was pleased about the vote. “That’s just too many houses crammed into that area,” she said. Council also moved a recusal ordinance for members of boards and commissions with a conflict of interest to second reading. Greenville County Council is scheduled to meet again on April 16, 6 p.m., at County Square, 301 University Ridge, Greenville. Journal contributing writer Jeanne Putnam contributed to this story. Contact April A. Morris at amorris@communityjournals.com.


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

“It’s obvious kids can make a difference. Kids can do anything an adult can do.” Rachel Kaup (left), fifth-grader and founder of “Make the World a Better Place Club” at Stone Academy

Club has raised more than $4,000 since its start By CINDY LANDRUM | staff

GREG BECKNER / STAFF

Student works to make the world

A BETTER PLACE

Don’t tell fifth-grader Rachel Kaup that kids can’t make a difference. Through the “Make the World a Better Place Club” that she founded in September 2011, Kaup and the other eight members of the club have raised more than $4,000, most of which is being used to fight hunger in Greenville and around the world and to help people along the East Coast recover from Hurricane Sandy. “I wanted to show people that kids can make a difference, that we can make the world a better place even though we are kids,” she said. “But you don’t have to start a club to make a difference.” But Kaup did. The club’s first fundraiser, a bake sale held last spring at Stone Academy, was so successful that Kaup’s mother, Kate, had to go buy cookies at Ingles because the girls sold the 300 cookies they had baked themselves. They raised $221. “We had to keep rewriting our goal chart because we sold so many cookies that week,” she said.

We are...

KAUP continued on PAGE 16

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journal community “I wanted to show people that kids can make a difference, that we can make the world a better place even though we are kids. But you don’t have to start a club to make a difference.”

KAUP continued from page 15

The money went to Stone Academy’s Backpack Blessings, a program that provides students at the school with food for the weekend. The club has also sponsored “Sacrifice Something Week,” a time when people contribute the money they would have otherwise spent on coffee specialty drinks, a movie or a new pair of jeans. The $1,658 raised during the event will be used for a “Stop Hunger Now” project that will pack 10,000 dehydrated meals for the world’s hungry. The “Make the World a Better Place Club” raised the $2,500 necessary to host a meal-packaging event, Kaup said. The “Stop Hunger Now” event is scheduled for May 11. During two hours, 60 to 80 volunteers will package 10,000 dehydrated, high-protein and highly nutritious meals that are sent to developing countries around the world. During “Sacrifice Something Week,” members of the club tried to increase their peers’ understanding of domestic and international needs and how they best could make an impact by allowing the classroom that contributed the most during the week to chose a charitable organization to receive $100. The club’s latest fundraiser was “Yard Work Month” last November. Club members took donations in exchange for doing yard work. “We raked a lot of leaves and picked up a lot

Rachel Kaup, fifth-grader and founder of “Make the World a Better Place Club” at Stone Academy

of acorns,” Kaup said. The $200 raised was donated to Hurricane Sandy relief efforts. Kaup organized a poverty tour for club members through United Ministries and invited the United Way’s director of operations to a club meeting to discuss charitable giving in Greenville. Speakers from Greenville Women Giving and the Julie Valentine Center are planned for this spring. Kaup said she hopes to increase membership in the club next year when she goes to middle school at League Academy. She said she talked about the club in her magnet application to attend the school. “It’s obvious kids can make a difference,” she said. “Kids can do anything an adult can do.” Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.

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Dream a little dream Frazee Dream Center strives to provide positive role models and character building By CASEY DARGAN | contributor

Seven years ago, Matt and Jenny Reeves were living normal middle-class lives with stable, reputable jobs and a nice home in a safe neighborhood. “We were really involved in church work and really enjoyed it but became frustrated with the idea that we were friends with all the same type of people,” Matt said. “All the ministry that we were doing was just with all the same people, just like us.” In 2006, they bought the Central Baptist Church’s gym in downtown Greenville. This was the beginning of the Frazee Dream Center, a nonprofit organization that offers preschool, after-school and summer programs for underprivileged children from ages 3 to 16. The center focuses on giving the children a stable environment to learn character building and life skills. The main purpose of the center is to give structure, stability, support and positive role models to these children. Their motto is “work hard,

Matt and Jenny Reeves, founders of the Frazee Dream Center

respect authority, love everyone and forgive quickly.” Matt and Jenny believe that learning these traits guarantees the children success and happiness. Many of these children move four or more times in their elementary years and have little stability. “As a child, I never worried that we were going to come home and not have power,” Jenny explains – unlike many of the children who attend the Frazee Dream Center. Matt and Jenny want the center, the mentors and staff members to be among the constants in the lives of these children. As children, Matt and Jenny had many layers of support from friends, family, coaches, teachers and more. In fact, the center’s name is in honor of James Frazee, the principal of Providence Christian Academy in Murfreesboro,

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18 THE Journal | APRIL 5, 2013

Residents of Greenville’s west side visit the emergency room twice as often as any other area of the county. More than half are overweight or obese; chronic health problems are common. And there are eight times more fastfood restaurants in their neighborhoods than grocery stores. A health impact assessment by the South Carolina Institute of Medicine and Public Health shows that Greenville’s plan to develop a park on land downtown now occupied by the city’s public works complex could increase physical activity among west side residents and help lower obesity rates and the prevalence of chronic diseases, result in fewer hospital visits and perhaps

lead to more economic stability. The report, “A Health Impact Assessment of Park, Trail and Green Space Planning in the West Side of Greenville, South Carolina,” used scientific data, professional expertise and stakeholder involvement to determine the effects that a potential plan might have on the health of a population. Maya Pack, IMPH’s associate director of research and strategic initiatives, said the health impact assessment advances the conversation around community health and the built environment. “As a result, health, which is often overlooked in community development, became a front-burner issue,” she said. An advisory committee prioritized impacts on physical activity, social cohesion and capital, community and family economic stability and access to


journal community

Tenn., and a close friend and inspiration. “This web of people that was building into us was just immense,” Matt explained. And the Frazee Dream Center is structured to provide the same kind of support for its students. Along with games, reading, homework help and dinner, the afterschool program has a Frazee Circle where the groups sit down and discusses their day. This time provides the children with a space for sharing their achievements and maintaining accountability for their actions. Alise Brown, volunteer coordinator, explains, “Almost all of our students have a family member, a cousin, someone, in jail. And if you ask them why they are in jail, almost every single one of them will say it’s never that person’s fault.” However, the Frazee Center wants children to grow up taking responsibility for their failures and their successes so that they can grow and learn. Although the center started in 2006 with only 10 children, the program is rapidly expanding, with more than 140 students and a relatively small staff. The staff includes only five lead teachers, two assistants, two directors and one administrator. Jenny cooks all the food, which is donated from Loaves and Fishes and the House of Raeford Farms, totaling 40,000 snacks and meals a year. Although the organization is always looking for donations to expand and provide for the children, they need healthy, affordable food. Other priorities included individual and community safety and air and water quality. The city wants to relocate its public works department, now located in the floodplain of the Reedy River, and turn that land near the Kroc Center and A.J. Whittenberg Elementary into a public park. The city has already purchased 33 acres of land on Fairforest Way next to the Duke Energy Operations Center for the public works relocation, although a cost estimate and timetable for the move has not yet been determined. Consultants with Seamon Whiteside + Associates have come up with three preliminary concept drawings they had crafted from input gathered at public meetings. They included gardens, green space, an amphitheater and a dog park. According to the study, people who live within two miles of a park are 34 percent more likely to exercise at the park than in their own home. Eightyone percent of people living within a mile of a park are four times more likely to go to the park at least once a week. Recommendations from the study

more mentors and volunteers from the community. The center uses mentors from the South Carolina MENTOR program of Greenville. For more information on the Frazee Dream Center, visit frazeecenter.com. To help through volunteering or donating, contact Alise Brown, volunteer coordinator, at 864-616-8867. For more information or to volunteer with South Carolina MENTOR’s Greenville chapter, visit sc-mentor. com, call 864-233-9727, or visit 37 Villa Road, Suite 201 B-121, Greenville. Contact Casey Dargan at cdargan@communityjournals.com.

A volunteer works with a child at the Frazee Dream Center.

included providing connections such as new trails, sidewalks and bike lanes for community members to access the park and the Swamp Rabbit Trail, to provide opportunities for physical activities at the park for all ages. The study recommended designing the potential park so it can be easily expanded and capitalize on added assets in the west side, such as the Kroc Center and Whittenberg Elementary School. It also recommended including a community garden and a farmer’s market in the park. The assessment said that while a park has the potential to positively impact public health, there could be one negative impact – increased opportunities for physical activity can lead to an increase in recreational injuries. For children ages 5 to 9 years old, recreational injuries are most likely to occur in the playground and while riding bikes. Most common for older children are cycling and sports-related injuries. Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.

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JOURNAL COMMUNITY

Golf and home tour benefits local cancer research HOME PHOTOS BY STEPHEN VITOSKY / CONTRIBUTING

BrightLife supports Tim Bright and iTOR By APRIL A. MORRIS | staff

Tim Bright is on a mission to help fund cancer research – and it’s not just because he’s undergone more than 100 chemotherapy treatments since March 2010 for colon and cancer. Bright was diag- Tim Jenny Bright nosed at age 27 and said immediately after learning about the cancer, two couples who are family friends founded the BrightLife Foundation to help Bright and his wife, Jenny, with expenses. “When you’re diagnosed with stage three and then stage four cancer, you never know where the journey is going to take you,” said Bright. “It’s humbling to think people would do this to help me out.” And Bright, now 30, has opted to pass along the support he has received. After the foundation raised what Bright felt like was enough, he said, he wanted to give

to cancer research at the iTOR (Institute for Translational Oncology Research) at Greenville Health System. BrightLife organized a fundraiser golf tournament, Tee It Up for Cancer, and proceeds were also donated to iTOR in 2012. This year’s tournament is already sold out, he said, but tickets are still available for the post-play dinner. BrightLife is also hosting a home tour during April to raise funds for iTOR. The tour features a 3,755-square-foot home built by Goodwin Foust Custom Homes. Proceeds from the tour and the sale of the house will benefit cancer research. The furnishings, provided by local merchants, will also be available for purchase.

Science

Tim Bright talks matter-of-factly about his experience and added that despite the frequent treatments, “I try to keep doing the normal things I usually do.” He is also focused on others’ experiences and helping to raise money to help them, too. “It seems like cancer affects almost everyone. These events give the researchers a

chance to continue their research.” Contact April Morris at amorris@communityjournals.com.

SO YOU KNOW TEE IT UP FOR CANCER 2013 BRIGHTLIFE/iTOR SHOW HOME • Thornblade Club, Greer • 101 Treetops Court, Greer • April 8 • April 12-14, 19-21 & 26-28; Fridays and Saturdays, •Dinner and silent auction 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Sundays, noon to 4 p.m.; $10 Visit brightlifesc.com for tickets and information about both events.

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JOURNAL COMMUNITY

Young sports fan creates Fantasy Diabetes By JEANNE PUTNAM | contributor

It seems that every sport – football, baseball, basketball – has a fantasy league. Justin Schur, an 11-year-old Greenville resident living with diabetes for the past three years, has created Fantasy Diabetes. Since his diagnosis at age 8, Schur has been open about his diabetes, initially showing his classmates how he managed his disease. Now in middle school, he has

used his passion for sports to create Fantasy Diabetes as a fun way to educate his friends. There are now 20 friends participating in the game. Justin has them sit down with him each week and guess his blood sugar number. “When he saw how much his friends were learning about diabetes and how much easier it was for him once his friends understood what he was going through, he wanted to share the game

with other kids with type 1 diabetes, so he created fantasydiabetes.com,” said Justin’s mother, Lori Schur. Justin Schur was honored on March 23 at the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation’s 11th Annual Black Tie Gala, with the theme of “Saluting Real Heroes.” The gala raised $297,984 with nearly 370 people in attendance, but the JDRF is projected to reach $300,000 with the usual post-event donations.

Justin’s story started out like many other people diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. He had to overcome his fear of needles to undergo blood sugar tests and insulin shots, said Lori Schur. And his family had to learn “how to give him shots, test his blood sugar, and to treat his highs and lows,” she said. They also had to create new routines to manage his health. “Diabetes is a disease that challenges you daily, because there is no consistency from day to day,” said Lori Schur. Contact Jeanne Putnam at jputnam@communityjournals.com.

APRIL 5, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 21


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JOURNAL COMMUNITY

Parkinson’s Group offers support and education By APRIL A. MORRIS | staff

FIGHT 4 PARKINSON’S

There are an estimated 500,000 people in the U.S. who have Parkinson’s disease and more than 5,000 of them live in the Upstate, according to Heather Wyss, executive director of the Parkinson’s Support Group of the Upstate. Parkinson’s disease is a neurological disorder that affects the region of the brain that controls movement, causing tremors, limb rigidity or stiffness, and slow movement. At this time, there is no cure. The group’s monthly meetings offer the chance for Parkinson’s patients to compare experiences and for caregivers to discuss issues. The Parkinson’s Support Group of the Upstate began meeting at Earle Street Baptist Church with about 25 attendees. With the recent outreach and referrals from local hospitals, attendance has tripled in the last few months, said Wyss, and a second meeting site was added at Southside Fellowship. For those interested in learning from the experts, the group hosts educational meetings quarterly, this month featuring Dr.

