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journal news

Worth Repeating They Said It

“There is this prevalent mindset in our society where we think that being overweight, having food allergies, feeling sluggish or run-down is just part of life and ageing. It’s not true.” James Colquihoun, whose film “Hungry for Change” takes on the “health food myths” perpetuated by the billion-dollar dieting and weight-loss industry.

Quote of the week

“I was enough of a block-headed Scot-Irish man to leave his house thinking, ‘I can do this.’” Former newspaper writer Paul Reid, on accepting author William Manchester’s request that he complete the third installment of Manchester’s three-book biography on British Prime Minister Winston Churchill. Manchester had suffered a stroke and could not finish.

“I weighed 68 pounds at 12 years old. I have no doubt that my mother would have ended up killing me.” Dave Pelzer, keynote speaker at The Julie Valentine Center breakfast on Feb. 14.

“My underlying belief is that education for people who have resources and power is the way to end poverty. Once people have seen the poverty here, they can’t ever forget it. Hopefully it will affect how they vote, how they chat with their peers and how they think out things as a community.” Beth Templeton, director of Our Eyes Were Opened, a Greenville organization that conducts “poverty tours” to combat blighted housing.

“I love the fact that Cabela’s is coming to Greenville, but why there? It will just make traffic so much worse, and it’s already horrible.” Greenville outdoorsman Skip Johnson, on learning of destination retailer Cabela’s plans to build a store on Woodruff Road.

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$400 million Amount of economic activity that traffic congestion costs the state each year.

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FEBRUARY 1, 2013 | the Journal 3


JOURNAL NEWS

DSN board: New director hired by spring 3 final candidates expected By APRIL A. MORRIS | staff

Greenville County’s interim board for the Disabilities and Special Needs Board (GCDSNB) began the year with an update on the executive director search that was launched in late September 2012. Board vice chair Jay Rogers said that Find Great People, the search firm hired

by GCDSNB, has processed “several dozen” resumes and has around six to pass along to the board. The firm interviewed multiple applicants, he said. Over the next month, several interim board members will interview the candidates and pass along three finalists to be interviewed by the entire five-member board, said Rogers. The goal is to have an executive director in place by mid-March, he said. The interim board debated last fall whether to take on the selection process for

executive director or leave the responsibility to the permanent board still to be appointed by Greenville County Council. The county ordinance creating the permanent board is still a work in progress, he said. David Goodell, who is associate state director for operations at the South Carolina Department of Disabilities and Special Needs, has served as interim executive director since the previous director left in May 2012. After the new executive director is hired, the search will begin for a new finance direc-

tor. Robert Decker of the Charles Lea Center in Spartanburg has been on loan to GCDSN, serving as interim finance director. In May 2012, the previous 12-member DSN board was dissolved by county council following a cascade of financial problems, the resignation of multiple board members and public complaints about dysfunction and transparency issues in the agency. The Greenville County Disabilities and Special Needs Board will meet again on Feb. 28, 6 p.m. at the Patrick Center Annex, 1700 Ridge Road, Greenville. Contact April A. Morris at amorris@communityjournals.com.

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Bon Secours St. Francis Culture Fusion introduces a month long series celebrating Black History Month. Beyond Race

Join us as we discuss the historical, relational and economic impact of cultural and ethnic diversity in Greenville. Panelists include: Nika White (VP of Diversity Greenville, Chamber of Commerce); Paul Guy (Executive Director, Beyond Differences); and Mack Lockhart (President, Sterling Land Trust/Vice President, TD Bank)

Tuesday, February 5 | 6:30pm at Warehouse Theatre

Healing Hands

Please join us as panelists share faith’s role in celebrating cultural similarities and bridging differences. Hear from Darrin Goss (Vice President of Community Impact, United Way/Pastor); Father Jon Chalmers (Director of Ministry Relations, Bon Secours St. Francis); Hasker Hudgens (Pastor, World Redemption Outreach); and Laurie Rovin (Executive Director, Pendleton Place).

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FEBRUARY 1, 2013 | the Journal 5


JOURNAL NEWS

OPINION VOICES FROM YOUR COMMUNITY, HEARD HERE

FROM THE EDITORIAL DESK

No more excuses With business and environmental groups clamoring in unison, 2013 may finally be the year “it’s too hard” no longer works as an excuse for the legislative paralysis that has formed South Carolina’s crumbling transportation system. Last week, the S.C. Business Roundtable joined the statewide chorus urging legislators to address the Palmetto State’s infrastructure crisis. The Roundtable – a coalition of 14 private sector groups from chambers of commerce to realtors, truckers and manufacturers – asked lawmakers to commit $6 billion over the next decade for critical repairs and improvements to state roads, bridges and highways. Preservation groups like Upstate Forever and Coastal Conservation League are equally adamant that South Carolina can no longer “afford not to act.” The reasons why are legion. According to the Department of Transportation, more than 80 percent of the state’s primary and secondary roads are rated fair to very poor; 20 percent of bridges are structurally deficient or weight limited; and traffic congestion is costing the state $400 million a year in economic activity. Why? Because the state maintains the fourth-largest road system in the nation via a gas tax that’s the country’s fourth-lowest and has remained unchanged since 1987. Two-thirds of South Carolina’s 66,000 miles of public highway are state-owned, against a national average of 19 percent. Transportation officials estimate bringing all roads and bridges to adequate condition would cost $29 billion over the next 20 years – $1.4 billion a year – and DOT’s entire annual budget is $1.3 billion. DOT says doubling the gas tax would raise barely half the money required per year, if lawmakers would even consider it (which they won’t). But the problem is more complex than a hatred of tax hikes: Legislators are equally averse to giving an agency as dysfunctional as DOT more money to spend. The monolithic agency is overseen by a board of seven part-time commissioners the Legislature appoints but cannot remove. Short of malfeasance, neither can the governor, leaving DOT effectively answerable to no one. The obvious solution – making DOT part of the executive branch – has proved anathema in a state where every scrap of authority granted the governor is parceled out in crumbs. The result is a deeply politicized agency where horse-trading and patronage subvert the objective project ranking the law requires – and a Legislature deeply divided over how to fix it. What cannot continue is the paralysis Rep. Harry Ott described to the Greenville News. No one supports a gas hike, he said, and lawmakers are divided over what to do instead. “Therefore, as we generally do when we don’t know, we just don’t talk about it.” This borders on dereliction of duty. Since December, lawmakers have had in their hands the results of a yearlong study by the Transportation Infrastructure Task Force that suggests 17 alternatives to the gas tax. Among them: Raise driver’s license and/or registration fees, divert a set percentage of General Fund revenue to roads, or lift the $300 sales tax cap on vehicles. Without question, the $100 million the 5 percent car sales tax currently generates should go straight to infrastructure needs. That failure is a dereliction in itself. Encouragingly, several bills are in play that would redirect all vehicle-related taxes and fees to infrastructure improvement, which is an important start. But it’s all just PR until the bills become law. According to the Business Roundtable, Georgia pours $35,000 per mile into its roads every year and North Carolina invests a whopping $150,000 a mile. South Carolina invests $15,000. This is the year that has to change.

A military-friendly state You probably haven’t heard much about it, but there’s an economic threat to South Carolina lurking on the horizon beyond the latest crises in Washington over the “fiscal cliff ” and the federal debt: a threatened round of military base closings throughout the nation, possibly as soon as 2015. While that sounds a long way off, if South Carolina is to preserve its military resources and their huge economic impact on the state, leaders must begin laying the groundwork immediately to combat this threat. One way to do this is for the General Assembly to pass military-friendly legislation that some lawmakers have put forth. Let me say at the outset that the Legislature has a very good track record in this area. A couple examples passed last year and are effective now. One continues in-state college tuition rates for dependents of military members after members get transferred outside the state; another provides temporary professional licenses to military spouses if they already hold a comparable license issued by another state. This bill helps spouses compete for suitable employment once they arrive, and helps the state by increasing the availability of skilled talent. These new laws help members of the military and their families who are stationed in South Carolina, removing some of the obstacles they would otherwise face with education and employment in our state. As chairman of the South Carolina Military Base Task Force, which works to preserve and enhance our state’s military resources, I can tell you firsthand that measures like these really do positively impact those serving in uniform in our state. The whole idea is to take good care of our military community and create an atmosphere to help them feel welcomed, appreciated and supported. This accomplishes a few things. First, it shows that we genuinely support our troops, beyond just organizing parades and warm welcomes. Second, it helps to improve the quality of life for our troops and their families, which can make them more productive and encourage them to make South Carolina their permanent home one day. Third, it enhances the military value of our bases, showing decision-makers at

IN MY OWN WORDS by RICHARD EKSTROM

the Pentagon that we support our bases in ways that make a real difference to the installations and the folks who operate them. In fact, the Department of Defense tracks this type of legislation. That way, when that next round of base closings does come along, we’ll be in a better position to safeguard our installations from being shuttered or downsized. By accomplishing all of these things, we also protect the huge economic impact of the military on our state. This past November, the S.C. Department of Commerce released a study showing that the military generated $15.7 billion in economic activity in South Carolina during 2011, supporting more than 138,000 jobs throughout the state. So, let me leave you with a couple of specific bills that the General Assembly could pass and send to Gov. Nikki Haley to help make South Carolina the most military-friendly state in the nation. One allows military personnel to receive college credit and civilian occupational licensing for courses completed and training mastered as part of their military service. Another addresses active-duty service members who get transferred out of state and are then forced to rent out their homes because they cannot sell them. The bill would allow them to pay their property taxes at “owner-occupied” rates, versus having to pay at the much higher “rental property” rates. It’s no secret I’m a Republican. But this is a bipartisan cause: Rep. James Smith, a Democrat from Columbia, is often the main sponsor of bills like these that support our military, as is Rep. Murrell Smith, a Republican from Sumter. Bipartisan – that’s the way it should be when it comes to supporting our military community. Richard Eckstrom is the comptroller general of South Carolina and commander of the S.C. State Guard.

IN MY OWN WORDS FEATURES ESSAYS BY RESIDENTS WITH PARTICULAR EXPERTISE WHO WANT TO TELL READERS ABOUT ISSUES IMPORTANT TO THEM. THE JOURNAL ALSO WELCOMES LETTERS TO THE EDITOR (MAXIMUM LENGTH OF 200 WORDS). PLEASE INCLUDE ADDRESS AND DAYTIME PHONE NUMBER. ALL LETTERS WILL BE CONFIRMED BEFORE PUBLICATION. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO EDIT ALL LETTERS FOR LENGTH. PLEASE CONTACT EXECUTIVE EDITOR SUSAN SIMMONS AT SSIMMONS@COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM.

6 THE JOURNAL | FEBRUARY 1, 2013


JOURNAL NEWS

SC infant mortality steady More of South Carolina’s babies are making it to their first birthday than in the past several years. The infant mortality rate did not drop, but held steady over the past year, the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) recently reported. A total of 57,338 births were recorded in the Palmetto State in 2011, but 423 infants died before their first birthday, a rate identical to 2010 numbers of 7.4 per 1,000. In Greenville County, the 2011 rate was 6.6 per 1,000 and 5.9 per 1,000 in Spartanburg County, according to DHEC. When the state rates are broken down by race, however, African-American and other infants died at 12.6 deaths per 1,000 – 2.4 times the rate of Caucasian infants in 2011. The mortality rate for Caucasian babies improved from 5.2 in 2010 to 5.0 in 2011. The rate for African-Americans in 2010 was 11.8 per 1,000. Determining the cause of racial disparity is a complex issue, said Dr. Lisa Waddell, deputy director for preventive services at DHEC. “With African-Americans here in South Carolina, babies who are born too small and too soon tend to contribute a greater amount to the number of infant deaths,” she said. Smoking, however, is not as great an issue in the African-American population in the state, though “high blood pressure is a problem for both African-American and Caucasian women, but disproportionately so in African-American women,” she said. Factors beyond just the mother’s health can also contribute to race disparity and need to be addressed, Waddell said. “Sometimes it takes those community factors that have to be improved so that the overall health of that mother, that infant and that community will be improved.” Health officials have identified a variety of target areas when it comes to infant mortality. “What we do know is that the causes of infant mortality are fairly consistent: birth defects, premature or low birth weight, sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and accidents, particularly accidents related to sleep positioning and safe sleep,” she said. Encouraging mothers to take folic acid before they conceive and during pregnancy helps address neural tube defects, one of the leading birth defects in the country, she said. DHEC is be-

ginning to isolate areas where birth defects are concentrated and can focus the message to those areas, she said. Experts have determined exposure to secondhand smoke is a factor in some SIDS deaths, Waddell said. Maternal smoking also leads to low birth weight, she said, so DHEC is working to help mothers quit smoking and to encourage them to keep their babies away from secondhand smoke. Encouraging safe sleep is another DHEC focus to prevent accidental suffocation, Waddell said. The good news is that the state’s infant mortality rate has improved 12 percent in five years, she said. According to DHEC, the statewide rate was 8.9 per 1,000 births in 2001, 5.8 for Caucasian residents and 14.5 for African-American and other ethnicities. Maintaining the educational message is essential, Waddell said. One way the agency is spreading the word is encouraging women to sign up for Text4Baby, which sends out timed messages to expectant mothers or those considering having a baby, said Waddell. A goal for the state is to have an infant mortality rate in line with the United States’ rate, which is 6.1 now, said Waddell. The Healthy People 2020 initiative from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has a goal of 6.0 per 1,000 infant mortality rate. “Our goal is for every baby to be born healthy and to live to be a productive young child, so maintaining a steady rate is not good enough for us,” Waddell said. Contact April A. Morris at amorris@communityjournals.com.

Infant Mortality Rates (per 1,000 births) 2011

2010

Spartanburg Co. Greenville Co. South Carolina African-American Caucasian Others

5.9 6.6 7.4 12.6 4.9 5.7

7.1 5.9 7.4 11.8 5.2 7.2

Mexico United States Canada United Kingdom France Japan

16.8 6.1 4.9 4.6 3.4 2.2

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By Cindy Landrum | staff

When Skip Johnson heard destination retailer Cabela’s planned to build a store on Woodruff Road in Greenville, he said he immediately saw what is retail heaven on earth for an outdoor enthusiast. Aisle upon aisle of fishing tackle. An indoor archery range. A gun “library” with antique guns for sale. Rows and rows of camouflage hunting gear, a huge selection of camping and hiking equipment and a wide variety of outdoor apparel. And the iconic final touch: a replica of a mountain with models of a variety of North American game animals – and all under the same roof. Then the picture instantly morphed into what the Upstate resident called “hell” – the exponential increase in traffic gridlock Cabela’s is sure to bring to that stretch of Greenville road he and others already take huge pains to avoid in rush hour and on weekends. “I’m a big outdoorsman and I love the fact that Cabela’s is coming to Greenville, but why there?” he said. “It will just make traffic so much worse, and it’s already horrible.” Greenville city officials say fixing Woodruff Road is the top priority in the Greenville Pickens Area Transportation Study’s long-range plan. The city is working to identify possible routes for a new road that would parallel Woodruff and divert some residential traffic from what has become one of Greenville’s fastest-growing and most congested retail areas. A corridor study initiated by the city and completed in 2007 showed Woodruff Road from Interstate 85 to State Highway 14 was at or over capacity, and the stretch from Interstate 85 to Verdae Boulevard was close. “The big box development on Woodruff has really picked up,” said Mike Murphy, the city’s public works director. Since the study was completed, development has continued apace at CUICAR, Clemson’s automotive research campus, as well as at Verdae, the Shops at Greenridge, the Point and Magnolia Park, the Menin Development project that landed Cabela’s.

