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GREENVILLE JOURNAL GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM • Friday, February 22, 2013 • Vol.15, No.8

A Safe Harbor for Oconee Domestic Violence Victims PAGE 15

Spartanburg Sculptor Epitomizes “Can-Do” PAGE 23

Mack Lockhart’s journey has taken him from Selma in 1965 with MLK to brand-new challenges in the Sterling community

PAGE 8

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2 THE JOURNAL | FEBRUARY 22, 2013

Mainly morning rain

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JOURNAL NEWS

WORTH REPEATING THEY SAID IT

“Two of the greatest words we can say are ‘Thank you.’” Singer Ann Hampton Calloway, on why she agreed to perform a concert tribute to Barbra Streisand.

$8.3 billion

Assets of the bank created by the recently announced merger of South Carolina Bank & Trust and First Federal Bank

20

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

“I want to present a concert as a well-balanced meal. It needs to have enough meat and potatoes and dessert.”

People who can be housed in a planned Safe Harbor shelter in Oconee County

World-renowned violinist Joshua Bell, who is performing at the Peace Center on Sunday.

“I feel it’s an issue that has been ignored and overlooked. We’ve got to start facing it to reduce these numbers at all.” Oconee County Sheriff Mike Crenshaw, on the need to address domestic violence in Oconee County.

“There is just so much money floating around in politics today that it is nearly impossible for a person of modest means to get involved.” Harry Kibler, leader of the RINO (Republican in Name Only) Hunt wing of the South Carolina tea party.

“We had been demonstrating when (George) Wallace was governor and there were barricades across the capitol, men on horseback with cattle prods.” Greenville resident Mack Lockhart, on participating in Martin Luther King Jr.’s march from Selma to Montgomery, Ala., in 1965.

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journal news

Eat Work Shop Play Live

Sundays Unplugged

UBJ special report

SCBT acquires First Federal

Cohen’s

By DICK HUGHES | senior business writer

South Carolina Bank & Trust has reached an agreement to acquire First DOGWALKER SWEATSHIRTS Federal Bank in a stock transaction valREG 65 ued at $302.4 million. For a low-stress, culturally engaging, inexpensive COHEN’S The merger will create a bank with Sunday afternoon, visit Chapman Cultural Center, 10! $8.3 billion in assets and 148 branch1-5 p.m. In addition to the galleries and exhibits, es in the Carolinas and Georgia. The free live music will be on tap… bank will operate as SCBT. SCBT is based in Columbia, First Financial in March 3… Jo Kokri-Bhatt, pianist/singer-songwriter Charleston. March 10… Jeremy Willis, acoustic/alternative/country The acquisition adds three First Saver branches in Greenville to SCBT’s UpMarch 17… DJ Baker, guitarist/singer state footprint. Those branches were acquired and rebranded First Federal March 24… Sydney McMath, vocalist/pianist after the FDIC-assisted purchase last 1/4 ZIP, W/SIDE PKTS, W/DETAILED EMBROIDERY April by First Federal of failed PlantaMarch 31… Closed for Easter Sunday APPAREL & ACCESSORIES tion Bank of Pawley’s Island. Last year, SCBT acquired the seven up to 90% off dept. store prices branches of Peoples Bancorporation’s 307 W Main St/WAREHOUSE/Sptbg SERVING INVESTORS SINCE 1832 3.2 m. east of Westgate Mall on 29 Peoples National Bank of Easley, the 542-ARTS M-Sat 10-6 • 864.342.0805 Bank of Anderson and Seneca NaChapmanCulturalCenter.org Portfolio Management | Estate Planning facebook.com/Cohens321 tional Bank. E Y JANNEY It also acquired a branch in SparS SINC Retirement Income Planning INVESTORS | Financial Planning SERVING SINCE 1832 tanburg when it bought, in an FDIC sale, the failed BankMeridian of CoWealth Transfer | Managed Accounts state Pl JANNEY Portfolio JANNEY Management | Estate Planning lumbia. SERVING INVESTORS SINCE 1832 Financia INVESTORS SINCE 1832 Mutual FundsRetirement | Fixed SERVING Income Income Strategies Planning | Financial Planning The merger of First Federal into Portfolio Management | Estate Planning ged Acco SCBT will create the state’s fifth-largWealth Transfer | Managed Accounts Risk Planning | Annuities | Insurance Equities Portfolio | Estate Planning Retirement Income PlanningManagement | |Financial Planning est bank in terms of depositsa and rival ome Str Mutual Funds Income Strategies Wealth Transfer|| Fixed Managed Accounts Retirement Income Planning | Financial Planning Philanthropic Opportunities First Citizens as the largest state-based sur ance Funds| |Annuities Fixed Income| Insurance Strategies | Equities RiskMutual Planning financial institution. Wealth Transfer | Managed Accounts Long-Term Care Risk Planning | Needs Annuities | Insurance | Equities rtunities Under terms of the agreement, Philanthropic Opportunities MutualOpportunities Funds | Fixed Income Strategies Philanthropic shareholders of First Financial will reBusiness Succession Planning Needs Long-Term Needs | Insurance | Equities Long-Term Care Care Needs Risk Planning | Annuities ceive 0.4237 shares of SCBT common Plannin Business Succession Planning Business Succession Planning stock for each share of FFCH common Philanthropic Opportunities Work with Trusted Advisors stock. The stock issuance is valued Work with Trusted Advisors Long-Term Care Needs Work with Trusted®Advisors at approximately $302.4 million, the ® d . trent ,lancaster d . trent lancaster awma , awma Business Succession Planning companies said. ® vice president / investments vice president investments dtlancaster@janney.com . /trent lancaster , awma® | trentlancaster.com The companies said SCBT Finanpresident / investments tlancaster@janney.com vice | trentlancaster.com ® cial would add five First Financial Work with Trusted Advisors . c o m p . ed medlin , awma tlancaster@janney.com | trentlancaster.com first vice president / investments board members to a combined board. ® pemedlin@janney.com p . ed medlin .awma trent p . ,ded medlinlancaster , awma® , awma® R. Wayne Hall, president and CEO of first vice president /vice investments vice president / investments president / investments 864.585.8282 |first 866.567.8282 First Financial, will be president of the pemedlin@janney.com 172 E. Main Streettlancaster@janney.com | Suite 102 | Spartanburg, SC 29306 | trentlancaster.com pemedlin@janney.com combined company. Robert R. Hill Jr. Janney Montgomery Scott LLC | Member NYSE, FINRA, SIPC ® of SCBT will be CEO. p . ed medlin , awma 864.585.8282 | 866.567.8282 282 | 866.567.8282 first vice president / investments The boards of both banks approved 172 E. Main Street | Suite 102 | Spartanburg, SC 29306 pemedlin@janney.com n Street | Suite 102 | Spartanburg, SC 29306 the merger, but it must get shareholder Janney Montgomery Scott LLC | Member NYSE, FINRA, SIPC ntgomery Scott LLC | Member NYSE, FINRA, SIPC and regulatory approval, which are ex864.585.8282 | 866.567.8282 pected, before closing.

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4 THE Journal | FEBRUARY 22, 2013

Contact Dick Hughes at dhughes@communityjournals.com.


Tea party mulls GOP challenge By CHarles Sowell | staff

Harry Kibler, leader of the RINO (Republican in Name Only) Hunt wing of the South Carolina tea party, has tentative plans to challenge state Republican Party leader Chad Connelly for leadership of the state party. Kibler has not made up his mind whether to personally challenge Connelly, or find a suitable substitute within tea party ranks. “If we see we have the votes to do it, there’s a real chance we’ll challenge,” he said. “If not, then we will most likely pull back with an eye toward starting our own party within the state.” The brewing controversy started with some incendiary comments by GOP strategist Karl Rove earlier this month. After disappointing defeats in 2012, Rove and other GOP tacticians are brainstorming ways to block unpredictable candidates like Todd Aiken of Missouri, whose controversial comments on rape lost the party a seat many had previously considered an easy Republican win. Kibler sees actions by state party lead-

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ers as dovetailing with Rove’s efforts to make the GOP over into a more mainstream party. “There was a high-level conference call held last night where a strategy was formed to block Tea Party-minded people from upcoming GOP precinct reorganization efforts,” Kibler said in an email message to RINO Hunt faithful. “Under the guise of keeping ‘Ron Paul Libertarians’ out of the SCGOP, many very powerful people conspired to prevent real conservatives from gaining access as delegates to county and state conventions.” Alex Stroman, executive director of the SCGOP, said he is “unsure of the claim that ‘the state party is planning to take over a nominating process to exclude ‘true conservatives.’ I’m not quite sure what this is talking about. This sensationalized, outlandish and conspiratorial statement can’t be answered because it is so out of the realm of reality.” This war of words has reached outside the state’s borders, with National Public Radio emailing Kibler to find out if he plans to help lead a push to unseat U.S. Sen. Lindsay Graham, R-S.C.

Kibler admits it would be tough to defeat a sitting U.S. senator, but he also likes the conservative bona fides of state Sen. Lee Bright, R-Spartanburg. Speaking to the political website “The Hill” earlier this month, Bright said he was considering a challenge to Graham, but that there were many arguments against it. “For one thing, there’s money,” Kibler said. It takes a minimum of $1 million to mount a statewide campaign.” For now, Kibler said, he is far more concerned with plans within the national and state GOP that would push out the “common man” from the electoral process. “There is just so much money floating around in politics today that it is nearly impossible for a person of modest means to get involved,” Kibler said. Currently the tea party is pushing a plan to reorganize local precincts in the tea party’s favor, said tea party activist Bill Rhodes. “We’d like to force the GOP into a more conservative-friendly stance,” he said. “The way to do that is to start at the precinct level.” Contact Charles Sowell at csowell@communityjournals.com.

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JOURNAL NEWS

OPINION VOICES FROM YOUR COMMUNITY, HEARD HERE

Government without First delete the loopholes representation

FROM THE EDITORIAL DESK

After years of attempts, it looks like state legislators may have finally crafted a fix to South Carolina’s antiquated anti-raffle law that manages to let the charitable causes go forward and keeps the poker barons locked out. Last week’s vote sends S. 213 to the Senate floor with the unanimous support of the Senate Judiciary Committee and – most significantly – the backing of several anti-gambling groups that have strenuously opposed past legislative efforts to make charitable raffles legal. For them, the problem was never the friendly church raffle to raise money for the youth mission trip, it was how to keep professional raffle promoters and gambling operations from descending on the state to stuff their pockets. This bill appears to thread that needle, says Oran Smith, the director of Family Research Council, an outspoken opponent of past reform attempts. “This tightens it up very well,” Smith told the Associated Press. “We think it’s a great effort and solves the problem.” And so it seems to do in several significant ways. The bill sets a cap on raffle ticket costs and the total value of prizes. It bans wagering on live sporting events or the use of “electronic gaming devices,” a transparent slam against video poker. The bill also bans nonprofits from lending their names to other entities for raffle purposes and requires them to operate the raffles with their own staff and volunteers – no outside contractors allowed. The bill further forbids casino-themed events and limits registered nonprofits to four raffles a year – all of which does seem to narrow the opportunity for predators to exploit. However – and this is a big “however” – with South Carolina’s history, one feels the need to check the fine print. Sen. Jack Lindsey, now deceased, unleashed video poker on this state 27 years ago by slipping one sentence into a complicated law that allowed video poker machines to give payouts. His colleagues missed it, and the game grew from a smattering of machines to a $3 billion a year predator that took a decade to kill. Some of the exceptions in this bill have equal potential for mischief. Take the “four raffles a year” limit. This applies to nonprofits that register with the state, as the bill demands of all that “intend to operate a raffle.” However, no registration is necessary if the charity offers non-cash prizes worth less than $500 – and the cap rises to $950 when the tickets are sold to nonprofit members or guests and not the general public. Further, the limit for nonprofits so exempted is no more than “one raffle every seven calendar days.” That’s 52 a year with no record of who’s running them – a pretty juicy loophole for the right “charity,” which the law defines so broadly it would be hard to find a group that doesn’t qualify. Then there’s the fine print on the bill’s “casino nights” ban. “Roulette, blackjack, poker, baccarat, or other card or dice games” are perfectly legal as long as they’re conducted “only for entertainment purposes and no prizes, financial rewards or incentives are received by players.” One can imagine an enterprisingly charitable gambling baron offering vouchers to blackjack players for “entertainment purposes” that then could be exchanged for cash. It’s happened before. Good-hearted groups like the Lions Club should be allowed their raffles to give eyeglasses to the disadvantaged. Senators just need to tighten the bill a bit more. Deleting the fine print – let’s call it what it is: “loopholes” – would be a great place to start.

In 1773, in Boston Harbor, patriots dumped tea into the water in protest over the English tax that had been imposed upon them. This iconic American event put into perspective a principle that would later be reflected in our Constitution: no taxation without representation. When the U. S. Constitution was adopted, it left the power to make laws solely in the legislative branch and kept that power distant from the executive branch. In that way, no tax or law would be imposed upon the public except through their elected representatives. The same principle is reflected in the South Carolina Constitution. Now, let us fast-forward to the 21st century. As the legislative process evolved over time, laws were passed to authorize state and federal agencies to promulgate regulations to implement the mandates of certain other laws. In South Carolina, these regulations go into effect after 120 days; in the federal system, they generally go into effect 60 days after submission to Congress. In both cases, all regulations can go into effect automatically, without the affirmative vote of your elected representatives. These regulations promulgated by bureaucrats have the full force and effect of law and can also impose fees on the public. “Fees” is a modern term for tax. The reality is that regulations impact many elements of people’s private lives or businesses. Those who oppose regulations have little chance through the legislative process of getting them disapproved, because they go into effect before time can be found to vote on them. Let me give you an example of the most recent incident with regulations. When the new session of the General Assembly started, DHEC filed regulations for home caregivers – people who provide basic services to people with disabilities or challenges such as assistance in dressing, going to the bathroom, or cleaning the house. A statute was passed to require background checks of home care providers and to require Workers’ Compensation Insurance coverage in the event of an injury. The statute authorized DHEC to promulgate regulations to implement these requirements of the statute. Instead, proposed regulations went far beyond what the statute intended, requiring the

IN MY OWN WORDS by LT. GOV. GLENN MCCONNELL

workers to record how much bathroom assistance they give a client as well as record other data identified in the regulation as “allergies, pets, etc.” What in the world is “etc.”? On top of that, the regulations required these records be kept for six years and gave DHEC inspectors access to people’s homes to verify compliance. DHEC bureaucrats also charged an initial $1,000 license fee the first year plus an $800 renewal fee each year, plus fines if you do not comply with the regulations as determined by DHEC. In a nutshell, this is not only taxation without representation, but government without representation. Over the decades, we have heard from those who call for limited government. But little is said about the broad grants of regulatory power given the executive branch both at the state and federal level. This current system allows the invisible growth of government. Since becoming lieutenant governor, I have had an opportunity to tour this state and see just how broken the regulatory system is. Common sense is lacking. I have encountered a residential assisted-living facility cited for regulatory violation because a lady had a can of hairspray in a private apartment. At another facility, a sidewalk essentially to nowhere was required to comply with regulations. This latest submission of regulations by DHEC energizes me to speak out to the people of South Carolina. They should demand that their representatives insist that any regulations taking the people’s money and posing undue burdens on them and our society not take effect without an affirmative vote of those elected to serve them. Until such a change is made, we will have a constant march toward ever more bureaucratic government in South Carolina and the United States. Glenn McConnell is lieutenant governor of South Carolina.

IN MY OWN WORDS FEATURES ESSAYS BY RESIDENTS WITH PARTICULAR EXPERTISE WHO WANT TO TELL READERS ABOUT ISSUES IMPORTANT TO THEM. THE JOURNAL ALSO WELCOMES LETTERS TO THE EDITOR (MAXIMUM LENGTH OF 200 WORDS). PLEASE INCLUDE ADDRESS AND DAYTIME PHONE NUMBER. ALL LETTERS WILL BE CONFIRMED BEFORE PUBLICATION. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO EDIT ALL LETTERS FOR LENGTH. PLEASE CONTACT EXECUTIVE EDITOR SUSAN SIMMONS AT SSIMMONS@COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM.

6 THE JOURNAL | FEBRUARY 22, 2013


JOURNAL NEWS

City wants input on possible new park

By CINDY LANDRUM | staff

Greenville’s got the land for its next downtown park, and now the city wants your ideas for what should go there. The city wants to relocate its public works department now located in the floodplain of the Reedy River and turn that land near the Kroc Center and A.J. Whittenberg Elementary into a public park. City officials have already purchased 33 acres of land on Fairforest Way next to the Duke Energy Operations Center for the public works relocation, although a cost estimate and timetable for the move has not yet been released. The Swamp Rabbit Trail, the well-used biking and walking trail built on an old railroad bed from Greenville to Travelers Rest, also runs through the potential park. “If the public works operational facili-

February 22

ties are relocated to another site, the relocation may provide an opportunity to develop a public park and a safe place for the Reedy River to temporarily flood,” said Dana Souza, the city’s park and recreation director. “The trees, shrubs, grass and open space with the park and the flood zone would easily tolerate the effects of a flood, and the open land would more closely reflect the natural function of a floodplain.” The park would also connect residents of the city’s west side to downtown Greenville. This week, the city and its consultant, Season Whiteside + Associates, are soliciting ideas from the public that will be used to create several design visions of the park. The project kicked off on Thursday with a public meeting at the Kroc Center. On Saturday, a public charrette and work session will be held at the Kroc Center from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. so members of the public may share their ideas for the park with the consultants. Childcare and lunch will be provided. Monday through Wednesday of next week, the design team will be at Taber-

nacle Baptist Church from 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. to begin working with the ideas. Walk-ins are encouraged. Finally on Thursday, Feb. 28, the consultants will share the drawings they’ve produced over the previous week at a public meeting at the Kroc Center. The meeting and drawing exhibition begins at 6 p.m. During the meeting, the consultants will highlight the requests and comments they heard most often and make sure they have documented all of the comments. The consultants are working on a redevelopment plan city officials hope will return West Greenville, the Southernside neighborhood and the rest of the West End into the vibrant, stable neighborhoods they once were. The Westside planning is being paid for with a $1.8 million grant from the federal departments of Housing and Urban Development and Transportation. It includes citywide housing and transportation studies. Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.