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Kapil Sethi of the Medical College of Georgia speaking on Living with Parkinson’s on April 18. Wyss said that the organization aims to offer educational meetings in addition to the monthly peer meetings. Greenville Mayor Knox White recently issued a declaration recognizing April as Parkinson’s Awareness Month. On April 13, the organization will be holding a fundraiser and celebration, Fight 4 Parkinson’s. The family-friendly event offers teams the chance to raise funds for research and features a kids’ fun run, carnival games and ceremonial remembrance. For more information about the support group, visit psgotu.org.

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Student on mission to deliver shoes worldwide By JEANNE PUTNAM | contributor

A contest on a shoe-shopping website grabbed Greenville Technical Charter High School senior Hannah McKeel’s attention. McKeel entered the TOMS contest, open until April 12, to be one of the top 50 vote-getters who will win a trip to distribute shoes to children in need. “I want to win this because I want to have the chance to make an impact in life of a child,” she said. “I want be sunshine to a child who doesn’t see much of that in his or her life.” In addition to the contest, TOMS also donates a pair of shoes to an impoverished child for every pair bought on their website. McKeel has already worked to make a difference through three mission trips – one to New Orleans in 2009 to help Hurricane Katrina victims, and two to work with children in the Dominican Republic. Mission trips are “so life-changing and you realize the language barriers

Hannah McKeel with young friends during a mission trip to the Dominican Republic.

aren’t a problem because love goes past that,” the teen says. McKeel, who plans to be an elementary school teacher, feels that if she won this contest she could show children “what it looks like to accomplish something you set out to do.” To vote for McKeel, visit toms.com/ ticket-to-give/flags/6323. Contact Jeanne Putnam at jputnam@communityjournals.com.

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APRIL 5, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 23


journal community

our community

community news, events and happenings

Greenville County Animal Care will host a volunteer fair at its location at 328 Furman Hall Road in Greenville on April 6 from 1-4 p.m. The longest-running charitable community event in Greenville, The Rose Ball, recently announced a theme for its upcoming Sept. 20 ball: The Art of the Rose. The board is asking local artists to submit rose-themed art that will be sold prior to the event with the hope that the artist will donate 50 percent of the proceeds to the Rose Ball Charity. For more information or to submit art by July 31, contact Leighann Markalunas at leighann@mstudioarchitecture.com.

LEARN

Gardening for Good will host a free cooking class, Growing Herbs for Your Kitchen, on April 9, 5-6:30 p.m., at the Sterling Hope Center. To register, visit ggardeningforgood.com. For more information, call 864-239-3757.

TO

The 18th Annual Greer Family Fest Bass Tournament will take place on April 13 at Lake Robinson. Cash prizes are over $3,000 and the Big Fish Award is $1,000. The deadline for entry is April 6. For more event information or to register, call 864877-6956 or visit greerfamilyfest.com.

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E

The Upcountry History Museum presents Night at the Museum on April 12, 6:30-10:30 p.m. Families can watch the film “Night at the Museum II” and tour the museum after lights-out, meeting live characters from SC history. Cost is $10-$15. Space is limited, so call 864-467-3100 to register. The museum is also seeking volunteers to dress in period costume during the April 12 and July 12 events. Actors of all types are needed. For more info, call 864-467-3100 ext. 119, or email jennifer@ upcountryhistory.org.

N SER

V

Clemson Extension’s Master Gardener program will begin offering online classes April 11 so gardeners can complete the course from their own homes. Participants can complete the 12 workshop modules at home, working through them on a week-by-week basis. The classes are offered April 11-June 4 and cost is $300. For more information or to register, go to clemson.edu/mastergardener. The SC Native Plant Society’s spring native plant sale will be held on April 6, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., in the parking lot of the University Center in Greenville. The sale will feature a selection of native plants, grasses, shrubs and trees, plants that provide habitat, nectar and food for native wildlife. For more information, visit scnps.org.

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Book Your Lunch with New York Times bestselling author William Kent Krueger on Saturday, April 13, at The Lazy Goat. Tickets are $25 per person. Tickets must be purchased in advance at bookyourlunch.com or by calling Fiction Addiction at 864-675-0540. For more information, visit fiction-addiction.com.

L E A R N T O F LY C O N T E S T NAME

The Mauldin Garden Club will host its eighth annual Spring Fling on April 6, 8 a.m.-2 p.m. at the Mauldin Cultural Center, 101 East Butler Road, Mauldin. Admission is free. Along with plant sales, there will be crafters, home-baked goods, chili dogs and vendors. In addition, there will be a silent auction and children’s activities. The club will also meet on April 9 at 7 p.m. at the Cultural Center for a discussion on rose disease prevention and which roses are the best to plant in this area. For more information, contact Ann Smith at 963-8267 or jerryannesm115@charter.net or visit mauldingardenclub.org.

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*Entry must be received by 5pm, 05/18/13. Must live and/or work in Greenville or Spartanburg County. Must be 17 by 05/19/13 and winners, if under age 18, must have signature of parent/legal guardian. Must be US Citizen; weigh less then 250 lbs.; capable of passing a third-class flight physical; & sign liability waiver. If Grand Prize winner is unable to accept prize, offer will default to Runner-Up. Training must be completed by May 19, 2014 with at least one lesson per week. Multiple entries accepted. Winners will be notified on 05/19/13 – International Learn to Fly Day!

24 THE Journal | APRIL 5, 2013

The 18th Annual Greer Family Fest Bass Tournament will take place on April 13 at Lake Robinson. Gates will open at 5 a.m.; blast-off will be at 6:30 a.m. with the weigh-in at 3 p.m. Cash prizes are over $3,000 and the Big Fish Award is $1,000. The deadline for entry is April 6. The tournament kick-off banquet will be held on April 12 at Riverside Baptist Church at 6 p.m. For more event information or to register, contact Larry Beheler at 864-877-6956 or visit greerfamilyfest.com. Submit entries to email: community@communityjournals.com.


journal community

our schools

activities, awards and accomplishments

St. Joseph’s Catholic School Middle School Chess Team took home first place honors for the second consecutive year in the State Scholastic Chess Championship. The Middle School Team, consisting of Morrigan Dearman, Charlotte Gayle, Elias Longenecker, Ben Ragan, Joey Schmidt, Brendan Cummings, Charlie Henderson, Andrew Armstrong and Chris McCune, competed against 141 of the best chess players in the state for individual and team honors. Individual trophies went to Ragan, Dearman and Longenecker. Greenville Middle Academy held a book drive, donating 1,888 books to East North Street Academy as part of the 1st Annual Book Swap between the two schools. This event, organized by the Greenville Middle Junior Beta Club, will provide at least two books to each student at East North Street Academy to read this summer.

The Robotics Workforce  received the Overall Championship Award at the Spartanburg Regional and placed first in Robot Programming at 2012-2013 South Carolina FLL State Championship Tournament. The team members are Anne Crowley, James Crowley, Kevin Tian, and Ronak Malde from The Charles Townes Center, Trip Crowley from Langston Charter Middle School, and Neil Gramopadhye and Nate Stageberg from Riverside Middle School. The team has moved on to compete in the FLL Global Innovation Competition.  The 2014 Summerall Guards, a silent drill platoon at The Citadel, recently made its debut during Corps Day Weekend. Sixty-one rising seniors have gone through rigorous drill and physical training to be selected as members. Cadets are chosen for their ability to precisely execute selected portions of the drill series and their demonstrated level of physical fitness and stamina. The chosen cadets are Eric Matthew Benfield of Greenville (Delta Company), Khalil Paul Khoury of Spartanburg (Kilo Company), Sloan Addison Lindsey of Easley (India Company), Jasper Dove

Puckett Jr. of Simpsonville (Oscar Company), Christopher Garrett Roper of Simpsonville (Oscar Company) and James Adam Stone of Simpsonville (November Company).  Greenville Classical Academy will offer two admission events during April. An Upper School, seventh through 12th-grade, Information Meeting will be held on April 9, 7 to 8 p.m. An Open House for grades K4 through 12 will be held on April 10, 8:30 a.m. to noon. More information is available at GreenvilleClassical.com. Timothy Renner, a 2012 Bob Jones University graduate, received second place in the young artist division of The ORPHEUS National Music Competition for Young Artists. The competition, sponsored by the Middle Tennessee Choral Society, was held on the campus of Middle Tennessee State University in Murfreesboro, Tenn.  Renner was awarded the $2,500 second place prize in the young artist division of the contest. The Woodbridge, Va., resident received his B.S. in music education in 2010 and his MMus in church music in 2012 from Bob Jones University. He is currently pursuing a Doctorate of Musical Arts (DMA) in Voice Performance and Literature at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Submit entries to: community@communityjournals.com.

APRIL 5, 2013 | The Journal 25


journal community

the good

events that make our community better

“The God Box: A Daughter’s Story” will be performed on April 16 at 7 p.m. at the Warehouse Theatre. The performance serves as a fundraiser for the Cancer Center of Greenville Hospital System. The Mary Lou Quinlan performance has travelled around the country, raising $100,000 for local cancer and hospice care initiatives. Tickets are $100 and include access to the performance, a reception with wine and heavy hors d’oeuvres and an autographed copy of the book, “The God Box.” To purchase tickets, visit ghsgiving.org/godbox. For information, contact Helen Pruitt at 864-797-7731 or hpruitt@ghs.org. For more information about “The God Box,” visit thegodboxproject.com.

larged for the 2013-2014 school year to include schools from across the entire Upstate. To learn more, contact Alissa Ritzo Duncan at 864-283-2313, aritzoduncan@ tenatthetop.org or visit cleanairupstate.org. Homes of Hope is holding a banquet on May 10, 7 p.m., at the Hyatt in downtown Greenville. The event will include entertainment, silent and live auctions and dinner and dessert. All funds received will help families in need of affordable housing, and men overcoming drug and alcohol addictions. There is no cost to attend, but attendees should RSVP. Sponsorships are available and Homes of Hope needs experienced artists to decorate wooden birdhouses for the auction. To reserve a seat or for more information, contact Jordon Weldon at 864-269-4663 or jweldon@homesofhope.org. 

Taylors Elementary and A.J. Whittenberg School of Engineering are the first Greenville County schools to receive a Clean Air Upstate Grant in recognition of their participation in DHEC’s Breathe Better Anti-Idling Program. To attain and maintain healthy air quality in the Upstate, the program focuses on turning off car engines when waiting in vehicles for students after school. Through a grant from the Hollingsworth Funds, Clean Air Upstate is providing individual participating Greenville County schools with a one-time $400 grant. Taylors Elementary and A.J. Whittenberg School of Engineering have both participated in the program over the last two years. The Clean Air Upstate Grant program will be en-

Greenville Health System was recently awarded a full five-year accreditation by the Association for the Accreditation of Human Research Protection Programs Inc., a worldwide organization which ensures highquality standards in research programs. The Greenvillebased academic medical center has more active clinical trials than any other healthcare system in the state: 670. To earn accreditation, organizations must provide policies, procedures, and practices that display their commitment to scientifically and ethically sound research

and to continuous improvement. For more information visit aahrpp.org or ghs.org. Champion Aerospace in Liberty recently donated supplies valued at $6,000 to the Aircraft Maintenance Technology program at Greenville Technical College. The supplies, including 90 spark plugs and six sets of ignition harnesses, will be used to repair aging aircraft, allowing instructors to better train future aviation technicians. Wildlife Rehab of Greenville has recently joined thousands of animal welfare organizations across North America by using Petfinder, the online leader in responsible pet ownership. For more information, visit wildlife-rehab.com or petfinder.com. Bon Secours St. Francis’s downtown and Eastside hospitals recently received recognition for top performance in the Premier healthcare alliance’s QUEST: High Performing Hospitals collaborative focusing on safe, reliable and efficient care. The Eastside location is one of only 18 out of 336 hospitals to achieve top performance in at least five domains and the downtown location was honored for the fourth year in a row.  Submit entries to: community@communityjournals.com.

Spring Football Fest Dinner and Program 5:15 PM - Sisk Hall

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JOURNAL CULTURE Peter Pan, played by Garrett Rollings, and Wendy, played by Ally McCaslin, in a scene from “Peter Pan” in the Wildcat Players production of the popular show.

THE HOOK

BRINGS HIM BACK Woodmont’s production of “Peter Pan” is a trip back into the past for Ragland By CINDY LANDRUM | staff

During this spring’s Wildcat Players production of “Peter Pan,” Woodmont High drama teacher Will Ragland could be forgiven for having a feeling of déjà vu. Ragland is playing Captain Hook, a role he first played 10 years ago at the South Carolina Children’s Theatre.