Humble beginnings Cabela’s started with the kitchen-table dreams of Dick Cabela, a furniture salesman. Cabela was at a furniture show in Chicago in 1961 when he spotted a vendor selling hand-tied fishing flies. He bought them and returned home to Chappell, Neb. He came up with a plan to sell them and placed an ad in a Wyoming newspaper that advertised “12 hand-tied flies for $1.” He got one response. Undaunted, Cabela rewrote the ad to “Free introductory offer! 5 hand-tied flies … 25 cents postage and handling” and placed it in outdoor magazines. When orders came in, Cabela and his wife, Mary, included a mimeographed catalog of other outdoor items they had added to their product line. Business was conducted around the couple’s kitchen until the increase in volume necessitated a move into Dick’s father’s furniture store basement. Business continued to grow and the Cabelas opened their first retail store in 1987. Cabela’s is now the largest mail-order, retail and Internet outdoor outfitter in the world. The store launched its own co-branded credit card in 1995 and chartered the World’s Foremost Bank N.A. in 2001 to provide customer service, risk management and payment processing exclusively for Cabela’s Visa cardholders. Cabela’s has 37 retail stores in the United States and three in Canada. Thirteen additional stores are planned, including the 100,000-square-foot store expected to open in Greenville in 2014 in Magnolia Park on Woodruff Road. The store will be Cabela’s first in the Southeast.

Retail tourism The status as the first Cabela’s store in the Southeast should bring shoppers to Greenville from the Upstate and several surrounding states. While Cabela’s hasn’t indicated how many shoppers it expects annually at its Greenville store, it does bill itself as a true destination retailer. Cabela’s other stores have attracted up to four million shoppers annually and daily traffic of 10,000

cars weekdays and upwards of 30,000 vehicles a day on weekends. Granted, those numbers were for bigger stores in bigger cities – but if Greenville’s store approaches that kind of traffic, it could put a real strain on Woodruff Road. According to the latest numbers, the average daily traffic count in 2011 on Woodruff Road from Interstate 85 to State Highway 14 was 33,500 vehicles. That’s up from 30,800 vehicles in 2006. The other ends of Woodruff don’t carry as much traffic: The stretch between Laurens Road to I-85 averaged 11,500 cars in 2011, down from 11,800 in 2006, and the section from State 14 to the Spartanburg County line averaged 17,400 vehicles a day, up from 15,800.

Long-term plan, short-term fixes The long-range solution to Woodruff Road’s congestion is a parallel road, said City Engineer Dwayne Cooper. The project in the city’s long-range plan would connect Market Pointe Drive with Carolina Point Parkway, build a new connection with Verdae Boulevard and a new bridge over I-85, Cooper said. A route, cost and construction timetable have yet to be determined. “There are a lot of people looking at Woodruff Road. There are several shortterm things that could be done, but the long-term solution is the parallel road,” Cooper said. Some relief could come with the realignment of the I-85 and I-385 interchange expected to begin in 2014, Cooper said. That project includes a couple of intersection projects near the Shops at Greenridge, said Tommy Elrod, project engineer for the South Carolina Department of Transportation: the addition of turn lanes at Woodruff and Garlington Road and a double right-turn lane at the north end of the Shops at Greenridge. “I don’t think it will make a noticeable change on Woodruff Road,” Elrod said. “We’re doing everything we can not to make it worse.” Murphy said the city decision to require interconnectivity between businesses in Magnolia Park will help, as will signal timing changes and median changes recommended in the Woodruff Road corridor plan that are under consideration. “We’re working on some things,” he said. “But it’s just a matter of funding.” Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.


Salon style Monthly TEDx events encourage idea exchange and aim for inspiration By APRIL A. MORRIS | staff

First there was TED. Born in 1984 California, the conference was created to exchange ideas about technology, entertainment and design. It showcased new technology like the compact disc and 3-D graphics. Since then, TED has sought out speakers who expound on everything from science and religion to music and philosophy. Now TED talks are recorded and made available free online to anyone, adhering to its tagline, “ideas worth spreading.” Beyond the conference and online content, TED has spawned TEDx – locally coordinated events that offer a similar experience. In the Upstate, this independent event features speakers from the Upstate and beyond on an annual basis. The more frequent and more intimate TEDx Salon continues to offer the exchange of ideas all year long. The Salon series was launched after the first local TEDx conference in 2010, said Maxim Williams, head curator and member of the Salon committee. Featuring live presenters along with a video from TED.com, the monthly events were designed to showcase the diversity and the creativity of the area, he said. Over the past year, the Salon series has focused on reaching out to different communities and residents who wouldn’t normally attend a TEDx event. Each Salon has a theme; among them, the wisdom of youth, mushrooms as medicine, sustainability, women entrepreneurs and senior citizens. During the roughly two-hour event, the attendees (limited to about 100) watch a TED video, hear speakers for 10 to 15 minutes and then ask questions, said Williams. The Salon events

are recorded and uploaded to the TED YouTube channel for worldwide viewing. Though run by local organizations, all salon events are licensed by TED and adhere to certain guidelines, he said. The most recent Salon, held at The Iron Yard in Greenville, featured entrepreneurs Jon McClure of ISO Poly Films and Chancey Lindsey-Peake of Banana Manna addressing the theme “Passion, Risk, Reward.” The presenters spoke on their entrepreneurial experience continued journey. With a minimal budget, the Salons are also held in spaces willing to offer them for free. Volunteers run each month’s Salon, doing everything from recording video and sound to brainstorming on themes, said Williams. Each Salon has a guest curator, who works to include a variety of organizations in forming the event, he said. The Salons are always free and open to anyone. “It’s about ideas,” Williams said. “It’s silly to charge for sharing ideas that will improve our community.” Just like historical salons that offered a forum for discussion, a smaller event equals a more intimate experience, he said, adding the speakers are by no means professionals and the ones with the least experience often deliver the better talks. “What the speaker doesn’t realize is that the audience is hanging on their every word,” he said. One guest Salon speaker was tapped to present at the larger TEDx conference this year. The question-and-answer portion of the program also creates an exchange between presenters and the attendees. The Salon team has one more event on Feb. 7, featuring vocal, slam poetry and salsa dancing performances on the subject of love, before a new year starts. Then on March 22, the local TEDx Conference arrives with the theme “By Design.” The daylong event will feature nearly 20 local and regional presenters, including Greenville mayor Knox White, former NFL player Perry Tuttle, Paris MTN Scout founder Emily Reach White, Taal Bollywood Dancers, entrepreneur Dodd Caldwell and performer Tim TV.

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There’s a nationwide gun and ammunition shortage and the Greenville Police Department wants to make sure it doesn’t affect officers’ firearms training. Sales of firearms and ammunition have skyrocketed since a debate over gun control began in reaction to the school shooting in Newtown, Conn. Many police departments across the country have had to cut back on firearms training for lack of ammunition. The Greenville Police Department requested on Monday night that it be allowed to spend nearly $71,000 from the Department of the Treasury account of the city’s law enforcement special revenue fund. Department officials said the expenditure would allow them to maintain the current training regimen without interruptions. The FBI reports performing a record 2.8 million background checks in December, most occurring after the Newtown massacre. The National Shooting Sports Foundation said that 2.2 million of those were related to firearms sales. Gun sales were also up in every state. Ammunition manufacturers are strug-

gling to keep up as consumers are buying ammunition for new guns and stocking up for the guns they already own. City Council gave initial approval to the purchase. City Council also gave initial approval for the fire department to accept a $61,107 homeland security grant for equipment and supplies for a series of practice drills using the Scott Towers, a 14-story public housing complex slated for demolition this spring. The practice drills will include scenarios for local law enforcement, the Greenville regional weapons of mass destruction response team, state incident management teams, local and regional fire and rescue personnel, and local emergency medical services and hospital systems. Council also gave initial approval to a development agreement that calls for the city to appropriate $500,000 from its downtown infrastructure fund for streetscape improvements on East McBee Avenue and Spring Street. The corner is where a hotel and spa had been planned, but Grant Peacock plans to build a 55-unit apartment com-

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plex there instead. Construction is expected to begin early this year. Final approval was given to the abandonment of parts of several streets necessary for a project that would put apartments and retail at the corner of Church Street and University Ridge. The Beach Company wants to build 348 apartments, 16,000 square feet of retail or office space and a parking garage. The council voted to abandon Carson Street, a portion of Springer Street, Judson Street from Springer to Wakefield Street, Quincy Street and an unnamed alley off Wakefield Street. The developer will donate to the city a right of way for the extension of Briar Street, an easement for a pedestrian and bike trail, and property for the widening of Wakefield Street and Briar Street. The next regularly scheduled meeting of City Council is Monday, Feb. 11 at 5:30 p.m. in Council Chambers on the 10th floor of City Hall. Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.

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journal news

spartanburg county council from the january 28 meeting

Spartanburg County got an unqualified clear report from its auditor this week, for the first time in two years. Stan Halliday, of McAbee, Talbert, Halliday and Company, presented the report to County Council Monday night. The auditor found no problems with what have traditionally proved hot-topic items, particularly within the recreation department, said Councilman David Britt. “It just goes to show issues like this

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start at the top,” he said. Former county administrator Glenn Breed lost his job over issues with construction projects that were part of a massive recreation department expansion. Jeff Caton, former recreation department chief, also was shown the door over issues uncovered within the department during an audit. “It has taken us this long to get things right again,” Britt said. Katherine Hubbard, Spartanburg’s new county administrator, said ending the string of critical letters from the auditors was one of her main goals this year.

In other action, council approved a resolution and grant request by Spartanburg Recreation for new greenway projects. The package included a resolution forming a partnership with the National Park Service to create a master plan for the Overmountain Victory National Historic Trail that crosses through Spartanburg to the Cowpens battlefield. Patriot forces, starting in Western Virginia, marched down the spine of the Blue Ridge to join up with forces in South Carolina at Cowpens and King’s Mountain near the end of the American Revolution. The new trails would become part of

a burgeoning system of trails and greenways within the county. Council also approved a fee-in-lieu agreement with Lockheart Power Company; a fee-in-lieu pact with Contec, Inc.; an inducement resolution with Project Cartridge; and a fee-in-lieu agreement with Benteler Automotive. Spartanburg County Council next meets on Feb. 18 at 5:30 p.m. in chambers at the county administration building, 366 N. Church St. Contact Charles Sowell at csowell@communityjournals.com.

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About 10 nonprofit organizations in Spartanburg have been getting an annual boost from the federal Community Development Block Grant program. The funding comes through the City of Spartanburg, which makes selections based on priorities such as crime prevention and public safety, substance abuse services and support for senior citizens. But with the pot of money shrinking – from nearly $90,000 for the current budget year to about $70,000 for the next year – City Council is considering ways to allocate funding more effectively. At Monday’s council meeting, Councilman Jerome Rice proposed rotating funding among the organizations, awarding fewer grants but giving larger sums. That way, organizations could either spend a greater amount on shortterm projects, or they could budget the money for future years, he said. This flex-

ibility “might give them an opportunity to do more as an organization,” he said. Mayor Junie White disagreed, saying he fears an interruption in funding might be problematic for selected nonprofits. Groups receiving funds include Art in Motion, the Butterfly Foundation, the Urban League, the SAFE Home Rape Crisis coalition, C.O.L.O.R.S., Christmas in Action and the Bethlehem Center. Patrena Mims, executive director of the Bethlehem Center, uses the grant to support an after-school program for inner city youth. Asked Tuesday morning about Rice’s proposal, she said she hadn’t considered the matter but would accept whatever direction the city decides to take. Either way, the CDBG grant is “very important,” she said. This year, the Bethlehem Center received $5,000. Aside from whether to allocate funds to organizations annually or in larger semi-annual lump sums, city director of

Spartanburg City Council’s next scheduled meeting is Feb. 11 at 5:30 p.m. at city hall.

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neighborhood services Wes Corrothers said council members could also establish new priorities for the program. For example, they might choose to focus all the funding on youth services or crime prevention. Several council members said they believe all the organizations receiving CDBG money are worthwhile and are in line with their priorities. “All these groups are very important to the city,” said Councilman Robert Reeder. Corrothers said that any changes to the program would need to be decided by the council by its February 11 meeting. In other business, outside auditor Kevin Madden, of the firm Greene, Finney & Horton, said the city’s financial records are in good order.

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Journal community Snow much fun in the South Increased snowmaking capacity allows North Carolina ski resorts to deliver winter wonderland

By Cindy Landrum | staff

North Carolina’s ski resorts have a growing cache of weapons – including an impressive supply of high-tech snow guns – to deal with Mother Nature’s winter mood swings. And mood swings she has had. Last year’s unusually mild winter was

sandwiched between a year marked by nearly 150 inches of snowfall in North Carolina’s high country and a year that supplied an October snowfall that allowed some ski resorts to open around Halloween, earlier than any other year on record. “It’s been a rollercoaster,” said Sugar Mountain’s marketing director Kim Jochl. “But that’s definitely nothing new. It’s

not unusual to have varying weather.” The three ski resorts in North Carolina’s High Country – the area of Boone, Blowing Rock and Banner Elk – have invested millions of dollars in snow-making equipment and groomers to supplement the natural snow the area receives. Appalachian Ski Mountain, Blowing Rock, North Carolina

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Temperatures drop 3 to 4 degrees with every thousand-foot rise in elevation, meaning that even when temperatures at lower elevations and the Upstate hover in the 50s, the weather in the ski areas can often support snowmaking. “Our ski resorts are used to making snow,” said Wright Tilley, executive director of the Watauga County Tourism Development Authority. “They make it regularly, more than the ski resorts in Colorado and Utah.” Snowmaking involves creating a mixture of air and water under pressure and spraying it out of a snow gun. The mixture then turns to snow and falls to the ground. Temperature and humidity is key, said Brad Moretz, general manager of Appalachian Ski Mountain, which has the greatest snowmaking pumping capacity per acre of any ski resort in the Southeast. “We can literally cover the mountain with snow overnight,” he said. Beech Mountain purchased six SMI Super PoleCat automated snow guns this past summer, bringing the resort’s total to 30. The state-of-the-art computeroperated machines are combined with more than 100 smaller guns to provide

Ski Beech Mountain Resort, Blowing Rock, North Carolina

the best snowmaking capacity in resort history. General Manager Ryan Costin repositioned several of the guns, bringing them into play earlier in the season to boost snow coverage on the resort’s

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popular Robbin’s Run and Upper Shawneehaw runs. “When we had windows last year to produce our product, we were very effective,” he said.

Beech Mountain’s marketing director Talia Freeman said the commitment to snowmaking allows the resort to offer consistent snow conditions to skiers and snowboarders, even after periods of mild weather. Hours of snowmaking per season range from 600 to 1,500, depending on the weather and the specific ski area. Some resorts stockpile snow in key slope locations to be strategically spread over decreasing snow base areas during periods of warm weather or rain. Moretz said 95 percent of skiers cannot tell the difference between natural and man-made snow, which doesn’t pack down as fast as natural snow. “Natural snow tends to disappear faster than manmade snow.” Each ski resort has a unique feature that sets it apart from the others. Appalachian Ski Mountain in Blowing Rock is North Carolina’s oldest ski resort and is known for its ski instruction. Sugar Mountain at Banner Elk has the highest vertical drop – 1,200 feet – and is North Carolina’s largest ski area. Beech Mountain has an elevation of 5,506 feet and bills itself as “the highest ski area in Eastern North America.” The Upstate is one of the North


JOURNAL COMMUNITY Carolina ski industry’s main out-ofstate draws. “Sometimes it can get frustrating because when it’s 50 degrees in the Upstate, people don’t think of snow,” Freeman said. “But when it is 50 there, it can be cold here with a lot of snow.” And higher daytime temperatures on the ski slopes – as long as they’re not too high – can be a good thing because the snow softens up a bit (ideal for somebody who is just learning to ski) and frostbite is not an issue. All of the resorts have webcams so Upstate residents can see slope conditions for themselves. Skiing is not the only winter sport the resorts offer. Snow-tubing, snowboarding and ice-skating supply non-skiers with plenty of alternatives. Hawksnest doesn’t offer skiing any more, but it is home to the largest snowtubing park on the east coast and the longest zipline tour in the nation. The zipline course features 19 cables covering four miles and is open year-round. The resorts will be open through the end of March. Said Freeman, “As long as we can make snow, we have snow.” Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.