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Public Works facility slated to be moved from flood zone

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Tues., Feb. 26 • 6-8 p.m. • Greenville Midwifery Care (35 Medical Ridge Dr.) Learn about GHS’ nurse-midwifery program and how a midwife can enhance the birthing process. Free; registration required.

Sun., March 24 • 2:30-4:30 p.m. • Patewood Medical Campus This program for boys in 4th and 5th grade eases the transition into puberty through open discussion. Fee: $50 dad/son. To register, visit the events page at girlology.com.

Controlling Asthma

Tues., March 12 • Noon-1 p.m. • GHS Life Center® Join GHS physicians from Cross Creek Internal Medicine for a discussion on asthma and the latest treatments. Lunch provided. Free; registration required.

Spring Into Action to Prevent Colorectal Cancer Tues., March 19 • 12:15-1:15 p.m. • GHS Life Center® Join GHS colorectal surgeon Dr. Patrick Culumovic to learn about colorectal cancer and steps you can take to prevent it. Lunch provided. Free; registration required.

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Sat., April 13 • 11 a.m.-2 p.m. • BI-LO® Center Speakers include renowned pediatric neurosurgeon Dr. Benjamin Carson, U.S. Olympic swimmer Cullen Jones and nutrition and wellness expert Dr. Ann Kulze. Free; registration required. Parking is $5. Food available for purchase. To register, for more information or to see a full schedule of events, visit ghs.org/360healthed or call 1-877-GHS-INFO (447-4636).

Sat., March 23 • 10 a.m.-3 p.m. • Bethlehem Baptist Church Those with diabetes, high blood pressure or a family history of these conditions or kidney disease are encouraged to get screened. Must be age 18 or older. To register, call (803) 799-3870 ext. 110. 130069

FEBRUARY 22, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 7


JOURNAL NEWS They would have been in corporate America or some other place,” he said. “They made up for inferior material that we would receive (secondhand books from other schools) with their teaching methodology.”

FIGHTING FOR CIVIL RIGHTS

Fighting for community GREG BECKNER/STAFF

From his 1965 march with Martin Luther King, Mack Lockhart now works to restore ‘the ingredients of the village’ to the Sterling community and beyond By APRIL A. MORRIS | staff

Mack Lockhart’s family is full of firsts. His mother, Theressa, was the first AfricanAmerican to work in the Sangamo-Weston Inc. office in Pickens in 1960, when the Ku Klux Klan still held rallies in the area, he said. Son Mack worked as the first AfricanAmerican UPS employee in the Upstate in 1967 and Piedmont Airlines’ first AfricanAmerican ticket agent in 1969.

DEEP UPSTATE ROOTS

Lockhart, 66, grew up in Greenville, and after traveling and building his career, returned to the Upstate nearly 15 years ago. His family’s roots in the area go back to 1917, when his grandparents moved to Greenville from Georgia. In 1917, his grandfather, Willie Watkins, worked for the C.F. Sauer Co., famous

8 THE JOURNAL | FEBRUARY 22, 2013

for producing Duke’s Mayonnaise. His parents met at another Upstate landmark, Donaldson Air Force Base. “My neighborhood isn’t there anymore, but the house I grew up in was near where the Kroc Center is today,” he said. Lockhart fondly recalls his tight-knit neighborhood and his time at Sterling High School in the early 1960s. “My high school was the only place where everybody (from different sides of town) came and had to be one.” As he walks through the school’s original gymnasium – the only part of the structure standing after a suspicious fire in 1967 – he recalls how the gym was filled with tremendous spirit on game days and how many superb athletes and leaders the teachers molded. “Many of the teachers had Ph.D.s and would have probably not been in the teaching profession had segregation not existed.

After graduating from Sterling High in 1964, Lockhart attended Tuskegee University, then Tuskegee Institute, in Tuskegee, Ala. In March of 1965, he joined students from Alabama State and Alabama A&M University to demonstrate with Martin Luther King Jr. as part of King’s march from Selma to Montgomery. Just weeks before, the marchers were assaulted in Selma by police with clubs and tear gas in an attack known forever after as “Bloody Sunday.” “We had been demonstrating when (George) Wallace was governor and there were barricades across the capitol – men on horseback with cattle prods,” he said. “We had parade permits until 5 p.m., we had police protection until 5 p.m. It was a little bit dangerous.” When asked whether he was afraid, Lockhart said simply, “Somehow when you’re youthful like that, you don’t have a lot of fear.” When he called home to tell his mother that he was going to Montgomery, she was the one filled with apprehension. “What did it for me was that my grandfather said to her, ‘Hey, let that boy go on and do it.’ And that’s all I needed.” Lockhart said he has since pondered how little he knows of the sorts of trials his grandfather must have endured during his life. Following the protests, Lockhart, who had been struggling in school, was drafted in November 1965, joining the Air Force, a family tradition. He served in Pakistan and Spain as a postal clerk. Afterward, Lockhart worked for Piedmont Airlines and UPS, later returning to school at Furman University in 1971. He recalls the inspiration of L.D. Johnson, pastor of First Baptist Church and university chaplain, who encouraged him, with other students, to help found a black student union at the school. “We started the Student League for Black Culture to bring speakers and have a voice on campus,” he said. The organization began with about 20 students and still exists today.

BUILDING A CAREER Trained in business, with a knack for numbers and relating to people, Lockhart began working with the Greenville County assessor’s office as part of Comprehensive Employ-

“The most important thing is family and where you come from. That’s what nurtures you.” – Mack Lockhart

MACK LOCKHART FACTS Graduate of Sterling High School, 1964 WIFE: Yvonne Lockhart CHILDREN: Andre, Ursula, Jessica and Kendase, 10 grandchildren DETAIL: Holds Certified Assessment Evaluation (CAE) Designation, highest in the field, and served as instructor for International Association of Assessing Officers LITTLE KNOWN FACT: He always wanted to be a fighter pilot and loves reading ancient history and philosophy. FAVORITES: “The Destruction of Black Civilization – Great Issues of a Race from 4500 B.C. to 2000 A.D.” by Chancellor Williams and “The Teachings of Don Juan” by Carlos Castaneda

ment and Training Act (CETA). After seven years, he took a position in the Mecklenburg County assessor’s office in Charlotte, N.C. Lockhart recalled challenges in his work life, like the day when he was working for the Richmond, Va., assessor’s office and a congressman tried to convince him to change a property assessment – a request he refused to grant. Lockhart noted that if he had consented, that would have opened a door for even more rule breaking. “The only way I survived was maintaining my integrity.” Today, he stresses that each person must find the center of his or her faith from which they cannot be shaken. “It’s up to you to bring yourself into balance, not the outside world.” After serving as Richmond’s senior appraiser and the acting city assessor in 1992, Lockhart retired in 2001 and returned to South Carolina. An opportunity came open with Carolina First Bank, now TD Bank, and Lockhart now works as an appraiser analyst.

RESTORING COMMUNITY Like many in his generation, Lockhart was raised in a village-like neighborhood and the people he knew helped to make him who he is today, he said. “What you see now is people don’t even know their neighbors,” he said. In the Sterling community, Lockhart wanted to help restore that village closeness, and so became involved in the Sterling Community Land Trust about four years ago. “We want to strengthen and engage the people in the community,” he said. “We know the ingredients of the village; it’s a combination of seniors and kids and all built on respect, which is a lost word now. “While people are dispersed in other neighborhoods, there is still this thing of segregation that looms. I think we have the opportunity to build on the legacy of the past, but the legacy of the past has to be preserved and told in honest dialogue.” Contact April A. Morris at amorris@communityjournals.com.


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journal news

County upholds decision to revoke club registration Greenville club was the site of two murders By april a. morris | staff

Following an appeal hearing and two days’ deliberation, Greenville County administrator Joseph Kernell has ruled to uphold the county’s Department of Gen-

eral Services’ revocation of a club’s business registration. Betty Barton, who ran the club called Z2, appealed the January decision at a hearing on Feb. 11. Barton took over the business at 330 White Horse Road in Greenville in September 2012, following the fatal shooting of the manager the month before. At the revocation hearing, Barton argued there were few law enforcement calls between the time she

took over the business and a second fatal shooting on Jan. 13. In the ruling statement dated Feb. 13 and released on Feb. 15, Kernell cited five reasons for upholding the decision to revoke the registration: the business being incorrectly classified as “retail trade” on the registration form, failure to pay hospitality tax, the number of law enforcement calls, sale of alcohol without a permit, and operations negatively affecting people and

property in the immediate vicinity. During the hearing, Greenville County Sheriff ’s Department representative Master Deputy Michael Bryan said the department requested the revocation because of the call volume related to the business, including the two shootings, narcotics, violence, assaults and gunfire. The State Law Enforcement Division had conducted an investigation into the illegal sale of alcohol at the location in August 2012.

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GREG BECKNER / STAFF

The Z2 nightclub on White Horse Road has lost its appeal to have its business registration reinstated.

Kernell wrote in the ruling that the decision was based “not on any singular incident but on the totality of the circumstances since the business first registered with the county.” During the hearing, Barton and the club’s manager, Arlo Workman, maintained that they should only be responsible for the events since taking over the business in September 2012. Z2 is the second business to have a registration revoked since the ordinance was approved in July 2009, and the first to appeal the decision. The first registration revocation was for The Red Planet club on Cedar Lane Road, also the site of multiple shootings in 2011. At the hearing, Barton and Workman indicated that whatever the decision, they would not be reopening the business, which had been closed since the January shooting. Barton was not available for comment following the ruling. Contact April A. Morris at amorris@communityjournals.com.

Boots and Badges The Blood Connection will hold a weeklong blood drive called “Boots and Badges” Feb. 23–Mar. 1. Drives are scheduled at various locations in the Upstate. Each donor will receive a T-shirt and each drive will serve special refreshments. Donors can also give blood at any of The Blood Connection Donation Centers in Greenville, Easley, Seneca, Greenwood and Spartanburg. The centers will be open from 8 a.m.–6 p.m. For more information and a list of donation locations with times, call  864-255-5005  or visit thebloodconnection.org.

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When school start dates began to creep closer to the beginning of August than Labor Day, the state’s tourism industry and some parent groups cried foul. They said early start dates were robbing families of their summers and costing one of South Carolina’s largest industries – tourism – a lot of money. A law passed in 2007 mandated schools could not open before the third Monday in August. But a report released by The Olde English Consortium shows the later uniform start date has had no impact on tourism, said Mike Fanning, the executive director of the nonprofit organization that serves Cherokee, Chester, Clover, Fairfield, Lancaster and York School Districts and the University of South Carolina at Lancaster. Before the uniform start date law was passed, some Upstate schools started in early August, sometimes as early as Aug. 3. But the state’s travel and tourism industry argued that earlier school start dates were responsible for declining August hotel occupancy rates and that there was no corresponding increase in May occupancy rates to offset the lost revenue. Fanning said if that claim were true, his organization believes it should have seen August occupancy rates increase since 2007 without an offsetting decline in May. In the five years since implementation of a uniform school start date, that has not happened, he said. “We believe that the start dates of schools have no bearing on the strength of the tourism industry and that elected school boards should make such decisions representing their community,” Fanning said. According to the research by Leland Graham, August occupancy rates declined from 64.6 percent in 2005 to 63.7 percent in 2006. However, this was completely offset by an increase in May, from 62.4 percent in 2005 to 64.1 percent in 2006. Graham said the average summer occupancy rate was virtually unchanged. The first August of the uniform start

date saw occupancy rates increase 1.7 percent to 65.4 percent. But occupancy fell to 61 percent the first May after the uniform start date, a 2.8 percent decrease. “This suggests that, if start dates have a correlative effect on tourism as industry lobbyists claim, the uniform start date hurts May occupancy rates more than it helps August rates, creating a net drag on the tourism industry,” the study said. The recession complicates the data for subsequent years, but Graham said before the introduction of the uniform start date, May occupancy rates in South Carolina lagged about 1.1 percent behind national figures. Since the uniform start date, that gap has more than doubled. The gap between state and national numbers in August has only marginally increased despite the economic downturn. “It is the belief of the Consortium that the start dates of schools across South Carolina have little to no bearing on the strength of the state’s tourism industry in August, or in any other month,” the report said. Education officials have argued that the earlier starts allowed the completion of the first semester before the winter holidays and maximized the amount of instruction time before students took the state’s high-stakes standardized tests. Greenville County’s first day for the 2013-14 school year is Aug. 21. Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.


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JOURNAL NEWS

GREENVILLE COUNTY COUNCIL

SPARTANBURG COUNTY COUNCIL

FROM THE FEBRUARY 19 MEETING

FROM THE FEBRUARY 18 MEETING

Proposed amendments from Councilman Willis Meadows stalled progress on a proposed stormwaterbanking program at third reading during Greenville County Council’s regular meeting Tuesday. Council voted to hold the issue until the next meeting. The program, developed with Clemson University and Upstate Forever, seeks to create a voluntary incentive for developers to pursue ways to reduce stormwater runoff and improve water quality. The initiative would allow for alternative densities, lot sizes and setback requirements for developments in some single-family and multi-family zoning districts. Meadows said development encouraged by the program needs to have feedback from nearby neighborhoods. Stormwater issues have cost the county money in the past due to impervious surfaces like parking lots and paving creating swollen creeks and flooding neighborhoods. In some areas, the county instituted a buyback program for homeowners in affected neighborhoods built in floodplains. The county currently has a stormwater utility fee, approximately $23-$26 per year, that helps pay for mitigation and federal and state requirements for pollution from stormwater. Participation in the stormwater-banking program will also help fund stormwater retrofits in the county. In other business, council voted to appoint councilman H.G. “Butch” Kirven to serve an unexpired term on the Greenville Area Development Corporation (GADC), a decision held over from last month’s meeting. Chairman Bob Taylor and vice chairman Meadows also serve on GADC. Council also approved a noise ordinance change pertaining to excessive noise from sound-amplifying devices in motor vehicles. The change requires the owner of the equipment to surrender it following a conviction of a third offence rather than law enforcement representatives seizing the device. Another change to reduce noise from auto wrecking facilities, junkyards, recycling facilities, salvage yards and scrap processors near residential areas came closer to approval, moving on to third reading. The proposed amendment requires that certain businesses have a special exception in the I-9 zoning areas. The change was spurred by a metal recycling business moving its

SO YOU KNOW GREENVILLE COUNTY COUNCIL STANDING COMMITTEES FINANCE Willis Meadows, chair Jim Burns, vice chair Sid Cates Butch Kirven Bob Taylor PUBLIC WORKS AND INFRASTRUCTURE Fred Payne, chair Xanthene Norris, vice chair Joe Baldwin Butch Kirven Jim Burns

PUBLIC SAFETY Liz Seman, chair Xanthene Norris, vice chair Dan Rawls Lottie Gibson Joe Baldwin PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT Joe Dill, chair Dan Rawls, vice chair Fred Payne Lottie Gibson Sid Cates

24-hour operations into a site near a neighborhood in Fountain Inn. Council members also took up rules changes, opting to streamline the chair and vice chair elections, allowing the top two candidates to proceed if three are nominated. In addition, they opted to limit public input during public hearings in regular council meetings to three minutes rather than five minutes, matching the timeframe for other citizen input during the meeting. Instead of the council chair voting last and vice chair voting next to last in a roll call vote, council voted 8-4 to eliminate the practice. Council members Sid Cates, Lottie Gibson, Butch Kirven and Fred Payne were opposed, while Joe Dill, Joe Baldwin, Xanthene Norris, Jim Burns, Bob Taylor, Willis Meadows, Liz Seman and Dan Rawls voted in favor. Council also approved a separate meeting for swearing in members and for electing a chair and vice chair. A proposal to enact term limits for council chair failed in a 6-6 vote. Greenville County Council will meet again on March 5, 6 p.m., at County Square, 301 University Ridge, Greenville. The Committee of the Whole will meet at 4:30 p.m. the same day. Contact April A. Morris at amorris@communityjournals.com.

In the end, practicality won our over heartfelt beliefs when Spartanburg County Council voted to extend the county’s animal shelter contract with Greenville County. By a 4-3 vote, council on Monday approved extending the county’s contract with Greenville for up to two years. It will cost the county $29,000 per month, up from the current rate of $24,000 monthly. The extra money goes to pay for inmate labor services that had previously been provided free of charge. County officials went with a contract with Greenville Animal Control after a spat with the Spartanburg Humane Society in 2011. Councilman David Britt crossed swords with Councilman O’Neil Mintz over the contract extension. Mintz interrupted Britt in mid-sentence to demand the veteran councilman recuse himself from the discussion due to family ties with the Humane Society. Britt refused, saying any connection to the society was long past. “We have thousands of animals roaming free on our streets now. This extending the pact with Greenville does nothing to deal with the core problem,” said Britt, who opposed extending the contract. Council Chairman Jeff Horton laid out the monetary facts facing the county, including a sharp fall in revenue before the vote. In the end, the reality of reduced income and increasing costs across the board swayed the majority. Under the terms of the contract, Spartanburg must make a good-faith effort to come up with a local solution to the stray animal problem. Council members Jane Hall and Dale Culbreth said they would push for a solution during this year’s budget talks, which are slated to start in coming months. Council members Britt, Culbreth and Roger Nutt voted against the contract. In other business, council: Approved changes to rules for flea markets and setbacks at mining operations; OK’d letting the county election commission handle municipal elections in Spartanburg, Duncan and Lyman; approved negotiating the purchase of the Clifton 2 Mill site; and allowed the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources to make the Cherokee Springs park property a public dove-hunting field. Spartanburg County Council next meets at 5:30 on March 18 in chambers at the county administration building at 366 N. Church St. Contact Charles Sowell at csowell@communityjournals.com.