The hook he’ll use in the Woodmont production is being made by Greenville artist and blacksmith Ryan Calloway, who was a classmate at Wren Middle and High schools and played soccer and took art classes with Ragland. And the production features a cast of 100, ranging from five years old to adult, reminiscent of the first play that Ragland directed on the Woodmont High stage as

he was building a drama program in the Piedmont area from scratch. “We’re right back where we started from,” said Ragland, who will act in a play with his students for the first time. Ragland, a regular on Greenville community theater stages, had a role in the Children’s Theatre’s production of PETER PAN continued on PAGE 28

APRIL 5, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 27


JOURNAL CULTURE PETER PAN continued from PAGE 20

“Oliver” in 2002. Another member of the cast happened to be former Greenville County Schools Superintendent Bill Harner, who convinced Ragland he would make a great teacher. Ragland taught art at Bryson Elementary for a year and then at Sue Cleveland Elementary for four years. The first play he directed on the Woodmont High stage was “The Wizard of Oz,” which featured a cast of 115 elementary, middle and high school students. For some, it was the first time they had been in – much less been to – live theater. Ragland has been at Woodmont High for six years. The drama program has become so popular that the school now has two full-time drama teachers. The high school program has gained so much attention that Woodmont Middle has added a theater teacher. The two programs will work closely together. Ragland will play Captain Hook, a role he played when he was 25. “I’ve played roles more than once and I always enjoyed seeing what I can do differently,” he said. “The first time I played him like Cyril Ritchard did, the Cathy Rigby version that was a more

GREG BECKNER / STAFF

From left, Tyler Pruitt, Matthew Brodsky and Matthew’s father, Chase Brodsky, work on the set of “Peter Pan.” Matthew plays one of the Lost Boys in the Wildcat Players production of the show.

aristocratic cartoon character. This time, it will be much darker, much more complex, much more frightening, much more grounded in reality. If Neverland is a dream, he’s a nightmare.” Ragland approached Calloway to make a hook that would fit his new portrayal of Captain Hook. “Most of them out there look feminine,” he said. “They look like a coat hanger or a question mark.”

Calloway will create a “darker, more villainous black hook.” “Each of us found a career in the arts in the Greenville area,” Ragland said. “Who would have thought?” Parents are pitching in to help build the mobile sets, each vastly different from the other, including a giant pirate ship and a multi-level unit where the lost boys live underground. The Woodmont production will be the

non-musical version. And Peter Pan, played by sixth-grader Garrett Rollings, will fly. Flying by Foy, a Las Vegas company that specializes in theatrical flight, will be coming to Woodmont in a couple of weeks to help the cast and crew learn how to fly, Ragland said. “I think we’re probably one of the first schools to feature flying in a play,” he said. “It’s pretty expensive. It will cost more than $6,000.” Ragland said he researched productions of “Peter Pan” that didn’t fly but he decided the Woodmont community enjoys entertaining spectacle. “We’re trying to make it as magical as we can,” he said. Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.

SO YOU KNOW WHAT: “Peter Pan” WHO: Woodmont Players WHERE: Woodmont High School, 2831 W. Georgia Rd., Piedmont WHEN: April 19, 20, 25, 26 and 27 at 7 p.m.; April 21 and 28 at 3 p.m. TICKETS: Sold at the door, $8 for adults, $5 for children 12 and under

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THE WEEK IN THE LOCAL ARTS WORLD

Metropolitan Arts Council will be taking applications for Flat Out Under Pressure now through May 17. The name Flat Out Under Pressure (FOUP) comes from the nature of the art competition, as area artists will be challenged to create a piece of work from start to finish within 24 hours. The winning artists will then have their work reproduced and displayed on the recycling bins that now line Main Street – as an outdoor gallery. The event will be held June 7-8. In addition, Greenville Open Studios is taking applications now through May 17 for the Nov. 2-3 event. Artists open their studios to the public over the weekend. For more information, call 864467-3132 or visit greenvillearts.com.

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Local artist Jennifer Lynne Ziemann will continue “Expanding Heart and Spirit,” a woman’s healing art course, beginning on April 16-17.  The multi-week course explores what stimulates the heart and spirit to open up and expand. Registration ends on April 10 and there is a limit of 12 students. For additional information, call 864-436-1875 or email peaceatlast.z@gmail.com. The Pickens County Museum, located at 307 Johnson St., will host “Sketchbook Studies from Nature, Part 1” class for adults with art instructor Jo Johnston. The class will be held Tuesdays, 10 a.m.–noon; April 16, 23, 30, May 7, 14 and 21. Sixweek sessions will be held at the Pickens County Museum. Tuition for this class is only $88 ($78 for museum members). Participants must be registered and paid by April 8 in person or by calling the museum. Tuition may be paid by cash, check or charge. For more information, call the museum at 864-898-5963. The Furman University Theatre will present “The Winter’s Tale” by William Shakespeare April 10-13 at 8 p.m., and April 14 at 3 p.m.; and again April 17-20 at 8 p.m. in the Furman Playhouse. The production is open to the public. Tickets are $15 general admission, $13 for seniors and $8 for students. For ticket information and reservations, call 864-294-2125. Spartanburg Philharmonic Orchestra presents Music Sandwiched In, free and live lunchtime concerts at the Spartanburg library downtown. On Wednesday, April 10, Portland guitar duo James Manuele and Foti Lycouridis will be the featured artists. The music starts at 12:15 p.m. Bring your lunch or buy one there. Call 864-9489020 for more information. The Greenville Little Theatre will present “Splish Splash,” the 1950s rock ’n’ roll revue featuring such songs as “Summertime Blues,” “Book of Love,” “Great Balls of Fire,” “Mack The Knife” and “Sixteen Tons.” Show dates are April 25-27 at 8 p.m. and April 28 at 3 p.m. Tickets are $30 with discounts available for seniors, children and groups. Call the box office at 864-233-6238 or visit greenvillelittletheatre.org for more information. The Greenville Little Theatre box office is located at 444 College St. and is open Monday through Friday from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Spartanburg Youth Theatre will present “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs of the Black Forest” on April 19-20 at Chapman Cultural Center. For tickets, call 542-ARTS. The Reserve at Lake Keowee Community Foundation will host Clemson University’s all-male a cappella group, Tigeroar, on April 16 at 7 p.m. at the Founders Hall. The performance is free and open to the public. All guests are asked to RSVP to Kathryn Gravely by calling 864-481-4010 or sending an email to kgravely@reservekeowee.com. The Greenville Commerce Club, One Liberty Square, Greenville, is teaming up with State of the Art to host an Evening of Art auction on April 18. The preview starts at 6 p.m. and auction at 7 p.m. The event is open to both members and guests. Attendees can look forward to a fun evening while viewing a fabulous collection of art for every taste and budget. The event is $8 per member and $14 per guest. For more information, visit commerce-club.com. Send us your arts announcement. Email: arts@communityjournals.com

APRIL 5, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 29


JOURNAL CULTURE

LISTEN UP

BEST BETS FOR LOCAL LIVE MUSIC 4/5, THE BOHEMIAN

The Bad Popes Upstate’s own country-rock band. Call 864-233-0006. 4/6, PEACE CENTER

Sarah Jarosz Rising new bluegrass star. Tickets: $10-$35. Call 864-467-3000 or visit peacecenter.org. 4/11, PEACE CENTER

Bobby McFerrin Grammy-winning vocal renaissance man. Tickets: $10-$55. Call 864-467-3000 or visit peacecenter.org. 4/16, BI-LO CENTER

Carrie Underwood Modern-country superstar. Tickets: $43.50-$63.50. Call 864-241-3800 or visit bilocenter.com. 4/16, GROUND ZERO

Hatebreed Grammy-nominated metalcore. Call 864-948-1661. 4/17, THE HANDLEBAR

Shooter Jennings Waylon’s son blazes his own trail of country and rock. Tickets: $21. Call 864233-6173 or visit handlebar-online.com. 4/17, PEACE CENTER

Boz Scaggs Veteran hit-maker. Tickets: $45-$60. Call 864-467-3000 or visit peacecenter.org. 4/23, THE HANDLEBAR

Gwar Legendary costumed metal gods. Tickets: $22 in advance, $24 day of show. Call 864233-6173 or visit handlebar-online.com. 4 / 2 4 , S PA R TA N B U R G MEMORIAL AUDITORIUM

Experience The Beatles with RAIN Tribute act re-creates the Fab Four. Tickets: $38-$58. Call 864-582-8107 or visit crowdpleaser.com. 4/26, THE HANDLEBAR

30 THE JOURNAL | APRIL 5, 2013

Victor Wooten Band Bela Fleck’s virtuoso bassist. Tickets: $20. Call 864-233-6173 or visit handlebar-online.com.


JOURNAL CULTURE

SOUND CHECK WITH VINCENT HARRIS

Traveling show Another Roadside Attraction takes jazz, folk, blues and vaudeville for a ride The band name Another Roadside Attraction is descriptive but somewhat deceiving. Yes, the Roanoke, Va.-based group, featuring a husband-and-wife nucleus of Jordan Rivers and Lucy de los Rios, has played by the roadside often, and they definitely attract attention. But they are anything but just another band. Since forming in 2010, the band’s acoustic-based sound has incorporated ragtime jazz, folk music, Latin influences, rollicking vaudeville-style vocals, ironic retro homilies reminiscent of Leon Redbone and classic guitar-pull country. But they didn’t necessarily start out as a roots-music band. “When we started off,  Lucy was  playing electric bass and I was primarily playing guitar,” Rivers says. “And then she picked up her old ukulele again, and we added that to the mix. Then I picked up a guitarron, which is like this big mariachi bass, and we started making up new songs using those instruments. We kind of rebuilt everything to put on a totally acoustic show.” While it might seem intimidating to come WHO: Another Roadside Attraction out from behind electric instruments and WHERE: The Handlebar, go acoustic, Rivers and de los Rios were in304 E. Stone Ave., Greenville spired by the change. “It was more liberating than anything,” Rivers says. “When you quiet WHEN: Monday, April 8, 8:30 p.m. down a little bit, you can play for anybody, TICKETS: $5 864-233-6173 or and you don’t really have to beat them over handlebar-online.com the head with the sound. You can make them listen.” Rivers and de los Rios discovered another handy aspect of playing acoustic: The world became their stage. “When we switched everything over to acoustic, we could play anywhere,” Rivers says. “We could play on a sidewalk. That’s what our first tour was, actually; we played 13 cities in 15 days. We would just wheel out the instruments and play on the sidewalk, and we found that people really enjoyed it. And you get people of all ages, people who weren’t expecting to hear music, and they just hang out with you for a while. You can see when it sparks a kid’s imagination. Or with an older person, it reminds them of something they might have seen from back when they were a kid.” As far as Another Roadside Attraction’s songwriting goes, Rivers says the style of the songs is often dictated by the instruments they play. “With the guitarron, you don’t really play it like you play anything else,” Rivers says. “So different things come out of it.” The band’s size can range from a duo to an octet, depending on the show, and Rivers says that that shifting membership is by design. “We like to play with different people,” he says. “It keeps the show fresh. When you first write a song, it’s amazing, but if you play it over and over the same way, it doesn’t give you that spark. So when you re-learn it with a different performer, it’s almost like writing it all over again.” Rivers has modest ambitions for Another Roadside Attraction. “My goal is to see as much as I can. Being in a band is kind of like a ticket to ride if you want to see things. It’s one of my favorite things, waking up in a different place and taking it in. I feel so happy and blessed to be where I find myself right now.” Contact Vincent Harris at vharris@communityjournals.com.

Join us for an afternoon of music and poetry inspired by the artwork of Helen DuPré Moseley.

Sunday, April 7 2 pm

Greenville County

Created by members of the Emrys Foundation for art lovers of all ages, poems and lyrics are paired with Moseley’s dreamlike paintings in the newly released children’s book, Hearing Helen.

Museum of Art 420 College Street Greenville, SC 29601 864-271-7570 gcma.org Wed - Sat 10 am - 6 pm Sun 1pm - 5 pm free admission

APRIL 5, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 31


journal culture

Haiku to you, too

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The girl sits watching the wet dogs run in circles chasing foaming waves. Haiku is one of the world’s oldest and most elegant forms of verse, and during National Poetry Month, Emrys is looking for local haiku gurus (and novices) to enter their Emrys Goes Haiku contest. All ages are invited to submit haiku poems that follow the traditional form of three lines: five syllables, seven syllables and five syllables. The contest is open to anyone living in Greenville County and all Emrys members. Poets, divided into four different age groups, can enter up to three previously unpublished poems. Submissions should be related to nature or the four seasons in some way, said contest coordinator and Emrys board member Linda Kelly. Organizers are aiming to not just target students,

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Through April 17 Enter at emrys.org/blog/emrys-goes-haiku

but all ages, said Kelly. “We are hoping to have a really varied group of entries.” The selected poems will be included in a publication, “Emrys Goes Haiku.” Poets will receive cash prizes and read their work at the Emrys Japanese Gala on Sep. 17. Kelly said she has encountered closet haiku composers throughout the Upstate who should share their work. “There are a lot of people who love writing haiku all on their own,” she said. “It’s something that almost everyone can do.” Emrys is a foundation that supports the literary arts. They chose haiku to coincide with National Poetry Month and their fall meeting’s theme. The entry deadline is National Haiku Day, April 17 – and submission time is short, just like the poems, said Kelly. “‘Emrys Goes Haiku’ is also five syllables,” she added. Contact April A. Morris at amorris@communityjournals.com.