SO YOU KNOW APPALACHIAN SKI MOUNTAIN BLOWING ROCK At a glance: 27 acres of skiable terrain with 12 slopes and trails (three beginner, three intermediate, three advanced, three freestyle terrain areas). Peak elevation: 4,000 feet. Vertical drop: 365 feet. Longest run: 2,640 feet. Lifts includes a double and two quads. Resort also features a Zambonimaintained ice rink. Connect: www.appskimtn.com, www.appterrainpark.com; 828-295-7828. BEECH MOUNTAIN RESORT BEECH MOUNTAIN At a glance: 95 acres of skiable terrain with 15 slopes and trails (three beginner, six intermediate, four advanced, two freestyle terrain areas). Peak elevation: 5,506 feet (highest ski area east of the Rockies). Vertical drop: 830 feet. Longest

run: 1 mile. Lifts include four doubles, a quad and a highspeed quad with a panoramic vista. With a village ice rink and the Beech Mountain Adaptive Snowsports Center for kids and adults with disabilities.

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At a glance: Eight acres of skiable terrain with two trails (one beginner, one intermediate). Peak elevation: 3,780 feet. Vertical drop: 200 feet. Longest run: 1,600 feet. Quad lift for the main run. Also features the Frozen Falls Tube Park with a 500-foot run and a 60-foot vertical drop.

CATALOOCHEE SKI AREA MAGGIE VALLEY At a glance: 50 acres of skiable terrain with 17 slopes and trails (eight beginner, six intermediate, three advanced) and one freestyle terrain park. Peak elevation: 5,400 feet. Vertical drop: 740 feet. Longest run: 3,500 feet (Upper and Lower Snowbird). Lifts include a double, a triple and a quad. Area offers interscholastic and NASTAR recreational race programs. Nearby Tube World features a six-run tubing park and a Wee Bowl Snowplay Area.

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Connect: www.skisapphire. com, 828-743-7663. SUGAR MOUNTAIN RESORT SUGAR MOUNTAIN At a glance: 115 acres of skiable area with 20 slopes and trails (seven beginner, nine intermediate, three advanced, one freestyle terrain area). Peak elevation: 5,300 feet. Vertical

drop: 1,200 feet. Longest run: 1.5 miles. Lifts include four doubles and one triple. With a 700-foot, multilane tube run; ice-skating; guided snowshoe tour; and public racing program. Connect: www.skisugar.com; 828-898-4521. HAWKSNEST SEVEN DEVILS BOONE At a glance: Hawksnest Resort is a family-friendly winter area that’s home to the largest snow tubing park on the East Coast as well as the longest zipline tour in the nation. The tubing park is comprised of four areas and more than 20 lit lanes ranging from 400 to 1,000 feet in length. The zipline course features 19 cables covering four miles and is open year-round. Connect: www. hawksnesttubing.com, 828-963-6561, 800-822-4295.

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Poverty tour offers an eye-opening look at Greenville By april a. morris | staff

Beth Lindsay Templeton has worked with the Upstate’s poor and disadvantaged for more than 20 years through United Ministries and now with her own organization, Our Eyes Were Opened. This week, she took a group of Greenville Forward members on a unique guided tour. This tour didn’t showcase architectural achievements or tourist attractions, but instead introduced the uninitiated to neighborhoods that were once mill villages or housing for returning World War II veterans that are now victims of neglect, decay and crime. Since launching Our Eyes Were Opened, once an offshoot of United Ministries and now its own organization, Templeton has conducted countless “poverty tours” and more than 3,000 people have participated in a poverty simulation she created. Tuesday’s tour was one of several monthly events Greenville Forward wants to offer to add value to its membership, said Russell Stall, executive director.

Templeton says Greenville has a 13 to 15 percent poverty rate, federally defined in 2012 as annual income of $22,500 for a family of four. She told the group a more general definition would be if a person “does not have the resources to meet basic needs for their family and for their time.” Templeton said the tour is designed to have a strong impact. “My PowerPoint presentation doesn’t do it, so we have to be in the neighborhoods.” Stall agreed, saying it’s “easy to drive down Augusta Road every day and not look 100 yards either way and see what’s going on.” As she drives, Templeton talks about the history of neighborhoods like Nicholtown, where the African-American middle class and professionals lived during segregation and also where returning World War II veterans moved in. Templeton grew up in the Nicholtown neighborhood in the 1950s. There is renewal going on in the area and some small, renovated homes are selling for approximately $250,000, said Yvonne Reeder, president of the Nicholtown

Neighborhood Association. One problem with housing has been the demolition of subsidized developments like the Jesse Jackson Townhomes without a comparable replacement with the same number of units, said Templeton. As the tour group passed a collection of neglected, single-wide trailer homes, Templeton said that though these homes are in disrepair – some with gaping holes – they are often the only option for people who can’t sign a long-term lease because of a criminal record, mental illness or similar situation. One homeless man who rented such a place was very excited because he had finally found someone to rent to him, she said. He paid $450 per month. Finding housing for this population is a gap in Greenville, Templeton said. “Greenville is doing a great job at providing housing for those who are called the ‘working poor’ and have some sort of stability, but not for those who cannot sign a long-term lease.” In the Greenline-Spartanburg neighborhood, she pointed out the lack of sidewalks along lanes too narrow to accommodate a fire truck. Many residents

have nice cars, however, she said. “It’s a whole lot easier to get a car loan than a house loan. People may not know where you live, but they know what kind of car you drive to work, church and to visit relatives.” Templeton said neighborhoods like Sterling are beginning to attract residents “who want to move in and build community” rather than renovate and “flip” houses or simply make an investment. Other bright spots include Southernside, which is in “rebuild mode,” and Reedy Place, a development that offers stable housing before treatment to those with mental illness or an addiction, she said. “My underlying belief is that education for people who have resources and power is the way to end poverty,” Templeton said. “Once people have seen the poverty here, they can’t ever forget it. Hopefully it will affect how they vote, how they chat with their peers and how they think out things as a community.” Contact April A. Morris at amorris@communityjournals.com.

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Dave Pelzer, author and advocate, to speak The Julie Valentine Center, serving survivors of child abuse and sexual assault in Greenville County, is welcoming author and child abuse survivor Dave Pelzer as the key- Pelzer note speaker for its annual luncheon held on Valentine’s Day. Pelzer, New York Times best-selling author of “A Child Called It” and other books, was saved from abuse when he was 12 years old. In the book, Pelzer recounts years of maltreatment and abuse at the hands of his mother, leaving him nearly starved. “I weighed 68 pounds at 12 years old,” he said. “I have no doubt that my mother would have ended up killing me.” Pelzer’s case was reportedly the worst in California’s history at the time. Several of his teachers rescued him, Pelzer said in a recent interview. He is

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still in contact with those teachers and says they were very courageous to step in and end his abuse. “My first book was one long thankyou to my teachers. I had so much help. I had so much help from complete strangers,” he said. Pelzer overcame his damaging childhood and later joined the Air Force. It was then that he began to do volunteer work with young people, he said, eventually recording his own story. “I wanted to tell the inspirational story of the kid who didn’t quit,” he said. He went on to be honored as one of the Ten Outstanding Young Americans and also a National Jefferson Award winner. He now uses his wit in speaking engagements to inspire students, writers, military personnel, abuse survivors and those who work with them. He has penned seven books, some of which have drawn criticism regarding their veracity. For the Julie Valentine Center event, its biggest fundraiser of the year, Pelzer said his core message is going

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JOURNAL COMMUNITY to focus on moving forward. “I’m about resilience, personal accountability and service,” he said. Everyone endures some sort of problem and “what you do with it” is what matters. Pelzer said so many people help victims of abuse, and he is happy to help acknowledge these workers at the event. He also wants to help provide a bigger picture of the issue of abuse beyond the shock value. “I’m actually shocked that society is still shocked,” he said. Pelzer said that his childhood experiences have also influenced him as a father. “I was a very young man when I found out I was going to be a father. That was the best thing that happened to me. I just beam when I think about him,” Pelzer said about his now-26-year-old son. Shauna Galloway-Williams, director of the Julie Valentine Center, said the organization is very excited to have Pelzer speak. Pelzer’s message will be uplifting to those survivors who are taking “a courageous step towards ending the cycle of abuse and rebuilding their lives,” she said. She added that Pelzer’s acknowledgement of the social workers and law enforcement officers who are on the front lines will also be important. In addition to Pelzer’s speech, the Julie Valentine Center event will feature a client

survivor story about a mother who found out her son was abused by his stepfather. “She took all the right steps,” said Galloway-Williams. They both participated in center-provided counseling, and the mother is now an advocate for the center, she said. “Her story represents a mom in impossible circumstances who did the right thing. The real message in the story is they are not allowing it (abuse) to define who they are.” Last year’s event, featuring Elizabeth Smart, the teen who was kidnapped, held and abused for nearly a year, drew nearly 1,000 supporters, said Galloway-Williams. The Julie Valentine Center, formerly the Greenville Rape Crisis and Child Abuse Center, offers a rape hotline, counseling services and parenting classes. In 2012, the center served 1,900 clients. Contact April A. Morris at amorris@communityjournals.com.

SO YOU KNOW Julie Valentine Center Luncheon Feb. 14, 11:30 a.m. TD Bank Convention Center For more information and tickets, visit www.julievalentinecenter.org or call 864-331-0560.

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FEBRUARY 1, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 19


journal community

our community

community news, events and happenings

“The Weight of the Nation,” a four-part documentary series, will continue screening through February. The series features case studies and interviews with leading experts, individuals and families struggling with obesity. The documentaries focus on the facts and myths of this health issue, showing how obesity affects the health of the nation and health care. Two parts of the series remain for screening: “Consequences,” screening on Feb. 7, and “Challenges,” screening on Feb. 21. The screenings will be held at the Hughes Main Library in Greenville from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Lunch can be pre-ordered for $10. To sign up for the screenings or for more information, visit weightofthenationgville.eventbrite.com. On Feb. 2, The Children’s Security Blanket Thrift Store will open its doors to the community at 9 a.m. with a ribbon-cutting. Every dollar taken in will help meet the ongoing needs of families who have a child diagnosed with cancer. Each week, store hours will be from 9 a.m.-6 p.m. on Thursday, Friday and Saturday. This nonprofit organization provides gas, meals and lodging for the families, not covered by insurance. Sometimes this includes plane travel. The store is located at 4141 Highway 9, Boiling Springs. For more information, call 864-599-0250.

No experience is necessary and registration is free. To sign up or for more information, visit www.uglywordsgreenville.bellstrike.com. Have a photo that encapsulates rural life in the Palmetto State? Send it to the S.C. Department of Commerce and you could win the ninth annual Amateur Rural Summit Photography Contest, which will be held in Aiken on Mar. 4. The contest is open to the public, and entries should reflect the unique features of rural life in the Palmetto State. Photographs must be original work of the applicant and feature rural South Carolina subject matter. Visit http://sccommerce.com/events/2013-rural-summit-and-photo-contest for submission guidelines. Deadline for submission is Feb. 15. The Greenville Kennel Dog Club Show will be held on Feb. 15 at the TD Convention Center. It is anticipated that there will be around 2,000 dogs competing in conformation, agility and obedience. Since this will be right after Westminster Dog Show in New York, many of the top dogs will be entering this show. There will also be a wide variety of vendors. For more information, contact Trevor Butler at 973-335-4514 or 864-322-3622.

Greenville Mental Health Services will host a Community Forum addressing Mental Healthcare issues on Feb. 7 at 6-7:30 p.m. in the GMHC Auditorium at 124 Mallard Street in Greenville. The forum will feature John H. Magill, SCDMH State Director; Al C. Edwards, M.D., Greenville Mental Health Center Director; and the leadership of Greenville Mental Health Services. This event will feature the latest news and statewide initiatives in mental healthcare; local community efforts; and review the progress made since the previous forum and facilitate a discussion on improving methods of delivering effective mental health treatment. Please RSVP to Gayle Peek at glp96@scdmh.org or 864-241-1040.

Partners for Active Living will host a Trail Cleanup Day on Feb. 16, 10 a.m.-noon, on the Mary Black Rail Trail in Spartanburg. Volunteers should meet at the Rail Trail Dog Park across from Duncan Park on Union. For more information, contact Melody Williams at mwilliams@active-living.org.

First Monday, a Republican forum, will host a panel of Republican leaders who will discuss “Where do we go from here … the fate of the Republican Party” on Feb. 4, noon at the Poinsett Club. For more information and to register, visit www.firstmondayingreenville.com.

The Joint Legislative Committee to Screen Candidates for College and University Boards of Trustees is accepting Letters of Intent to begin screening and qualifying candidates for a number of seats. It is required by law that any person who wishes to offer as a candidate for a board position must notify the Legislative Screening Committee in writing of his/her intent to offer for the specific seat. Applicants must reside in the district for which they are applying. The deadline for receiving Letters of Intent is Feb. 19 at noon. All letters should be addressed to: Sen. Harvey S. Peeler, Jr., chairman, Joint Legislative Committee to Screen Candidates for College and University Boards of Trustees, P.O. Box 142, Columbia, SC 29201.

The Hurricane Junior Golf Tour will be visiting Greer’s Willow Creek Golf Club on Feb. 23-24 for the Greenville Jr. Shootout. Four age divisions will comprise the field and the event is ranked by the National Junior Golf Scoreboard. Winners of each division will receive an automatic bid into the 2013 Tour Championship. The format for the Greenville Jr. Shootout will consist of 36-hole stroke play. Registration for members is $179 and the non-member fee is $199. Registration deadline is Feb. 13. For more information, visit www.hjgt.org, call 904-379-2697 or email info@hjgt.org. Ugly Words Writing Center will host its first spring workshop on Feb. 16 from 10 a.m. to noon. The workshop is titled “Anonymous Source: Investigative Journalism.” Children ages 11 to 14 will use their detective skills to discover the culprit of a crime.

Book Your Lunch with popular Christian romance author Shelley Shepard Gray on Feb. 18 at The Lazy Goat. Tickets are $25 per person and must be purchased in advance at www.bookyourlunch.com or by calling Fiction Addiction at 864-675-0540.

The United States Power Squadron will offer a Safe Boating Course starting Feb. 25, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., at Messiah Lutheran Church in Mauldin. The eight-hour course covers boat handling, anchoring, finding directions, adverse condition and using the marine radio. The cost of the course, including the text, will be $40. For more information, visit www.lake-hartwell.org

If you are sponsoring a community event, we want to share your news. Submit entries to email: community@communityjournals.com.

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journal community

our schools

activities, awards and accomplishments

Jakob Su’A-Filo of Taylors, a student at Blue Ridge High School, and Kacey Lentz, a student at Wade Hampton High School, have been selected to represent South Carolina as National Youth Delegates at the weeklong 2013 Washington Youth Summit on the Environment at George Mason University.

The Greenville County District Office Juried Elementary Art Show awarded “Best in the Show” to fifth grader Clifford Culpepper of Cherrydale Elementary School. Third grade student Alda Francisco also received an honorable mention.

Langston Charter Middle School is hosting a financial aid workshop for middle school parents on Feb. 7 at 6:30 p.m. in the Langston gymnasium. The workshop will be presented by Mehul Shah, a Greenville-based CPA who will provide information on methods and strategies that are critical to maximizing financial aid eligibility. All area families are invited to attend this free event. For more information, call 864-286-9700.

The Governor’s School for Science and Mathematics is now accepting applications from current high school sophomores through Feb. 15. Online applications are available at http://scgssm.org/apply. One of only 15 of its kind in the nation, GSSM is a public, residential high school specializing in science, technology, engineering and math. The school considers not only aptitude but also proven performance and demonstrated interest in science and mathematics. For more information, contact Brigitte Barnett, director of recruitment, at 803-201-9168 or brigitte@scgssm.org. Four St. Joseph’s Catholic School students were recently named to the 2013 All-State Orchestra. In grades nine-10, 67 violinists competed for 36 seats. Freshman Alice Bailey earned 12th chair in the first violin section. In grades 11-12, 39 violinists competed for 30 seats. Junior Alec Biscopink earned the highest score of the day for all violinists in this orchestra and earned first chair. Junior Kira Sawyers earned fifth chair and junior Wil Magaha earned sixth chair in the second violin section. The 2013 All-State Orchestra Concert, to be held in Columbia Feb. 22-24, will feature the best string orchestra students in the state.