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“These tragedies … have catapulted our efforts from ‘need to do this’ to red-hot, on-fire project.” Julie Meredith of Safe Harbor

Domestic violence shelter planned for Oconee County Safe Harbor to launch capital campaign March 1

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By APRIL A. MORRIS | staff

In a state that ranks second in the nation in the number of women killed by men, Oconee County has had six deaths related

to domestic violence in as many months. Advocates have been campaigning for a domestic violence shelter in the county for years, and newly elected Oconee County Sheriff Mike Crenshaw highlighted the issue in his campaign platform.

On March 1, Safe Harbor, which serves victims of domestic violence in Oconee, Pickens, Greenville and Anderson counties, will kick off a capital campaign to make an Oconee County shelter a reality. The nonprofit already has a building under contract “that’s going to be a great shelter,” said Julie Meredith, Safe Harbor’s director of communication. Safe Harbor has set a fundraising goal of $990,000 to cover the cost of the shelter, operations and program expenses for three years, Meredith said. The shelter will have 15 to 20 beds, three full-time staff members and rotating staff to ensure that it is open 24 hours a day. Projected opening of the shelter is 2015. Safe Harbor already has a presence in Oconee County, offering education in local schools and community counseling, but anyone seeking shelter must go to facilities in Greenville or Anderson counties, she said. The Greenville shelter can accommodate 34 people and 20 may stay in the Anderson location, according to Meredith. The Oconee community approached Safe Harbor with the need for a shelter in 2008, said Safe Harbor Director Becky Callaham. SAFE HARBOR continued on PAGE 16

FEBRUARY 22, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 15 1/28/13 2:20 PM


JOURNAL COMMUNITY SAFE HARBOR continued from PAGE 15

“A feasibility study gave us more than anecdotal evidence that there was a need,” she said. The study revealed that 47 percent of county residents knew someone in the county who had been a victim of domestic violence in the last year. In addition, 38 percent said they knew of a child who was living in a home where domestic violence was occurring. The organization had been laying the groundwork for additional services and a shelter was part of the long-term plan. Safe Harbor recruited local Oconee board members and an advisory committee, and two survivors of domestic violence donated $90,000 in seed money for a shelter, funds they had raised through a grassroots campaign. Then came July 2012, when five people lost their lives because of domestic violence in one week, said Callaham. “The community at that point rallied around the issue and the campaign kicked into high gear.” Raising funds for operations costs is essential, especially to provide consistent services, she said. “We want to be a viable and long-term solution for victims of domestic violence.”

OCONEE COUNTY SHELTER CAMPAIGN KICKOFF March 1, 9:30 a.m. Oconee County Sheriff’s Office, 300 S. Church St., Walhalla To donate: visit safeharborsc.org or call 864-385-7181.

Safe Harbor is a 24/7, private, nonprofit organization dedicated to helping victims of domestic violence in Upstate South Carolina with approximately 18 full-time staff, 20 part-time staff and over 200 volunteers, including their board of directors.

Sheriff Mike Crenshaw said after serving 25 years in law enforcement, he saw the need for additional domestic violence services in his county. In the first few weeks on the job, he was called to a murder-suicide in January. “I left that day kind of feeling helpless. That incident upped it on my priority list.”

After several public forums, he learned that domestic violence was a priority with residents, too, he said. “I feel it’s an issue that has been ignored and overlooked. We’ve got to start facing it to reduce these numbers at all,” he said. “Obviously it (shelter) won’t solve the problem of domestic violence in Oconee

County; more still needs to be done.” Callaham agreed, saying Safe Harbor prefers to “do most of our work in prevention” before the situation gets to a critical stage. She said the shelter is necessary, but there’s not just one solution. Crenshaw said he has encountered people who may not seek shelter because they would have to leave Oconee County to do so. “I’m very optimistic that people will take advantage of the (new) shelter,” he said. “These tragedies … have catapulted our efforts from ‘need to do this’ to red-hot, on-fire project,” Meredith said. Contact April A. Morris at amorris@communityjournals.com.

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Good for You Spartanburg offers healthy tools online By april a. morris | staff

In an effort to take charge of their health, many people turn to multiple online tools or apps to track their caloric intake or record their physical activity. One Upstate nonprofit has taken this concept a step further and made information about keeping healthy free and exclusively local. Spartanburg’s Partnership for Active Living recently launched a comprehensive website, Good for You Spartanburg, that pools information about healthy eating, dining out, exercise, outdoor activities, events and prevention tips – all for Spartanburg County. Good for You Spartanburg, a healthy living initiative and branding campaign created by the Spartanburg Obesity Task Force, is designed to harness the support of governments, nonprofits and grassroots organizations to work toward a healthy Spartanburg County. The task force recently completed a survey of body-mass indexes (BMI) of children in several Spartanburg-area elementary schools and reported that nearly 40 percent of fifthgraders are obese or overweight. From disc golf courses and Zumba classes to childhood obesity numbers and restaurants offering healthy options, the Good for You Spartanburg site is designed to be a one-stop source for becoming physically active and eating healthy. Organizations like workplaces, schools or faith communities can become partners of the initiative by committing to five strategies to increase their institution’s health by making healthy eating and physical activity more accessible and encouraged. Multiple Spartanburg-area restaurants have become partners, offering low-calorie dishes, smaller portions, lower-sodium choices, limited trans fats and more, said Michelle Child, Americorps Vista staff member of Partners for Active Living, an initiative sponsor. Since its launch in January, Good for You Spartanburg has garnered five new partners and 10 interested parties, said Child. The newest partners include Spartanburg Water and Converse College, she said.

The site is designed to be easily accessible and interactive, said Child. One feature allows residents to search for healthy living facilities by region to find the closest to home, she said. The initiative is also looking into partnering with public schools to allow use of their playgrounds and track facilities. “Sometimes school is the only place for recreation, especially in rural areas,” she said.

Thursday , March 7, 20 13 A calendar on the site lists events like health screenings, outings and classes. “The goal is that all the events are open to the public and most are free,” Child said. Laura Ringo, executive director of Partners for Active Living, lauded the “significant momentum and strong collaboration in recent years to create a healthier Spartanburg County. By creating a central resource hub for these efforts, we hope to further the efforts that organizations have started.” The initiative has identified 13 community sectors to target, including schools, faith-based communities and workplaces, and in the future wants to address each sector when grant and sponsorship funding becomes available, Child said. Visit the site at goodforyouspartanburg.org. Organizations interested in joining the partnership can fill out a form online. Contact April A. Morris at amorris@communityjournals.com. 33.4% of Spartanburg County firstgraders are obese or overweight

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Dunleavy tapped to head Mary Black Foundation Spartanburg’s own Katherine Dunleavy has been named president and CEO of the Mary Black Foundation. Dunleavy led the United Way of the Piedmont from 2003 until Dunleavy 2011, when she retired. Molly Talbot Metz, spokeswoman for the foundation, said Dunleavy was a natural choice for the top spot at Mary Black. “We were fortunate to find someone of her caliber in our own backyard.” The search committee was not contemplating a local face to lead the foundation, she said, and had been looking all over the nation for the right person. Dunleavy said she is “humbled by the board’s expressions of confidence. In my prior role (as head of the United Way of the Piedmont), I worked closely with the Foundation’s board and staff on critical issues of common interest,

and I know how important the Foundation and its support have been to our community.” Dunleavy received a Bachelor of Science degree in business administration from the University of Florida. She began her career at First Federal/BB&T, becoming senior vice president of retail banking. She then spent a year as executive director of the Walker Foundation for the SC School for the Deaf and the Blind before becoming CEO of United Way of the Piedmont. She has also served on the boards of the Spartanburg Regional Healthcare System, Carolina Country Club, the Converse College Board of Visitors and the BB&T Advisory Board. She is a former member of the Rotary Club of Spartanburg and has participated in both Leadership Spartanburg and Leadership South Carolina. Dunleavy will start work at the Foundation on March 4. Contact Charles Sowell at csowell@communityjournals.com.

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JOURNAL COMMUNITY

Coastal ‘Encounters’

Do your kids a favor.

Myrtle Beach offers up UFO exhibit

You checked for monsters under her bed, sent her to the best school and helped her buy her first car. Now, do her one more favor…

By JEANNE PUTNAM | contributor

Aliens have landed at Myrtle Beach’s Broadway at the Beach, but they haven’t come for the stage shows or the sandy shores. They are part of the world’s first comprehensive exhibition on UFOs, close encounters and alien abductions, entitled “Encounters: UFO Experience.” The exhibition, which opens April 4, will feature more than 200 original artifacts, conceptual models, and documented film clips and recordings that support claims of ancient encounters through to modernday sightings. In addition, the facility will have seven galleries that will showcase ancient alien encounters, the military’s role in modern sightings and pop culture’s fascination with extraterrestrial life. Interactive exhibits will also allow visitors to personally experience, through sight, sound and other senses, an alien abduction based on thousands of eyewitness accounts from alleged alien abductees. Documents and other memorabilia will allow visitors to form their own conclusions about the many conspiracy theories swirling around famous UFO events in places like Area 51 and Roswell. A space travel gallery will trace the evolution of space exploration, and a section devoted to science fiction in pop culture will feature replica props from films such as “E.T.” and “Men in Black.” Organizers chose to premiere “Encounters” in the Myrtle Beach area thanks in part to its convenient location along the East Coast and popularity among vacationers: The area hosted 14.5 million visitors in 2011, 11 percent of them from the Upstate, according to the Myrtle Beach

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Chamber of Commerce. However, exhibitors say the main reason Myrtle Beach was chosen is the area’s personal experience with alien encounters, based on 50 years worth of sightings reported. “The coastal area around Myrtle Beach has a well-documented history of multiple UFO sightings,” said Brian Bouquet of the Event Agency, the organization in charge of the attraction. The most recent and one of the largest sightings occurred in August 2012, when hundreds of people reported what appeared to be a large mother ship rendezvousing with a smaller flying craft over North Myrtle Beach. “In 2012 alone, 59 sightings were reported and, given Myrtle Beach’s interest in UFOs, it seemed like the ideal place to launch what we expect will be an exhibition that will eventually travel around the world, “ Bouquet said. The family-friendly exhibition will be located on the northeastern side of Broadway at the Beach in a building with a flying saucer bursting from its side. Days of operation in April and May will be limited to Thursday-Sunday. Summer hours will be announced at a later date. For more information on “Encounters: UFO Experience,” visit ufoexhibition.com.

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FEBRUARY 22, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 19


journal community

our community

community news, events and happenings

Tickets are now on sale for the  TEDxGreenville 2013 conference, By Design.  The conference will be held March 22, 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m., at The Kroc Center in Greenville.  Tickets are $55 each and include the full-day conference and lunch. Presenters include Greenville mayor Knox White, InnoVenture’s John Warner, former NFL and Clemson star wide receiver Perry Tuttle and many others. To purchase tickets, visit tedxgreenville.com.  The Evening Music Program sponsored by Preserving Our Southern Appalachian Music will resume classes in acoustic instruments beginning Feb. 25. The program is designed to teach students ages third grade to adult to play instruments in the traditional way, by ear. Instruments include guitar, mandolin, fiddle (oldtime or bluegrass), and banjo (claw hammer or bluegrass). The six-week sessions will be held in Easley, Greenville, Pickens and Clemson. The cost is $60 per session and instrument rental is available for $25. Enrollment is through Feb. 28. Contact program directors to sign up: Easley and Greenville, Susan Ware-Snow at 864-979-9188; Pickens, Steve McGaha at 864-283-4871; or Clemson, Ryan Wilson at 864-360-4763. For more information, visit yamupstate.org.

J.J. Ferrer will be signing copies of her new book, “The Art of Stone Skipping and Other Fun Old-Time Games,” on Feb. 23, 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m. at the Pickwick Pharmacy and Soda Fountain, 3219 Augusta St., Greenville. For more information, call 864-277-4180. Gardening for Good will hold a free Introduction to Beekeeping workshop on Feb. 26, 4-5:30 p.m. Presented at May Farms Apiary, the class will teach participants the importance of bees to home and community gardens. To register, visit ggardeningforgood.com. For more information, call 864-239-3757. The Greenville County Historical Society presents a program by Greenville mayor Knox White, “Walking Greenville’s History,” on Feb. 24 at 3 p.m. at the Kroc Center, 424 Westfield St., Greenville. The event is free; call 864-233-4103 for additional information. South Carolina Children’s Theatre will host Character Breakfast 2013 on Mar. 9, 8:30 a.m., at the Poinsett Club. Tickets are $25 per person. Those interested can also sponsor children from a local child-centered agency to attend the event. For more information, call Ame Holcombe at 864-235-2885 x15 or visit scchildrenstheatre.org.

ART

The Upcountry History Museum will present “John B. Watson: The Misbehaving Behaviorist” with Charles Brewer, professor of psychology at Furman University, on Feb. 27 as part of the High Noon Lecture Series. John Broadus Watson, known as the “Father of Behavioral Psychology,” was born in Travelers Rest in 1878 and earned a master’s degree from Furman in 1899. For more information, call 864-294-2185 or e-mail Marie Newman-Rogers at marie.newman-rogers@furman.edu. St. Joseph’s Catholic School will host a free Adult Computer Class on campus on Mar. 9 from 10 a.m. to noon. Sponsored by the school’s National Honor Society, the seminar will help adults and senior citizens learn the basic use of the Internet and computer programs. The event is limited to 20 participants. For more information or to register, contact Melissa Broering at 864-234-9009, x120. Western North Carolina Quilters Guild celebrates National Quilting Day from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Mar. 9 at the Blue Ridge Mall. National Quilting Day celebrates the rich history of quilt making and the many contributions quilters have made to their families and communities. Viewers of the celebration will be able to vote on their favorite quilt. For more information, visit westernncquilter.org.

If you are sponsoring a community event, we want to share your news. Submit entries to email: community@communityjournals.com.

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journal community

our schools

activities, awards and accomplishments

Spartanburg Community College is hosting a College Goal South Carolina event on Feb. 23, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., at the college’s Cherokee County Campus in Gaffney. Anyone interested in attending college is invited to attend this free event to receive assistance with completing and filing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), get advice from financial aid experts, receive scholarship information and learn about the financial process. Individuals planning to complete the FAFSA at the event will need their Social Security number, driver’s license (if applicable), and all 2012 income tax documents including W-2s and other income information. Other records that may be required, if applicable, are business and investment mortgage information, farm records, stock, bond and other investment records. For more information, contact Cindy Evans at 864-592-4824. SCC’s Cherokee County Campus is located just off exit 92 on I-85 at 523 Chesnee Hwy. (Hwy. 11), in Gaffney. Shannon Forest Christian School students will celebrate Hispanic Heritage Days. The Early Childhood student event will be held on Feb. 25. Lower School students in first through fifth grades will celebrate on Mar. 4. Students will visit cultural booths from a variety of countries, taste-test special cuisine, break a traditional piñata, play games and learn salsa dancing. Southside Christian School will host an Open House and campus tour for parents of students on Feb. 22, Mar. 1, Mar. 15 and Mar. 22. The informational sessions begin at 9 a.m. First Foundations Inc. is hosting an essay contest for high school homeschoolers with cash scholarships awarded to the three winning essays. The theme is “Resurrection Relevance in 2013” and submission deadline is Mar. 5. For additional information, visit firstfound.us or call 864-834-2300. Greenville Middle Academy’s first annual Ram Run is scheduled for Mar. 15. Beginning Mar. 1, students will collect pledges for the event with all proceeds supporting a new iPad lab at the school. All students will receive

a free T-shirt and participate in the Ram Run – complete with D.J. and live music on the outdoor track.

St. Anthony’s K5 students were visited by students from St. Joseph’s Numinous Knaves household on Wednesday, Feb. 13. The students participated in an enrichment activity to celebrate St. Valentine’s Day.

The Music Club of Greenville is now accepting scholarship applications from high school or home-schooled seniors who are residents of Greenville, Pickens or Spartanburg counties. Student must be planning to major in music (vocal or instrument) at college. Applications are available at musicclubgreenville.org  or by calling 864458-8463. A live audition is required and deadline for application submission is Mar. 20. Applications for the Mary Wheeler Davis Scholarship are being accepted by The Arts Partnership of Greater Spartanburg at the Chapman Cultural Center. One or more $1,000 scholarships are awarded annually to Spartanburg students pursuing college degrees in the visual or performing arts. The selection is based on character, financial need, and artistic potential. Applications are available from The Arts Partnership in the Chapman Cultural Center, by calling 864-278-9693, by emailing ahughes@spartanarts.org or by downloading the forms at chapmanculturalcenter.org. Completed applications must be returned by 5 p.m., Mar. 29.

Southside Christian School recognized (from left) Kira Ford, John (Jake) Welsh VI and Luis DeCastro as National Merit Scholarship Program finalists. Chandler Creek thirdgraders Ethan Parker, Tommy Culpepper and Jasiahs Jennings help volunteer Gil Garrett bring South Carolina history to life. Garrett is portraying William Moultrie.