Artisphere expands hours to expand audience

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Emrys Goes Haiku Contest

Artisphere will open at noon Friday this year, a move organizers hope will open up the Greenville fine arts festival to a whole new local audience. Artisphere is May 10 through May 12 in downtown. When Artisphere executive director Kerry Murphy and program director Liz Rundorff Smith visited Louisville’s St. James Court Art Show, Sunshine Artist Magazine’s top-ranked art show in the country for 2012, they were amazed that the festival was packed at 10 a.m. Friday. They were told the festival had always been open during the day on Friday and the local school district had trouble with teachers calling in sick that day to attend. The school district also had trouble finding substitute teachers for that day, Murphy said. Artisphere has typically opened at 4 p.m. on Friday, but this year will open

four hours earlier. Murphy said the earlier opening would allow downtown workers – who in past years headed home at quitting time and didn’t come back to Greenville until Monday morning – to experience the festival. “We think it will open up a whole new crowd of people for us,” she said. “We think this could be a way to expand our audience.” This year’s festival will also have a new demo and “do it yourself ” stage featuring live art demonstrations and informational talks on topics such as lighting artwork in the home or starting an art collection. Artisphere will again feature Artist Row, performance artist Brian Olsen’s “Art in Action,” art exhibitions, an online silent auction, a private label wine, a children’s area and stages featuring dance, theater and music. For more information, visit artisphere.us. Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.


journal culture

Peas and harmony Community garden concert series takes root in Sans Souci By ALLISON WALSH | contributor

The appeal of Sans Souci, a small, quiet community just north of Greenville, has long been a well-kept secret. These days, thanks to one devoted homeowner and his school project, the secret is out. Not long after moving to Sans Souci in 2006, Matthew Manley realized his new home was ripe for revitalization. As luck would have it, the city and regional planning degree he was pursuing at the time required just such a project. Among the fruits of his labor is a thriving community garden entering its third growing season, which also plays host to an increasingly popular concert series. The mission of the garden, which occupies a once vacant lot owned by St. Mark United Methodist Church in the heart of Sans Souci, is to create a stronger sense of community among the residents. “Several gardeners have mentioned they didn’t really know anybody in their peer group before joining the garden, and as a result new friendships have been formed,” says Neil Collins, a seven-year Sans Souci resident who lucked into the title of head gardener primar-

Listeners enjoy a concert at Sans Souci Community Garden.

ily because he lives next door. While membership in the garden is restricted to residents of Sans Souci, Manley, a self-professed live music fan, sees the family-friendly concerts as an opportunity to show off the community he and his neighbors are so proud to call home. “The goal is to draw people in that don’t live here and to overcome misconceptions about Sans Souci,” Manley says, adding that many concertgoers were unaware of the community before coming to a show. The concerts are free, though donations are accepted for the artists, and all are welcome – kids, dogs, grandparents, anyone who enjoys live music in a laid back

venue. Last year’s show drew an average crowd of 45 music lovers, so Manley this year decided to give local nonprofits a soapbox at each event to drum up awareness and support for their causes. Local clothing stylist and artist-of-all-trades Christi Garland handles décor for the shows. She and local musician Alexa Woodward were the first performers to grace the Sans Souci stage, and Garland has continued to lend her artistic eye to the event. The concerts have proved so popular that other local gardens are looking to get in on the action. “I’ve had other gardens coming to me and asking for help in replicating what Matt’s doing,” says Reece Lyerly of Gardening for Good, a Greenville Forward program that serves as a network and resource center for community gardens in Greenville. The result is the Community Garden Music Series, which begins in April with a concert at the First Christian Church Community Garden, travels to Sans Souci in May, and winds up in June at the Swamp Rabbit Discover howRabbit a littleplot Community Garden & Cafe. The Swamp brow shaping has been chosen as the Gardening for Goodcan teaching frame your garden, where Lyerly hopesuplift folks and will come, learn and Join us and take that knowledge back entire to their face. neighborhoods schools to sow their own community gardens. for an eye-opening The Sans Souci garden concert scheduletoday. can be found experience on Facebook. For information on the Community Garden Music Series, visit ggardeningforgood.com/concert.

Myrtle Hall-Smith to speak at NGU

BROW

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BROW

Myrtle Hall-Smith, former vocal soloist with the Billy Graham World Crusade, will be the guest speaker and soloist for North Greenville University’s Women’s Auxiliary Board’s spring luncheon on April 9 at 11:30 a.m. on the NGU campus. The luncheon is open to the public and admission is $10, but reservations are required. Contact LaVerne Howell at laverne.howell@ngu.edu or 864-977-7013. Hall-Smith

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W8 2 TXT Wednesdays

Troopers from the SC Department of Public Safety will be at designated Subway restaurants for W8 2 TXT Wednesdays, 4 to 7 p.m., in support of National Distracted Driving Awareness Month. They will also offer hands-on demonstrations about the dangers of distracted driving. The events are free and open to the public – April 17: 2422 Hudson Road, Brushy Creek Plaza, Greer; and April 24: Laurens Road at Verdae Village, Greenville. Visit SUBWAYW82TXT.com for details.

Elimination of Racism

The YWCA of Greenville will host the second annual Elimination of Racism Breakfast on April 10 at the TD Convention Center. Keynote speakers will be Elizabeth Colbert Busch, candidate for Congress, and Dr. Dorethea Walker of Black Girls Run! Charleston. Tickets are $20 and can be ordered at eliminationofracismbreakfast.eventbrite.com. For more information, email info@ywcagreenville.org or call 864-373-6300.

M E RLE NORMAN .COM

FREE BROW DESIGN & WAX April 12th thru 30th Must call to schedule appointment

Swamp Rabbit Cyclebration

The first annual Swamp Rabbit Cyclebration will be held April 6 at Gateway Park in Travelers Rest. There will be rides and activities for all levels, including routes that will ride by the future site for the GHS Swamp Rabbit expansion. Visit greenvillerec.com/events-list for additional information.

Merle Norman of Simpsonville

Fairview Road

864-962-1767

APRIL 5, 2013 | The Journal 33


JOURNAL CULTURE

Arts Calendar The Academy of Arts Logos Theatre The 5 Browns Apr. 5-6 ~ 268-9342 Greenville Little Theatre Elvis Has Left the Building Apr. 5-20 ~ 233-6238 Peace Center Sarah Jarosz Apr. 6 ~ 467-3000 Furman University Hartness and Gladden Quartets Apr. 10 ~ 294-2086 Furman University Theatre The Winter’s Tale Apr. 10-20 ~ 294-2125

charity gala benefiting the

April 19, 2013 April 19,GREENVILLE 2013 HYATT REGENCY

April 19, 2013 April 19, 2013 April 19, 2013 Featuring: HYATT REGENCY GREENVILLE Featuring:

April April 19, 2013 19, 2013 T Featuring: Featuring: April 19, 2013 Featuring: For reservations & details visit Featuring: April 19, 2013

Downtown Alive The Tarlatans Apr. 11 – 232-2273 Peace Center Bobby McFerrin Apr. 11 ~ 467-3000 Metropolitan Arts Council Some Like It Hot: Encaustic Art in the Upstate Through Apr. 12 ~ 467-3132 The Warehouse Theatre

Romeo and Juliet • Live Performance by • Entertainment by Through Apr. 13 ~ 235-6948 HYATT REGENCY GREENVILLE artist Jared Emerson REGENCY Encore, Upstate’s HYATT • Live Performance by • EntertainmentGREENVILLE by Premier Party Band • artist GeoffJared Hart Emerson of WYFF, Encore, Upstate’s REGENCY GREENVILLE Master of REGENCY Ceremonies • Silent & Party Live Auctions Premier Band HYATT GREENVILLE • Geoff Hart of WYFF,

• Live Performance by • Silent Entertainment by Master of Auctions • Ceremonies Live Performance by & Live • Entertainment by artist Jared Emerson Encore, Upstate’s artist Jared Emerson Encore, Upstate’s HYATT REGENCY GREENVILLE erformance by www.fmnball.org/upstate • Entertainment by Premier Party Band Party Band For reservations &Entertainment details visit Premier • Geoff Hart of WYFF, Live Performance by • by • Live Performance by artist Jared Emerson • Geoff Hart of WYFF, ared Emerson Encore, HYATT REGENCY GREENVILLE BLACK TIE OPTIONAL.Upstate’s RESERVATIONS ARE REQUIRED. Master of Ceremonies • Encore, Silent & Upstate’s Live Auctions artistwww.fmnball.org/upstate Jared Emerson Master ofParty Ceremonies • Silent & Live Auctions Premier Band • Geoff Hart of WYFF, Master of Ceremonies Hart of WYFF, Premier Party Band BLACK TIE OPTIONAL. RESERVATIONS ARE REQUIRED. • Your Geoff Hart WYFF, support helps raise awareness, advance research, and enhance of Ceremonies • ofSilent & Live • support Live by ••Auctions Entertainment by forPerformance those affected by Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias. • Entertainment by Encore, Upstate’s Master of Ceremonies Silent & Live Auctions support helps Emerson raise awareness, and enhance •Your Live Performance by advance•research, Entertainment by artist Jared Encore, Upstate’s Premier Party Band supportwww.fmnball.org/upstate for those affected by Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias. artist Jared Emerson Encore, Upstate’s www.fmnball.org/upstate Premier Party Band • GeoffBLACK HartTIEofOPTIONAL. WYFF, RESERVATIONS ARE REQUIRED. Premier Party Band • Silent & Live Auctions BLACK TIE OPTIONAL. RESERVATIONS ARE REQUIRED. • Master Geoff Hart of WYFF, of Ceremonies • Silent & Live Auctions ww.fmnball.org/upstate www.fmnball.org/upstate Master of Ceremonies • Silent & Live Auctions

Featuring: Featuring: For reservations & details&visitdetails visit For reservations For reservations details visit For& reservations & details visit For details visit visit For reservations reservations & & details

ACK TIE OPTIONAL. RESERVATIONS ARE REQUIRED. Your support helps raise awareness, advance research, and enhance Your support helpsRESERVATIONS raise awareness,ARE advance research, and enhance BLACK TIE OPTIONAL. REQUIRED. support for those affected by Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias.

support for those affected by Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias.

www.fmnball.org/upstate www.fmnball.org/upstate

helps raise awareness, advance research, and enhance support helps raise advance research, and enhance e affected Your by Alzheimer’s disease andawareness, related dementias. support for those affected by Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias.

BLACK TIE OPTIONAL. RESERVATIONS ARE REQUIRED. BLACK TIE OPTIONAL. RESERVATIONS ARE REQUIRED.

Your support helps raise awareness, advance research, and enhance Your for support raisebyawareness, advance anddementias. enhance support thosehelps affected Alzheimer’s diseaseresearch, and related support for those affected by Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias.

34 THE JOURNAL | APRIL 5, 2013

April 5 – 11, 2013 Centre Stage A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum Through Apr. 21 ~ 233-6733 Greenville County Museum of Art Jamie Wyeth, Rockwell Kent and Monhegan Through Apr. 21 ~ 271-7570 William H. Johnson: Native Son Through Sep. 29 ~ 271-7570 Jackson Marketing Vision Gallery Works by Carole Tinsley Through Apr. 27 ~ 272-3000 Metro. Arts Council @ Centre Stage Works by Kim Hassold Through Apr. 29 ~ 233-6733 Greenville Chamber of Commerce Photographs by William Abbott and Lynn Pilewski Through May 3 ~ 242-1050


JOURNAL HOMES

DETAILS

Featured Homes & Neighborhoods | Open Houses | Property Transfers

Live within minutes of Downtown Greenville in this stunning new home to be constructed in this popular North Main Area. The home designed for Highland Homes by Mel Dias Designs will look as though it has been a part of this traditional neighborhood for years, but will incorporate craftsman architecture with the modern luxuries and green technologies of homes built today. The upper and lower levels offer plenty of places for the whole family to spread out. Amenities will include hardwood floors, Granite countertops, and Energy Star appliances and high efficiency heating and air conditioning systems. Don’t miss this opportunity to own brand new construction in this convenient and established North Main community.

THIS WEEK’S FEATURED HOME

HOME INFO Price: $525,000 | Square Footage: Approx. 3100 Bedrooms: 4 Baths: 3.5 Schools: Stone Academy League Academy | Greenville High Energy Efficient Appliances, Detached 2-car Garage, Relaxing Screened Porch Contact: Patrick Franzen 864.250.1234 patrickfranzen@msn.com Highland Homes 864.233.4175 www.highlandhomessc.com To submit your Open House: homes@greenvillejournal.com

W Mountainview, North Main Area, Greenville

T FU Main Level

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G TIN S I L

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Future Space: 721 Unfinished Lower Level

ICE PR

PARKINS MILL

CLUB FOREST

AUGUSTA RD AREA

HIGHGROVE ESTATES

POINSETT CORNERS

28 Quail Hill Drive MLS#1253667 • $995,000

40 Club Forest Lane MLS#1253827 • $629,900

8 Byrd Boulevard MLS# 1256932 • $519,000

14 Ganibrille Court MLS#1256672 • $459,000

112 W Broad Street MLS#1254581 • $309,900

Helen Hagood

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

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Selling Greenville for over 28 years. Ranked #4 out of 100 Agents. 864.419.2889 | See my listings: cbcaine.com/agents/HelenHagood

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APRIL 5, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 35


JOURNAL HOMES

PE OPL E, AWA RD S, HONOR S

FEATURED OPEN HOUSE

O P E N S U N D AY, A P R I L 7 F R O M 2 – 5 P M

Coldwell Banker Caine Honored with Multiple Awards at Cartus Broker Network International Conference GREENVILLE, S.C. – March 13, 2013 – Coldwell Banker Caine was awarded the Five Star award and the Platinum award in recognition of its service to Cartus and the customers, members and relocating employees whom the company assists. The Cartus Five Star Award, recognizes brokers who have met or exceeded their individual objectives for outgoing brokerto-broker referral closings during the calendar year. The Platinum Award is the highest level of the Excellence Awards presented to Cartus Broker Network members. Platinum Award recognition is based on performance results related to a wide variety of goals including customer service, cost management, and effective analysis and marketing of homes. During 2012, Platinum Award recipients represented the top 10 percent of firms in the Principal Network. “The Cartus Broker Network is comprised of the top achievers in each market,” said Gerald Pearce, Cartus executive vice president, Broker Services, Affinity Services, and Cartus Asset Recovery. “The significant achievement of Coldwell Banker Caine in winning honors in multiple categories exemplifies the level of commitment that makes our brokers such valued partners. We are proud to be affiliated with the most accomplished cadre of real estate professionals in the industry.” “Receiving these awards from the Cartus Broker Network highlights the benefits that we bring each other and the emphasis quality that both our organizations endorse,” said Brad Halter, President of Coldwell Banker Caine. Representing 835 of the top-performing brokers across the country, the Cartus Broker Network provides real estate services to clients and customers of Cartus’ affinity, corporate, and government clients. In 2012, Cartus and the Cartus Broker Network closed sales of approximately 79,000 properties, with a value of more than $21 billion, on behalf of Cartus clients and Network members.