Celebrating 41 years, Battle of the Brains, a question-and-answer competition, is encouraging middle schools in the Upstate to put on their thinking caps. Bill Drake, local radio host of “Awake with Drake,” is the founder of this quiz bowl tradition, involving 36 schools from four counties. Each week, the students are on stage at Chapman Cultural Center to answer random questions in hopes of bringing home prize money to their schools. In addition, thousands of people listen as Drake broadcasts the game over the radio every Thursday, 7-8 a.m. For more information on Battle of the Brains, call 864-595-9500 or email bill@awakewithdrake.com. Veritas Preparatory School is hosting an Open House for interested families on Feb. 7 at 7:30 p.m. at Downtown Presbyterian Church, 435 W. Washington St. Veritas is a Christian, classical, university-model school opening in the downtown area of Greenville in the fall of 2013 for K5-fifth grades. For more information, visit www. veritasgreenville.com or email info@veritasgreenville.com. Shannon Forest Christian School recently recognized seniors Rachel Graham and Brandon Troka as the school’s Heisman Athletic Award Winners. Graham and Troka have been recognized as Shannon Forest students who excel in learning, performing and leading in the classroom, on the field and in the community.

Graham

Troka

Mt. Zion Christian School will hold a fundraiser on Feb. 11, 5-8 p.m., at Chickfil-A on Woodruff Road. The restaurant will give a portion of sales to the school and classes can compete for the chance to win a class brownie party. Clemson University assistant professor Shaundra Daily has been recognized as a 2013 Emerging Scholar by Diverse: Issues in Higher Education. Daily, who works in the Human-Centered Computing Division, and 11 other educators were named 2013 Emerging Scholars in the publication. The national magazine focuses on matters of access, equality and opportunity in higher education and annually honors educators who are under 40 with proven abilities to lead and inspire. Clemson University recently honored two long-serving trustees, Thomas B. McTeer Jr. of Columbia and Joseph D. Swann of Greenville, with the university’s highest public honor, the Clemson Medallion. The Clemson Medallion is presented to individuals who have rendered notable and significant service and support to Clemson University and who exemplify the dedication and foresight of university founder Thomas Green Clemson.

Submit entries to: Community Journals, Our Schools, 148 River Street, Ste. 120, Greenville, SC 29601 or email: community@communityjournals.com

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journal community

the good

events that make our community better

Homes of Hope recently unveiled the first two LoCAL homes at 438 Perry Ave. in Greenville. The homes were constructed by men overcoming addictions, along with Fluor volunteers. These two new homes brought the organization’s count of homes developed to date to 400. Families will ultimately be able to purchase their LoCAL home for $30,000, with a standard mortgage payment of no more than $250 a month. For more information, visit www.homesofhope.org. The Build-A-Bear Workshop Huggable Heroes program is accepting nominations for young people ages eight to 18 who are doing their part to make the world a better place. Ten Huggable Heroes will each receive $10,000, which includes an educational scholarship, a donation to a charity of their choice, and a mentoring scholarship to support their charitable entrepreneurships. Nominations will be accepted through www.buildabear.com/huggableheroes or by mail until Feb. 28, 2013. Nomination forms are also available at Build-A-Bear Workshop stores. The South Carolina Chapter of the March of Dimes has awarded more than $140,000 in 15 community grants for projects focused on improving the health of mothers and babies in South Carolina. Upstate grants include $104,632 for the Greenville Hospital System University Medical Group Obstetric Care Center’s Centering Pregnancy program, which implements an evidenced-based group model of prenatal care, and $28,900 to BirthMatters to provide in-home education and support to underserved pregnant women in Spartanburg. Bob Jones Museum and Gallery will hold “For the Love Of…,” a fundraiser celebrating romance on Feb. 15 at 7 p.m. The evening will feature a self-paced tour of the gallery, music, a live auction and desserts. Proceeds benefit the Arts Encounter program for students. Tickets are $25 per person. For more information or to buy tickets, visit www.bjumg.org/for-the-love-of or call 864-770-1331.

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First Baptist Church of Greenville will host the C. Dan Joyner Memorial Run 5K on Feb. 23. The 5K will start on the recreation fields and use the Swamp Rabbit Trail. The 1 Mile Walk will follow the beginning of the trail and the Kid’s Dash will take place on the recreation fields. Walkers, strollers and leashed pets are welcome. The entry fee for the Kid’s Dash is a donation of a jar of peanut butter or squeeze jelly. The entry fee for the 5K is $25 before Feb. 19 and $30 after. The 1 Mile Walk fee is $10. $50 race day registration is available. For more information or to register, visit www.theaymc.com. The Guild of the Greenville Symphony will hold The Black and White Ball, “Starry Starry Night,” on Feb. 23 at the Westin Poinsett Hotel. The ball will benefit and honor the Greenville Symphony Orchestra. This black-tie event begins at 6 p.m. and includes an open bar, dinner, dancing and silent and live auctions. Tickets are $160 per person and include valet parking. For more information, call 864-370-0965 or visit www. guildGSO.org. The Carolina Ballet Theatre is hosting its 40th Anniversary Season finale performance and celebratory Black + White Gala on March 15. Black + White is a unique repertoire of Hernan Justo’s original ballets. The evening will include a homecoming of alumni from Carolina Ballet Theatre’s corps of company dancers and a special tribute to Barbara Selvy, founder of Carolina Ballet Theatre. The performance will occur at 7:30 p.m. at the Peace Center Concert Hall. The Gala, immediately following the performance, will begin at 9 p.m. at Genevieve’s at the Peace Center. Tickets can be purchased through the Carolina Ballet Theatre by visiting www.carolinaballet.org or through the Peace Center Box Office by visiting www.peacecenter.org or calling 864-467-3000. Sponsored by Home Instead Senior Care, the Salute to Senior Service program is seeking nominations of senior volunteers who are 65 or older and who volunteer at least 15 hours a month in their community. Friends, co-workers, family members and nonprofit organizations can also nominate deserving seniors for possible state and national honors. Nominations will be accepted from Feb. 1 through March 31. The winner in each state will receive $500 and one national winner will receive $5,000 to donate to the winners’ charities of choice. For more information, visit www.salutetoseniorservice.com. Completed nomination forms also can be mailed to Salute to Senior Service, P.O. Box 285, Bellevue, NE 68005. Engenius has completed and launched two websites for its 2012 Engenius Grants. Engenius Grants include a fully developed website, professional logo design, Web hosting, marketing consultation, and ongoing hosting and support. The value of these grants is more than $9,000. The 2012 winners were Loaves and Fishes, www.loavesandfishesgreenville.com, and Gardening for Good, www.ggardeningforgood.com. Applications for 2013 grants will be available in the spring. For more information, visit www.engeniusgrants.com. GreenvilleConnect, an organization with the goal of building and unifying the area’s Christian community by being a resource to facilitate collaboration, has named its 2013 board officers. The chairman will be Tim Brett, CEO of Complete Public Relations; chair-elect is Bobby McDonald, executive director of the South Carolina Christian Foundation; and secretary is Gwen Martin, an attorney with Bradford Neal Martin & Associates, PA. Fifty-one students at Easley High School recently competed for the title of Miss EHS. Kelsey Savannah Day was crowned and Meagan Leigh Haywood won first runner-up. The recent death of an Easley student and his mother, who were victims of domestic violence, inspired the school to donate proceeds from the event to MARYS House. MARYS House is a nonprofit organization whose purpose is to provide emergency shelter, services and spiritual guidance to women and children fleeing domestic violence. The pageant contestants raised $1,022 for MARYS House by selling T-shirts, key chains, bracelets and necklaces. For more information, visit www.maryshouse. com or call 864-855-1708. Send us your announcement. Email: community@communityjournals.com.


JOURNAL CULTURE Author gives ‘THE LAST LION’ his final roar Paul Reid finishes William Manchester’s epic Churchill biography series

By CINDY LANDRUM | staff

After Paul Reid received the second part of William Manchester’s biography of Winston Churchill as a Christmas present from his wife, he – along with other Manchester fans and Churchill aficionados around the world – waited for the trilogy’s final part. He never thought he’d be the one to actually write it. Manchester had finished most of the research and about 100 pages of his book, “The Last Lion: Defender of the Realm,” in which he intended to chronicle the years of Winston Churchill’s life from his appointment as prime minister of the United Kingdom in 1940 through World War II to his death in 1965. But writer’s block and two strokes left Manchester unable to complete the work. In 2003, he asked Reid, a former awardwinning feature writer and food critic for the Palm Beach Post who now lives in Tryon, N.C., to finish it – even though Reid had never written anything longer than a few thousand words. “It was completely unexpected. It was a huge opportunity, a challenge, but I was enough of a block-headed Scot-Irish man to leave his house thinking, ‘I can do this,’” Reid said in a telephone interview from his North Carolina home. “Three years into it, my feelings changed to ‘Oh, CHURCHILL continued on PAGE 24

PHOTO COURTESY OF PBS; BOOK IMAGE PROVIDED

FEBRUARY 1, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 23


JOURNAL CULTURE CHURCHILL continued from PAGE 23

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goodness, I have to finish it.’ Six years into it, I was thinking, ‘I’m going to finish it.’” The book was published in November, ending nearly a decade of work for Reid and a more than two-decade wait for the Churchill biography’s final installment. The first, “The Last Lion: Visions of Glory,” was published in 1983. The second volume, “Alone,” was published in 1988. “If someone had told me it’d be nine years before the book was published, I would have had severe second thoughts about leaving my newspaper job,” Reid said. The two writers met in 1998 when Manchester hosted in his home some Marine veterans who had served with him on Okinawa. It had been a tough year for Manchester; his wife had died and he had suffered a stroke. The men were there trying to lift his spirits, and Reid was there to write a story on the reunion. It would be one of several features Reid wrote about Manchester. The two – both from New England, both with newspaper backgrounds – became friends. Reid was not a Churchill scholar, but Manchester didn’t want one to finish his work. Instead, he wanted a storyteller, something Reid did and did well. “We all know how the war ended,” Reid said. “It was my job to make the reader forget. It was my job to put them in the shoes of these world leaders.” Reid’s hobby was World War II history. His father was a big naval history buff and Reid grew up listening to Churchill’s speeches on the family’s RCA Victrola. He listened to Hitler and Mussolini give speeches in languages he couldn’t understand. “Hearing those brought the personal to it, brought the character into it,” Reid said. He owned about 100 books on World War II and Churchill when Manchester asked him to finish the trilogy back in 2003. Reid was at Manchester’s home watching a Boston Red Sox game with the author, who was confined to bed. Manchester asked him to retrieve a large suitcase from the next room. Inside were hundreds of pages of research and some reference books. Manchester told Reid he wanted him to finish the book, and asked him to write 25 pages on the Nazi bombing of Britain as his try-out. Reid was shocked. Manchester had told him in an earlier interview that he would never hand over the writing of the final installment to anybody else. “I told I wouldn’t let him down,” Reid said. Manchester had his own way of organizing his research. It took Reid two years to decipher it.

Reid supplemented those notes with his own research. Manchester’s writing is scattered among the first 200 of the book’s 1,200-plus pages. “They say journalism is the first draft of history,” Reid said. “The very same tools I used for feature stories, I used for the book. It’s telling a story, only it’s longer.” The book begins with a preamble that gives readers who may not have read the first two books a glimpse into Churchill’s character – and a character Churchill was. The prime minister had a habit of sitting in bed, wearing a pink robe and drinking a bottle of wine for breakfast. He had a fearful temper, kept a work schedule that would tire a much younger man and banned ticking clocks from his room.

Paul Reid

“He was a man full of contradictions,” Reid said, adding that during his research, he discovered that Churchill did not suffer from lifelong depression as many thought. Reid said he thinks Churchill saved Western civilization. “He believed Hitler and the Nazis were a mortal threat to everything held dear in Western civilization since Plato. At the end, when the Americans and Russians came in, he knew he would win. But I think he also knew the cost was the loss of the English empire.” Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.

SO YOU KNOW WHO: Paul Reid, author of “The Last Lion: Winston Spencer Churchill: Defender of the Realm, 1940-1965.” WHAT: reading and book signing WHERE: Hub City Bookshop 186 W. Main St. Spartanburg WHEN: Thursday, Feb. 7, 7 p.m. COST: Free INFORMATION: 864-577-9349


JOURNAL CULTURE

Film series meant to provide food for thought Flicks for Thought features films to think about food By CINDY LANDRUM | staff

Greenville’s Flicks for Thought film series wants to provide Upstate residents some food for thought about the food they eat. The series, the sixth held in Greenville, features documentaries and other films on environmental and agricultural issues. A different film will be shown each Thursday in February in Building 102 on Greenville Technical College’s Barton Campus on Pleasantburg Drive. Greenville Organic Foods Organization, Greenville Tech, Whole Foods Market, Natural Awakenings, Shafer & Huguley and Green City Creative are sponsoring the series. Free reservations can be made at www. flicksforthought.com. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. and the films begin at 6 p.m. A 30-minute discussion will follow the showings. The films to be shown are:

“Hungry for Change,” Feb. 7 Medical and nutritional experts take on the billion dollar dieting and weight loss industry and the fallacies of what the filmmakers call the so-called health food myths. “Hungry for Change” explains why diet and fat-free foods should be avoided and how to overcome food addictions and obsessive food cravings. The film explains how to read food labels and identify food additives. “There is this prevalent mindset in our society where we think that being overweight, having food allergies, feeling sluggish or run-down is just part of life and aging,” said James Colquihoun, one of the filmmakers. “It’s not true.” Keri Moore of Whole Foods Market will lead the discussion after the film. “Vanishing of the Bees,” Feb. 14 This film explores the possible relationship between pesticides and the sudden disappearance of honeybees from hives worldwide. Filmmakers say colony collapse disorder has caused a crisis in an industry responsible for helping produce apples,

broccoli, watermelon, onions, cherries and many other fruits and vegetables. Commercial honeybee operations pollinate crops that make up one out of every three bites of food on our table. The film follows commercial beekeepers David Hackenberg and Dave Mendes as they try to keep their bees healthy and fulfill pollination contracts throughout the U.S. Organic beekeepers say there’s a different reason for what’s happening, but scientists haven’t found a definitive answer. Buddy May of May Farms LLC leads the discussion. “Community of Gardeners,” Feb. 21 This film explores the vital role of seven urban community gardens in the Washington, D.C., area as a source for fresh nutritious food. People of all ages, backgrounds and nationalities use community gardens – some for basic sustenance, others as a respite from their troubles and still others as a way to remember their homelands. The film looks at seven Washington, D.C., community gardens as well as the

history of community gardens in the U.S., from the potato patch farms of the late 19th century to the victory gardens of World War II to community gardening’s current renaissance. Reece Lyerly of Gardening for Good will lead the discussion. “Genetic Roulette,” Feb. 28 This film will explore the role of genetically engineered foods in rising disease rates in the U.S. population. The filmmakers say never-before-seen evidence points to genetically engineered foods as a major contributor to rising disease rates in this country, especially among children. They say that gastrointestinal disorders, allergies, inflammatory diseases and infertility are some of the problems implicated in humans, pets, livestock and lab animals that eat genetically modified soybeans and corn. Dr. Sriyani Rajapakse, a biological sciences professor at Greenville Tech, will lead the discussion. Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.

Way to go, Greenville! Thanks to our citizens, the City achieved a 45% participation rate for its curbside recycling program in 2012. According to a SCDHEC yearly report, the US average was 34% and the SC average was 29%. Eligible city residents may request as many recycling bins as they wish, free of charge, by calling 467-8300.