Shannon Forest Christian School will hold its annual Golf Classic on April 12 at Greenville’s Willow Tree Golf Club. The day will include lunch, golf, a Lowcountry boil dinner and silent auction. For more information or to register, visit shannonforest.com or contact Diana Van Houten at dvanhouten@shannonforest.com. Seven nonprofit leadership students in the George Dean Johnson Jr. College of Business and Economics at the University of South Carolina Upstate recently attended professional development training at the Alliance Management/Leadership Institute. The students were Andrea Bonner, Angela Cannon, Alexander Dukes, Annette Glover, Joyasha Hicklin, Laurel McAlister and Nichole Oltz. The students were awarded second place in the undergraduate research poster presentation contest.

Legacy Charter School sixth-grader Isaiah Hyppolite plays the viola at the instrument “petting zoo” prior to attending the New Century Chamber Orchestra performance at the Peace Center.

Submit entries to: Community Journals, Our Schools, 148 River Street, Ste. 120, Greenville, SC 29601 or email: community@communityjournals.com

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FEBRUARY 22, 2013 | The Journal 21


journal community

the good

events that make our community better

Customers who shop at Whole Foods Market, 1140 Woodruff Road, Greenville, Feb. 26, 8 a.m.–9 p.m., can participate in “5% Day,” when five percent of the day’s net sales will be donated to Family Connection, a nonprofit organization that strengthens and encourages families of children with special healthcare needs through parent support. The event will feature specials on high-dollar items and includes the store’s ready-to-eat bar. For more information about Family Connection, find them on Facebook and visit familyconnectionsc.org. The Red Shoe Society will be hosting their 4th Annual Kickoff Event at the Courtyard Marriott Downtown Greenville, Feb. 28, 6–8 p.m. This event begins the young philanthropic group’s 2013 calendar year with new volunteer opportunities and social functions. There will be giveaways and a chance to network with Greenville’s young philanthropic community – all in support of Ronald McDonald House Charities of the Carolinas. For more information, call 864-235-0506 or visit www.redshoesociety.org. “Rummage For A Reason,” a cooperative fundraising event coordinated by  Uptown of Spartanburg Sertoma Club to benefit community efforts, will be Feb. 22 from 6-8 p.m. for the Pre-Sale and Feb. 23 from 8 a.m.-2 p.m. for the Public Sale at 110 Country Club Rd. in Spartanburg. The event will take place rain or shine. Admission on Feb. 22 is $5 and on Feb. 23 is $1. Children 5 and under are free. All proceeds benefit local nonprofit agencies. For pre-sale tickets, call Mary Beth at 864-583-1117. The Greenville Jazzercise Center will hold a “Girls Night Out” fundraiser class with all proceeds to benefit the Veterans Administration (VA) Hospital of Anderson through the Upstate chapter of the Military Order of the Purple Heart organization by staging a benefit dance-fitness class on Feb. 22 at 7 p.m. at 1280 Woodruff Road, Greenville. For more information, contact Kathy Turner at 864-363-5215. Students from all seven colleges in Spartanburg’s College Town Consortium will be participating in The All Nighter Dance-A-Thon at USC Upstate’s G.B. Hodge Center, Spar-

22 THE Journal | FEBRUARY 22, 2013

tanburg, on Feb. 22 from 8 p.m.-8 a.m. The event benefits the Gibbs Cancer Center. Participants are asked to donate $15 and provide contact information for eight friends and/ or family members who might be interested in supporting them. Community members are encouraged to donate and will have the opportunity to “credit” their favorite local college with the donation. For more information or to register, visit collegetownallnighter.com or contact Donna Pulliam at 864-590-0514 or ndpulliam@gmail.com.

Resource Center, 219 Townsend St., Anderson. The money raised through this event is necessary for Clean Start to continue serving the homeless population of Anderson County. For $6, a bowl of chili or vegetable soup with crackers or cornbread, iced tea and a brownie are available for dine in or carry out. Orders for 10 people or more should be called in. For tickets or to place orders, call 864-716-0766. For more information, contact Pati Brosche at 864-367-8627.

On Saturday, Feb. 23, 7:30-11:30 p.m., “Tinis and Tapas: A Night at the Oscars” at Indigo Hall in Spartanburg will benefit the Ellen Hines Smith Girls’ Home/Children Shelter of the Upstate. The event will feature an exclusive brand premiere, eight tempting tinis stations, delicious tapas, and a live and silent auction. Cost is $75 per person and $85 at the door. Black tie is optional. Visit spgirlshome.com/tinis-andtapas or call 864-573-5773 for more information and tickets.

The South Carolina Governor’s School for Science and Mathematics will honor the University of South Carolina School of Medicine - Greenville during Keep on Dreaming: The 21st Annual Townes Award Dinner on March 12. The Townes Award is named for South Carolina native, Furman graduate, and recipient of the Nobel Laureate in physics Dr. Charles H. Townes. GSSM presents the award annually to individuals or institutions that have gone beyond the basic requirements of their professional positions to raise the quality of scientific, mathematic and technologic innovation in South Carolina.

Furman University’s Community Conservation Corps recently received Upstate Forever’s “Clear Skies Champion” award for its work weatherizing low-income homes through its free weatherization and retrofit program. The program, funded by partnerships with AmeriCorps, Piedmont Natural Gas, the Bank of America Charitable Foundation, and TD Charitable Foundation (through a grant to Upstate Forever), allows qualifying low-income homeowners to receive free energy audits and weatherization upgrades. For a listing of all of this year’s winners, visit upstateforever.org. Efforts to restore a railcar and establish the Swamp Rabbit Station pocket park on the Greenville Hospital System Swamp Rabbit Trail are progressing and organizers have created an opportunity for the community to be part of the project. Community members can purchase engraved bricks for $50. Swamp Rabbit Station will stand in the center of the 17-mile trail, a heavily used resting and turn around spot for families, cyclists and runners. For more information on the project, or to purchase a brick, visit swamprabbitstation.com/buy-a-brick.   

Food Lion’s annual Easter Seals Shop & Care fundraiser will last through Mar. 12 and aims to raise millions of dollars to assist children and adults with disabilities in Food Lion’s more than 1,100 stores. To participate, purchase specially marked products from any of manufacturers that supports the Easter Seals’ mission to help children, families and adults with disabilities address life’s challenges and achieve personal goals. For more information, visit foodlion.com. South Carolina Children’s Theatre will be accepting hair donations in partnership with The Childhood Leukemia Foundation’s Hugs-U-Wear program to benefit children with cancer. Participants can bring a clean-cut 10-inch ponytail or braid in a Ziploc bag to 153 Augusta St., Greenville, between 10 a.m. and 6 p.m., Monday through Friday. Each hair donation will receive one free child’s ticket to “Rapunzel! Rapunzel! A Very Hairy Fairy Tale” at the Peace Center April 19-21 or April 26-28. Hair that has been colored, chemically damaged or cut years ago is not usable.

This year’s Scoop Some Soup event will be held on Mar. 7, 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., at Clean Start Hygiene and Send us your announcement. Email: community@communityjournals.com.


JOURNAL CULTURE

Award winner for arts education. The Verner Award is the state’s highest honor in the arts. Boggs, who has taught at Converse College for 43 years, will be honored with seven other individuals and organizations from across the state at a Statehouse ceremony in May. Other winners are artist Mary Whyte, Ethel S. Brody of Columbia, Fox Music House in Charleston, the city of Anderson, the Franklin G. Burroughs – Simeon B. Chapin Art Museum in Myrtle Beach, artist Pearl Fryar of Bishopville and John Ashbury Zeigler Jr. of Charleston. “Again this year we have an outstanding, diverse group of Verner Award winners,” said Arts Commission Board Chair Dr. Sarah Lynn Hayes. “These exceptional individuals and organizations illustrate the true depth of the arts community in our state. We are grateful for their passion, their contributions and their commitment to serving as ambassadors and standard-bearers for the arts.”

By CINDY LANDRUM | staff

Spartanburg artist and teacher Mac Boggs epitomizes “can-do.” He taught himself enough about architecture through six months of library research and redrawing blueprints by hand to land an entrylevel job at an architecture firm in his Kentucky hometown. He finished a major retrospective of his decades-long art career on time despite suffering an injury to his hand in the crucial weeks leading up to the show that was so big it had to be held on the campuses of three Spartanburg colleges. He helped land one of his Converse College art students an internship at an internationally recognized fabric design company she saw in a magazine ad despite having no inroads to the company, only a phone number from the ad to go on. That “can-do” attitude has paid off for Boggs in a big way: He is the South Carolina Arts Commission’s 2013 Elizabeth O’Neill Verner Governor’s

‘CAN-DO’ ATTITUDE marks Boggs’ art, teaching Spartanburg sculptor wins prestigious Verner award PHOTOS BY GERRY PATE / CONTRIBUTING

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FEBRUARY 22, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 23


JOURNAL CULTURE BOGGS continued from PAGE 23

For Boggs, making art is his way of carrying on a family tradition. His greatgrandfather was a blacksmith; both his grandfathers and his father were welders and steelworkers. Boggs turns discarded metal into outdoor sculptures that can be found in presidential libraries, public parks and his own outdoor sculpture garden at his Spartanburg home. “I didn’t want to just be a steelworker, although that’s what I do,” he said. Boggs grew up in eastern Kentucky and was the first in his family to finish high school. There was no money for college, so he went to the library and taught himself enough about architecture to land his first job, beating out the valedictorian of his high school class with an architectural degree from the University of Cincinnati. Boggs eventually went to college and landed a job at Converse, where he developed the art curriculum that includes opportunities for coursework in interior design, studio art, art education, textile design and graphic design. He says the keys to his success as a teacher is to focus on building a students’ self-confidence and “can-do” attitude in three ways: exposure, exploration and

experience. First, Boggs exposes students to contemporary and historic art through visits to museums and galleries. Then, students visit local foundries, manufacturing plants and artist’s studios to learn about techniques and see them being used to create art. Finally, he pushes students to get internships. He remembers one student who spotted a small gallery off Fifth Avenue during a trip to New York. The student later brought a high-gloss magazine with an ad from the studio into Boggs’ office and told him she wanted to work there. He picked up the phone and called the gallery owner. The student took a long train ride to New York and got the internship. She is now vice president of one of the company’s divisions. Boggs encourages students to enter competitions and juried shows both to validate their work and soften rejection, something that is constant for artists. “I have a long resume of exhibitions. Not one line on that resume is about not getting into a show,” he said. “I don’t teach failure. There’s no such thing as failure. It’s only a learning experience to grow.” Boggs is well known for his abstract paintings, steel sculptures, bronze work, computer graphics and architectural designs. His work is in the presidential

GERRY PATE / CONTRIBUTING

Mac Boggs is the South Carolina Arts Commission’s 2013 Elizabeth O’Neill Verner Governor’s Award winner for arts education – the state’s highest honor in the arts.

libraries of Gerald Ford and Jimmy Carter and is located internationally in numerous corporate collections. He was invited to present his Sept. 11 World Trade Center memorial, “The Halo Project,” at the International Biennial of Contemporary Art exhibition in Italy. Boggs’ can-do attitude is still serving him well. A medical condition is forcing him to reduce his teaching load – he’ll

officially retire from Converse at the end of the school year but will continue to teach part-time – and re-examine what he wants to do in his own art career. “I’m going through the process of deciding what I’m going to do now,” he said. “One thing I know, I’ll keep right on making art.” Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.

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BECOME PART OF HISTORY Leadership Greenville Class 39 is working with Greenville County Recreation District to refurbish a 70-year-old boxcar and create a unique destination that will be a resting/gathering point along the Greenville Hospital System Swamp Rabbit Trail. Swamp Rabbit Station will be at the center of the 17-mile trail, a heavily used resting and turn-around spot for families, cyclists and runners. You can be a part of this trail’s history by buying, or gifting, an engraved brick for $50. To buy your brick or learn more, visit www.SwampRabbitStation.com or snap the QR code below.


JOURNAL CULTURE

An homage to Streisand Keith Lockhart returns to Greenville with the Boston Pops and singer Ann Hampton Calloway By CINDY LANDRUM | staff

The first time Ann Hampton Calloway was asked by the Boston Pops to do a concert tribute to Barbra Streisand, she said she wasn’t interested. “It’s a daunting task to do a tribute to a living legend,” she said in a telephone interview. “And I think she’s one of the greatest living singers.” But then Calloway reconsidered, mainly because Streisand is one of the singers who have inspired her during her own career. “Two of the greatest words we can say are ‘Thank you.’” Calloway will celebrate the grand dame of entertainment on Tuesday when she joins the Boston Pops and conductor Keith Lockhart, a Furman University graduate, in concert on Tuesday at the Peace Center. “Barbra has been the song track to our lives,” she said. And, according to Lockhart, there’s nobody better than Calloway to celebrate Streisand in concert. Streisand recorded songs Calloway wrote on six of her albums, including “I’ve Dreamed of You,” the song Streisand sang to her husband, James Brolin, on her wedding day. The concert will also feature a tribute to the late Marvin Hamlisch, the composer of one of Streisand’s hits, “The Way We Were.” Hamlisch died in August, just four months after Streisand celebrated her 70th birthday. “This past year was both fortuitous and unfortunate,” Lockhart said. Calloway said she struggled at first to write Streisand’s wedding-day song. Then the singer told her not to try to

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write a wedding song, because there were enough of those. “The moment she said that, it freed me up,” Calloway said. “I was sitting outside on the Hudson River pretending I was Barbra and thinking about what I would say. I put myself in her shoes and focused on the moment and the truth of the moment.” Streisand would later tell her she wrote exactly what she wanted to say. “It was very daunting knowing how important that song was,” she said. “But we all have our fears to get over. Instead of being afraid, you have to focus on your heart.” Lockhart calls Calloway an amazing vocal actress, singer and songwriter. Calloway said she’s honored to be able to do a Streisand-themed concert. “I always feel a sense of awe. Barbra is so iconic to me,” she said. “I always feel, ‘Oh, my God.’” Lockhart said the concert should be attractive to both the traditional orchestra audience and fans of pop music. “It’s a formula that has worked for 130 years,” he said. Lockhart’s 17-year tenure has been marked by a dramatic increase in touring, the orchestra’s first Grammy nominations and the first major network national broadcast of the Pops’ Fourth of July spectacular. He has led the Pops at several high-profile sports events, including the Super Bowl pre-game show, the national anthem for the 2008 NBA Finals and the opening game of the 2007 World Series. “My job is to make sure the tradition is maintained and flourishes,” he said. Tuesday’s concert will mark Lockhart’s first at the Peace Center. He said he looks forward to reconnecting with his Furman friends as well as seeing a packed house on Tuesday night. “There’s no substitute for hearing the orchestra live,” he said. Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.

SO YOU KNOW WHAT: Boston Pops Orchestra

WHEN: Feb. 26, 7:30 p.m. WHERE: Peace Center TICKETS: $65-$95 INFORMATION: 864-467-3000

Joan Herlong Owner, BIC

STU ROSNER / CONTRIBUTING

WHO: Conductor Keith Lockhart, singer Ann Hampton Calloway and the Furman Symphony Orchestra

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journal culture

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To say world-renowned violinist Joshua Bell is busy would be an understatement. He’s currently touring the U.S. and Europe, playing recitals with pianist Sam Haywood – including a concert at Greenville’s Peace Center on Sunday afternoon – and playing with orchestras such as the New York Philharmonic. He’s the music director of the Academy of St. Martin in the Fields, the distinguished London orchestra that just released a recording of Beethoven’s Symphonies No. 4 and No. 7 on Feb. 12. He’s working on a birthday celebration for his violin, a 300-yearold Stradivarius once owned

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JOURNAL CULTURE by violinist Bronislaw Huberman. seven people threw money in his open He teaches at Indiana University. And violin case. His take: $32.17. he’s the dad of three sons, the oldest of He played the Huberman that day, as whom is 5 and had his first cello recital he does in all of his performances. The recently. violin has an interesting history: It was “Stamina is the key,” said the 45-year- twice stolen; the first time, in 1919, it old musician in a telephone interview disappeared from the Polish virtuoso’s from New York. “So far, I’m surviving it, hotel room and was quickly returned. but I don’t know how much longer I can The second time, Huberman didn’t get do 140 concerts a year.” it back. Still, Bell said he loves the recitals. New York journeyman violinist Ju“Something about recitals that I really lian Altman took the violin from a love is that I control the Carnegie Hall dressing whole evening.” room while HuberHe said the recital in man played a concert Greenville will include in 1936. Altman conSchubert’s Sonatina in fessed to the theft to A minor, Strauss ‘s Sohis second wife on his Joshua Bell nata in E-flat, Opus 18, deathbed in 1985. and Prokofiev’s Sonata Bell bought the violin No. 2 in D Major, Opus in 2001 after he heard 94. Additional pieces will be added of the then-owner’s plan to sell it as a from the stage. museum piece. He’ll play that instruThe program was designed around ment in Greenville. the Strauss, he said. “It’s something new After the concert, it wouldn’t be surin my own repertoire, although I have prising to find Bell watching the Oscars. heard it since I was very young. It’s not The composer of the song “Before My one of my desert island pieces, but it is Time,” a song Bell and Scarlett Johansglorious and beautiful.” son performed in the documentary Bell calls Schubert the “greatest melo- “Chasing Ice,” is an Oscar nominee. dist that ever lived.” “Schubert is in my top three (favorite Contact Cindy Landrum at composers), if not my favorite,” he said. clandrum@communityjournals.com. Prokofiev, a Russian 20th-century composer, adds contrast to the program, Bell said. “I want to present a concert as a well-balanced meal. It needs to have WHO: Violinist Joshua Bell (with pianist Sam Haywood) enough meat and potatoes and dessert. I think these pieces connect in an orWHERE: Peace Center ganic way.” WHEN: Sunday, Feb. 24, 3 p.m. Many people know Bell only as the TICKETS: $45-$75 violinist who played in a Washington D.C. metro station one morning durINFORMATION: 864-467-3000 ing rush hour and virtually nobody noEXTRA: To listen to a portion of the new ticed. Nearly 1,100 people passed by as Academy of St. Martin in the Fields/Joshua he played that day. Only seven stopped, Bell recording of Beethoven’s Symphonies and just one recognized him as one of No. 4 and No. 7, go to goo.gl/4k8EF. the world’s greatest violinists. Twenty-

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journal culture

listen up

2/24, Peace Center

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Joshua Bell Classical music superstar. Tickets: $45-$75. Call 864-467-3000 or visit peacecenter.org.