209 Weddington Lane, Linden Park This custom built ranch has 3 bedrooms and 2.5 baths on main level and a bonus room upstairs. Covered front and back porch, double garage, custom features like granite countertops, 9’ ceilings, oak hardwood flooring, ceramic tile baths, and nice molding package. If you’re ready to simplify your life, we think Linden Park is a good option. Homes are built in traditional Craftsman style, with deep porches, efficient floorplans, and natural materials such as brick, stone, and fiber cement siding. Simple, classic lines and rich details give each home a timeless appeal that is grounded in old world quality. Guided by strict architectural guidelines, we have some of Greenville’s best local builders ready to personalize your home design and help you through the selection process. Linden Park is just a stone’s throw from I-385 and short walk to shopping and downtown Simpsonville. Life here moves at an easier pace. If this is the kind of relaxed, engaging atmosphere that brings you pleasure, we invite you to visit us at Linden Park.

HOME INFO Price: $259,900 | MLS#: 1247923 Directions: I-385 exit Hwy 417 (Main Street Simpsonville) towards Simpsonville. Left on Hwy 14. Right on Stokes Rd. Linden Park 100 yards on right. Schools: Simpsonville Elementary Hillcrest Middle | Hillcrest High Contact: Providence Realty & Marketing 864.676.1719 | www.alleghenycommunity.com To submit your Open House: homes@greenvillejournal.com

About Coldwell Banker Caine: As a premier provider of full-service real estate

C O N T I N U E D… PA G E 4 3

36 THE JOURNAL | APRIL 5, 2013

 FOR MORE INFORMATION

JournalHOMES.com


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116 Ridge Glen - Simpsonville

99 Echo Dr. - Caesars Head

115 Siena Dr. - Montebello

$895,000 • 1252670 • 4 BR/3.5 BA

$750,000 • 1243569 • 3 BR/2.5 BA

$749,000 • 1240775 • 4 BR/3.5 BA

8 Acre Estate includes 5 car garage w/2 BR. 1.5 BA apartment, 2 story barn and salt water pool Valerie Miller 864.430.6602 | Chuck Miller 864.293.4778

Amazing Views! ≈ 3000 foot elevation, Old Caesar’s Head community Tom Marchant 864.449.1658

1 Story w/lower level walkout, ≈5000 sf, lake front Nancy McCrory 864.505.8367 | Karen Turpin 864.230.5176

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3 Andy Ct. - On Lake Robinson

225 Meyers Dr. - Sunset Hills

106 Wren Way - Swansgate

$405,000 • 1250243 • 3 BR/3 BA

$337,500 • 1255804 • 3 BR/3 BA

$299,000 • 1250156 • 2 BR/2BA + office

Arrowhead, 5 car garage, workshp and pool. Panoramic lake view. Updates: hdwds, granite, windows and roof. Valerie Miller 864.430.6602 | Chuck Miller 864.293.4778

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Sought after street, ≈ 0.42 acres & 1990 sf, hardwoods, updated kitchen ‘08 Anne Marchant 864.420.0009 | Jolene Wimberly 864. 414.1688

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310 Ashford Ave. - Stone Lake Heights

111 E. McBee Ave. - The Bookends

$259,000 • 1254678 • 3 BR/2.5 BA + bonus

$258,000 • 1256393 • 1 BR/ 1.5 BA

Quite cul-de-sac, some hdwds, many updates: landsp’g, AC unit, some painting in/out, prof. carpet cleaning. Anne Marchant 864.420.0009 | Jolene Wimberly 864. 414.1688

ial erc m m Co

≈1300 sf corner loft, modern design, 2 story living rm, offers granite & stainless appl’s, 1/2 block from Main St. Chas Whitmire 864.430.6110

6343 Highway 418 - Fountain Inn $249,921 • 1252537 • 4 BR/3 BA

7+ Acres convenient to Woodruff Rd. New Roof Joan Rapp 864.901.3839

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64 Ryan Dr. - Fountain Inn $199,921 • 1246784 • ≈5000 SF

Great floor plan, hardwood floors, deck, ≈ 2500 sf Tom Marchant 864.449.1658

101 Ramblewood Ln. - Wildaire $185,000 • 1250944 • 3 BR/2 BA

108 Lomond Ln. - Glen Garry $149,900 • 1254199 • 3 BR/2BA

e om g Inc ducin Pro

128 A & B Hyde Cr. - Mauldin $129,921 • 1236205 • 4 BR/2 BA

Great service business space, w/office & full BA. Free income generating mobile home on premise.

Cul-de-sac lot, hardwood floors & built-ins, convient location

Amazing ranch w/fenced yard, upgraded Kitchen cabinets, carpet and lam. Hdwds

Completely redone duplex inside and out. Income producing of $1325

Joan Rapp 864.901.3839

Mary Praytor 864.593.0366

James Akers 864.325.8413

Joan Rapp 864.901.3839

RENTAL PROPERTIES AVAILABLE • Marchantpm.com

www.marchantco.com

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

|

864.467.0085 | AGENT ON DUTY: Mary Praytor 864.593.0366

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Celebrating 20 years of Service in the Upstate APRIL 5, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 37


JOURNAL HOMES

JOURNAL HOMES

OPEN THIS WEEKEND SPAULDING FARM

O P E N S U N D AY, A P R I L 7 F R O M 2 – 4 P M CLAREMONT

2 BUCKLAND WAY . $899,900 . MLS#1256669

523 CHAMBLEE BLVD . $769,000 . MLS#1252608

5BR/4 Full/2 Half BA What an incredible home! Beautiful home coupled with in ground pool, fun pool house, extensive deck and pool decking, outdoor landscape lighting, brick and wrought iron fence in the backyard.

4BR/4BA Beautiful home under construction in gated community. MBR and 2nd BR + Study on main. Upstairs2BR/2BA + Bonus. 385 S to Roper Mtn exit, L off ramp, go 5 miles to Right into SD on Chamblee Blvd.

Contact: Charlotte Sarvis 864-346-9943 Carol Pyfrom Realty

Contact: Margaret Marcum/Leigh Irwin 420-3125/380-7755 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

SPAULDING FARM

KINGSBRIDGE

KINGSBRIDGE

205 RYAN’S RUN COURT . $699,000 . MLS#1256871

406 KINGSGATE CT . $569,900 . MLS#1255899

1 CROWN GATE COURT . $735,000 . MLS#1256407

4BR/3.5BA First time on market! Highly sought after lake lot with fantastic view from large lot. Beautiful, gently lived in, custom built home! First floor extra thick tile exudes quality.

3BR/2BA Exquisite custom built home by Bergeron Builders in Kingsbridge. Somany features. Come see! From Woodruff Rd to Left on Batesville Rd, Left into SD on Kingsgate Rd

5BR/4.5BA Spacious all brick home in premier gated community. Hardwoods, plantation shutters, detailed moldings, french doors and built ins throughout, 2 gas fireplaces, central vacuum, intercom, and walk in closets.

Contact: Tara Singleton 250-2112 Carol Pyfrom Realty

Contact: Jeffrey Meister 979-4633 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Cynthia Serra 304-3372 Allen Tate Realtors

HAMMETT CREEK

STONEHAVEN

CARISBROOKE

9 CLAYMORE COURT . $539,900 . MLS#1256389

203 WINTER BROOK LANE . $407,500 . MLS#1254782

304 ROSEBUD LANE . $379,000 . MLS#1253870

4BR/3.5BA Estate home w in ground pool + large level fncd yard, bonus room, new hwd flrs all main, updated kit, elegance and style throughout.Dir: Old Sprtg to Hammett Rd, TR on Breton TR on Claymore, #9 on L.

4BR/3.5BA Stunning home in wonderful location. Spacious rooms. Master on main. This home has all you could want and is move-in ready. Woodruff Rd to Right on Hwy 14, Left on Mawell Rd, 2nd Left on Winter Brook.

3BR/2.5BA Exquisite brick ranch on cul-de-sac lot. Pelham Road to Hudson, Right into SD, Left to end of street, Right on Rosebud. Home on Left.

Contact: JJ Bowers 483-6172 RE/MAX Realty Professionals

Contact: Tim Keagy 905-3304 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Wanda Reed 270-4078 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

38 THE JOURNAL | APRIL 5, 2013

FOR MORE INFORMATION

JournalHOMES.com


JOURNAL HOMES

OPEN THIS WEEKEND AUGUSTA ROAD AREA

O P E N S U N D AY, A P R I L 7 F R O M 2 – 4 P M HOLLY TRACE

MERRIFIELD PARK

102 GROVE RD . $269,000 . MLS#1251251

317 CIRCLE SLOPE DR . $258,900 . MLS#1256279

14 ENFIELD WAY . $239,900 . MLS#1255645

4BR/3.5BA Beautifully renovated brick bungalow home. Hardwood floors throughout, granite coutertops & much more. Augusta Circle, Hughes and Greenville High Schools. Augusta Rd to Grove Rd, 3rd home on Right.

4BR/3BA Beautiful brick home w/frml LR & DR, large den, screened porch. Extremely well kept both inside & out. Woodruff Rd to Hwy 14, Take a Right, SD on Right

3BR/2BA Outstanding in every detail. Impressive corner lot, a showplace in every way. Offers Souther lifestyle and sophisticated flair. 85 to Pelham Rd towards GVL, R on Hudson Rd, R on Devenger, R into SD.

Contact: Ashley R. Behlke 915-0253 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

MOUNTAIN LAKE II

Contact: Cynthia Rehberg 884-9953 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

BETHEL GREENE

Contact: Sharon Gillespie 553-9975 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

RIVER SHOALS

112 LILLIE MARIE DR . $189,900 . MLS#1254030

5 THOMAS LN . $182,500 . MLS#1254243

141 ST JOHNS ST . $180,000 . MLS#1255902

3BR/2BA Charming Cape Cod in quiet meighborhood in Award Winning Wren School District. Master on main. 85 South to Exit 35. Turn Right towards Easley. Right on Timms Road. Turn Left into subdivision.

3BR/2BA This easy flowing floorplan will have you yearning to entertain!. 385 South to Left on Bridges Rd, Right on Holland Rd, Right on Bethel Greene Ct, Left on Bethel Way, Right on Thomas Ln.

3BR/2.5BA Like new, move-in ready home in amenity rich SD. 385 South towards Columbia, R on Exit 29 - West Georgia Rd, R off the exit, go about 3 miles to R on Rio Grande Pl, R on Wateree, R on St Johns St.

Contact: Marie Barton 903-1840 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Chet & Beth Smith 458-SOLD(7653) Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Vivian Gorski 349-6090 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

TRAILS @ WINDSOR FOREST

SPARTANBURG AREA

GREER AREA

108 WELSFORD CT . $174,900 . MLS#1251751

1 BARNETT STREET . $124,000 . MLS#1256157

404 PENNSYLVANIA AVE . $77,900 . MLS#1251311

3BR/2.5BA The perfect 2 story home w/large walk out lower level in a quiet cul-de-sac! Hwy 417 to Simpsonville, L on Hwy 14, R on Adams Mill, R on Brown, L on Rossway, L on Stillwater, 1st R on Welsford Ct.

3BR/2BA Meticulously maintained. Spacious living room w/cathedral ceilings, gallery kitchen. Huge fenced lot at .68 acres. From Wade Hampton Blvd towards Greer, left onto Hwy 357, left onto Barnett.

4BR/1BA Ideal family home, great updated floor plan, 1800+ SF. 100% USDA Financing available. Wade Hampton Blvd to Greer,Right on W. Poinsett St, Right on Pennsylvania.