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For more info: recycle.greenvillesc.gov FEBRUARY 1, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 25


JOURNAL CULTURE

LISTEN UP

BEST BETS FOR LOCAL LIVE MUSIC 2/1, HORIZON RECORDS

Lee Bains III & The Glory Fires Ex-Dexateens frontman slings out razor-sharp rock. Call 864-235-7922. 2/1, THE HANDLEBAR

Sevendust Chart-busting hard-rock band. Tickets: $23 ADV/$25 DOS. Call 864-233-6173 or visit www.handlebar-online.com. 2/2, THE HANDLEBAR

Robert Earl Keen Great Americana singer/songwriter. Tickets: $30. Call 864-233-6173 or visit www.handlebar-online.com. 2/8, GOTTROCKS

Sol Driven Train Multi-genre harmony-laden band from Charleston. Call 864-235-5519. 2/16, BI-LO CENTER

Kid Rock Rap-rock superstar. Tickets: $30-$89. Call 864-241-3800 or visit www.bilocenter.com. 2/23, GROUND ZERO

Mushroomhead Eight-piece horror-heavy metal outfit. Call 864-948-1661. 2/23, PEACE CENTER

Kodo Drummers Japanese taiko drumming ensemble. Tickets: $35-$45. Call 864-467-3000 or go to www.peacecenter.org. 2/24, PEACE CENTER

Greenville (864) 235-1883 • Columbia, SC • Valle Crucis • Boone • Waynesville Hendersonville • Asheville, NC • Knoxville, TN • MastGeneralStore.com Parking available behind our store in the Richardson Street Garage. Use our back entrance.

Good thru FEB. 5

26 THE JOURNAL | FEBRUARY 1, 2013

Joshua Bell Classical music superstar. Tickets: $45-$75. Call 864-467-3000 or go to www.peacecenter.org. 2 / 2 8 , B R O W N S T. C L U B

Mark Dye Trio Bassist for The Work brings the jazz. Call 864-250-9193 or visit www.brownstreetclub.com.


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‘Show up and play’ is the rule on Wednesday nights

On most weekdays, you can find Freddie Wooten behind the counter at Palmetto Drum Co., where he’s been building custom drum kits and selling musical instruments since 1993. But on Wednesday nights, he turns from businessman to host and occasional drummer at Smiley’s Acoustic Cafe on Augusta Street in Greenville, where he’s in charge of Palmetto Drum Co.’s Blues Night, a jam session that brings together some of the Upstate’s most notable musicians. Wooten was contacted in May of 2012 by local guitarist Charles Hedgepath, who books the musical entertainment at Smiley’s. “Charles approached me about hosting some type of jam night on Wednesdays,” Wooten says. “It took a little while to get it going, because Smiley’s hadn’t really had anything going on Wednesdays before. But after a few weeks, we really started drawing a crowd. During the summer the Greenville Drive games really help (Smiley’s is located close to Fluor Field), but we tend to have a good crowd, regardless.” The structure of Blues Night is pretty simple: as little structure as possible. “Basically, I’ll pick some guys randomly, usually a couple of guitar players, a keyboard player, a singer,” Wooten says. “We just sort of mix it up. “We usually start the music about 9 p.m., and everybody’s welcome to come play. All people have to do is show up. If you’re a guitar or bass player, bring your guitar. If you’re a drummer, all you’ve got to do is sit down behind the drums. If you approach me during the night and say, ‘I’d like to get up and play,’ then it’s all good by me. “The less I play, the better it is,” Wooten adds with a laugh. Wooten says that the only real rule he tries to follow is to keep things electric, so as not to interfere with another weekly spot at Smiley’s. “We don’t really encourage acoustic players, because they have an acoustic jam open-mic night on Mondays,” Wooten says. “What we’re trying to do is gear our night more to rock and blues.” Since kicking off last May, the series has attracted a virtual who’s-who of Upstate musicians, including Niel Brooks, Matt Morgan, Mac McCloud, Donnie Duncan, Mike Merck, Wolfman Grant and J. Michael King. “We have a pretty good cross-section of musicians,” Wooten says. “I’ve been really pleased, both in terms of people who want to hear the music and musicians who want to play. A lot of guys enjoy playing, but aren’t really in bands, and it gives them an opportunity to get in there and play with some other guys without having to be part of band. They can get their playing fix, and then go home. They just want to jam a little bit.” Palmetto Drum Co. has been connected with several events on the Upstate music scene (including tributes to the Allman Bros. Band’s “Live at Fillmore East” album and the original Woodstock festival), but Wooten says there’s one common denominator in the projects he chooses. “I’ve always done what I’ve enjoyed doing,” he says. “If it’s something that we’ve hitched our wagon to, then it’s something that we enjoy doing, or that we believe in. I wasn’t sure how long this thing would last, or how long I’d want to do it, but so far, I haven’t gotten tired of it. So as long as everybody’s having a good time, it’s something I’ll continue to do.”

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THE GUILD OF THE GREENVILLE SYMPHONY

FEBRUARY 23, 2013 6:00 PM THE WESTIN POINSETT TO BENEFIT THE GREENVILLE SYMPHONY

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TO BENEFIT THE GREENVILLE SYMPHONY FEBRUARY23, 23,2013 2013 FEBRUARY FEBRUARY23, 23,2013 2013 FEBRUARY COCKTAILS COCKTAILS - HORS - HORS D’OEUVRES D’OEUVRES - DINNER - DINNER RSVPRSVP BY FEBRUARY BYBYFEBRUARY 13, 2013 13, 6:00 PM COCKTAILS - HORS D’OEUVRES DINNER RSVP FEBRUARY 13,2013 2013 6:00 PM 6:00 PM 6:00 PM SILENT SILENT & LIVE & AUCTIONS LIVE&AUCTIONS - TOP HAT TOP BAND HAT BAND 370-0965 370-0965 OR OR SILENT LIVE AUCTIONS TOP HAT BAND 370-0965 OR THE WESTIN POINSETT RSVP BY FEBRUARY 13, 2013 THE WESTIN COCKTAILS - HORS D’OEUVRES - POINSETT DINNER THE WESTIN POINSETT TIE - VALET PARKING Office@guildgso.org BLACK BLACK TIE -BLACK VALET TIE - VALET PARKING PARKING Office@guildgso.org THE WESTIN POINSETT O BENEFIT THE G REENVILLE SOffice@guildgso.org YMPHONY370-0965 OR T OLIVE BENEFIT THE G REENVILLE SYMPHONY SILENTT& AUCTIONS TOP HAT BAND SYMPHONY TO BENEFIT THE GREENVILLE

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COCKTAILS - HORS D’OEUVRES - DINNER RSVP BY FEBRUA COCKTAILS - HORS D’OEUVRES - DINNER 2013 RSVP FEBRUARY 13, 2013 FEBRUARY 23, COCKTAILS - HORS D’OEUVRES - DINNER RSVP BYBY FEBRUARY 13, 2013 COCKTAILS - HORS D’OEUVRES - DINNER SILENT LIVE AUCTIONS - TOP HAT BAND COCKTAILS - HORS D’OEUVRES -BAND DINNER SILENT && LIVE AUCTIONS - TOP HAT SILENT & LIVE AUCTIONS - TOP HAT BAND BLACK TIE VALET PARKING SILENTBLACK & LIVETIEAUCTIONS - TOP HAT BAND - VALET PARKING BLACK TIE - VALET PARKING

SILENT & LIVE AUCTIONS - TOP HAT BAND

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370-0965 6:00 PM David Drake: Potter and Poet BLACK TIE - VALET PARKING Office@guild THE WESTIN POINSETT of Edgefield District TO BENEFIT THE GREENVILLE SYMPHONY BLACK TIE - VALET PARKING

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COCKTAILS - HORS D’OEUVRES - DINNER RSVP BY FEBRUA Explore the legacy SILENT & LIVE AUCTIONS - TOP HAT BAND 370-0965 of David Drake– BLACK TIE - VALET PARKING Office@guild legally enslaved, illegally literate, living, and creating, in 19 th -century South Carolina. Greenville County Museum of Art 420 College Street Greenville, SC 29601 864.271.7570 admission free gcma.org

Contact Vincent Harris at vharris@communityjournals.com.

FEBRUARY 1, 2013 | The Journal 27


journal culture

scene. here.

the week in the local arts world

Rick Alviti will present a tribute to Elvis on Feb. 2, 7:30 p.m. at the Fountain Inn Center for the Visual and Performing Arts. Alviti’s show, “That’s the Way it Was,” is full of audience interaction. Tickets are $25-$30 and are available at www.ftinnarts.org or 864-409-1050.

6 p.m., and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., or by appointment. For more information, call 864-804-6501 or visit www.westmainartists.org.

The Spartanburg Youth Theatre will begin the spring semester of its 2013 Theatre Education Program with an array of classes starting the week of Feb. 11. SYT classes are available for students in grades 4K to 12. The Spartanburg Youth Theatre has scholarship opportunities available for those who require financial assistance. To sign up for a class or for more information, call 864-585-8278 or visit www.spartanburgyouththeatre.com.

The Greenville Little Theatre proudly presents nationally renowned pianist Emile Pandolfi in concert on Valentine’s Day, Feb. 14, at 8 p.m. Joining Pandolfi on stage is noted soprano Dana Russell. Order tickets online at www.greenvillelittletheatre. org or call the box office at 864-233- Pandolfi 6238. Tickets are $40, which includes a pre-concert reception starting at 6:45 p.m. including hors d’oeuvres, chocolate and champagne. For more information, visit www.greenvillelittletheatre.org.

The West Main Artists Co-Op will feature two new art exhibits, “Happy Home” by Robin Childers and “Watercolor Patchwork: An Artist’s Path” by Dr. Mary Lou Hightower. Childers is a fine-art printmaker who primarily creates silk screen prints. Hightower is primarily a watercolor artist. The exhibits will feature new and old works of art by each artist. The exhibition will run through Feb. 9. The West Main Artists Co-Op’s regular hours are Thursday and Friday, 3 to

Greenville County Museum of Art will have William H. Johnson’s “Native Son” and Merton Simpson’s “Confrontations” on exhibit Feb. 6-Sept. 29. Johnson’s exhibition surveys his career from his early Paris works to his later 1940s recollections of his boyhood in South Carolina. Powerful and poignant, the largescale paintings of artist Merton Simpson offer a contemporaneous glimpse of the horror of the Harlem race riots and the Orangeburg Massacre.

Carolina Ballet Theatre will present “Made in the Carolinas,” a debut performance featuring world premiere pieces by CBT’s artistic director and company members. The ballet will take place Feb. 9 at 7:30 p.m. at the Fountain Inn Center for Visual and Performing Arts. Tickets are $15 for adults and $12 for students. To purchase tickets or for more information, call 864409-1050 or visit www.ftinnarts.org. Erika Grace Powell, Furman graduate, voice talent, Miss South Carolina and Miss America contestant, will perform at Centre Stage on Feb. 12, 7 p.m. For more information, call 864-233-6733 or visit www. centrestage.org. Gallery East in Spartanburg will host local artist Bailie’s new exhibit, “In the Valley of the Shadow Omo,” through Feb. 16. With 12 main sculptures and a variety of ceramic bowls, Bailie has captured the essence of the main 12 tribes in the African region of Omo. Created from natural materials, such as clay, wood and shells, the representative statue for each tribe is as historically accurate as possible. The exhibit is open to the public Tuesday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturdays 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. For more information, call 864-497-8677.

Steve Martin and the Steep Canyon Rangers featuring Edie Brickell

Thursday, May 30th 7:30pm This Grammy-winning, bluegrass banjoist, composer and comedian returns to the Peace Center! SteveMartin.com

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PEACE CONCERT HALL 28 THE Journal | FEBRUARY 1, 2013

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journal culture

Artisphere hits record numbers Fine arts show ranked among top 10 in country scheduled for May 10-12 By Cindy Landrum | staff

This year’s Artisphere will have a decidedly new and local flavor. Fifty-six of the 120 artists selected for Artist Row will be new to the festival, one that earned a Top 10 ranking on Greg Lawler’s annual Art Fair Sourcebook, an annual publication that ranks the top 600 arts shows across the country on the basis of artist net sales. Exhibiting artists at last year’s Artisphere reported average sales of $5,865, a record for the eight-year-old festival. The festival was ranked seventh in the Sourcebook’s fine art category and 10th in the fine craft category. It’s the second time in four years that the festival earned a spot in the top 10; the sixth time in the top 50. Festivals ranking above Artisphere include the La Quinta Arts Festival in La Quinta, Calif.; Art on the Square in Bel-

leville, Ill.; Cherry Creek Arts Festival in Denver; Art in the Pearl in Portland, Ore.; the St. Louis Art Fair in St. Louis; and the Plaza Art Fair, Kansas City, Mo. “Locals and visitors will really enjoy this year’s Artist Row,” said Artisphere Board President Judith Aughtry. “They are amazingly talented and diverse; there is something for everyone.” And there will be a record number of local artists in Artisphere, a juried festival. Thirteen artists are from Greenville County: Kent Ambler, printmaking/graphics; Beth Andrews, emerging artist, fiber; Joseph Bradley, 2-D mixed media; Chris Bruner, photography; Tami Cardenella, painting: oil and acrylic; Janina Ellis, painting: oil and acrylic; Lynn Greer, painting: watercolor; Marie Gruber, photography; Signe and Genna Grushovenko, painting: oil and acrylic; Danielle Miller-Gilliam, precious jewelry; Llyn Strong, precious jewelry; Diana Farfan, emerging artist, sculpture; and Judy Verhoeven, 2-D mixed media. A list of all of the Artist Row artists and links to their websites is available at www.artisphere.us. In addition to a fine arts show that includes 17 different media categories,

The Greenville Chorale’s Chamber Ensemble will present “Music for the Soul,” featuring “Requiem” by Gabriel Fauré with other chamber music selections on Feb. 17, 2 p.m., in Daniel Chapel at Furman University. For tickets, call 864-467-3000. The Warehouse Theatre presents “Eurydice” by Sarah Ruhl through Feb. 16. In addition, the Warehouse Theatre will host a discussion with Furman’s Dr. Nick Radel before the show on Feb. 14. Talkbacks, a discussion with the cast and director, will take place immediately after the first matinee on Feb. 14. Admission to the talkbacks is free to ticket holders. To get tickets, call 864-2356948 or visit www.warehousetheatre.com. Centre Stage will hold auditions for “The Fox on the Fairway” by Ken Ludwig. The cast calls for three men and three women. Auditions will take place on Feb. 17 from 6 to 9 p.m. at Centre Stage. A headshot and resume are necessary for audition. Auditions

"WinterScape" by Steve Marlow. Photo image on fabric, 54x36. Can be viewed at Cafe at Williams Hardware, 13 South Main St., Travelers Rest. Want to see your artwork here? Send a high-res image to arts@ communityjournals.com.

are by appointment only and performers must be prepared to read from the script. To make an appointment to audition or for more information, email glenda.manwaring@centrestage.org. Brenda Leonard on cello and Kimberlee Turnbough on piano will present a concert on Feb. 19 at 7 p.m. in Hamlin Recital Hall at North

‘Doubt: A Parable’ keeps audiences in suspense By Jeanne putnam | contributor

Sidewalk artist Anthony Cappetto works on a chalk drawing on the sidewalk next to the Reedy River at Artisphere 2012.