Chris Duarte Brilliant blues guitarist. Tickets: $14. Call 864-233-6173 or visit handlebar-online.com.

best bets for local live music 2/23, Ground Zero

Mushroomhead Eight-piece horror-heavy metal outfit. Call 864-948-1661 2/23, Peace Center

Kodo Drummers Japanese taiko drumming ensemble. Tickets: $35-$45. Call 864-467-3000 or visit peacecenter.org.

Of Montreal Multi-genre electronica collective. Tickets: $19 in advance, $21 day of show. Call 864-233-6173 or visit handlebar-online.com.

Lionz Of Zion Cool reggae grooves. Call 864-235-5519. 3/13, The Handlebar

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The Work celebrates 12th anniversary jammin’ with its Gottrocks fans

Thursday, February 28

For the last 12 years, The Work has been an Upstate music institution. The band has ranged from a quintet to a septet over the years. Even as their performances have become less frequent, their occasional concerts – usually for worthy causes like the Ronald McDonald House – still draw huge crowds. The faithful fan base has loved their genre-spanning, relentlessly energetic music since the group started playing weekly Wednesday night shows at Greenville’s Gottrocks club in the early 2000s. This weekend, the band is returning to Gottrocks to celebrate their 12th anniversary in style. The core lineup for most of the band’s existence has been drummer Jason Owens, bassist Mark Dye, trumpet player Craig Sorrells and guitarists Charles Hedgepath and Mitch Towles. The Who: The Work group alternates lead vocals between Dye, Towles, Hedgepath and Sorrells, What: 12th anniversary show with Sorrells doing the lion’s share of Where: Gottrocks, the singing. Their sound combines the 200 Eisenhower Drive, Greenville psychedelic jamming of bands like the When: Saturday, Feb. 23, 10 p.m. Grateful Dead with the funk grooves of Parliament-Funkadelic with hints Call: 864-235-5519 of straight-ahead rock and country thrown in the mix. Keyboardist Matt Jennings and percussionist Jeff Holland also spent time in the group and still sit in at the occasional show. After forming from a jam session at the now-defunct downtown Kincaid’s, the band quickly found a home at Gottrocks, playing Wednesday night shows that lasted four hours or more to an ecstatic crowd. “Everybody past and present at Gottrocks has always made us feel like family,” Hedgepath says. “Those weekly gigs would not have been possible if we hadn’t had a place to play that allowed us the freedom to explore our music.” From that launching pad, the Work grew into a bigger and bigger group, eventually touring all over the Southeast, sharing the stage with internationally known bands (a Charleston gig with the Dirty Dozen Brass Band was among the most memorable for Hedgepath) and recording an album with acclaimed producer John Keane (R.E.M., 10,000 Maniacs, Cowboy Junkies). That album, 2005’s “Bring Back the Good,” marked a peak for the band, at least in terms of activity. Gradually, the band members began focusing more on their own projects, though Hedgepath says they still love playing together and will always have a tight bond. “Our common experiences have kept us together,” he says. “We’ve been through a lot as a band, both musically and personally. Whenever we get together and play, there’s always a great feeling of familiarity.” Hedgepath is quick to credit the band’s fans for helping keep them together for over a decade. “Our audience has always been a central part to our growth as a band,” he says. “People would come out every Wednesday night at Gottrocks and watch us try different things each week; that’s not what a typical fan base would do.”

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FEBRUARY 22, 2013 | The Journal 29


JOURNAL CULTURE

Spartanburg pairs great stories with great filmmaking By NICHOLE LIVENGOOD | contributor

The Expecting Goodness film festival began in 2011 with a big idea from Spartanburg filmmaker Josh Foster: Find a way to connect South Carolina writers and their stories with South Carolina filmmakers. Foster sought collaboration with the Hub City Writer’s Project and Hub-Bub. The result: seven films created over two months. This year, the goodness expanded to 15 films over a four-month period. The collection will premiere on March 23 at Chapman Cultural Center. “The first year was an experiment, but was extremely successful,” says Kari Jackson, assistant director of the Hub City Writers Project. “The premiere is not just about coming to see movies; it is about seeing the results of the hard work of hundreds of people around the state, and even the country. This project really connects writers and filmmakers and involves the community in the making of their films.”

Foster said the idea grew out of his desire “to be part of something that reflected my passion for the arts and film, so I could put my own personal stamp on a project that hopefully inspires others, celebrates Spartanburg, and helps build the infrastructure for a film community in the Upstate.” Jackson said the Expecting Goodness process takes a different approach from other film festivals. “In other cases you make your short film and submit it and they decide if they will show it. This film festival matches filmmakers with writers and shows films for the first time at the festival,” she said. “We get a lot of first-time film makers. They get a story to work with so they do not have to think of something from nothing, and they get support from other filmmakers. Seeing the community come together around the festival, seeing the filmmakers and writers connecting and making friends and getting jobs together

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beyond this project, is really cool.” The first year, films were pulled from a collection of short stories called “Expecting Goodness,” written by Spartanburg writers and published by the Hub City Writer’s Project (hence the name of the festival). This time around, a call went out for stories from across the state that had recently been published or had won an award. The process assured a vetted and well-written story; filmmakers then chose from the 38 stories submitted. “Pairing the writers and the filmmakers showcases writers and their stories in a way that doesn’t really happen anywhere else,” Jackson said. “It’s so easy for a story to get published and a few people read it and then it’s history, but if somebody reads it and is inspired by it and wants to tell the story in a different way, in this case visually through a short film, then the story lives on and reaches more people than it could on the page.”

This year, Expecting Goodness is hosting a series of events at the Spartanburg Headquarters Library called “Story to Screen.” People are asked to read a book, then come watch the film adapted from the text and participate in a discussion. The next selection is “Into the Wild,” showing on March 13 at 6 p.m. The Spartanburg project has become about building relationships in the film community across the state. Expecting Goodness teamed with the Indie Grits Film Festival, a juried film festival for South Carolina filmmakers in Columbia, for two events. Organizers are also working with the South Carolina Film Commission and will be screening their Indie Grants films on Feb. 23 at 7 p.m. at The Showroom in Spartanburg ($7 in advance or at the door). The program gives grants to South Carolina filmmakers who have ideas for specific short films. One of the films showing, “The Debutante Hunters,” a documentary by Maria White, won an audience award at Sundance last year. Jackson said she hopes people come away from the festival “with this great sense of community that people from all over the state can come together and create something and then celebrate it.” “For people in Spartanburg, it’s another event they can attend and be proud of, another way we can show off our city,” Foster said. For tickets and information, visit expectinggoodness.com. Tickets are $15. Contact Nichole Livengood at nlivengood@communityjournals.com.

Harry Walton Boone exhibit Milliken Art Gallery at Converse College is hosting an exhibition of paintings of abstracted nature through March 14. Harry Walton Boone will explore his visions of nature and the world around him in Human Nature. Gallery hours are Monday-Friday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sunday 2-5 p.m. The gallery is closed during school holidays. There will be a gallery talk on March 7 at 6 p.m. “Nature Series” by Harry Walton Boone with a reception following. The exhibit and events are free and open to the public. For more information, visit converse.edu or contact Kathryn Boucher at kathryn.boucher@converse.edu.


journal culture

scene. here.

the week in the local arts world

The Greenville Little Theatre will present “Sherlock Holmes & The Case of the Jersey Lily” by Katie Forgette Feb. 22-March 9. The starring role of Sherlock Holmes will be played by Evan Harris and John Watson will be played by Rod McClendon. On Feb. 26, there will be a benefit performance for the Carolina Youth Symphony with hors d’oeuvres and cash bar at 7 p.m. Cost is $30 for the benefit. Regular performance tickets are $26 with discounts available for seniors, children and groups. To buy tickets or for more information, visit greenvillelittletheatre.org or call 864-233-6238. Jo Johnston, a former commercial artist of 30 years, will be teaching six-week classes at the Pickens County Museum. “Fast and Fun Painting with Watercolor” will begin Mar. 5 and “From Sketchbook to Painting” will begin Mar. 7. The “From Sketchbook to Painting” class requires experience in both part one and part two of the “Sketching from Nature” class. Both classes are for adults only and held from 10 a.m. to noon. Tuition for each class is $78-$88. Registration and payment are required by Feb. 26. To register, visit the Pickens County Museum or call 864-898-5963. The next deadline to apply for a Quarterly Community Grant from The Arts Partnership of Greater Spartanburg is Feb. 28. The program provides quarterly project assistance grants ranging from $500 to $1,000 for nonprofit organizations and professional artists in Spartanburg County. Eligible cultural projects are those that actively engage the performing, visual, literary or folk arts. For more information, visit chapmanculturalcenter.org and click on The Arts Partnership. The Fountain Inn Center for the Visual and Performing Arts will present Neil Simon’s “Barefoot in the Park” through Feb. 24. The romantic comedy features newlyweds Corie and Paul and their life in a tiny, fifth-floor apartment. To purchase tickets, visit ftinnarts.org or call 864-409-1050. The Greer Children’s Theatre presents “Grease: The School Version” Feb. 22-23 at 7 p.m., Feb. 17-24 at 2 p.m. at the J. Harley Bond’s Career Center at 505 North Main St. in Greer. Tickets are $15 for adults, $12 for students/seniors and $7 for children under 5. Riverside High School Choral/Drama departments will present the classic musical “The Wizard of Oz” on Feb. 28, Mar. 1 and 2 at 7 p.m. Tickets are $10 and can be purchased in advance by calling 864-355-7828 or emailing dofowler@ greenville.k12.sc.us. Tickets will also be available at the door. The Curtis R. Harley Art Gallery at the University of South Carolina Upstate will display a collection of movie posters, “Film Art from Behind the Iron Curtain,” from Eastern European countries courtesy of Dr. Matthew Johnston, through May 10. The exhibit features posters from Poland, the former Czechoslovakia, Eastern Germany, Romania, Russia and Cuba. The public is invited to Johnston’s free public lecture Feb. 28 at 4:30 p.m. A reception will follow. For more information, contact Jane Nodine, gallery director, at 864-503-5838 or jnodine@uscupstate.edu, or Michael Dickins, gallery manager, at 864-503-5848 or mdickins@uscupstate.edu. The Children’s Museum of the Upstate is honored to host NRG! Exhibits “The Hunt for Treasure!” sponsored by Up-

state Gold Exchange. On display through June 2, “The Hunt for Treasure!” invites visitors to learn about shipwrecks, treasure hunters, tools for hunting treasure and how to look for treasure close to home. The exhibit has four themes including sunken treasure, buried treasure, metal detecting and the modern treasure hunt. For more information, call 864-2337755 or visit tcmupstate.org.

tune into these classics

The Furman University Wind Ensemble will present a concert, La Fiesta, on Friday, Feb. 22 at 8 p.m. in McAlister Auditorium on the Furman campus. The concert is open to the public and is part of Furman’s Cultural Life Program events. Tickets are $12 for adults, $10 for seniors and $3 for students. For more information, call 864-294-3069. Wofford College will show the Chinese movie “If You Are the One II” as part of its World Film Series on Feb. 27 at 3:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. in Olin Teaching Theater, Franklin W. Olin Building, on campus. Bob Jones University will present Giuseppe Verdi’s “Requiem” in Rodeheaver Auditorium at 7:30 p.m. on Friday, March 1. Four guest soloists will accompany nearly 300 instrumentalists and choristers. The performance, in honor of Giuseppe Verdi’s 200th birthday, is open to the public, and tickets are available at bju.edu/tickets or by calling 864-770-1372. Riverworks Gallery presents First Edition, a juried exhibition of original prints created by undergraduates currently studying in colleges within the Southeast, Feb. 28-April 14. An opening reception and awards presentation will be March 1, 6-9 p.m. The prints represent many traditional printmaking methods, such as linoleum cut, wood- By Matthew Nielson, untitled cut, intaglio, screenprinting. The images themselves are contemporary, vibrant and fresh. The exhibit is also a product of a collaboration with the Department of English to express the natural affinity of visual art and literature, celebrate the similar histories of printmaking and the printed word as means of mass communication. Riverworks is open 1-5 p.m. Sunday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday. For more information, call 864-271-0679 or email fleming. markel@gvltec.edu or visit gvltec.edu/vpa/ and click on Riverworks. The T.L. Norris Gallery, 1 Wade Hampton Blvd., Greenville, will host the Cityscapes Show featuring works by artists Faye Vander Veer and Jacki Newell Feb. 22-Mar. 16. The opening night celebration will be held on Feb. 22 from 5:30-9 p.m. For more information, call 864-991-8645 or visit tlnorrisgallery.com.

JOSHUA BELL

with pianist Sam Haywood Feb. 24, 3:00pm

KEITH LOCKHART

and the Boston Pops Esplanade Orchestra featuring Ann Hampton Callaway Feb. 26, 7:30pm

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Send us your arts announcement. Email: arts@communityjournals.com

FEBRUARY 22, 2013 | The Journal 31


journal culture

Arts Calendar

IRA GLASS

Feb. 22 – 28, 2013

Greenville Little Theatre Sherlock Homes and the Case of the Jersey Lily Feb. 22-Mar. 9 ~ 233-6238 Peace Center Kodo Feb. 23 ~ 467-3000

Saturday, Mar. 16th 8:00pm

Centre Stage Rock ‘n Roll Forever: ’80s Edition Through Feb. 23 ~ 233-6733 Peace Center Oscar-Nominated Short Films 2013 Through Feb. 23 ~ 467-3000 Peace Center Joshua Bell Feb. 24 ~ 467-3000

Greenville Chautauqua Society Susan B. Anthony Discussion Feb. 26 ~ 244-1499 Peace Center Keith Lockhart & the Boston Pops Esplanade Orchestra Feb. 26 ~ 467-3000 Furman University Daniel Koppelman & Ruth Neville, Piano & Electronics Feb. 27 ~ 294-2086 North Greenville University The Tempest Through Mar. 2 ~ 977-7085 Metro. Arts Council at Centre Stage Works by Georgia Harrison Through Mar. 4 ~ 233-6733

Fountain Inn Arts Center Barefoot in the Park Through Feb. 24 ~ 409-1050 Greenville County Museum of Art Here’s Your Freedom Through Feb. 24 ~ 271-7570

Greenville County Museum of Art The Art of Helen Moseley Through Apr. 14 ~ 271-7570

Greer Children’s Theatre Grease: The School Version Through Feb. 24 ~ 848-5383 SC Children’s Theatre Glow Tales Through Feb. 24 ~ 235-2885

David Drake: Potter and Poet of Edgefield District Join us to learn more about the inspiring life of David Drake! Saturday, February 23 2 pm – 4 pm n n

PEACE CONCERT HALL Everyone’s favorite favorite “This American Life” host presents “Reinventing Radio: An Evening with Ira Glass.” His stories, music, and interview clips will explore the process behind the show and what makes compelling radio. peacecenter.org 864.467.3000 800.888.7768 BEST PRICES BEST SEATS

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32 THE Journal | FEBRUARY 22, 2013

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Pottery demonstrations Reading by Coletta Bryce of the children’s book Dave the Potter, Artist, Poet, Slave African dancing, drums, and percussion with Jeff Holland Hands-on art activities for children Certus Saturday is free and is sponsored by

Sunday, February 24 2 pm Meet Upstate artist Jay Owens to learn more about creating beauty and function from dirt and water. This free event is sponsored by

Greenville County Museum of Art 420 College Street Greenville, SC 29601 864.271.7570 admission free gcma gcma.org


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FROM

2–4PM

1 0 7 B e l l R o a d , B e l l s G r a n t WHAT A BEAUTIFUL COMMUNITY AND HOME!!! You will love the convenience of tons of shopping, private and public schools, close to I385, 85 and minutes from the airport! Awesome open floor plan with master bedroom on the main level. Beautiful hardwoods throughout 1st floor, raised panel doors throughout, cat 5 wiring, oversize garage boasts cabinets for storage and work area plus a tub sink. Silestone/ granite HOME INFO counter tops. Built in desk/computer area. Very open floor plan with kitchen, great Price: $364,500 | MLS#1237694 room and keeping room areas. This home 4 Bedrooms, 3.5 Baths, 3000-3199SF shows like it is brand new!!! Large side Mauldin Elementary grilling porch plus a rocking chair front Mauldin Middle porch. Owner willing to throw in a one year lawn maintenance with acceptable offer. Mauldin High Incredible combination of Craftsman style Charlotte Sarvis 864.346.9943 workmanship with a European flair. You will Prudential C. Dan Joyner, Co. love the Craftsman style of this home!!!