Contact: Bob Schmidt 313-4474 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Maggie Aiken 616-4280 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Kathy Fleming 918-2142 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

APRIL 5, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 39


JOURNAL HOMES

R E A L E S TAT E - R E L AT E D N E W S Home Values Performed 42 Percent Better When Located Near Public Transportation During Last Recession

80 years of homework around the kitchen counter. The real estate professionals of the Caine Companies have always known real estate is about more than buying, selling or leasing houses and buildings. It’s about helping people come home—which we’ve been doing for the past 80 years. Let us help you find your dream home—visit cbcaine.com

March 21, 2013 - Location, location, location near public transportation may be the new real-estate mantra according to a new study released today by the American Public Transportation Association (APTA) and the National Association of Realtors® (NAR). Data in the study reveals that during the last recession, residential property values performed 42 percent better on average if they were located near public transportation with high-frequency service. “When homes are located near public transportation, it is the equivalent of creating housing as desirable as beach front property,” said APTA President and CEO Michael Melaniphy. “This study shows that consumers are choosing neighborhoods with high-frequency public transportation because it provides access to up to �ive times as many jobs per square mile as compared to other areas in a given region. Other attractive amenities in these neighborhoods include lower transportation costs, walkable areas and robust transportation choices.” “Higher home values re�lect greater market demand for areas near public transportation,” said 2013 President of the Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS® and Broker- in-Charge of Keller Williams Realty in Greenville, SC. “Transportation plays an important role in real estate and housing decisions, and the data suggests that residential real-estate near public transit will remain attractive to buyers going forward. A sound transportation system not only bene�its individual property owners, but also creates the foundation for a community’s long-term economic well being.” The study, The New Real-Estate Mantra: Location near Public Transportation, investigates how well residential properties located in a halfmile proximity to high-frequency public transportation or in the “public transit shed” have performed in holding their value during the recession compared to other properties in a given region. While residential property values declined substantially between 2006 to 2011, properties close to public transit showed signi�icantly stronger resiliency. The following are a few examples from the study: In Boston, residential property in the rapid transit area outperformed other properties in the region by an incredible 129 percent. In the Chicago public transit area home values performed 30 percent higher than the region; in San Francisco, 37 percent higher; Minneapolis-St Paul, 48 percent; and in Phoenix 37 percent higher. The study looked at �ive regions, which illustrate the types of highfrequency public transit systems throughout the U.S. High-frequency public transportation includes subway (heavy rail), light rail and bus rapid transit. This sample accurately projects the nationwide average (42 percent) variance among properties located near high-frequency public transportation and those that are located further away from public transit. The following table provides examples of the impact of high-frequency public transportation in the �ive study areas. Comparisons to the public transit shed versus the region show that the public transit shed provides access in some instances to more than three times more jobs per square mile as compared to other areas in a given region. (Note: not shown in the chart below but living near bus rapid transit in Boston resulted in access to �ive times more jobs per square mile compared to the region.) The table also illustrates that C O N T I N U E D… PA G E 4 2

40 THE JOURNAL | APRIL 5, 2013

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NEIGHBORHOOD PROFILE

DOWNTOWN GREER 111 Dan Street MLS#1250469 • $109,900

TAYLORS

19 Alderwood Court MLS#1252335 • $167,100

NEIGHBORHOOD INFO Prices starting in the : $180s

TAYLORS

14 Rising Meadow Lane MLS#1251726 • $217,900

Schools: Crestview Elementary School Greer Middle School Greer High School

Castle Rock, Greer, SC Castle Rock is a new community with Craftsman Style homes on 1/2 acre lots with beautiful mountain views! Located in Greer, just off Hwy 14 and minutes to Wade Hampton Blvd or Hwy 11. Prices starting in the $180s. All homes are on crawl space and include the following: 10x10 Deck, 2-Zone Sprinkler System for front lawn, Hardboard siding, Architectural Shingles, Stone Accents, Craftsman Style Garage Door, 9 ft ceilings, Smooth Ceilings, Rounded Corners, Arched Doorways, Hardwoods in Entry, 6” Baseboards, Cabinet Crown Molding and an Upgraded Paint Package. Receive up to an $8,000 Incentive when using our recommended Lender/Closing Attorney. Purchase one of our Inventory Homes and close in 22 Days! Call for details.

Contact: McAlister Realty 864.292.0400 www.BuilderPeople.com

GREENVILLE

115 Beaumont Creek Lane MLS#1250030 • $299,900

Visit our Model Home which is open daily! Mon-Fri 12pm - 5pm and Sat-Sun 1pm-4pm

SIMPSONVILLE

100 Moorgate Drive MLS#1247608 • $349,900

BuilderPeople.com | 864.292.0400 SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

APRIL 5, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 41


JOURNAL HOMES

G R E E N V I L L E T R A N S AC T ION S

R E A L E S TAT E - R E L AT E D N E W S

M A R C H 11 - 15, 2 013

transportation costs are reduced by up to $351 a month for households residing in the public transit shed.

SUBD.

NORTH PARK COBBLESTONE MONTEBELLO ASHETON RACHEL BURNS IVY GROVE GOWER ESTATES BRIGHTON FIVE FORKS PLANTATION COURTYARDS ON W GEORGIA ROAD STONEHAVEN

SHELLBROOK PLANTATION

“Stable property values in areas with public transit access have a number of policy implications,” said Melaniphy. “As Congress and state and local governments look for ways to accelerate economic growth, this study shows that investing in public transportation is a boon to revitalizing our economy.” “When consumers choose a home, they also choose a lifestyle. Shorter commutes and more walkable neighborhoods matter to a growing number of people, especially those living in congested metro areas,” said Lawton. The American Public Transportation Association (APTA) is a nonpro�it international association of 1,500 public and private sector organizations, engaged in the areas of bus, paratransit, light rail, commuter rail, subways, waterborne services, and intercity and high-speed passenger rail. This includes: transit systems; planning, design, construction, and �inance �irms; product and service providers; academic institutions; transit associations and state departments of transportation. APTA is the only association in North America that represents all modes of public transportation. APTA members serve the public interest by providing safe, ef�icient and economical transit services and products More than 90 percent of the people using public transportation in the United States and Canada ride APTA member systems.

The National Association of Realtors®, “The Voice for Real Estate,” is America’s largest trade association, representing 1 million members involved in all aspects of the residential and commercial real estate industries. Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS® represents over 1,600 members in all aspects of the real estate industry. Please visit the Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS® web site at www.ggar.com for real estate and consumer information. “Every market is different, call a REALTOR® today.”

CHANDLER LAKE CUNNINGHAM POINT CREEKWOOD BRIDGEWATER CLEVELAND RIDGE HUDDERS CREEK WOODSTONE COTTAGES HUNTERS RIDGE COUNTRY CLUB ESTATES MORNING MIST FARM GREYSTONE COTTAGES COTTAGES @ HARRISON BRIDGE FOXGLOVE THE RESERVE AT GREEN VALLEY PENNBROOKE AT ASHBY PARK COPPER CREEK COPPER CREEK WINDERMERE NEELY FARM - DEER SPRINGS ROPER MOUNTAIN PLANTATION DUFFIE WOODS THE MEADOW@BLUE RIDGE PLANTATION HAMMETT CROSSING SUMMERWALK FAIRVIEW MEADOWS COTTAGES @ HARRISON BRIDGE HERITAGE CREEK WOODLAND CREEK ENOREE TRACE JENKINS ESTATES FAIRVIEW CHASE THE HEIGHTS

FIELDSTONE CARRIAGE WEST REID VALLEY SUMMERFIELD THE MEADOWS AT GILDER CREEK FARM NEELY FARM - LAUREL BROOK DWELLING HEIGHTS STALLINGS HEIGHTS THE GROVE

PRICE

SELLER

$3,750,000 $923,000 $800,000 $706,850 $693,700 $642,500 $520,000 $500,000 $481,000 $450,000 $420,000 $370,000 $368,000 $360,000 $357,725 $355,000 $355,000 $350,000 $328,450 $328,000 $325,000 $305,745 $300,000 $299,750 $289,406 $258,000 $256,724 $249,000 $245,900 $233,000 $232,500 $224,900 $224,900 $224,900 $224,000 $222,675 $219,500 $208,000 $207,100 $202,150 $200,000 $196,500 $196,000 $194,000 $186,609 $185,000 $184,000 $179,000 $178,500 $176,623 $174,500 $174,378 $174,015 $174,000 $172,196 $170,510 $168,000 $167,500 $166,900 $163,700 $162,500 $155,000 $153,750 $152,000 $152,000 $151,000 $150,000 $150,000

PELHAM PLACE PROPERTIES WBCMT 2007-C33 RETAIL 30 WHITE MARSHA P COTTINGHAM A HALLAM IV SUBER DEVELOPMENT LLC SC GREER WADE HAMPTON LL BURGESS J TYLER GAUTREY CHRISTOPHER WAGNER RUSSELL A REVOCAB LEIPPRANDT JAMES A (JTWR KERN KATHERINE BLOCK MARIA E BUTLER ALVINA R HAMILTON BARBARA B (JTWR MURPHY EMILY N CRAMER EVAN C (JTWROS) PHILIP ANDREW (JTWROS) AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL R ARBOR HOMES LLC CBNA-SC LLC BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT HARRISON JAMES E T & C VENTURES PROPERTIE BROOME JAMES F III (JTWR DILEO NICHOLAS V JR CRETEGNY LAURENT MARK III PROPERTIES INC NVR INC VIRANI LLC HASELDEN TIMOTHY L (JTWR GOODIN JOEL DENNIS RASHA DARWIN H JR (JTWRO NANCE TERI L HOFFMAN SUSAN A SOUTHSIDE ASSEMBLY OF GO SCBT BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT MICHAEL CHRISTOPHER FAWAZ JENNIFER L (JTWROS COLOMBARINI ELENA REYNOSOL CORP A MICHIGAN MESA HOLDINGS LLC BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT SANDERS ELAINE B PYHALA JACOB MCMANN EARL H (JTWROS) BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT MILLER PAMELA L C & A PROPERTY HOLDINGS BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT BARBER ROBERT D TOMSKI STEVEN M LAFAILLE KELLY S SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND ROSEWOOD OF THE PIEDMONT SPARKS-WYNN L ANN FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG HORN PAIGE C CONGER KYLE J EVANS CAROLINE I SEWELL HOKUN MENGELER WILFRIED (JTWRO ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC MICHAUD GERALD (JTWROS) DWELLING GROUP LLC BERG ELLEN (JTWROS) HAGINS ROBERT W FITZGERALD GERALD N (JTW GVAA LLC BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT HAWKINS MELISSA J U S BANK NATIONAL ASSOCI BUTCHER TRACEY ELLEN EDW FANNIN ALEXANDER (JTWROS SERRA AMANDA L HUFFMAN CHAD AARON MUNGO HOMES INC ADDISON WILLIAM (JTWROS) MUNGO HOMES INC KRIMMEL FRANK B III HALL CHARLES DEWITT STEWARDSON JAMES E (JTWR OGBURN LONNIE J GOWAN FRASER N ENGLE CRAIG (JTWROS) JOHNSON JOSHUA P (JTWROS MULE’ JAMES V WHISNANT DIANE M FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG PRICE GERALD D KYZER PAUL D WEIGAND GORDON H (JTWROS DOYLE ROGER M GAJDA SEAN M (JTWROS) HOWES DONNA DURYEA JASON A (SURV) HOWELL MARK J DORSCH CARLA L (JTWROS) DWELLING GROUP LLC DUBOSE HOLLI K FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG AMERICAN HOMES 4 RENT PR NVR INC PATTERSON THEODORE K (JT SK BUILDERS INC FRANKLIN BENJAMIN W (JTW CORBY ANTOINETTE M LINDSEY TARREN B MUNGO HOMES INC HILLS CHRISTOPHER (JTWRO NVR INC MORAN MATTHEW D STROBLE CHRISTINE T HOLCOMBE DARRYL (JTWROS) MARTIN LAUREN E ANDERSON VICTORIA LANE JAIME JUAN CARLOS COPELAND PRISCILLA C FBSA 1 LLC WADE NATHAN SORRENTINO GLENN AMERICAN HOMES 4 RENT PR HOCK AARON M AMERICAN HOMES 4 RENT PR CWALT INC ALTERNATIVE LO STRUTZ DELPHINE BELL TRACEY L MORGAN MARIA COLEMAN EDDIE L GERAPETRITIS HARRY (JTWR MOONEYHAM LIBBY R HUNT VIRGINIA A J & H INVESTMENTS LLC SK BUILDERS INC SMITH RYAN D AMERICAN HOMES 4 RENT PR

Agents on call this weekend

BILLY WEBSTER 630-4951 PELHAM RD.

KIMBERLY ARNOLD 616-7310 SIMPSONVILLE

42 THE JOURNAL | APRIL 5, 2013

KAAREN ANDERSON 979-9954 WOODRUFF RD.

SUSANNA ERICKSON 879-4239 GREER

SHARON GILLESPIE 553-9975 PLEASANTBURG

LISA WATSON 918-6105 EASLEY/ POWDERSVILLE

VICKI DUKE 979-8425 AUGUSTA RD.

BUYER

ADDRESS 1601 WASHINGTON AVE STE 700 1030 PARKINS MILL RD 2721 DEVINE ST 1107 N MAIN ST 114 STRATHMORE DR 617 BRIXTON CIR 8 SPOLETO CT 617 MCDANIEL AVE 6 PENN CTR W 2ND FL 6602 CALHOUN MEMORIAL HWY 28 GROVE VALLEY WAY 721 PARKINS MILL RD 206 STEADMAN WAY 30 PATEWOOD DR STE 257 526 TOMOTLEY CT 15 TROWBRIDGE CT 6810 MOUNTAIN VIEW RD 3315 ANDERSON RD 22 STAR FISH CT 302 ELM ST 200 BI LO BLVD 15 TEA OLIVE PL 7 CUNNINHAM POINT CT 133 CREEK SHOALS DR PO BOX 1039 405 OAKLAND AVE APT 202 40 MARIETTA ST 6 LITTEN WAY 51 PARK VISTA WAY 39 DOUGLAS DR 502 TULIP TREE LN 601 CASTLESTONE DR 27 BRIARHILL DR 14 AMBERJACK CT PO BOX 1039 4801 FREDERICA ST 206 BRANCHESTER CT 3 BUENA VISTA AVE 8 KENNARD CT 305 LEIGH CREEK DR 211 UNDERSTONE DR 3 HUNTSMAN CT 305 BATTERY BLVD 105 LOST TREE LN 107 BERRIGAN PL 4900 LOCUST HILL RD 5 COTTER LN 4 SUMMER HILL RD 407 BLUE SAGE PL 38 BRIARHILL DR 23815 STUART RANCH RD 228 MEADOW ROSE DR 128 SAFFRON WAY 3810 FORK SHOALS RD 302 RIVERS EDGE CIR 108 SHALE CT 3118 CANNON RD 104 CAMMER AVE 48 CANTERA CIR 200 S MEMMINGER ST 23815 STUART RANCH RD 23815 STUART RANCH RD 107 MEETING PL 303 WILD HORSE CREEK DR 304 WHILDEN RIDGE CT 8 CAMMER AVE 52 SAINT MARK RD 23815 STUART RANCH RD

Interested in Buying or Selling a home? Contact one of our Agents on Call or visit us online at

cdanjoyner.com.