Artisphere also features four performing arts stages, a culinary arts cafe that showcases local restaurants, a children’s area, a juried art exhibition for Upstate artists, wine tasting and an opening night gala. Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com. Greenville University. This recital features two sonatas for cello and piano by Beethoven and Shostakovich. Leonard is faculty cellist at North Greenville University and Turnbough is on the faculty at Newberry College in Newberry. Tickets are required and will be available Feb. 4. For more information, call 864-977-7085 or email theatre@ngu.edu. Art & Light Gallery will feature the work of Algie (A.C.) Curry Brown, Feb. 8-28 with an opening reception on Feb. 8, 6-9 p.m. Brown’s “His Bye Gone Days” series of paintings concentrates on the South in the Great Depression and the Silent Generation into which he was born. A special painting of “Shoeless” Joe Jackson will be sold in a silent auction format with proceeds benefiting the Greenville County Historical Society. For more information, visit www.artandlightgallery.com or call 864-363-8172. Send us your arts announcement. Email: arts@communityjournals.com

Mystery, suspicion and intrigue are all words that come to mind when describing Furman Theatre’s latest play, “Doubt: A Parable.” John Patrick Shanley’s award-winning play, made a household name by the 2008 film starring Meryl Streep and Philip Seymour Hoffman, takes place in a Catholic school in 1964. However, Shanley only leaves one solid clue about the year in the script. That, combined with the simplicity of Furman’s set and the traditional costumes chosen for the clergy, make the story almost seem timeless. Father Flynn, portrayed by Furman computer science professor Kevin Treu, reveals early in the play that it is one year after President John F. Kennedy’s assassination. Once the audience learns that, the story starts to fall into place. The play mirrors the 1960s as a time when the old traditions were being challenged with the Civil Rights Movement and other social crusades. The centerpiece of the story is school principal Sister Aloysius Beauvier’s belief that something suspicious is going on when Flynn takes a special interest in the school’s only minority student. “Sister Aloysius represents old-school correctness and is fighting against change,” said Caroline Davis, the Furman senior who is playing the role. It is this fight that pits Sister Aloysius against Sister James, portrayed by Furman freshman Lizzie Dockery. “Sister James is the new nun at the school and she is young and innocent,” said Dockery. “The best part about playing her is that it is a great way to practice reacting to other actors.” Despite their differences, both nuns find themselves questioning the motives behind Father Flynn’s personal attention towards student Donald Miller. Based on those concerns, the play builds on the doubt both feel – most particularly Sister Aloysius – regarding Flynn’s true intentions, leaving the audience to wonder if he is guilty or innocent. “Doubt: A Parable” will run as a nine-act show with no intermission on Feb. 7-9 and Feb. 13-16 at 8 p.m., and Feb. 10 at 3 p.m. at the Furman Playhouse on Furman University’s campus. Tickets are $16 for general admission, $13 for seniors and $8 for students. For ticket information and reservations, call the theatre box office at 864-294-2125. Contact Jeanne Putnam at jputnam@communityjournals.com.

FEBRUARY 1, 2013 | The Journal 29


JOURNAL CULTURE

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Arts Calendar Fine Arts Center A Taste of the Fine Arts Feb. 1 ~ 355-2550 SC Children’s Theatre Charlotte’s Web Feb. 1-10 ~ 467-3000 Fountain Inn Arts Center Rick Alviti’s A Tribute to Elvis Feb. 2 ~ 409-1050 Furman University Theatre Doubt Feb. 7-16 ~ 294-2125 Furman University Thompson Gallery Andrew Wrangle Photography Through Feb. 8 ~ 294-2074 Metropolitan Arts Council Gallery Counterpoints: Form & Space Through Feb. 15 ~ 467-3132 The Warehouse Theatre Eurydice Through Feb. 16 ~ 235-6948

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Centre Stage Rock ‘n Roll Forever: The ’80-s Edition Through Feb. 23 ~ 233-6733

Feb. 1 – 7, 2013 Greenville County Museum of Art Here’s Your Freedom Through Feb. 24 ~ 271-7570 The Art of Helen Moseley Through Apr. 14 ~ 271-7570 Greenville Chamber of Commerce Works by Lynn Greer & Liz Rundorff Smith Through Mar. 1 ~ 242-1050 Metro. Arts Council at Centre Stage Works by Georgia Harrison Through Mar. 4 ~ 233-6733 Fine Arts Center Textile Artist Terry Diamond Through Mar. 22 ~ 355-2550 BJU Museum & Gallery at Heritage Green From Rublev to Faberge Ongoing ~ 770-1372


JOURNAL HOMES F E AT U R E D H O M E S & N E I G H B O R H O O D S | O P E N H O U S E S | P R O P E R T Y T R A N S F E R S

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FEBRUARY 1, 2013 | T H E J O U R N A L 31


F E A T U R E D OPEN

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This beautiful 4 bedroom, 3 bathroom home is located on a cul-de-sac street in the desirable River Walk neighborhood and backs to the walking trail. Home has been impeccably cared for. Sellers added a 12x28 sun room with a sunken hot tub & bead board ceiling and a 3rd bay detached garage with additional storage. Hardwood floors throughout most of main level that were refinished in December 2012. The home has the perfect flow with a large living room, dining room and the kitchen and breakfast room open to the great room with gas log fireplace and sun room. The kitchen has beautiful cherry cabinets, granite counter tops, tile back splash, Jenn Air oven and microwave and a 4 burner gas cook top. There is also a built in desk. There is a bedroom on the main level with a full bathroom, which could also be used as a study. Upstairs you will find the master suite, 2 additional bedrooms, plus a large bonus room, which could also be a 5th bedroom. There are hardwood floors in the hallway, master bedroom and bonus room. The carpet was recently replaced in the other bedrooms. The large master suite has a huge walk in closet that was designed by HOME INFO California Closets. The master bath has a jetted tub, double sinks and Price: $485,000 | MLS#1251171 separate shower. Yard is beautifully 4 Bedrooms, 3 Baths, 3800-3999SF landscaped with stone walls and can be enjoyed from the sun room and Monarch Elementary patio. This home is move in ready! Mauldin Middle River Walk boasts award winning Mauldin High schools, clubhouse, pool, swim team, Contact: Olivia Grube tennis courts, playground and walking 864.385.9087 trails that weave throughout the Prudential C. Dan Joyner, Co. neighborhood.

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523 CHAMBLEE BLVD - $769,000 4BR/4BA. Beautiful home under construction in gated community. MBR and 2nd BR + Study on main. Upstairs-2BR/2BA + Bonus. 385 S to Roper Mtn exit, L off ramp, go 5 miles to Right into SD on Chamblee Blvd. Margaret Marcum/Leigh Irwin, 4203125/380-7755 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1252608

23 DEER TRACK RD - $485,000 4 SHADOW POINT COURT - $304,000 5BR/3BA. Stunning brick home w/3 car 3BR/2.5BA. OPEN HOUSE! Brick Home with garage. Beautiful kit w/cherry cabs. Lg 3/bed.2 ba./2 half ba.On Cul-de-sac in heart sunroom w/sunken hot tub. Hwy 14 to Five of Simpsonville. New Kitchen/Paint/Windows. Forks Rd, turn on Parkside Dr, L on River Screened in porch overlooking landscaped Walk Dr, L on Rockberry Terrace, R on Deer backyard! Come take a look this Sunday! Track. Olivia Grube, 385-9087 Prudential C. Karen Lawton, 444-7004 Keller Williams Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1251171 Upstate MLS#1244619

213 BERGEN COURT - $259,000 3BR/2.5BA. Great brick front single story home with a bonus! 3 bedrooms with 2.5 baths featuring a dramatic 2 story foyer. The open floor plan has great quality and detail featuring a vaulted ceiling. Janet Sandifer, 864-979-6713 Carol Pyfrom Realty MLS#1252452

21 BEAUDON CT - $249,900 3BR/2.5BA. Professionally designed and upgraded. Must see! South to Hwy 417 toward Simpsonville, Left to Hwy 14, Left @ Light, Right on Harts Ln, Left into SD. Beth French, 386-6003 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1252861

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33 DONEMERE WAY - $199,900 3BR/2.5BA. craftsman style, Energy Star home. Upgradees & advanced technology. 385 S to Exit 23, Hwy 418. Go apprx. 1/2 mile and turn Left. Turn Right at light on S. Main, Go 1/2 mile & turn Left into SD Kate Anderson/Kristin Brady, 363-3634/9087200 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1249245

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20 HEATHER STONE CT - $193,700 4BR/2.5BA. Great home in great location. Master on 2nd level. Quiet culdesac location. Great amenities. 385 South to Exit 26, Right off ramp, Left into SD @ light, Right on Heatherstone. Tim Keagy, 905-3304 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1243254

32 T H E J O U R N A L | FEBRUARY 1, 2013

WATERTON

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324 WATERTON WAY - $177,500 4BR/2.5BA. Very nice, move-in ready home convenient to everything! Over 1/2 acre! Great flrplan w/lg open kitchen! Fenced & more! 385 S to Exit 26, R on Harrison Bridge, at 2nd light Left on Waterton into SD. Carolyn Laws-Irwin, 451-9407 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1249619

SUN 2-4PM (2/3)

100 COBB HALL CT - $177,000 3BR/2.5BA. Charming home in great location. New hardwoods andceramic tile. Great floor plan. Butler Rd, right on Tanner Rd, right into s/d on Old Hall Ln, 1st right on Cobb Hall, home on right. Scott Holtzclaw, 884-6783 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1248401

SHARON PLACE

SUN 2-4PM (2/3)

205 PIKE CT - $217,500 4BR/3BA. Spacious home with 2 masters. Wonderful location. Large deck. Deep fenced backyard. A must see! Butler Rd to Right on Tanner, Left into SD on Burdock, Right on Pike. Tim Keagy, 905-3304 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1251879

SUN 2-4PM (2/3)

100 MULBERRY STREET - $109,900 3BR/2BA. Walk to downtown Greer from this cute cottage. Loads of updates. Lg kitchen, hdwds, master on main. 85 North to Hwy 14, Lt over bridge into DT Greer, L on McCall @ CPW, R on Mulberry, Home on Left. Ryan Carlson, 320-5366 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1251005

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL


F E A T U R E D PREMIER

PROPERTIES

H O M E

C U R R E N T LY

ON

THE

MARKET

THIS WEEK’S FEATURED HOME

O 2 Quail Hill Court, Parkins Mill Area, Greenville Another fine home by Oasis Custom Homes! The ONLY brand new home in the sought after Parkins Mill Area! This Low Country style brick home is convenient to Downtown, ICAR, I-85, excellent local schools, and to CCES. Set on private 0.84 acre level lot, this home features 10 ft ceilings on the main floor, 9 ft upstairs, and site finished hardwoods throughout the first floor (including the Master Bedroom and Bath). The Master is spacious and secluded, with separate His & Hers granite vanities, and shower

ASIS CUSTOM HOMES

with body spray and rain head. Two fireplaces, one in the Great Room, one in the Screened porch. Four Bedrooms and three full Baths up (all Baths have granite vanities), plus versatile Bonus/Rec Room. Front and back stairs. Circular and side drives. Three car attached garage. The open Kitchen features granite counters, custom cabinetry, top of the line stainless appliances, breakfast bar, and Breakfast Room with built in window seat. There is nothing “spec” about this inviting home, ready this spring! Still time to customize to your personal taste!

More photos, info and over 1,900 neighborhoods online at

HOME INFO PRICE: $799,607 | MLS# 1249555 5 Bedrooms, 4.5 Baths, Abt. 5000 SF Brand New Construction, Low Country Style Brick Home with a 3 Car Garage Contact: Joan Herlong 864.325.2112 Joan@AugustaRoad.com AugustaRoad.com Realty, LLC Send us your Featured Home for consideration: homes@greenvillejournal.com

207 Abbot Trail 29605 – 200 Rock Creek Drive 29605 – 114 Woodland Way 29601 – 6 Riverside Drive 29605~ 108 Mt Vista Ave 29605 – 10 Riverside Drive 29605 – 841 Raven Road 29356 – 5 Club Drive 29605 – 21 Sylvan Drive 29605 – 215 Melville Ave 29605 – 337 Riverside Drive 29605 – 106 Mt Vista Ave 29605 – 218 E. Augusta Place 29605 – 15 Timbers Edge Way 29690 – 18 Lawson Way 29605 – 2 Quail Hill Court 29607 – 36 Dogwood Lane 29607 – 202 Rock Creek Drive 29605 – 40 Dogwood Lane 29607 – 31 Gossamer Place 29607 – 100 Boxwood Lane 29601 – 111 Melville Ave 29605 – 22 Foggy Ridge Way 29690 – 25 Sylvan Drive 29605 – 218 Melville Ave 29605 – 35 Douglas Drive 29605 – 8 Riverside Drive 29605 – 427 McIver St 29601 – 408 Chapman Road 29605 – 417 East Seven Oaks 29605 – 112 Upper Ridge Way 29690 – 2 Riverside Drive 29605 – 501 East Seven Oaks 29605 – 423 Alexander Road 29650 – 705 McDaniel Ave 29605 – 209 Oregon St 29605 – 140 Lake Point Drive 29687 – 44 Lanneau Drive 29605 – 117 Capers St 29605 – 28 Conestee Ave 29605 – 26 Byrd Blvd 29605 – 7 Club Drive 29605 – 207 Robinson Street 29609 – 14 Lawson Way 29605 – 1606 N. Main St 29609 – 117 Aldridge Drive 29607 – 205 Terra Woods 29615 – 25 Club Drive 29605 – 27 Rock Creek Drive 29605 – 341 Riverside Drive 29605 – 102 Jones Ave 29601 – 8 Waccamaw Circle 29605 – 3 Foxwood Lane 29687 – 105 S Almond Drive 29681 – 29 Sylvan Drive 29605 – 301 Buckland Way 29615 – 215 South Ladyslipper Lane 29650 – 9 Snapdragon Way 29356 – 101 High Rock Ridge 29356 – 1 Touch Me Not Trail 29356 – 37 Douglas Drive 29605 – 94 Eagle Rock Road 29356 – 435Alexander Road 29650 – 10 Lavender Lane 29356 – 20 Aurora Trail 29356 – 308 Lake Hills Lane 29690 – 4 Riverside Drive 29605 – 50 Secret Hollow Trail 29661 – 27 Sylvan Drive 29605 – 323 Mountain Summit Road 29690 – 940 Laurelwood Marketed exclusively by Joan Herlong, BIC 864-325-2112 AugustaRoad.com oasiscustomhomes.com · 864-292-5901 Way 29356 – 32 Gossamer Place 29607 – 596 Old Chapman Bridge Road 29685 – 220 E. Augusta Place 29605 – 105 Winding Oaks Way 29690

NEW CONSTRUCTION,

O

ASIS CUSTOM HOMES

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

RENOVATIONS

& COMPLETE

DESIGN/BUILD SERVICES

FEBRUARY 1, 2013 | T H E J O U R N A L 33


N E I G H B O R H O O D STERLING

P R O F I L E

R EA L E STAT E D I G E ST PEOPLE,

ESTATES

AWARDS,

HONORS

Carlson Joins Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS®

Carlson

January 3, 2013 – Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS® is pleased to announce that Ryan Carlson has joined the company and serves as a sales associate at the Garlington Road office.

Originally from Irving, Texas, Carlson graduated from Irving High School. Prior to joining C. Dan Joyner Company, he

served as Construction Manager for Fluor Corporation. “We are excited to have Ryan join our family of Realtors,” said Donna Smith, Broker-in-Charge of the Garlington Road office. Carlson currently lives in Greenville with his wife, Dunya and four children, Adam, Matthew, Amber and LaCosta. In his free time, he enjoys motorcycles, NASCAR, scuba

Rex Galloway Joins Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS® January 9, 2013 – Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS® is pleased to announce that Rex Galloway has joined the company and serves as a sales Galloway associate with The Greenville Team at the Pelham Road office.

Sterling Estates, Boiling Springs Sterling Estates is the perfect place to call home! This neighborhood offers newly constructed, beautiful homes in traditional, craftsman and cottage style architecture that feature Hardie plank with brick and stone construction and spacious backyards as well as access to community amenities. Sterling Estates is conveniently located off of Highway 9 with easy access to I-85, I-26 and

downtown Spartanburg and is close to the highly ranked District 2 schools as well as shopping and more! Sterling Estates has a wonderful community pool and clubhouse for you to enjoy. You will look forward to entertaining friends and family at Sterling Estates!

NEIGHBORHOOD INFO 12 Month Average Home Price: $275,000 Sq Ft Range: 1900-3600 SF Amenities: Swimming Pool, Clubhouse, Recreation Area

Over 1,900 neighborhoods online at 34 T H E J O U R N A L | FEBRUARY 1, 2013

Schools: Boiling Springs Elementary Boiling Springs Junior High Boiling Springs High School

A Greenville native, Galloway graduated from Wade Hampton High School and earned his BS degree from University of South Carolina in Columbia. With 25 years of experience, Galloway has earned the designations as Graduate, REALTOR Institute (GRI),

Certified Seller Representative (CSR), Accredited Buyer’s Representative (ABR), and Broker. “We are pleased to have Rex join our family of Realtors,” said Tim Toates, Broker-in-Charge of the Pelham Road office. Galloway currently lives in Taylors with his wife, Kary and children Logan and Lacy. In his free time, he enjoys activities with his family, (especially equestrian and music with his children) and fishing. Galloway is actively involved at Taylors First Baptist Church, River of Life Outreach ministries and Healing P.O.T.S. (people on the streets).