OPEN THIS WEEKEND OPEN CLAREMONT

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GREYWOOD AT HAMMETT (2/24)

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MAHAFFEY PLANTATIONSUN 2-4PM (2/24) THISTLEDOWN

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AUGUSTA ROAD AREA SUN 2-4PM (2/24)

CONNORS CREEK

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523 CHAMBLEE BLVD - $769,000 4BR/4BA. Beautiful home under construction in gated community. MBR and 2nd BR + Study on main. Upstairs-2BR/2BA + Bonus. 385 S to Roper Mtn exit, L off ramp, go 5 miles to Right into SD on Chamblee Blvd. Margaret Marcum/Leigh Irwin, 4203125/380-7755 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1252608

101 TREETOPS COURT - $689,000 4BR/4BA. New home in gated community. Must see. I-85 to Pelham Rd, Right on the Parkway, Left on Batesville Rd, Left on Enoree Rd, Left on Old Spartanburg Rd, Right on Hammett Rd, SD approx 1 mile on Left. Krista Ligon, 430-1845 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1252165

201 RIVERSTONE WAY - $579,900 25. What an incredible Dillard Jones home, perfect for that large family. Gorgeous basement brick 3 story home featuring bedrooms galore, 5 to be exact and 5 full bathrooms, lots of living space, too. Charlotte Sarvis, 864-346-9943 Carol Pyfrom Realty MLS#1236658

19 THISTLE BROOK CT - $529,000 3BR/3.5BA. Energy Star hm in gated community. Bonus room, unfished basement, MBR on main, 2 car garage, dream kitchen w/double ovens. I-385 S to Roper Mountain Rd Exit, Left off ramp, go 1 mile to Left into SD. Leigh Irwin, 380-7755 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1252171

27 SYLVAN DRIVE - $474,000 11 CONNORS CREEK CT - $469,900 4BR/3.5BA. Open floorplan, 4 bdrms, bonus, 5BR/3.5BA. Exquisite custom built home office, 2-car garage, fenced bkyrd, master on with full walk out basement. Luxury, exclusivmain, gourmet kitchen, great rm, dining rm, 9 ity & functionality. 385 to Woodruff Rd, go ft. ceilings, hardwoods! Augusta Rd to Byrd towards Five Forks, R on Scuffletown, R on Blvd. to Sylvan. Home on rt. Virginia Hayes, Adams Mill Rd, 2nd SD on R, Home on L. (864) 313-2986 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Jeffrey Meister, 979-4633 Prudential C. Co. MLS#1254461 Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1254115

BELLS GRANT

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AUGUSTA ROAD AREA SUN 2-4PM (2/24)

WOODLAND HILLS

TUCKER BRANCH

PEBBLE CREEK

107 BELL ROAD - $364,500 24. LOCATION! LOCATION! LOCATION! WHAT A BEAUTIFUL HOME!!! You will love the convenience of tons of shopping, private schools and public schools.. close to I385,85 and minutes from the airport! Charlotte Sarvis, 864-346-9943 Carol Pyfrom Realty MLS#1237694

311 MEYERS DRIVE - $349,500 3BR/2BA. Unique custom Passive Solar Contemporary, Frank Lloyd Wright style home. The lot is incredible and it is located just off August Road near the hospital. Dawn Borkowski, (864) 313-4608 Keller Williams Upstate MLS#1236814

2 ROSEFIELD COURT - $339,500 .63 acres. Relaxation and peacefulness await you on this back deck! Wonderful home with a great floor plan--master bedroom and guest bedroom on main. 2 other nice bedrooms and a huge bonus upstairs COME & SEE! Patty Pfister, (864) 630-0410 Keller Williams Main MLS#1252908

TUCKER BRANCH

THE VINEYARD

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5 BRIERFIELD WAY - $259,900 3BR/2.5BA. Energy Style qualified superior quality home. Hdwds, 9 ft clgs, deep crown mldgs, scrnd prch.385 S to Exit 23, Hwy 418. Go approx 1/2 mile- turn L. R at light on S. Main, Go 1/2 mile - turn L into SD Kate Anderson/Kristin Brady, 363-3634 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1250930

SUN 2-4PM (2/24)

109 WHITTLIN WAY - $229,900 4BR/2.5BA. Updated ranch with great family/ rec room with custom bar. Beautiful MBR and kitchen. Pebble Creek golf course community. Rutherford Rd to Stallings Rd, Right on Pebble Creek Dr, Right on Whittlin Way Robyn Gillis, 915-5723 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1250943

MORNING MIST

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3 CARDEROCK CT - $224,999 5BR/2.5BA. Beautiful home on oversized CDS fenced lot conveniently located! Awesome kitchen! New custom patio! 385 S to Exit 29, R on West Georgia, L in SD, L on Tulip Tree, R on Crowflock, L on Carderock Carolyn Laws-Irwin,, 451-9407 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1252783

SUN 2-4PM (2/24)

BEFORE YOU BUY OR SELL, DO YOUR

33 DONEMERE WAY - $199,900 3BR/2.5BA. Craftsman style, Energy Star home. Upgradees & advanced technology. 385 S to Exit 23, Hwy 418. Go apprx. 1/2 mile and turn Left. Turn Right at light on S. Main, Go 1/2 mile & turn Left into SD Kate Anderson/Kristin Brady, 363-3634/9087200 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1249245

12 KNOLLVINE COVE - $178,000 4BR/2.5BA. Home in culdesac. New: roof, HVAC, carpet, paint & appliances. Fenced yard, new deck w/arbor and new outbuilding. Butler Rd to Ashmore Bridge, Right on Bel Arbor, Left on Knollvine. Steve May, 346-2570 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1253729

34 T H E J O U R N A L | FEBRUARY 22, 2013

HOMEWORK SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL


F E A T U R E D PREMIER

PROPERTIES

H O M E

C U R R E N T LY

ON

THE

MARKET

THIS WEEK’S FEATURED HOME

Water Oak Home 507 Townes Street, Downtown Greenville The construction features Energy Star and Earth Craft certifications that creates an energy efficient home plus a SUPER quiet home environment. Guaranteed utility costs include gas and electric not to exceed a total of $100 per month or $1200 for the first 12 months of ownership. This guarantee is for the first year only to show the new owner we are serious about the efficiency in the energy costs for the homes at Craftsman Court. This is amazing downtown new construction designed by award winning Arts and Crafts designer, Trey Cole,

with the detailing of the sought after charming bungalows of the Arts and Crafts era. This is the BEST alternative to the downtown condo. It is only a few blocks from Main Street and on the trolley route, with an abundance of natural light, often an objection from downtown condo owners, no one living above or on either side.

More photos, info and over 1,900 neighborhoods online at

HOME INFO Price: $419,000 | MLS# 1251732 3 Bedrooms, 2.5 Baths, 2400-2599 SF Stone Academy League Academy Greenville High Academy Contact: Valerie Miller 864.430.6602 The Marchant Company Send us your Featured Home for consideration: homes@greenvillejournal.com

Custom Build – Renovations – Design

TURNING DREAMS I N T O R E A L I T Y SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

C111R

highlandhomessc.com – 864.233.4175

FEBRUARY 22, 2013 | T H E J O U R N A L 35


w vie ng i z a Am

99 Echo Drive $750,000 • 1243569 • 3 BR/2.5 BA

3000 feet elevation Old Caesar’s Head community. Tom Marchant 864.449.1658

n n tow ctio wnnstru o D Co w e N

507-B Townes Street $419,000 • 1251732 • 3 BR/2.5 BA

Energy Star & Earth Craft certificated. $100/month utilities 1st year of ownership, guaranteed. Valerie Miller 864.430.6602 | Chuck Miller 864.293.4778

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g tin Lis

1 Somerville Court $174,900 • 1253787 • 3 BR/2.5 BA + Bonus

≈2300 SF, cul-de-sac, corner lot, gas fireplace/great room, fenced yard, patio with gas line for grill. Anne Marchant 864.420.0009 | Jolene Wimberly 864. 414.1688

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1 Mission Street $119,900 • 1253798 • 3 BR/2 BA

Renovated 1945 Victorian w/wrap around porch. Updates: hdwds & kitchen. Master on main. Mins to D’town & 385. James Akers 864.325-8413

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321 Sorono Drive $519,900 • 1254242 • 3 BR/2 Full & (2) 1/2 BA

Private/gated Montebello Tuscan Villa, MBR on main, Luxurious details throughout. Nancy McCrory 864.505.8367 | Karen Turpin 864.230.5176

at ocksee R e Th ocas J

Handicap accessible, in-law suite, golf course view. Joan Rapp 864.901.3839

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Desired Augusta Rd street, ≈0.35 ac lot, hdwds, granite, fenced yard, partially finished basement, plus updates. Anne Marchant 864.420.0009 | Jolene Wimberly 864. 414.1688

1 story on cul-de-sac in Half Mile Lake with manicured yard. Appli. package & 10 mins to downtown, Amenities. Nancy McCrory 864.505.8367 | Karen Turpin 864.230.5176

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3 Sayebrook Road $217,000 • 1253691 • 4 BR/2.5 BA + Bonus

Spacious, decorator colors inspired home. Updates: hdwds in MBA & antique vanities in BAs. Fenced yard w/irr. sys. Barb Riggs 864.423.2783

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103 East Tugaloo Court $169,900 • 1254347 • 3 BR/2 BA

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38 Mount Vista Avenue $429,900 • 1253949 • 4 BR/4 BA

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105 Woodmere Drive $274,921 • 1250743 • 3 BR/3.5 BA

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108 Lomond Lane $149,900 • 1254199 • 3 BR/2 BA

Amazing ranch with fenced yard, offers granite counter tops and upgrades: carpet, cabinets, laminate hardwoods. James Akers 864.325-8413

FANNIE MAE OWNED PROPERTY

507 Wren Way $99,500 • 1254174 • 2 BR/2 BA

Carefree living, ≈1300 SF condo in Swansgate, 2 pk spaces, handicap equip. BRs/BAs, Appli. remain, amenities. Joey Beeson 864.660.9689

407 Fairview Drive

$244,900

1253293

206 Wilton

$178,500

1253402

5733 Locust Hill Road

$109,900

1252003

10 Cottingham Circle

$56,500

1253183

107 Elrod

$37,500

1253910

www.Homepath.com Kathy Slayter • 864.982.7772

RENTAL PROPERTY AVAILABLE • Marchantpm.com

The name you know. The people you trust. www.marchantco.com 36 T H E J O U R N A L | FEBRUARY 22, 2013

|

864.467.0085 | AGENT ON DUTY: JeanE Bartlett 864.506.4093 SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL


ON THE MARKET

N E I G H B O R H O O D SYCAMORE

P R O F I L E

RIDGE

NG

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40 Club Forest Lane $649,90 • MLS 1253827 $279,900

3BR/3BA FOUNTAIN INN A beautiful farm house located on a corner lot with tons of yard space for gardening, pets and children to run & play! The updates include: stainless appliances in 2010, roof in ‘02, HVAC 5 ton in ‘09 Hilary Hurst (864) 313-6077 MLS#1250471

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108 St. Johns Street $169,900 • MLS 1254519 NG

4BR/3BA MOUNT VERNON ESTATES 4/3 Ranch with 3 car garage located in upscale Mt. Vernon Estates; just minutes from town, GSP airport, dining & shops! Home offers a split floor plan with a master suite fit for a King! Must See! Hilary Hurst (864) 313-6077 MLS#1210344

I IST

$219,747

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35 W. Tallulah $412,900 • MLS 1254436

DIGEST Hampton Joins Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS®

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

$4

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Helen Hagood

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Mobile: 864-419-2889 hhagood@cbcaine.com See these homes and more at cbcaine.com/agents/HelenHagood

M13A

Bryson Elementary Bryson Middle School Hillcrest High School

$6

$306,590

Amenities: Clubhouse, Sidewalks, Swimming Pool, Tennis Courts

HISTORIC HOME SALES

$365,917

Hampton currently lives in Fountain Inn with her husband, Gregory, and four children. In her free time, she loves to sew and makes custom designed clothes.

12 Month Average Home Price: $439,862

235 McDaniel Ave $599,900 • MLS 1252827

Selling Greenville for 28 Years!

NEIGHBORHOOD INFO

$445,350

“We are excited to have Angela join our family of Realtors,” said Donna Smith, Broker-in-Charge. “We look forward to working with her.”

lifestyle. Take advantage of the privacy Sycamore Ridge offers by enjoying a stroll along the shaded sidewalks at your leisure. Minutes from downtown Simpsonville with easy and convenient access to schools, shopping, restaurants, golf and community events.

$430,233

An Upstate native, Hampton graduated from Laurens District 55 High School and earned her Associate’s degree in General Business at Piedmont Technical College. She is a graduate of Fortune Real Estate Academy.

Sycamore Ridge, Simpsonville, SC The quiet neighborhood of Sycamore Ridge is the perfect location for your family. Sycamore Ridge features stately homes on large, private, well-tended lots. With a clubhouse, junior Olympic swimming pool, and tennis courts, there are many outlets to accommodate an active

$471,455

February 8, 2013 – Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS® is pleased to announce that Angela Hampton has joined the company Hampton and serves as a sales associate at the Simpsonville office.

Over 1,900 neighborhoods online at

FEBRUARY 22, 2013 | T H E J O U R N A L 37


Welcome to the Team! Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS is proud to announce new sales associates have joined the company.

JEFF HENSON

ANGELA HAMPTON

SUSANNA ERICKSON

WILL THOMASON

North Pleasantburg Office Cell 614-406-6363 jhenson@cdanjoyner.com

Simpsonville Office Cell 864-534-2392 ahampton@cdanjoyner.com

Greer Office Cell 864-395-6764 serickson@cdanjoyner.com

Pleasantburg Cell 864-504-7124 wthomason@cdanjoyner.com

Agents on call this weekend

KARY GALLOWAY 901-2204 PELHAM RD.

ANGELIKA SCHMIDT 430-1671 SIMPSONVILLE

GRETCHEN STATHAKIS 640-9008 WOODRUFF RD.

SHARON CALHOUN 879-4239 GREER

BETH GARY THOMPSON NICHOLS 414-7448 991-9121 EASLEY/ PLEASANTBURG POWDERSVILLE

CARMEN C. FEEMSTER 616-5177 AUGUSTA RD.

Interested in Buying or Selling a home? Contact one of our Agents on Call or visit us online at

cdanjoyner.com.

R EA L E STAT E D I G E ST PEOPLE,

AWARDS,

HONORS

Behlke Joins Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS® February 5, 2013 – Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS® is pleased to announce that Ashley Richardson Behlke has joined the company and serves as a sales associate at the N. Pleasantburg Drive office. A Westchester, New York native, Behlke graduated from New Rochelle High School and went on

to study nursing at the University of Rhode Island. Following college, she worked in outside sales, management and industrial packaging sales for 15 years. “We are excited to have Ashley join our family of Realtors,” said Jeremy Wood, Broker-in-Charge. “We look forward to working with her.”

38 T H E J O U R N A L | FEBRUARY 22, 2013

Behlke moved to the Upstate in 1995 and lives in the Augusta Road area with her husband, Marvin (Bob) Behlke, Jr. and their children, Alston, Ashley, Rocky, and Cave. She enjoys running, outdoor activities, decorating, gardening and spending time with family and friends. She is an active volunteer in the community

and coached Girls on the Run for three years.

Behlke

Behlke has a family history of real estate and is excited to pursue it as her career.

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL


GREENVILLE TRANSACTIONS JANUARY SUBD.