FOR MORE INFORMATION

JournalHOMES.com


PE OPL E, AWA RD S, HONOR S  in the Upstate, Coldwell Banker Caine

is a nationally competitive firm that has the highest per person productivity in the Upstate. The company offers quality residential and commercial real estate services across Greenville, Spartanburg, Oconee and Pickens counties. Family owned and operated, Coldwell Banker Caine has been providing service beyond the contract to the Upstate community since 1933. About Cartus and the Cartus Broker Network: Cartus Broker Network is the nation’s leading network of more than 811 market-leading real estate firms representing approximately 3,000 offices and more than 109,000 agents. Cartus provides trusted guidance to organizations of all types and sizes that require global relocation solutions. Cartus serves 64 percent of the Fortune 50. We provide service in more than 165 countries, applying our more than half century of experience to help our clients with their mobility, outsourcing, consulting, and language and intercultural training needs. Cartus is part of Realogy Holdings Corp.

JOURNAL HOMES

S PA RTA N B U R G T R A N S A C T I O N S O C T O B E R 27 – N O V E M B E R 2 , 2 012 SUBD.

PRICE

SELLER

BUYER

ADDRESS

WILLOW CREEK

$500,000 $492,000 $440,000 $399,500 $395,000 $375,000 $348,230 $274,900 $241,171 $189,500 $183,000 $171,359 $170,000 $169,500 $166,000 $160,000 $160,000 $160,000 $154,900 $154,900 $150,000 $150,000 $145,000 $144,000 $144,000 $140,000 $140,000 $139,900 $135,000 $132,700 $132,357 $132,000 $129,900 $124,900 $118,000 $115,200 $110,500 $104,900 $100,332 $100,000 $96,600 $96,000

JEFFREY, BENNY ROMANA LLC HALL JR, GEORGE MILFORD MARSTON, BRIAN SCHUEBEL, MARTIN AMES, JOHNNIE DOUVILLE, MATTHEW THOMAS FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGAGE EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LLC WILLIAMS, GEORGE B FICHTER, BARRY L MUNGO, HOMES INC WALLACE, GARY F CLAYTON, HARLEY N GOODWIN, JAMES HARRISON MCKALE, CHRISTIAN K SCHWARTZ, ERIC R ASHMORE, HOMES INC EDMUNDSON, DEBOIS L CONDREY, JAMES HACK, JOACHIM M SPLAWN, BRENDA F CANNON, MARK L FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE KING, JEREMY R LANFORD, GEORGIA W HARPING, RUSSELL J SIENA PROPERTIES LLC MENARD, MICHAEL L DISTINGUISHED DESIGN LLC REYNOLDS, KRISTIN PAYNE, KENNETH H RANDY CAMP CONSTRUCTION LLC WILLIAMS, APRIL L KIDWELL, RONNIE W DISTRINGUISHED DESIGN MITCHELL, JAMES A BIJEAU, CARL M LEWIS, AMANDA M RKP LLC WILLIAMSON, JOHN F KANG, SAMON

SARNACKI, MARK S ROBERTS, BRANDON T GREER STATE BANK LANCE, MICHELLE D GOURDEAU, ROBERT P DESHIELDS, JOHN COX, MATTHEW M GUY, DENNIS BHARDWAJ, MUNISH BALL, JAMES R COATS, MIRANDA E STONE, MARY G WILLIAMS JR, MICHAEL D JOHNSON, RANDALL E SHIELDS, PATRICK R MASON, WILLIAM W KILLIAN, BENJAMIN CREWS, FAITH P DAWSON JR, THEODORE R BEDENBAUGH, PATRICIA M WILLIAM, RICARDO CLAYTON, HARLEY N POOLE JR, CHARLES T VAN HOOSIER, ADRIAN TAYLOR, TIMOTHY N BOYTER, RICHARD A GALLAGHER, DALE M KOBEE, CHRISTOPHER M BAILEY, MICHAEL SCOTT STEWART, THOMAS L THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON HAMRICK, JOSHUA L POSTOL MITCHELL, BERNARD CRUTCHFIELD, LORELEI B BUSHEE, JAMIE L SHELTON, CASEY A NIAMIRA, SIARHEI JOLLIE, SHAUN J US BANK TRUST NA SCBT RUSCH, CHIRSTOPHER S HOLLY DRIVE PROPERTIES INC

164 TUPELO DR 618 PARK RIDGE CIR 2920 BISHOP RD 681 DRIFTWOOD DR 208 TUPELO DR 953 NANTAHALA DR 151 BRANDERMILL RD 999 NANTAHALA DR 307 PARK RIDGE CIR 174 BRADFORD CROSSING DR 123 CASTLETON CIR 523 GOLDSTONE LN 804 SOMERSET PL 222 CARBANDY DR 133 MCINTOSH LN 505 SUNCREST CT 103 CLARICE CIR 8 HOLCOMBE RD 2051 RAINBOW LAKE RD 218 LEGACY DR 434 ROSEHAVEN WAY 823 WHITE MAGNOLIA DR 405 HIXONWOOD DR 820 BAYSHORE LN 315 BRIGHT FARM RD 109 CHARLESTOWN CT 689 JORDAN CREEK RD 633 ADELAIDE DR 36 DEWRIDGE CT LOT NUMBER: 25 325 STILLWATER CIR 328 ST JAMES DR 520 CORNUCOPIA LN 237 ABIGAIL LN 383 SMITHVIEW DR 235 WALCOTT DR 684 THORNBIRD CIR 2027 BALLENGER RD 298 PROMISED LAND DR 510 S ALABAMA AVE 118 LORETTA DR 1561 SETTLE RD

MILFORD HALL WILLOW CREEK WILLOW CREEK CROOKED CREEK WOODRIDGE CROOKED CREEK VILLAGE AT BENT CREEK BRADFORD CROSSING COBBS CREEK HANGING ROCK CAMBRIDGE GRAMLING HILLS ORCHARD HILLS SUNSET POINTE SPRINGDALE HOLCOMBE CREEK COVINGTON RIDGE BENT CREEK PLANTATION SHALLOWFORD SWEETWATER HILLS BRIGHT FARMS BRADFORD WEST LAKE COOLEY LANDING WESTGATE PLANTATION RAINTREE WOODLAND FOREST HIDDEN CREEK TOWN HOUSES WOODLAND HEIGHTS HARVEST RIDGE TYGER WOODS LOCKLAND PLACE EAGLE POINTE BALLENGER ACRES TRINITY GATES SHORESWOOD CARRIAGE PARK

Welcome to the Team! Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS is proud to announce new sales associates have joined the company.

REGINA SALLEY

VIVIAN GORSKI

LINDA BROWN

JAMES MOSER

Easley Cell 864-979-9646 rsalley@cdanjoyner.com

Simpsonville Cell 864-349-6090 vgorski@cdanjoyner.com

Simpsonville Cell 864-884-0966 lbrown@cdanjoyner.com

Simpsonville Cell 864-752-5862 jmoser@cdanjoyner.com

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

APRIL 5, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 43


journal culture

the week in photos

look who’s in the journal this week Lander LaRue and Chase Freeman, students in Cathy Dodson’s fourth-grade Stone Academy class, won a contest for their essays explaining why they wanted to conduct the Greenville Symphony Orchestra. Maestro Edvard Tchivzhel invited the students to assist him in conducting the orchestra during the Greenville Symphony Orchestra Michelin’s Children’s Concert at the Peace Center.

THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA NOTICE NOTICE OF SERVICE BY PUBLICATION (Termination of Child Support) STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE FAMILY COURT OF THE 13th CIRCUIT DARYL S. THOMAS PLAINTIFF V. BELICIA M. GRANT DEFENDANT, PLAINTIFF TAKE NOTICE that a Petition to terminate your receipt of child support payments has been filed in Greenville County Family Court in the 13th Circuit, Greenville County, South Carolina. YOU ARE required to make defense to such pleading not later than May 6, 2013, exclusive of said date, and upon your failure to do so, the party seeking service against you will apply to the Court for summary judgment for the relief sought on or after May 7, 2013. You are also hereby notified that you have the right to be represented by to a lawyer in this case. This the22nd day of March, 2013. Charles W. Marchbanks, Jr., Attorney for Plaintiff 1225 S. Church Street, Greenville, SC 29605 (864) 5521606 S. C. Bar No. 76395 AMENDED SUMMONS STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA, COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS THIRTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT CASE NO.: 2012-CP-23-2009 TINA FREEMAN YOUMANS, Plaintiff, v. DUGOUT OF GREENVILLE, INC., DREDD (LAST NAME UNKNOWN) AND PROTECTIVE DIVISION ONE SECURITY, LLC, Defendant. TO THE DEFENDANTS ABOVENAMED: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint in this action, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to serve a copy of your answer to the said Complaint on the subscriber at his office at 112 Wakefield Street, P.O. Box 10496, Greenville, South Carolina 29601 within thirty days (30) after the service hereof, exclusive of the day of such service; and, if you fail to appear and defend by filing an answer to the Complaint within the time aforesaid, judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. Respectfully submitted, FLETCHER N. SMITH, JR., Attorney at Law 112 Wakefield Street (29601) Post Office Box 10496, F.S., Greenville, South Carolina 29603 (864) 232-6541 GREENVILLE, South Carolina Dated: November 12, 2012

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING GREATER GREENVILLE SANITATION COMMISSION Adoption of Annual Budget 1 July 2013 thru 30 June 2014 SECOND READING Notice is hereby given that on Tuesday, 23rd April, 2013, at 5:30 p.m. in the Education Room of the Greater Greenville Sanitation Commission Headquarters located at 1600 West Washington Street, Greenville, South Carolina 29601, a public hearing will be held for a first reading of the 2013/2014 Annual Budget for the Sanitation Commission. The public is invited to attend. 2012/2013 Annual Operating Budget -10,388,062 2012/2013 Annual Capital Budget - 1,110,000 Anticipated 2012/2013 Revenue 11,450,000 Anticipated 2012/2013 Expenses -11,498,062 <> 2013/2014 Proposed Operating Budget - 10,180,342 2013/2014 Proposed Capital Budget - 1,005,000 Projected 2013/2014 Revenue 11,450,000 Projected 2013/2014 Expenses11,450,014 <> The percentage of change in the Operating Budgets from 2012/2013 and the Proposed 2013/2014 Budget is: . 4% Decrease 2012/2013 Tax Millage (14.54) $4,143,608.00 2013/2014 Tax Millage (14.54) $4,143,608.00 2012/2013 No Change in Sanitation Fee 2013/2014 No Change in Commercial Sanitation Fee $25.00 Vacant Lot Fee to be Levied ~ This Notice is given in lieu of the requirements of Section 4-9-130. Anyone wishing to be placed on the Agenda for Public Comment is asked to call the District at 2326721 extension 221 between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. Monday through Thursday. Public comments will be limited based on the number of persons addressing the Commission. Public comment can also be posted on the website. www.ggsc.gov Bob Taylor, Chairman Greenville County Council

SUMMONS AND NOTICE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF PICKENS IN THE PROBATE COURT 2012-ES-39-00584 In the matter of William Daniel Thomas, Deceased Jimmy R. King, Esq. as Agent for the Estate of Smith Thomas, Petitioner, vs. Heirs of the Decedent, William Daniel Thomas, a/k/a William Danny) Thomas, a/k/a Dan Thomas, a/k/a William D. Thomas, Respondents. TO: Heirs of the Decedent, William Daniel Thomas YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Petition in this action, of which a copy is herewith served upon you (a copy of the Petition can be obtained from Lewey C. Hammett, Jr., P.A. or from the Pickens County Probate Court), and to serve a copy of your Answer to the said Petition on the subscriber at his office at Lewey C. Hammett, Jr., P.A., 1821 North Boulevard, Anderson, South Carolina 29621, within thirty (30) days after the service hereof, exclusive of the day of such service; and if you fail to Answer the Petition within the time aforesaid, the Petitioner in this action will apply to the Court for the said relief demanded in the Petition. This shall also serve as Notice of a Hearing scheduled for Wednesday, June 19, 2013 at 9:30 a.m. at the Pickens County Probate Court located at 222 McDaniel Avenue, Suite B-16, Pickens, South Carolina 29671. Please be advised that the Probate Court may change the Hearing date to a date after June 19, 2013. Therefore, it is your responsibility to contact the Pickens County Probate Court for the dates of any Hearings occurring after June 19, 2013. You have the right to retain an attorney to represent your interest in this matter. If you retain legal counsel, please have your attorney to advise the Pickens County Probate Court immediately. Respectfully submitted, LEWEY C. HAMMETT, JR., P.A. LEWEY C. HAMMETT, JR. 1821 North Boulevard Anderson, SC 29621 (864) 226-5006 Attorney for Petitioner March 20, 2013

FORFEITED LAND COMMISSION SALE The Forfeited Land Commission (FLC) of Greenville County will begin selling assignments on properties not sold at the Greenville County Delinquent Tax Sale. This sale will begin April 30, 2013 at 1:00 p.m. in the Greenville County Treasurer’s office, 301 University Ridge, Suite 600. Random numbers will be drawn to establish place in line at 1:00 p.m. The FLC will accept offers-to-purchase equal to the published price for each property. Offers-to-purchase will be considered in the order submitted. The FLC reserves the right to reject any offer-to-purchase that does not meet these published requirements. Payment will only be accepted in the form of cash, cashier’s check or money order from a recognized financial institution and must be received at the time the sale is made. Property is sold “as is”. Tax accounts of buyers must be in good standing with the Greenville County Tax Collector. A list of the properties as well as an offer form can be obtained in the Forfeited Land Commission section of the Greenville County Treasurer’s web page –http://www.greenvillecounty. org/County_Treasurer/ or in the Greenville County Treasurer’s Office. SOLICIATION NOTICE MARKETING SERVICES Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: Marketing Services, RFP# 39-04/24/13, 3:00 P.M. Solicitations can be found at www. greenvillecounty.org or by calling (864) 467-7200.