Kary Galloway Joins Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS® January 9, 2013 – Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS® is pleased to announce that Kary H. Galloway has joined the company and serves at the Galloway Pelham Road office as a sales associate with The Greenville Team. A Greenville native, Galloway graduated from Wade Hampton High School and the University of South Carolina in Columbia. She works with her husband, Rex, as The Greenville

Team and has 23 years of experience in real estate. “We are pleased to have Kary join us at C. Dan Joyner Company,” said Tim Toates, Broker-in-Charge. “We look forward to working with The Greenville Team.” Galloway lives in Taylors with her husband and two children Logan and Lacy. In her free time, she enjoys church and family activities, especially involving music and horses. Galloway is an active volunteer with the children’s programs and teaching at Taylors First Baptist Church.

Doug Keel joins Carol Pyfrom Realty January 24, 2013 – Carol Pyfrom Realty is pleased to announce the addition of Doug Keel as a new REALTOR to their team. Keel comes to Carol Pyfrom Realty from Allstate Insurance where he served as a agency owner for the last 15 years. He successfully established a strong insurance business from scratch

in 1998 and was voted best of the upstate in 2000 by the readers of The Greenville News. Keel currently serves on the Family Selection Committee for Habitat for Humanity and has a lawn maintenance route for Diligent Hands Gracious Hearts. SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL


GREENVILLE TRANSACTIONS JANUARY SUBD. COBBLESTONE DEERFIELD DALEWOOD HEIGHTS CLIFFS VALLEY KNOLLWOOD HUNTERS RIDGE NORTH PARK OAK CREST AT AUGUSTA BENNETTS CROSSING GOWER ESTATES

CHANTICLEER TOWNS GRESHAM PARK HIGHGROVE ASHETON PENNINGTON PARK

CREEKWOOD KNIGHTS BRIDGE

HERITAGE POINT CARRINGTON GREEN SILVERLEAF PELHAM ESTATES HOLLINGTON THE TOWNES AT HIGHGROVE GILDER CHASE HIGHLAND CREEK HOLLINGSWORTH PARK AT VERDAE HOLLINGSWORTH PARK AT VERDAE HEARTHSTONE AT RIVER SHOALS PELHAM SPRINGS CROSSGATE AT REMINGTON CAROLINA SPRINGS CAROLINA SPRINGS HENDERSON FOREST BRENTMOOR CASTLE ROCK HUNTERS RIDGE WOODRUFF HALTON PROFESSIONAL PARK COPPER CREEK PEMBERTON PLACE ENCLAVE AT LEXINGTON PLACE HOLLY TRACE FORRESTER HEIGHTS DOVE TREE TETON FOREST BALDWIN FOREST MORNING MIST FARM MILL POND AT RIVER SHOALS TOWNES AT BROOKWOOD TREYBERN SOUTHAMPTON LENHARDT VILLAGE RIVERSIDE FOXDALE RIVER RIDGE KALEDON ACRES MAPLE GROVE POPLAR FOREST BLACKSTONE THORNBLADE CROSSING LISMORE VILLAGE BALDWIN FOREST EAST HIGHLANDS ESTATES COACH HILLS MAPLE CREEK BEECHWOOD THE VALLEY AT TANNER ESTATES COLLEGE HEIGHTS RIVER RUN SOUTHAMPTON GLENDALE AUTUMN HILLS STONEBRIDGE CRESCENTWOOD VILLAGE BLACKSTONE

7-11,

2013

AUGUST

PRICE

SELLER

BUYER

ADDRESS

$28,800,000 $1,425,000 $745,875 $677,066 $670,000 $650,000 $640,000 $525,000 $520,000 $470,000 $456,375 $450,000 $435,001 $400,000 $400,000 $380,000 $364,000 $357,500 $346,000 $332,000 $330,000 $325,000 $312,630 $312,452 $307,500 $296,000 $289,900 $287,900 $275,000 $275,000 $275,000 $264,900 $258,000 $245,000 $239,977 $234,450 $234,200 $225,000 $225,000 $224,427 $219,000 $219,000 $218,000 $217,824 $216,350 $200,000 $195,000 $194,944 $187,500 $186,000 $175,000 $175,000 $175,000 $168,103 $165,466 $152,000 $150,000 $148,500 $147,000 $146,580 $139,000 $138,500 $133,130 $130,000 $129,990 $128,710 $128,005 $125,000 $125,000 $125,000 $122,500 $120,000 $120,000 $120,000 $119,850 $119,000 $118,000 $116,000 $113,500 $112,000 $110,000 $110,000 $110,000 $100,000 $100,000 $100,000 $100,000

PLAZAGREEN LIMITED PARTN JOHNSTON LAURA AKINS CYNTHIA CRUDUP OIL COMPANY WALLHAUS ROBERT A GREEN DEER PROPERTIES LL HR REAL ESTATE DEVELOPME HENDLEY HARRIETT S TRUST MSNSAI LLC ABERNETHY RICHARD MELVIN DRAYTON MANAGEMEN DUGGAN DANIEL S (JTWROS) CRAIG SCOTT E TOMBSTONE LLC TATE GEORGE E TCT PROPERTIES LLC NIKOLICH BRIAN GAINES JEFFREY GARDEN SPOT #5 LLC ANDERSON HOMES AND CONST WALLACE ROBERT WADE WILSON CANDACE C BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT MOON-MCMANUS LLC GREENVILLE FIRST BANK N BACHMAN FRED P BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT GERMANO ALLISON K SUBER W JOHN REIMERS ROSA REVOCABLE T VENTROLA TODD S (JTWROS) NVR INC BROWN LANE PROPERTIES LL APK REAL ESTATE LLC HAGEMANN BRAD J VERDAE DEVELOPMENT INC VERDAE DEVELOPMENT INC WILSON DARIUS H DEGRUELLE ALBERT P (JTWR D R HORTON INC WESTBROOK JAMES DANIEL BROOKFIELD RELOCATION IN TOMLINSON BARBARA B D R HORTON INC SK BUILDERS INC SNIPES AUDREY J WOODRUFF HALTON PROFESSI MUNGO HOMES INC WHICKER DONALD W BROWN F ALLENE OLSON MICHAEL A DISHER CHRISTINA L SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND HOLLAND ELIZABETH M CUSTOM DESIGN BUILDERS I NICEWONGER RALPH E LOVELACE CHARLES SR RIVER SHOALS LLC BROOKWOOD TOWNES LLC BRADSHAW BRENDA W SOUTHAMPTON DEVELOPMENT UNIQUE LOGIC LLC WEATHERS EARL L LAMONT STEVEN EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL SK BUILDERS INC VILLADA ANA ISABEL MILLS BRIAN D CORNERSTONE NATIONAL BAN NELSON MATTHEW H ANDERSON EXCAVATING INC STACK PATRICK FREEMAN GEORGE MICHAEL J KNIGHT PROPERTY GROUP LL HILL CHARLES A SR SMITH KATHLEEN J BIXBY DONNA RUTH MMB DEVELOPMENT NINE L P RYLL GRETCHEN LEPPER CODY SOUTHAMPTON DEVELOPMENT ASHWORTH MICHAEL JEFFERSON GROUP LLC THE AHO TIMOTHY A WATERS ALISON D PARAS BERNADETTE D CORNERSTONE NATIONAL BAN

KRG PLAZA GREEN LLC SUBER W JOHN JR BANK OF AMERICA N A MARTIMER LLC MOTTI GARY MATTICE KATHERINE O (JTW BK RESIDENTIAL VENTURES CLIFF HAWK PROPERTIES LL KGH LLC KNIGHT JOHN R DOLL DONALD FREDRICK UMBERGER JENNIFER B (JTW FIRST CAROLINA TRUST OF ELLS MARK K FAIREY JILL D (JTWROS) EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL OCONNELL ANNAMARIA T (JT STONE FINANCING LLC TS GROCERY LLC SIMPSON ADAM R (SURV) BLESSING JOHN C (JTWROS) SAYLER CHAD M RISHER JOHN CLEAR FOCUS HOLDINGS LLC CHONG SUNG GOO (JTWROS) NEASE LESLIE A (JTWROS) FREEMAN TERA FIELD AMANDA J (JTWROS) FARYNA STACEY LYN (JTWRO RIMER DOROTHY K LUNEAU MICHAEL J KUPEC HERBERT A (JTWROS) GRAY REALTY AND DEVELOPM GAUTAM HOLDINGS LLC MELLON JESSE THOMAS SCHULTE BRAD SCHULTE BRAD FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG DORAN RICHARD S REYES PETER BRYANT BROOKFIELD RELOCATION IN GLENN DENISE L MCKNIGHT JEAN S STRATTON SUE E FULFORD GREGORY P (JTWRO GILBERT CLAUDINE GARRETT MANNING KUPPINGER JOHN C (JTWROS ADAMS MARY K (JTWROS) MAGG NORMAN (JTWROS) FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG ZIABCHENKO ANDREI V (JTW WESSEL JOHN FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG WELLS JOHN R JASPER MARTIN J WELLS FARGO BANK N A NVR INC STONE CAROL J PIERCE DONALD E JR (JTWR STONELEDGE PROPERTIES LL SOMERS GREGORY BRET (JTW ROGERS GEORGE F GREEN STEPHEN A DENNIS LITASHA R BAGHERI SOLO 401K TRUST LVS TITLE TRUST I JPMORGAN CHASE BANK NATI JAY COX CONSTRUCTION LLC WELLS FARGO BANK N A DORRITY LINDSAY R ROE DAVID H WELLS FARGO BANK N A CRH PROPERTIES LLC EMC MORTGAGE LLC WIKTOR JERZY WACLAW GONZALES CYNTHIA KATHERI BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT ESPOSITO RONALD RICHARDSON MICHAEL L (JT STONELEDGE PROPERTIES LL HAWKINS PROPERTIES OF TR AMERICAN PRIDE PROPERTIE FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGA BANK OF AMERICA N A JPMORGAN CHASE BANK NATI JAY COX CONSTRUCTION LLC

30 S MERIDIAN ST STE 1100 624 BRIXTON CIR 102 CAPE ANN AVE 1618 FAIRVIEW RD 72 LONG COVE DR 114 MEYERS DR PO BOX 1039 19 W STONE AVE 201 OLD BOILING SPRINGS RD STE 17 OAK CREST CT 484 S BENNETTS BRIDGE RD 330 HENDERSON RD 4113 E NORTH ST 34 RICHLAND CREEK DR 103 HIDDEN HILLS DR 2857 WESTPORT RD 112 GRENADIER CT 16260 N 71ST ST 3 ALTAMONT CT 212 COUNTRY MIST DR 307 W PARK AVE 618 PHILLIPS RD 432 RIVER SUMMIT DR 101 JACK ST 1041 PARKINS MILL RD 1740 LITTLE TEXAS RD 393 HERITAGE POINT DR 130 CHADLEY WAY 14 CROSSWINDS WAY 210 REDCLIFFE RD 344 ABBEY GARDENS LN 219 BICKLEIGH CT 424 S YORK ST PO BOX 288 111 DUNROBIN LN 49 SHADWELL ST 49 SHADWELL ST 14221 DALLAS PKWY STE 100 146 PELHAM SPRINGS PL 103 BRADBOURNE WAY 16260 N 71ST ST 232 PHEASANT WAY 28 DAHLGLEN AVE 217 CANNON CIR 104 CAYANNE CT 121 GRAMERCY CT 403 N MAIN ST 7 KENNARD CT 206 KINARD WAY 307 LEXINGTON PLACE WAY 14221 DALLAS PKWY STE 100 253 BARBOURS LN 109 STURBRIDGE DR 14221 DALLAS PKWY STE 100 13020 AMBERLEY CT APT 308 3 TRIDENT CT 3476 STATEVIEW BLVD 30 PATEWOOD DR STE 257 42 BAY SPRINGS DR 621 SUMMERVILLE WAY PO BOX 80974 8 CARDONA CT 101 HEATHWOOD DR 8 PIMA CT 109 TRUMPETER LN 225 BRIAR CREEK RD 60 LIVINGSTON AVE 3415 VISION DR PO BOX 881 3476 STATEVIEW BLVD 19 SWADE WAY PO BOX 8711 3476 STATEVIEW BLVD 931 SQUIRES POINTE 2 OFFICE PARK CT STE 103 411 GOLDEN LEAF LN 19 CAROLINE DR PO BOX 1039 111 BATESVIEW DR 17 RIVER WATCH DR PO BOX 80974 PO BOX 1087 940 CENTRE CIRCLE STE 2005 3415 VISION DR 2000 CENTER POINT RD STE 2375 3415 VISION DR PO BOX 881

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

S PA RTA N B U RG T R A N SAC T I O N S SUBD.

WOODFIN RIDGE WILLOW CREEK BRIAR CREEK SPRING POINT COAL CREEK TURTLE CREEK SPRINGLAKE HOLDEN POINT SHENANDOAH III CORIE CREST

CYPRESS CREEK THE VILLAGE AT BENT CREEK SPRING LAKE CARLTON CREEK HOLLY MEADOWS SPRING LAKE WOODRIDGE SPRING LAKE GLENLAKE OAKS AT ROCK SPRINGS WHITE SPRINGS FERNWOOD CONVERSE HEIGHTS GREYLOGS LAUREL SPRINGS LINDLEY ESTATES GLENLAKE FERNWOOD FARMS FERNWOOD FARMS CAREY PLANTATION FOUR SEASONS FARMS HARVEST RIDGE BENT RIVER ARBOURS WEST HERITAGE CREEK AUTUMN BROOK WESTCHESTER HILLBROOK FOREST WESTCHESTER SHAFTSBURY BRISTOL CREEK BRINKLEY PLACE BRINKLEY PLACE WESTGATE PLANTATION FOWLERS CREST HAWK CREEK NORTH STONE WOOD CROSSING QUAIL HOLLOW

WOODLAND HEIGHTS EMERALD SPRINGS CANDLEWOOD WEST POINTE AT OAK FOREST JAMES CREEK

MASON ESTATES HIDDEN CREEK TOWNHOUSES CYPRESS RIDGE FALCON RIDGE CAPUCINE ACRES PACIFIC MILLS WOODBURN CLUB SHALLOW CREEK WEST CLARK GLEN WILKINS HILLS ALLGOOD ESTATES CARDINAL PLACE HORSESHOE FALLS MAXWELL HILLS MALLARD COVE HAMPTON ROAD ESTATES SHAMROAK PARK

25-31, BUYER

2012

PRICE

SELLER

$3,050,000 $950,000 $790,000 $525,000 $430,000 $350,000 $305,000 $298,000 $280,510 $272,000 $245,700 $236,000 $228,000 $220,206 $220,000 $214,000 $207,156 $204,060 $200,726 $200,000 $188,385 $185,000 $184,900 $183,300 $175,000 $174,900 $172,517 $170,000 $170,000 $166,000 $165,000 $161,500 $157,000 $156,000 $152,000 $152,000 $150,000 $147,209 $146,800 $145,900 $143,000 $141,500 $138,500 $138,176 $138,000 $138,000 $138,000 $137,000 $135,000 $131,900 $130,500 $130,500 $130,000 $129,000 $128,000 $125,000 $124,000 $122,000 $117,000 $117,000 $110,500 $109,000 $108,000 $108,000 $107,200 $100,000 $100,000 $98,900 $98,000 $95,000 $95,000 $92,935 $85,000 $85,000 $83,500 $82,500 $82,000 $82,000 $81,500 $80,750 $80,000 $80,000 $78,859 $78,000 $75,000 $74,900 $71,311

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FEBRUARY 1, 2013 | T H E J O U R N A L 35


journal culture

the week in photos

look who’s in the journal this week People check out a reproduction of a 1930s era Chris Craft manufactured by Fish Brothers at the 43rd Annual Upstate SC Boat Show on display in the Antique and Classic Boat Society Inc. area of the boat show.

THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA

GREENVILLE COUNTY ZONING AND PLANNING PUBLIC HEARING There will be a public hearing before County Council on Monday, February 18, 2013 at 6:30 p.m. in County Council Chambers, County Square, for the purpose of hearing those persons interested in the following items: DOCKET NUMBER: CZ-2013-5 APPLICANT: Joy Satterfield CONTACT INFORMATION: 444-5769 PROPERTY LOCATION: Hipps Drive (Simpsonville) PIN: 0560030103342, 0560030103300, and 0560030103315 (portion) EXISTING ZONING: S-1, Services REQUESTED ZONING: R-S, Residential Suburban ACREAGE: 8.78 COUNTY COUNCIL: 27 – Kirven

All persons interested in these proposed amendments to the Greenville County Zoning Ordinance and Map are invited to attend this meeting. At subsequent meetings, Greenville County Council may approve or deny the proposed amendments as requested or approve a different zoning classification than requested.

SOLICITATION NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: RFP# 27-02/19/13, River Falls Fire Department, February 19, 2013, 3:00 P.M. IFB# 25-02/14/13, Hammett Street Extension Sidewalk Installation, February 14, 2013, 3:00 P.M. A mandatory prebid meeting and site visit will be held on 9:00 A.M., E.S.T., February 7, 2013, 301 University Ridge, suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601. Solicitations can be found at www.greenvillecounty.org or by calling (864) 467-7200.

SUMMONS AND NOTICE (JURY) IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE Case No: 2012-CP-23-6277 Bryan Leppard, Plaintiff, v. Antonia Avila and Emilio Perez, Defendant(s). TO: THE DEFENDANTS ABOVE NAMED: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint and to serve a copy of your Answer upon the subscriber at 1007 East Washington Street, Greenville, South Carolina, within thirty (30) days after the service heron, exclusive of the day of such service. If you fail to answer, judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. By: Richard V. Davis 1007 East Washington Street, Greenville, South Carolina 29601 (864)232-7363 Attorney for Plaintiff

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Purple Money, LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE AND LIQUOR at 2607 Wade Hampton Blvd., Greenville SC 29615. To object to the issuance of this license/ permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than February 3, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Basilio’s Bar and Grill, LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE AND LIQUOR at 6300 White Horse Road, Suite 106, Greenville, SC 29611. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than February 17, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Brewery 85, LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON AND OFF premises consumption of BEER AND WINE at 6 Whitlee Court, Greenville, SC 29615. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than February 17, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

LEGAL NOTICES Only $.79 per line • ABC NOTICE OF APPLICATION Only $145 • tel 864.679.1205 • fax 864.679.1305 • email aharley@communityjournals.com

Presents Presents Presents

Ashston Hakala, 8, left, and his father, Josh Hakala, take a close look at one of the over 150 boats on display.

Photos by Greg Beckner / Staff

DOCKET NUMBER: CZ-2013-6 APPLICANT: Savannah, LLC CONTACT INFORMATION: renee@gandp.us or 901-1101 PROPERTY LOCATION: Pelham Road and Boiling Springs Road PIN: 0533040102000, 0533040101700, and 0533040101600 EXISTING ZONING: R-20, SingleFamily Residential REQUESTED ZONING: FRD, Flexible Review District ACREAGE: 5.2 COUNTY COUNCIL: 21 – Burns

SOLICITATION NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: Broker of Record/Fee Based Consultant for Self-Insured Health Care Plans, RFP# 2402/18/13, 3:00 P.M. Solicitations can be found at www.greenvillecounty.org or by calling (864) 467-7200.

Photos by Greg Beckner / Staff

SOLICITATION NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: Riverstone Way Drainage Improvement Project, February 26, 2013, 3:00 P.M. Solicitations can be found at www.greenvillecounty.org or by calling 864-467-7200.

Larry Means with Paragon Building Systems, right, guides a 737 fuselage into place. The plane fuselage will eventually be part of the new aviation-themed community park at the Greenville Downtown Airport. “As soon as Greenville Tech completes the necessary changes to the fuselage, it will be installed along with a new fence at the front of the park,” stated Parks McLeod of McLeod Landscape Architects, designer of the park.

Saturday, February 9 • 11am-6pm

Satuday, Feb 99 Satuday, Feb Satuday, Feb 9 11am-6pm 11am-6pm 11am-6pm

This event will feature: Sweetheart Adoption Specials • Sweets Bake Sale Pet Photos (12-4pm) • $5.00 Nail Trims (12-4pm) www. greenvillepets.org

328 Furman Hall Road, Greenville, SC 29609 • 864-467-3986

36 THE Journal | FEBRUARY 1, 2013

Roland Curtis with Paragon Building Systems prepares to wrap a harness around a 15-foot cross section of a Boeing 737 fuselage so it can be taken off of the flatbed trailer it was delivered with and placed near the hangar where it will be worked on.


journal culture

the week in photos

look who’s in the journal this week

Wade Herrin (left) of GE receives the Unsung Heroes corporate award from Dr. Keith Miller of Greenville Tech.

Blue Ridge Middle School was represented at the South Carolina Junior Beta Club Convention held in Myrtle Beach. The Quiz Bowl team, consisting of Amy Barnette, Addie Callahan, Campbell Davenport, and Jake Holland, won first place in the state. Blue Ridge defeated Riverside Middle in the semis and Wren Middle in the finals. They will compete at the National Junior Beta Club Convention in Mobile, Ala. in June.

Crossword puzzle: page 38

Sudoku puzzle: page 38

Upstate UpstateFoodie .com Feed Your Inner Food Enthusiast

(Above) Spartanburg Day School varsity basketball player Andrew Pennington signs autographs for lower-school students at the Annual Red and White game. (Below) Lower-school students cheer for players during the game.

Ansley Glenn dressed as Gandhi for “Dead Ringers Day” at Spartanburg Day School.

E E FR

si p Pe day h t r Bi y ! t r Pa age k c Pa If you live in Greenville or Laurens County and your child will be 6 years old in February, bring your child’s birth certificate to the Pepsi Plant and receive a FREE Pepsi Birthday Party Package!

Sixth-grade students at Spartanburg Day School dress for “Crazy Hat, Crazy Hair Day.”

Listen to the Ellis and Bradley Show on 100.5 WSSL or visit www.wsslfm.com for more details!

CCJR

February 4 - 9, Mon.- Fri. 1pm-5pm; Sat. 10am-12pm 751 State Park Road, Greenville, SC • 864-672-2060 ext.2057

FEBRUARY 1, 2013 | THE Journal 37


journal culture Search: Things To Do

figure. this. out. Kiddie taxidermy

By Bruce R. Sutphin and Doug Peterson

An Evening of Jazz… Jazz singer Tish Oney and the Upstate Jazz All Stars will perform in the David W. Reid Theatre Friday, Feb. 1, 7-8:30 p.m. Oney is internationally recognized for her top quality performances. Adults/$10; Students/$5. Art Exhibit… Tarleton Blackwell, a living South Carolina artist, is currently exhibiting in Spartanburg Art Museum. His colorful paintings are large, often mural-size collages of icons that comment on what it means to be a South Carolinian and a Southerner. Ends Feb. 16. Open Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sundays, 1-5 p.m. Art Exhibit… Mary Ellen Suitt: In Retrospect pays tribute to one of Spartanburg’s own native artists. This exhibit of paintings traces her life’s work from the 1940s to within the past few years. Be sure to appreciate the “blue people” series that made her famous. Open Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sundays, 1-5 p.m. in the Spartanburg Art Museum. Ends Feb. 16. Art Exhibit… For the first time, Artists’ Guild of Spartanburg presents an exhibit open to all its members at one time. The public is invited to vote for their favorite pieces of art, and top vote-getters will be awarded cash prizes. Open Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and on Sundays, 1-5 p.m. Always free. Art Exhibit… Students from Spartanburg School Districts 3, 5, and 6 currently have their work on display in the Student Galleries at Chapman Cultural Center. A different group of students is presented each month. Always free. Open Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and on Sundays, 1-5 p.m. Open on Sundays with Free Live Music… Chapman Cultural Center is now open on Sundays, 1-5 p.m. You can visit Spartanburg Art Museum, Spartanburg County History Museum, and Spartanburg Science Center. You can also visit Artists’ Guild of Spartanburg Gallery and the Student Galleries, which are always free. This Sunday, Feb. 3, jazz musician Frank Walker will present a free mini-concert 2-4 p.m. in the Moseley Building. Have a cultured Sunday. Harold and the Purple Crayon… This children’s play opens Friday, Feb. 8, for two days and three shows. This classic children’s story is about the power and beauty of a child’s imagination. Presented by Spartanburg Youth Theatre in the David Reid Theatre.

542-ARTS ChapmanCulturalCenter.org 200 E. Saint John St. Spartanburg

38 THE Journal | FEBRUARY 1, 2013

Across 1 “The Reader” Oscar winner 8 Really excited 14 Refuse to bite one’s tongue 20 Copy cats? 21 Highly decorated 22 Online self-image 23 *High-ranking administrator 25 Mocha native 26 Typically tough life phase 27 “__ only take a minute” 28 Bygone U.N. member 30 AAA offering 31 Composer Telemann 34 *Really pricey spread 38 Far from certain 41 Like some drafts 43 Jack up 44 Will Smith title role 45 San __: Calif. city or its county 46 Slip into 47 Doesn’t interfere with 51 *Home of a 360-member music group 56 German import 57 Speak bluish? 58 Rattle 59 Friend of Rabbit 60 Chou En-__ 61 U. muck-a-mucks 64 “Ben-Hur” broke its Oscar record 66 Yank’s enemy

68 Takes painkillers, say 69 *”Love, Actually” actor 72 *Get down and dirty? 75 In a deft manner 76 It may influence which club you choose 77 Idyllic locale 79 118-Across’s home, familiarly 80 ISP choice 81 Reheat, in a way 83 Quaintly small 85 Not eating anyone’s dust 88 Creepy gaze 90 *Teetotaler, for the night 94 Cause to erupt 96 Carry with effort 97 Moved, as a lifeboat 98 Monarch’s reign, e.g. 99 Really advocate 102 Free-for-all 103 Modern diary 104 *Vera Wang’s field 108 Martial arts mercenary 110 Important Dadaist 111 Thoroughly goes over 112 Bachelor finale? 114 Some ATM sites 118 Bruin rival 120 Cuddly toys, or what can be found at the two-letter “head” and “tail” of the answers to starred clues

125 Nasty rumor 126 Was jealous of 127 They may be casual 128 “The Lion King” trio 129 Virginia et al. 130 Most astute

Down 1 Early 103-Down player 2 Tête output 3 Number of Oscars for 64-Across 4 Not very generous 5 Like a muumuu 6 Misspeak, say 7 General of Chinese cuisine 8 Lenient 9 Narrow-brimmed fedora 10 Réunion attendee 11 Chiang __-shek 12 Limo driver’s request, perhaps 13 Mighty storm 14 Union contract subject 15 Stayed too long at the fare? 16 Kitchen spray 17 “SNL” alum Cheri 18 Fruity soda brand 19 McDonald’s fixture 24 Symbol of decency 29 Economical shorthand in store names 32 Mideast land 33 “Rodent” band since the 1980s

35 Jaworski of Watergate 36 Forearm-related 37 Official nix 38 Alpo rival 39 Smooth movement 40 Nolan Ryan, notably 42 West Indies island 45 Dimwit

Medium

46 Coffee pot remnant 48 Home with a between-floors entrance 49 Important thing 50 Musical dedicatee whose true identity is the subject of much

speculation 52 Title woman in a Jolson classic 53 Web periodical 54 Wood purchase 55 Theater chain 62 Hanna-Barbera fan’s purchase 63 Grab hold of 65 “__ man with seven wives ...” 67 Chum 68 Tokyo brew 69 Crock-Pot utensil 70 “Ghosts” playwright 71 Sailing places 73 Let drain, as a sink 74 Modern greeting 78 Bumper defect 82 Maneuver, as a ship 84 Ached (for) 86 Prefix with nautical 87 Major bummer 89 At attention 90 Heads down 91 Source of knowledge 92 One less than vier 93 Celebrity chef Paula 95 “Guerrilla Warfare” author 100 Super-popular 101 Stirs 102 Non-negotiable charge 103 Hero with a mask 104 Devise 105 Wide assortment 106 Barely leading 107 Prepare for additional use 109 Actress Pressly 113 “Bill & __ Excellent Adventure” 115 Few and far between 116 Types 117 Part of ADA: Abbr. 119 Mo. in which the Emancipation Proclamation was delivered 121 Destructive material 122 Charlottesville sch. 123 Chest with tablets 124 Society page word

Crossword answers: page 37

Sudoku answers: page 37


journal culture

The Symptoms By ashley holt

Mid-life Ophiuchus Insofar as I cared about astrology, I was pretty satisfied with my designation as a Sagittarius. It’s the sign of the lazy, philosophical dreamer who writes poems between naps, and it seemed to suit me well enough. The Sagittarius follows his own interests, pursuing higher education to suit his whims, seeking a “big picture” understanding of the world (all the better to dismiss your specific concerns as major bringdowns with the potential to harsh one’s mellow). He craves creative adventure and independence, avoids commitment and lives like a freewheeling motorcycle rebel jonesin’ for kicks. Alright! So here I am, at 44, fully engorged on a lifetime of Sagittarian splendor, when I’m informed that there’s been an adjustment to the classic zodiac calendar. I’m no expert on these things, but apparently the Earth shifted its rotational pull into the Seventh House of Pantaloons, causing the Star of Hortense to enter the Elbow of Zeus, which made 2011 some kind of astrological leap year or something. The end result is that we thereafter had a 13th sign: Ophiuchus. And guess who got awarded this new designation. The first thing I found offensive was the name, which I couldn’t pronounce. I checked with Dictionary.com, which has that nifty audio feature that sounds out the words for you, and I got even more depressed. For one thing, that distinguished voice which pronounces the words on the site has a lot of attitude. Her tone seems to imply, “What are you, an idiot?” when she sounds out each word. “Ophiuchus, you moron.” That’s what I heard, anyway. Worse, she vindicated what I feared. It rhymes with mucous. A little more research revealed that this Ophiu-

D E ND

D NE

R

G I S E ED

&

PA X E

chus character is a real brown-nosing twerp. Reading over the attributes of the new sign made my stomach turn. He is a “tax assessor,” with “supervisory skills,” who “joins or gathers together.” He’s the “apple of his father’s eye” (spit take), and “receives the favor of those in authority” (….!). I hate this bootlick putz! Not to mention, Ophiuchus is expected to be a scientist or architect working to benefit mankind. What happened to my self-absorbed, creative adventures? My rebellious journeys into the philosophical realm?

R FO

3 1 0 2

My lofty weekends of hashish and Doors albums? Now I’m expected to get organized and cure halitosis? I’m an old man now, I don’t need this pressure. As icing on the cake, Ophiuchus is said to “wear clothing of vibrant colors, and plaids in particular.” I guess this is the sign that I’m officially moving into my elder years, embracing the Easter-egg golf pants and sweater vests of Grandpaville. What happened? The “born to be wild” Sagittarius was supposed to have died in a knife fight during a drag race by now. And if all that weren’t enough to bring me down, I have the visual representation of Opie Mucous to confront. Since ancient times, the constellation has been otherwise known as Serpentarius, and is “depicted as a man holding a giant serpent.” Wrestling with it, to be exact, while dressed in the skimpiest of drapery and sandals. And there’s just no way to rationalize that as heterosexual. Well, there’s just no arguing with the stars, right? So, meet the new me, everyone: apple of my father’s eye, friend to authority figures everywhere, ready to cure your illness, build your houses, and wrestle your serpents. Look for me at the next pride parade. I’ll be the one in neon plaid.. Ashley Holt is a writer and illustrator living in Spartanburg. His neurotic quirks and extreme sensitivity to broad social trends are chronicled in The Symptoms, an illustrated blog. Check out his website at www.ashleyholt.com.

COMING BEHIND THE COUNTER

2013

To feature your own business or to suggest a business you would like to see in BEHIND call today 864-679-1205.

THE COUNTER, FEBRUARY 1, 2013 | THE Journal 39


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PROTEC SECURITY IS A DIVISION OF

Feb. 1, 2013 Greenville Journal  

Greenville Journal published by Community Journals for Greenville, South Carolina. My design and layout seen on the following pieces: main C...

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