SOUTHAMPTON NORTHGATE CHANTICLEER FIVE FORKS PLANTATION RIVER WALK CHANTICLEER

CHANTICLEER TUSCANY FALLS CARISBROOKE COVEY HILL KILGORE FARMS MCRAE PARK SYCAMORE RIDGE HIGHLANDS TUSCANY FALLS KNIGHTS BRIDGE FRANKLIN MEADOWS HIGHLAND TERRACE THE PLANTATION ON PELHAM VERDMONT FIELD HOUSE CONDOMINIUM BOXWOOD HOLLAND PLACE KILGORE FARMS ROBINSON COVE KILGORE FARMS TUXEDO PARK HOLLINGTON SOUTHBROOK VERDMONT CARRIAGE PARK THE VALLEY AT TANNER ESTATES HOLLINGSWORTH PARK AT VERDAE MALLARD CREEK PARKINS KNOLL BELLE TERRACE ACRES GREYTHORNE RESERVE AT PLANTATION GREENE MILL POND AT RIVER SHOALS HOLLINGTON BELMONT HGHTS VALLEY VIEW “GOLF COMMUNITY” WOODLAND CREEK FORRESTER COVE THE VILLAGE AT WINDSOR CREEK KELSEY GLEN FORRESTER HEIGHTS THE VILLAGE AT WINDSOR CREEK THE VILLAGE AT WINDSOR CREEK CARDO ACRES KELLETT ACRES KELSEY GLEN SOUTHSIDE ESTATES KELSEY GLEN CASTLE ROCK HERITAGE POINT BLUESTONE COTTAGES OAK CREST HERITAGE CREEK FAIRVIEW CHASE THE FARM @ SANDY SPRINGS ORCHARD WATERS EDGE BEAVER BROOK II THE LANDING AT SAVANNAH POINTE LISMORE PARK DEVENGER PLACE HERITAGE GLEN SILVER RIDGE FARMS

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$4,571,096 $2,000,000 $1,875,000 $1,648,000 $1,000,000 $950,000 $850,000 $728,000 $605,000 $600,000 $474,900 $460,000 $430,000 $425,000 $407,000 $402,500 $381,000 $370,250 $366,000 $361,000 $360,000 $350,000 $349,000 $345,000 $343,325 $340,310 $336,000 $330,000 $325,000 $325,000 $319,000 $315,000 $313,000 $300,000 $291,500 $290,000 $284,750 $281,200 $280,000 $277,235 $277,000 $275,000 $275,000 $272,500 $265,000 $257,000 $250,000 $242,000 $240,000 $240,000 $236,910 $235,900 $234,000 $233,900 $232,000 $225,000 $224,000 $224,000 $224,000 $222,996 $222,375 $219,000 $216,866 $215,000 $213,700 $212,000 $210,000 $207,315 $204,900 $204,000 $203,460 $199,000 $198,000 $190,000 $188,000 $185,840 $183,258 $183,109 $182,500 $182,500 $182,000 $180,128 $175,000 $175,000 $175,000 $175,000 $174,000

QUIKTRIP CORPORATION 385/417 HOLDINGS LLC MPKG GREENVILLE LLC CBNA-SC LLC LANDWOOD RIDGE LTD PARTN GEORGIA BANK & TRUST COM STONELEDGE PROPERTIES LL GEOLAS ROBERT THOMAS JR GADZIALA THOMAS S SIX MILE PROPERTIES LLC NVR INC CUMMINGS CHRISTOPHER J SMITH BRADLEY J PATTON KENNON H LIVING T BOLT CAROLINE BERRY SMITH STERLING W S C PILLON HOMES INC WHITE SUZANNE K BURRELL J ARNOLD BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT OXNER ELIZABETH S BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT REO SOLUTIONS LLC GOSNELL LARRY D S C PILLON HOMES INC BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT SDADAVECCHIA JANE T ANDREWS RICHARD FRANK JR MILLARD JEFFREY D MOORE CARLA J CHRISTOPHER KENDALL AT LOPEZ SUSAN E (JTWROS) KING TERESA ROSS L FRED RAMMES MATTHEW W DUNN JAMES H CASH CHRISTOPHER C SELLARS J BRYAN FORD ROAD PROPERTIES LLC BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT MINCHEW JAMES WILLIAM II NVR INC DAN RYAN BUILDERS SC INC FLANARY EDWARD RALPH JR SLOAN COURTNEY VERDAE DEVELOPMENT INC BEDSAUL MATTHEW O KUBIC THOMAS J ANDERSON DANIEL E MAUTZ ALLISON J S C PILLON HOMES INC GREENE VILLAS LLC COLEMAN BILLI JO MCSHANE MICHAEL R (JTWRO COBB JOHN R AMOS JOSEPH RAINES JEFFREY K DENNISTON VANESSA HUDSON CYNTHIA G EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL NVR INC SPIES HESTER M EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL BAKER SEAN P EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL THIBEAU JASON R JP MORGAN CHASE BANK NA NVR INC FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG NVR INC SK BUILDERS INC LA PLANTE LIONEL BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT ROSEWOOD OF THE PIEDMONT RALLIS RONALD D JR S C PILLON HOMES INC MUNGO HOMES INC D R HORTON INC EHLERS LAURA J MITCHELL SANDRA L HORVATH ANDREW D R HORTON INC GUTIERREZ JANET SPEHAR GEORGE S JR CUMBERBATCH BRYAN MITCHELL KENNETH A AVILA MARIA RAY (JTWROS)

VI-J LLC COLE SX SIMPSONVILLE SC MCRS PROPERTIES LLC RECOVERY PROPERTIES IV L LANDWOOD UHA 12 LLC DJZ LLC GOTTSCHALK GINA MARIE GARGOYLE PROPERTIES LLC GOSNELL LARRY D (JTWROS) MCCAMMON PROPERTIES CONC GEORGAS DOMINIQUE A ANTLEY CHRISTOPHER R (JT SHULL MARY PORTER (JTWRO OREILLY AUTOMOTIVE STORE ELLIOTT FRANCES BARNES NORRIS ALEC L (JTWROS) TURNER KIMBERLY HERIN ALIENE B LANGEROUDI NAZANIN ESMAI PATEL BIJAL FEISAL JAMES PHILIP (JTW CALLEGARIS ANDRES A SMITH JAMIE L (JTWROS) IGOU CAROLINE (JTWROS) MURRAY STEVEN THORNE JERRY C RANDALL JONATHAN AMATI JANE B MILLARD DONNA H RAY-RIVERA MARIA T (JTWR BAKER JAY N BANKS CHRISTOPHER SHANNE SCHUTZMAN DAVID (JTWROS) WASHINGTON BAPTIST CHURC CAVANNA RAOUL L PENNEY CHRISTINE F FOSHEE DAVID R (JTWROS) HANTJIS ASHTON H (JTWROS BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT REEVES JUSTIN B (JTWROS) HUDSON CYNTHIA G BREWSTER BENNIE F (JTWRO PULSIPHER MARK KALIA RUBY BRYAN CHRISTINA S WALTON ASHLEY HENSON MAURICE B JR (JTW ELLIS JANINA E T (JTWROS REGIONS BANK TUCKER KATHRYN E BOYD HORACE R HUTCHINSON RODOLFO A (JT GOTTMAN DANA M WHITEHEAD JACLYN LESLIE DONALD S JR (JTWR MLMI TRUST SERIES 2006 H STATE EMPLOYEES CREDIT U SAMAKE WANDA HARMON REBECCA R KOVACS DENNIS C WADSWORTH MATTHEW T BOULWARE CHRISTOPHER R ( HILTON RICHARD T BABINGTON JENNY-LYNN (JT IYER SIVAKAMASUNDARI V MARTIN ERIN (JTWROS) MARTIN MATTHEW V EATMAN MARIAN CHAPMAN PHILIP K SR FLOOD BRENT A (JTWROS) REED JESSICA MARIA (JTWR LANCE BEN CHARLES PENLAND KENNETH R (JTWRO RUSSO FRANKIE L ZANE INVESTMENTS LLC GRIFFITH LANCE CZERNEGA LINDA (JTWROS) DEMONE DIANNE G (JTWROS) FIRTH CHRISTOPHER OAKLEY BRYANT FRASIER CLAYTON SCOTT SMITH ERIK S (JTWROS) MALIK MUHAMMAD B CRAWFORD LAURA A GSAMP TRUST 2006 FM3 FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG TATE DUSTIN J

13018 E PINEHURST DR 2325 E CAMELBACK RD STE 1100 PO BOX 1572 PO BOX 27049 1345 GARNER LN STE 103 15 FAIR GREEN LN 220 PRIVELLO PL 1724 N MAIN ST 200 LOWOOD LN 668 SUMMERFORD CT NW 500 SCARLET OAK DR 207 WALNUT TRACE CT 2 CHANTICLEER DR N/O/D 14 MCPHERSON LN 11 BARTRAM GRV 1371 DOGWOOD DR SW 603 LADYKIRK LN 115 COVEY HILL LN 315 CARTERS CREEK CT 18 BEN ST 27 MCRAE PL 104 PLAYER WAY 116 LANNEAU DR 116 VERSILIA LN 6 CANDLESTON PL 222 FRANKLIN OAKS LN 30 E HILLCREST DR 20 RIVOLI LN 201 FREMONT DR 927 S MAIN ST UNIT 510 206 MOSS WOOD CIR 3 HAGUE CT 3500 N HIGHWAY 14 10 CEDAR GLENN WAY 2 CRUSOE CV 9 GARDEN CORNERS CT 306 W PRENTISS AVE PO BOX 1039 112 ABBEY GARDENS LN 10 WILTON ST 304 SELDEN WAY 1357 E WARM SPRINGS AVE 7 CREEDMOOR DR 9 FARREN CT 47 SHADWELL ST 107 PEARL AVE 22 S CEDARBLUFF CT MAILCODE RCN4 BH 40402B 10 ELJEMA FRST 9 LAZY WILLOW DR 60 BARNWOOD CIR 206 BRAZOS LN 327 ABBEY GARDENS LN 253 SHEFFIELD RD MAIL STOP TX2 980 01 22 3101 WAKE FOREST RD 209 PLUM CREEK LN 110 ROBINSON ST 213 PENRITH CT 10 VELMERE DR 133 RIVANNA LN 212 PENRITH CT 13 SUMNER ST 14 PENRITH CT 15 KNOTTS CT 158 HOLCOMBE RD 18 VELMERE DR 9 SANTA MONICA LN 6 REDVALES RD 116 DRAW BRIDGE CT 2603 FORK SHOALS RD 221 HERITAGE POINT DR 215 CATSKILL DR 11 RIVOLI LN 262 OAK BRANCH DR 217 RIVERS EDGE CIR 171 MAREHAVEN CT 315 BASS COVE DR 700 CHANDON CT 107 BROOK LAUREL LN 116 RAMAPO CT 221 KYLEMORE LN 400 HUDSON FARM RD 1675 PALM BEACH LAKES BLVD S-4 712 DILLS FARM WAY 1 JOGGINS DR

$2,142,854 SCHUYLER APARTMENTS $750,000 CROOKED CREEK $380,464 DILLARD CREEK CROSSING $340,000 RIVER FALLS PLANTATION $262,000 VILLAGE AT BENT CREEK $254,923 $248,000 WILSON FERRY $231,000 HILLBROOK FOREST $230,000 HANGING ROCK $212,000 SPRING/LAKE $208,000 LAKEWINDS $200,000 CHATIM RIDGE $199,900 BELLOAKS $199,000 CARRIAGE PARK $185,000 CLARA RIDGE $180,500 REIDVILLE CROSSING $178,525 TIMBERLAKE $177,500 REIDVILLE CROSSING $170,557 SWEETWATER HILLS $165,900 GABRIEL POINT $165,000 WYNBROOK $152,900 MILL BROOK $149,900 CARRIE OAKS $148,000 ROYALE PINES $146,000 LAURELWOOD $142,000 SWEETWATER HILLS $140,650 THE CAROLINA COUNTRY CLUB $140,000 SHAFTSBURY $140,000 MONTGOMERY LAKES AT TIMM CREEK $140,000 BENT CREEK PLANTATION $139,500 PORT ORLEANS $129,900 THORNHILL $125,000 SPRINGDALE $123,750 REIDVILLE CROSSING $122,501 HOLLY HEIGHTS $122,000 HANGING ROCK $120,150 FAWN BRANCH $120,000 BUCKSKIN TRAIL $119,900 $112,000 HILLVIEW $110,000 FAWN BRANCH $110,000 JAMES CREEK $109,000 $100,000 BRITTANY WOODS $100,000 FALCON RIDGE $97,500 CYPRESS RIDGE $93,000 LAKES OF CANAAN $90,000 FAWN BRANCH $90,000 $89,900 $89,350 POPLAR CREEK FARMS $89,000 WOODWIND $85,600 STONE STATION $85,000 LITTLE VISTA HEIGHTS $79,900 WOODLAND HEIGHTS $78,000 $78,000 SPRINGFIELD $75,000 BROOKWOOD PARK $74,500 HILLSIDE ACRES $70,000 RIVERWOOD $65,000 VICTOR MILL VILLAGE $64,900 COUNTRY FOREST $64,000 W D BLACKWELL ESTATE $62,000 WINDY HILL ESTATES $60,000 THE VILLAGE AT BENT CREEK $59,000 PISGAH FOREST $53,000 RAINTREE $50,000 $49,505 WILKINS HILLS $47,872 $46,000 WILLOW CREEK $45,000 $45,000 CROMER HEIGHTS $44,890 $43,079 VICTOR MILL VILLAGE $40,000 PARK HILLS $40,000 $35,000 $34,500 GLENLAKE $31,500 $27,500 SPRING LAKE $27,500 TOWNSEL PLACE $26,500 BROOKSIDE VILLAGE $25,000 FISHER ACRES $25,000 ARCHER ACRES $25,000 FAWN BRANCH $20,000

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

PRICE

SELLER

15-21, BUYER

2012 ADDRESS

221-85 PARTNERS LLC ARC BJSTBSC001 LLC 2245 CHESNEE HWY IB PROPERTY HOLDINGS LLC PROGRESSIVE CONSULTANTS 275 S CHURCH ST GLAJA, NICOLAE FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGAGE 999 NANTAHALA DR VIRANI LLC SIMMONS, JOYCE WALSH 516 HORTON GROVE RD WARNER, GARTH B LEMON, ERIC 733 CHARLESTON PL EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LLC GILLIAM, MATTHEW L LOT NUMBER: 9 BURNETT, JAMES B COMPTON, BRIAN F 207 W KILLARNEY LAKE DR RUD, OLEG HOLIDAY, MONICA ALLIE 340 GRACEWOOD CIR PRESTIPINO, CARL L PHILLIPS, WILLIAM R 123 BRIAN DR OWENS, RENEE C SARVER III, ROBERT A 433 SLATE DR BEAUSOLEIL, JOSEPH FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGAGE 561 CLEMENT LOOP RD PEEPLES, GLENN W CONNOLLY, JOHN W 911 STILL SPRING RUN KEEVER, JOHN MATTHEW TAYLOR, GREGORY D 106 CHATIM RIDGE CT HAMMACK, JACK W HAYDEN, AMY M 225 BURNTWOOD LN YOUNGER, JAMES W LOCH, LAYHEANG 3640 NEW CUT RD GRIFFIN, L LEONARD GARBAR, FEDOR 117 MELBA LN S C PILLON HOMES INC WAGNER, KELLYA 629 W FARRELL DR SCHOCH, RONALD C WILSON, F DOUGLAS 101 TIMBERLAKE CIR S C PILLON HOMES INC HAYNES, RYAN J 171 E FARRELL DR DIGORY & KIRKE INVESTMENTS BARTOLAC, PATSY H 510 S SWEETWATER HILLS DR OSTRANDER, JOHN EDWARD WEBB, JAMIE 347 LAURA FAYE LN ENCHANTED CONSTRUCTION LLC WIGGINS, JARRILL D 516 TILGATE CT FOUNDERS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION GABRIEL, LI CHEN 731 ELAM WAY BRANCH BANKING & TRUST COMPANY MOORE, IVEY J 260 JOE ARTHUR DR FENDER III, WILLIE D RUSCHLI JR, EDWARD J 381 RECTOR RD HEATH, J ANDREW FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGAGE 850 LAURELCREEK DR ADAMS HOMES AEC LLC SANDERS, KEITH 357 ARCHWAY CT YOUNG, EVELYN K SCARBOROUGH, LEE T 107 CAROLINA CLUB DR GM HOMES INC DITTY, CASEY ANN 473 ABBERLY LN HOUSING & URBAN DEVELOPMENT SHROUDS, DANIEL 331 CONGAREE RD RICHARDS, WILLIAM M MATZ, DANIEL R 304 THORNBUSH CT SWEENEY JR, WILLIAM E CLOSE, TRACY D 212 ORLEANS DR WORTHY, C FRAN WORTHY, R JEFFREY 905 BURKSHIRE CT YODER, MARLIN D MEHAFFEY, KIM J 209 CLARICE CIR MCFARLAND, LYNDA SECRETARY OF VETERANS AFFAIRS 304 ELLSWORTH CT MULLEN, DAVID P JACKSON, DONNA C 20 JEFFCOAT ST ADAMS HOMES AEC LLC WILLIAMS, BRENDA F 614 FLINTROCK DR MANNING LYNCH INC YATES, AMY M 614 FAWN BRANCH TRL REDUS SC HOUSING LLC PEAKE, TIFFANY 703 BUCKSKIN TRL BUTLER, CHAD S LOVELACE, MATTHEW W 225 HAMPTON RD FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGAGE RIDGEWAY, KATHY S 1199 MELVIN ST MANNING, LYNCH MARONE, SANDRA K 618 FAWN BRANCH TRL ENCHANTED CONSTRUCTION LLC PWELL, JUSTIN R STOCKBRIDGE DR JABEN REALTY LLC WALKER, MARVIN A FAIRFIELD RD BRIDGES, RACHEL H MASON, NADEAN 331 DOUBLE BRIDGE RD BIJEAU, CARL M HENRY, BETTY ANN 208 KYLENE CT COHEN, STANEY W PARKER S, REBECCA M 606 MESA LN RICE, JAMES T FLAGSTAR BANK FSB 406 DELLWATER WAY GEORGE, KELLIE FANNIE MAE 551 FAWN BRANCH TRL VANDERBILT MORTGAGE & FINANCE RABINS, AMY 830 WALNUT HILL RD BRANCH, RICHARD W CITIMORTGAGE INC 2231 RUNION RD SIMPSON, JEFFERY T ELLIS, RANDY 511 INDIGO SPRINGS RUN HEWES II, RONALDE FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGAGE 50 WOODWIND DR JPMC SPECIALTY MORTGAGE LLC CORN, CHARLES 279 AUGUSTINE DR GENTRY, KENNETH W KNOWLES, FREDERICK DONNA 761 DUNCAN PARK DR SETTLE, HARRIS E CHAMPION, DORLISA B 203 ARROWHEAD CIR CALANDRIELLO, FRANK WHITE, JOSEPHINE M 370 HILLBROOK CIR WHITEHEAD, DANIEL FANNIE MAE 316 SHADY DR DONNAHOO, SARAH A HAGAN, BENJAMIN L 1026 BERRY DR BLACKWELL, FRANCES P HOLMAN, STEVEN C 102 W CAROLINA ST RICE, WYANETTE LEVESQUE, GARY 318 PARSONS RD IVESTER, CHRISTOPHER PHILLIPS, STEVEN H 2 9TH ST FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE I & I PROPERTIES LLC 330 CANYON RIDGE TRL WILMARTH, LAWRENCE M GRACE UNLIMITED INTERNATIONAL INC 1214 HOLLY SPRINGS RD HORTON, KELLY M BRANCH BANKING & TRUST 133 WILDFLOWER LN ARMOCIDA, FRANK MCCLEER CONSTRUCTION COLLC 197 CHANDLER CREEK CT U S BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FIELDS INVESTMENTS LLC 126 PISGAH DR SYNOVUS BANK SOLESBEE PROPERTIES LLC 216 BRIARCREEK DR FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGAGE TURCHETTA, VILAY A 214 OLD TOWNE RD BRYANT, DIANA J US BANK NA 565 WILKINS RD GRACE UNLIMITED INTERNATIONAL INC AMERICAN IRA LLC CUST 12 F ST BANK OF AMERICA NA ERSKINE, STEVE 530 BROCKMAN RD ROTH, SHARON DUNCAN, JOHNNY E 928 WESLEY CT KERBY, GEORGE P BRANCH BANKING & TRUST 201 CROMER ST EARLE, DERRICK E FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGAGE 744 ASHEVILLE HWY HINDMAN, BILLY J COPELAND, MALCOLM W 95 OLD WOODRUFF RD BENANTI, MARK J CLOWNEY, TALAN M 334 BRIARCLIFF RD EQUITY TRUST COMPANY CHRIS MORRIS BUILDERS INC 303 JOHNSON CIR WHITE, DANIEL R THOMAS, TAMELA M 101 MOSS ST MARK III PROPERTIES INC NVR INC 532 SHORELINE BLVD BROWN, KENNETH C RUSCHLI JR, EDWARD J 391 RECTOR RD KEF LLC SC PILLON HOMES INC 612 WILLOWTREE WAY TUCKER JR, ROBERT TISDALE, DAVID 414 TOWNSEL RD NETTLES, ROBERT LARK, BILL 206 MILLBANK RD STEWART, ROBERT B FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGAGE 213 SPRINGWATER DR FANIE MAE THONGDEE, BUNSON G 477 BARNWELL RD LYNCH, JR MANNING MANNING LYNCH INC 618 FAWN BRANCH TRL

FEBRUARY 22, 2013 | T H E J O U R N A L 39


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the week in photos THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA SOLICITATIONS NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: RFP# 30-03/21/13 Inmate Telephone Service System, March 21, 2013, 3:00 P.M. There will be a mandatory pre-proposal meeting 9:00 A.M., E.S.T., Thursday, March 7, 2013 at the Greenville County Detention Center, 20 McGee Street, Greenville, SC 29601. Solicitations can be found at www.greenvillecounty.org or by calling (864) 467-7200.

PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE There will be a PUBLIC HEARING before the GREENVILLE COUNTY BOARD OF ZONING APPEALS ON WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2013 AT 3:00 P.M. in CONFERENCE ROOM –D at GREENVILLE COUNTY SQUARE, 301 UNIVERSITY RIDGE, GREENVILLE, S.C., for the purpose of hearing those persons interested in the petitions listed below. PERSONS HAVING AN INTEREST IN THESE PETITIONS MAY BECOME PARTIES OF RECORD BY FILING WITH THE BOARD, AT LEAST THREE (3) DAYS PRIOR TO THE SCHEDULED DATE SET FOR HEARING, BY WRITING THEIR ADDRESS, A STATEMENT OF THEIR POSITION AND THE REASONS WHY THE RELIEF SOUGHT WITH RESPECT TO SUCH PROPERTY SHOULD OR SHOULD NOT BE GRANTED.

CB-13-11 APPLICANT: FUENTE de AGUA VIVA, Inc. PROPERTY: Tax Map #0149.0003-013.00; 1710 BUNCOMBE ROAD, GREENVILLE SC REQUEST: VARIANCE in Setback Requirements/Use by Special Exception for addition to the existing Church building on site. CB-13-12 APPLICANT: NETXUSA, Inc. PROPERTY: Tax Map #P009.01-01-009.01; 231 BEVERLY RD, GREENVILLE SC REQUEST: VARIANCE in REAR setback requirement for Building expansion. CB-13-13 APPLICANT: PAPA JOHNS PIZZA/ BO KNAPP PROPERTY: Tax Map #0541.03-01-016.01; 624 HOWELL ROAD, GREENVILLE SC REQUEST: VARIANCE in setback requirement for a sign.

CB-13-15 APPLICANT: TAYLORS SEWER DEPARTMENT PROPERTY: Tax Map #538.31-1; 405 Brushy Creek Road, Taylors, SC REQUEST: VARIANCE from setback requirements and a Use by Special Exception for an additional storage building on site.

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Greenville Hop House Company, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of BEER AND WINE at 1619 E. North Street, Greenville, SC 29607. To object to the issuance of this license/ permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than March 3, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that SWH Mimi’s Café, LLC/ DBA Mimi’s Café, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE AND LIQUOR at 1133 Woodruff Road, Greenville, SC 29607. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than March 3, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that The Little Hat Tavern, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE AND LIQUOR at 22349 Asheville Highway, Landrum, South Carolina 29356. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than March 3, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

CB-13-10 APPLICANT: HAL DILLARD PROPERTY: Tax Map #P028.00-01-020.00; 6 CONE STREET, GREENVILLE SC REQUEST: APPEAL the Zoning Administrator’s Decision to allow S-1 use on R-10 property.

CB-13-14 APPLICANT: PIEDMONT NATURAL GAS PROPERTY: Tax Map #0547.03-01-001.00; 298 GARLINGTON ROAD, GREENVILLE SC REQUEST: Use by Special Exception for a Utility building on a pipeline project.

“Orbital Trio,” an aluminum sculpture by Upstate artist John Acorn, is Greenville’s newest piece of public art. The piece, featuring interlocking spheres, was commissioned by JHM Hotels, and is in NOMA Square in front of the newly renovated Hyatt on North Main Street downtown. Acorn was a Clemson University art professor from 1967 until his retirement in 1998. He is a past winner of the Elizabeth O’Neill Verner Award, the state’s highest honor in the arts, given by the South Carolina Arts Commission.

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Azteca Mauldin, LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE AND LIQUOR at 114 W. Butler Road, Mauldin, SC 29662. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than February 24, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

photos by Greg Beckner / Staff

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS COUNTY OF ANDERSON 2010-CP-04-1065 Dell Jones and Lorraine Jones, Plaintiff, vs. Bradley H. Batson and James C. Owens, individually and doing business as Tylar Construction Company, Inc., Defendants, AND Bradley H. Batson, individually and doing business as Tylar Construction Company, Inc., Third-Party Plaintiff, vs. James C. Owens, individually and doing business as Tylar Construction Company, Inc., Third-Party Defendant. TO: THE DEFENDANT AND THIRD-PARTY DEFENDANT, JAMES C. OWENS, INDIVIDUALLY AND DBA TYLAR CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, INC. YOU will please take notice that the Summons and Second Amended Complaint in the above entitled action was filed in Court of Common Pleas on February 6, 2013, and is now on file therein. You are hereby summoned and required to answer the Second Amended Complaint in this action upon the subscriber at his office, 116 West Whitner Street, Anderson South Carolina, within thirty (30) days after the service hereof, exclusive of the day of such service and if you fail to answer the said Second Amended Complaint within the time aforesaid, the Plaintiff in this action will apply to the Court for relief demanded. Robert L. Waldrep, Jr. Robert L. Waldrep, Jr., P.A. 116 West Whitner Street Anderson, South Carolina 29624 (864)224-6341

SOLICITATIONS NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: RFP # 29-03/12/13 – AUCTIONEER SERVICES FOR THE GREENVILLE COUNTY TAX COLLECTOR in Greenville County, March 12, 2013, 3:00 P.M. Solicitations can be found at www.greenvillevillecounty.org or by calling 864-467-7200.

look who’s in the journal this week

Pendelton artist John Acorn makes a few comments before the formal unveiling of “Orbital Trio.” Stone Academy’s fourth-grade teachers (from left): Catherine Dodson (Paul Revere), Carrie McConnell (George Washington), Kara Holmgren (Benjamin Franklin) and Lyndsey Trickett (John Hancock) dressed as Revolutionary War figures from the children’s book “John, Paul, George & Ben.” This was part of the school’s “I Love Books Week” and Valentine’s Day celebration in which students and staff dressed as their favorite book characters. St. Anthony of Padua Catholic School students recently celebrated Black History Month. Students dressed as historical figures including Rosa Parks, Desmond Tutu, Mary McLeod Bethune and Miles Davis.

Crossword puzzle: page 42

40 THE Journal | FEBRUARY 22, 2013

Sudoku puzzle: page 42


journal culture

the week in photos

look who’s in the journal this week

photos by Greg Beckner / Staff

People mingle at the kick-off luncheon for the American Heart Association Heart Walk at the Prudential C. Dan Joyner offices on Pleasantburg Drive. The hamburger/hotdog luncheon was open to the public. A blood drive was also held, along with signups for Team C. Dan for the upcoming Heart Walk. All money raised at the luncheon was for the benefit of the American Heart Association Heart Walk.

“Kat” Joyner and her son, Danny Joyner, at the kick-off luncheon for the American Heart Association Heart Walk at Prudential C. Dan Joyner. The Julie Valentine Center held their third annual fundraising luncheon, raising more than $100,000 from 800 members of the community to support their cause.

Stephanie Arnel with Prudential C. Dan Joyner waits for the “stick” from Sheneka Davis with the Blood Connection. Arnel was giving blood at the kick-off luncheon for the American Heart Association Heart Walk at Prudential C. Dan Joyner on Pleasantburg Drive.

Keynote speaker of the luncheon, Dave Pelzer, New York Times bestselling author and child abuse survivor.

FEBRUARY 22, 2013 | THE Journal 41


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figure. this. out.

Feed Your Inner Food Enthusiast

UpstateFoodie.com

Excess baggage

42 THE Journal | FEBRUARY 22, 2013

Across

1 Corn at a picnic 5 Proofer’s mark 9 Wind surge 13 Protozoa genus 19 First Nations tribe 20 Kitchen aid 22 Elephant in the Jungle of Nool 23 Self-defense overkill? 25 Because 26 Secure 27 Orbital extremes 29 The ones right here 30 Shocked, in a way 33 Red wines aged in autos? 35 Water carriers 38 Garbage collectors 41 Rose to great heights 42 Dashboard Confessional music genre 43 Expanding concern? 46 Edible mollusks 50 KEGO on your radio dial? 54 Get stuck (on), mentally 55 Ocean gathering 56 Thread holder 57 Series of turns, usually: Abbr. 58 Secret alternative 59 Solar __ 63 Foreword, briefly 65 Takes to the streets 67 Part of the Constitution that describes Cong. powers 70 Direct route to Los-

erville? 73 Stockings 74 They may have spurs 76 Unfamiliar 77 How chicken may be served 79 Bugler with horns 80 Chicago-based superstation 82 Growing business 84 California peak rumored to hide advanced beings called Lemurians 88 Giggle 90 Entertaining show in a run-down hotel? 94 Vending machine options 97 After Effects and Final Cut Pro 98 Mount Rushmore prez 99 Pabst brand 101 Large green moth 102 Mythical enchantress 104 Consumer Reports first aid recommendations? 109 Rear-__ 111 Retail benchmark 112 Close enough 115 “Shortly” 119 Like some domestic help 121 Activist grocery clerk? 124 “The Human Condition” writer Hannah 125 Contraption 126 Italian capital

By Melanie Miller

127 They’re popular in Japanese gardening 128 Unusable, as a cellphone 129 It may be used to walk the dog 130 Obey a red light

Down

1 Chamber bouncer 2 Many a Yemeni 3 Borrow for a price 4 Unflappable 5 Checks out, as groceries 6 Hash attachment 7 H.S. course 8 __ Bora: Afghan region 9 Italy’s largest seaport 10 Eel, at sushi bars 11 Ritual meals 12 South American arboreal snake 13 Hawaiian tuna 14 Least populous state capital 15 Traditional 16 Wild blue yonder 17 Sing one’s own praises 18 Kitty starters 21 Verve 24 Leaning 28 Swedish import 31 Dies down 32 Plan to take off 34 Payola, e.g. 35 Correctly assesses 36 Apple variety

37 Elegant 39 Cryptologic govt. org. 40 Something to build on 43 Checked out 44 Hair color immortalized by a Renaissance painter 45 In its early stages

Medium

47 Jar Jar Binks’s home planet 48 Virginie et Floride 49 Horse __ 51 Hasbro reaction game 52 Email letters 53 Short blaster? 57 Revved engine sound

60 Capital of Shaanxi province 61 Modern search result 62 Strong, drinkwise 64 Small-government proponent Paul 66 “__ the train a-comin’”: Johnny Cash lyric 67 Covers for a crook, say 68 Battle on a log 69 Tipped, as a dealer 71 Bluesy Memphis street 72 Some are compact 75 Brushed off 78 Vital life force, to acupuncturists 81 Storied officer __ Ludwig von Trapp 83 Junk __ 85 Gob 86 Den focus, familiarly 87 Sailing 89 Stars no longer shining 91 A/C measure 92 Unrivaled 93 Nana 95 1969 Arkin/Moreno comedy 96 Soccer protection 100 Minor injury 102 Options list 103 Takes out mistakes 104 Faith of nearly a quarter of Earth’s population 105 Where “Aida” premiered 106 Rivendell inhabitants 107 Key letter 108 “Golf Begins at Forty” author 110 Souse 113 Lab warning 114 Cybermarket since 1995 116 Latched, say 117 Designer Saarinen 118 Prune 120 Some Windows systems 122 From __ Z 123 Chap

Crossword answers: page 40

Sudoku answers: page 40


journal culture

Past and present with courtney tollison Hartness, ph.d.

Biltmore laid groundwork for land conservation Two weeks ago in my American history course at Furman, my class and I discussed the Gilded Age of the late 1800s. The phrase, coined by Mark Twain, was intended as a derogatory statement indicting those who amassed great wealth at the expense of workers who toiled beneath them. Yet many of these so-called “robber barons,” with last names such as Astor, Carnegie, Duke, Morgan, Rockefeller and Vanderbilt, also subscribed to what Andrew Carnegie referred to in the late 1800s as the “Gospel of Wealth” – a belief that people of means had a duty to share their wealth for the benefit of their communities and their country. From the late 1800s onward, these men and their families designated funds that established universities, libraries and more. By the 1920s, for instance, half of the nation’s public libraries had been established with Carnegie funds. The former men’s campus of Furman University, located near the Governor’s School for the Arts and County Square, had one such library at the heart of its campus. Today, the main Furman library is named for another Gilded Age giant, James Buchanan Duke of tobacco and electricity fame, whose endowment provided the funds for Furman’s library and other endowed programs and scholarships. Another significant lasting vestige of the Gilded Age is a convenient day

trip from the Upstate. In 1888, George Washington Vanderbilt fell in love with the mountains of western North Carolina and decided to build a home in the area soon thereafter. He engaged noted architect Richard Morris Hunt, who designed the facade of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City, the pedestal of the Statue of Liberty, and other Vanderbilt family homes in New York and Newport, R.I. Vanderbilt also hired a man often referred to as the founding father of landscape architecture in the U.S., the noted Frederick Law Olmstead, whose projects included the design of New York City’s Central Park and the grounds surrounding the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C. As ironic as it seems today, there were strong concerns throughout the 1890s that America’s frontier no longer existed; that all land in the continental U.S. had been explored, and that we, as a nation, needed to refocus our efforts towards caring for the land we have. Future President Teddy Roosevelt became quite passionate about land conservation, the health of our nation’s forests, and the preservation of our natural and historic treasures. Biltmore was well ahead of national efforts to care for our nation’s land. Olmstead used the estate of over 100,000 acres to develop a systematically managed forest. He hired Gifford Pinchot, a forester trained at Yale and in

France, who further developed a plan to improve the health of the forest while also generating profit. His system served as a national model. After several years, Pinchot accepted a position in Washington, D.C., as the first head of the new Division of Forestry, which was later renamed the U.S. Forest Service. Roosevelt admired Pinchot and when Roosevelt became president, he brought Pinchot into his informal “Tennis Cabinet,” a group of friends who engaged in recreational activities with Roosevelt while also advising him on matters of national importance. These years around the turn of the century constitute the foundation of land conservation in our country, with Biltmore’s founding forester at the helm. Throughout the 1890s, even in the midst of Gilded Age excess, the national press heralded Biltmore. In 1890, The New York Times described the expansive estate that Vanderbilt had purchased: “Switzerland does not possess more fertile valleys, more rugged mountains, more cool and delicious springs, and more beautiful water courses.” In 1894, an article in The Atlanta Constitution referred to the home, built in the style of a French chateau, as Vanderbilt’s “mountain palace” in the “land of the sky.” The article claimed that Biltmore’s nurseries were the larg-

est in the world, and referenced the impressive forestry displays exhibited by the estate at the World’s Fair and noted that the stables were “far ahead of Queen Victoria’s royal stables.” When Vanderbilt opened his estate, The Atlanta Constitution and other newspapers covered the lavish party on the evening of Christmas Day, to which 500 guests had been invited. Today, the grand Biltmore Estate is America’s largest private home and the home and its grounds are a historical artifact granted National Historic Landmark status in 1963. The Biltmore Estate reveals much about the decades surrounding the turn of the century. Men such as Vanderbilt, Hunt, Olmstead and Pinchot left behind a legacy of Gilded Age wealth but also vanguard efforts at land conservation. As a child visiting with my mother on what became a near-annual Christmas tradition, I was in awe of the magnificent Christmas tree, the spectacular library, and the candlelit home. Now, as a historian, I also value the estate as a representation of a bygone era in American history.

Dr. Courtney Tollison Hartness is an assistant professor of history at Furman and museum historian at the Upcountry History Museum.

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