SUMMONS STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA, COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS CASE NO.: 2013-CP-23HAROLD LEE MOON, Plaintiff, v. JESSICA DAWN PARSONS and ANNA CHASSE, Defendant. TO THE DEFENDANTS ABOVENAMED: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint in this action, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to serve a copy of your answer to the said Complaint on the subscriber at his office at 112 Wakefield Street, P.O. Box 10496, Greenville, South Carolina 29601 within thirty days (30) after the service hereof, exclusive of the day of such service; and, if you fail to appear and defend by filing an answer to the Complaint within the time aforesaid, judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. Respectfully submitted, FLETCHER N. SMITH, JR., Attorney at Law 112 Wakefield Street (29601) Post Office Box 10496, F.S., Greenville, South Carolina 29603 Greenville, South Carolina Dated: February 7, 2013 SOLICIATION NOTICE NONSTOP TANDEM COMPUTER MAINTENANCE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: RFP# 40-04/19/13, HP S7800 NonStop Tandem Computer Maintenance, April 19, 2013, 3:00 P.M. Solicitations can be found at www.greenvillecounty.org or by calling (864) 467-7200.

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that TLJG LLC/ DBA Bubbly, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 20 West McBee Street, Greenville, SC 29601. To object to the issuance of this license/ permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than April 7, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

Kendra Okonkwo participates in the Teddy Bear Day parade in Brenda Ellington’s K3 class at Mitchell Road Christian Academy. Washington Center student Takiona Peay benefits from the contribution of a vibrating chair made possible by the Hillcrest High School Spirit Week donations.

St. Anthony’s kindergarten and first-grade students went on a field trip with their Elder Buddies to downtown Greenville. They enjoyed a morning of adventure searching for Greenville’s Mice on Main, followed by lunch together.

LEGAL NOTICES Only $.79 per line • ABC NOTICE OF APPLICATION Only $145 tel 864.679.1205 • fax 864.679.1305 • email aharley@communityjournals.com

 Saturday, April 6, 2013 1:00—4:00 pm  

Greenville County Animal Care 328 Furman Hall Road Greenville, SC 29609

www.greenvillepets.org 44 THE Journal | APRIL 5, 2013

Greenville Middle Academy recently held its first annual Ram Run. Students enjoyed live music while they ran and walked on the school’s outdoor track. The students collected their pledges based on the number of laps they completed; all proceeds will support a new iPad lab at the school. Students were rewarded for their efforts through drawings for iPad Minis and other fun prizes.


journal culture

the week in photos

Learn more about this and other Upstate businesses in the 2013 edition of

look who’s in the journal this week Students from Boiling Springs High School create artistic interpretations of Igor Stravinski’s “The Rite of Spring.” The resulting art exhibit will go up April 18 at Chapman Cultural Center as part of the Spartanburg Philharmonic’s celebration of the 100th anniversary of Stravinski’s work.

This year’s Roses for Relief, presented by Greer Relief, continued to celebrate the Luck of the Irish. Green was the color of choice for most guests. The event raised more than $5,700.

MONTESSORI SCHOOL OF GREENVILLE 305 Pelham Rd., Greenville | 864.232.3447 www.montessorigreenville.com info@montessorigreenville.com

What makes us different from the competition? There is no trademark for a Montessori school. Each is unique. We hire the finest teachers. Tenure averages over sixteen years. Some of the parents were children themselves in our school. We have seen our students go on to prestigious universities such as Duke, MIT, Emory, some on full scholarships. In our forty-plus years, we have educated people with a passion for excelling in their field of expertise and giving back to their communities-as doctors, attorneys, biomedical statisticians, artists-doing what interests them most. Remember: Your local spending supports local jobs and businesses. Sales taxes support local schools...our future.

Crossword puzzle: page 46

Sudoku puzzle: page 46

To feature your business, call 679-1200.

APRIL 5, 2013 | THE Journal 45


journal culture

figure. this. out.

Welcome Spring

PC connections

By Don and Barbie Gagliardo

with our new door hangers!

Feed Your Inner Food Enthusiast

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3219 Augusta Street, Greenville 864-277-4180 • ThePickwick.net Monday-Friday 9-6 & Saturday 9-3

46 THE Journal | APRIL 5, 2013

J43

~ Your neighborhood pharmacy and soda fountain ~

Across 1 Bebop aficionado 8 Bond phrase 13 Harness 20 Soul mate 21 Vatican City statue 22 Landlord, at times 23 Track team 24 __-foot oil 25 Betty Boop feature 26 Subst. for unnamed things 27 Wonderland visitor 29 White House title: Abbr. 30 Suffix with cyan31 Unlike cons 32 Bit of fan support 34 Where to see a guest’s name 37 Actor Firth 39 Gouge 41 __ volente 42 City in Florida’s horse country 43 Bounded 44 “Rain Man” subject 46 __ Alto 48 Prone’s opposite 50 Jenny Craig suggestion, e.g. 52 Lady’s man 54 Changes for the better 57 Drawing for beginners 58 Piano lesson subject 61 Zoo channel 63 “Green Eggs and Ham” narrator

66 Toward the back 68 Soup __ 69 “You got it!” 70 Solo product 73 Restaurant specialist 75 A, to Aristotle 76 Ruin, as a scene 78 Like the main point 79 Buckeyes’ sch. 80 Short court plea 81 Sore loser 83 Droughty 85 Keeper’s counterpart? 87 Graf __ 88 It’s directly behind the three 92 “The Merchant of Venice” heroine 95 Parking spot border 97 Ace-queen, e.g., in bridge 98 Gave out cards 100 Name derived from Nicholas 102 College subj. in which 44-Across would be discussed 104 Eject 105 Caesar’s first attacker 106 Burgess’s “I’d rather see than be one” critter 108 Civic border? 109 Call the game 110 Basic ed. trio 112 Go (for) 113 German camera 115 Tach readout 118 It has a tip, a shaft

and a butt 120 Hot spot 122 Talladega leader 124 Cheaper for residents, as a college 125 Jetson son 126 Sign of an error 127 Poker-faced 128 D-backs and Cards 129 Like a leopard moth’s wings

Down 1 Bob with jokes 2 Still alive 3 Vet visitor’s burden 4 Great Basin cap. 5 Holy scroll 6 Sinister-sounding daredevil name 7 Use another dustcloth on 8 Sleep disruption 9 Neck wrap 10 Part of JFK’s legacy 11 Historic Greek region 12 Imps 13 So-so 14 Like a real go-getter 15 Fir coat feature? 16 Former trucking regulatory agcy. 17 Sequence of unspecified size, in math 18 Steamy 19 Acrylic fiber 28 Every other horse sound? 33 Japanese spitz

35 It may be part of a code 36 “This Is India” novelist Santha Rama __ 38 Amateur night feature, briefly 39 Bummed 40 French consent

Medium

41 “The Comedians” composer Kabalevsky 43 It might be a stretch 45 Layers 47 Shakespearean calls to battle 49 Makeshift storage container

51 Statistical circle 53 Sparrow portrayer 55 Honolulu-born jet pilot/pop singer 56 Wise guys 59 Not let get away 60 “I would __ far as to say ...” 62 Soy stuff 63 Bridge stat 64 Permit 65 Syrup source 67 USAFA part: Abbr. 69 Print credit 71 Waterproof boot 72 Little yippers 74 Albino, for one 77 Movies, hit songs, TV, etc. 81 Ernie’s pal 82 Waste not 84 Thick 86 Head of the world? 89 Office owie 90 Milieu for axels 91 Fresh 93 Site for serious treatment, briefly 94 Slugging teammate of Bob Feller 96 Fraternal gp. since 1868 98 Singer Vic 99 Señor’s wife 101 Shock 103 Slides through a reader 105 God with a bow 106 Clean, bird-style 107 Pottery sources 108 Chocolate source 111 “Hollywood Squares” semi-regular __ Lee 114 Nitpick 116 Cut the skin from 117 Steed who could read 119 Old Ford 121 “... tears __ prayers shall purchase out abuses”: Shakespeare 123 Approx. number

Crossword answers: page 45

Sudoku answers: page 45


60 & Beyond with peggy henderson

journal culture

mckinney dodge – ram – chrysler – jeep presents

Random kindness On Palm Sunday, my husband and I woke up in Oxford, Miss. Being out of town, we would have found a church service to attend, but we were in Oxford for a weekend of lectures. To our amazing grace, we received a blessing of an unrehearsed mini-sermon not intended for this particular academic venue. As scheduled for Sunday morning, we attended a panel at the Center for the Study of Southern Culture at the University of Mississippi. The subject was “The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture: Art & Architecture,” recently published by the University of North Carolina Press. One of the panelists and co-authors was noticeably absent. As the lecture hall’s wall clock ticked its way to the final fifteen minutes of questions and answers, the author from Lexington, Ky., swept in without notes but with gestures of apology. Well known for his expertise and profound historical art history writing and research, the author did not have to introduce himself. (This writer will keep his moniker anonymous.) Following his succinct but sincere apology for his tardiness, he leaned in and began his short saga. Being in a college town during the early hours of a Sunday morning, the author related that he wasn’t shocked to see a drunk college kid weaving around on the road. But somehow this was different. First of all, the kid was walking solo, beat up and more than stoned; he looked like he was desperately trying to find his way back home. “How can you drive past and not stop and help him?” he asked us. Silence filled the room. The author shook his head and said that he took the kid back to his dorm building. His shared story was not given with drama or any intention of showing off his “Good Christianity.” His experience created a perfect parable for Palm Sunday. It began and ended with the lesson that he gave so eloquently: The reason that we were all together that morning was not art, not architecture nor culture. Real life was above all that. The issues that are full of worth are spirited caring, forgiving without judgment and the joys of simple living. I’ve thought about that a lot since I’ve been home. After seeing the photo of Pope Francis washing the feet of a dozen juvenile inmates, I was moved by the symbolism of the event. Pope Francis

said, “Help one another. This is what I do. This comes from the heart.” To take this message a step closer to home, I see there is a perceptive difference in doing appointed helpful work for one’s place of worship, community and country. However, there is that special, go-the extra-mile random giving that comes from the purity of soul work. It’s never pre-planned. It’s an instinctual human element that sits waiting inside for a call for action. Action without thinking. Dictionary.com defines the word “random” as “without aim, purpose, method.” The following well-worn cliché still and will always exist because of its validity. San Francisco writer, pacifist and activist Anne Herbert created the “Random Acts of Kindness” movement in the late ’90s. The movement grabbed the media’s attention and over a million books were sold. The question that comes to mind is: Why don’t we commit ourselves to those impromptu random happenings during our daily work and play? For instance, I was waiting in the checkout line at Arby’s, and a man who was driving away had bought a bag of sandwiches for the obviously inneed family behind him and in front of me. In my case, it’s plain ol’ fear. Too much thinking. What if I ask one of God’s children if he needs a ride to his workplace on a hot, parched summer’s day? Will I be mugged? Give food money to a panhandler accompanied by a child who should be in school – what if he uses it for drugs? Should you keep silent when you know an acquaintance is physically abusing her children? This all about getting involved, and it’s easier to look the other way. The cool thing about doing an act of random kindness is that the deal is that you don’t tell anybody about it. No needy pats on the shoulder. That is true soul work. So since spring is here, there are many opportunities for growth and giving thanks for knowing that in everything there is Good. Remember Ann Herbert’s words (she was also a professional house- and dog-sitter): “Go plant daffodils where there are none.” Peggy Henderson is a 60 & Beyond former freelance writer turned newspaper columnist. Besides appearing in the Greenville Journal, her column is syndicated with Senior Wire News Services. In addition, she’s a staff writer for the website www.Go60.us. Contact her at peg4745@aol.com.

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April 5, 2013 Greenville Journal