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Kristin Griffin Using Sound to Create Art Grade Level 9-12 General Art Education Course

Goals and Rationale National Visual Arts Standards-Content Standard #1: Understanding and applying media, techniques, and processes Content Standard #2: Using knowledge of structures and functions Content Standard #4: Understanding the visual arts in relation to history and cultures Content Standard #5: Reflecting upon and assessing the characteristics and merits of their work and the work of others Content Standard #6: Making connections between visual arts and other disciplines

State Standards-Goal 1: Students in Missouri public schools will acquire the knowledge and skills to gather, analyze, and apply information and ideas Goal 2: Students in Missouri public schools will acquire the knowledge and skills to communicate effectively within and beyond the classroom Goal 4: Students in Missouri public schools will acquire the knowledge and skills to make decisions and act as responsible members of society

Knowledge Standards-1. Process and techniques for the production, exhibition, or performance of one or more of the visual or performed arts 2. The principles and elements of different art forms 3. The vocabulary to explain perceptions about and evaluations of works in dance, music, theater, and visual arts


4. Interrelationships of visual and performing arts and the relationships of the arts to other disciplines 5. Visual and performing arts in historical and cultural context

Grade Level Expectations-Strand I Product/Performance HS Level 1-4: Select and apply two-dimensional media, techniques, and processes to communicate ideas and solve challenging visual problems. (Drawing/Painting) Strand II Elements and Principles HS Level 1-4: Select and use elements of art for their effect in communicating ideas through artwork (Balance/Color/Form/Lines/Rhythem/Repetition/Shapes/Texture/Unity) Strand III Artistic Perceptions HS Level 1-4: Investigate the nature of art and discuss responses to artworks (Aesthetics) HS Level 1-4: Analyze and evaluate art using vocabulary (Art Criticism) Strand IV Interdisciplinary Connections HS Level 1-4: Explain connections between visual and performing arts (Connecting visual and performing arts) Strand V Historical Period or Culture HS Level 1-4: Compare and contrast artworks from different historical time periods and/or culture (Characteristics of artworks)

Rationale for Artists and Artworks used (to meet the unit goals) Music has been and continues to be a source of inspiration for artists. Students will explore musical inspiration of Georgia O’Keeffe and Wassily Kandinsky. Then how musical inspiration can be expressed in their art making, conversation, and writing.

Enduring Ideas Artists are inspired by music and musical inspiration can result in many different art styles, expressive results, and uses of media. Artists can also be inspired by the work of other artists. Making meaning through meaningful making. Meaningful art making is about exploration, asking


questions, problem solving, and developing a knowledge base. To connect meanings of elements in art with elements in music.

Essential Questions What does music look like? What does art sound like? – When looking at an artwork what do you hear? If someone couldn’t hear the music/sound, how would you draw/paint it to show the rhythm? How does music inspire an artist? – How can music inspire artwork? What are similar elements of art and music? How do we analyze the use of the elements and principles of design in an artwork? How can personal artwork be inspired by ideas explored by past artists? How does the use of a medium correlate with music?

Materials Artist journal Pencils Colored pencils Drawing paper Recording of song/Ipod Compass Ruler Brushes Watercolor Watercolor paper

Lesson Title (One)


Medium: Colored pencil Grade Level:

Rationale and goals for this lesson—

Enduring Ideas— Introduce the use of music as inspiration and how people use music to make art while connecting the elements of art with those of music.

Essential Questions— What does music look like? If someone couldn’t hear the music or sound, how would you draw it to show the rhythm? How can music inspire an artwork? What are similar elements of art and music? How do we analyze the use of elements of art and principles of design in an artwork? How does the use of a medium correlate with music?

Key Instructional Concepts— Students will learn and become familiar with the elements of art and principles of design. That they are used in teaching and enable us to describe what an artist has done, analyze what is going on in an artwork, and communicate thoughts and findings using a common language.

Objectives— The students will be able to, not only define the elements of art, but how to apply them with principles of design. They will compare similar elements of art and music, experimenting how sound can be shown through art.


Vocabulary— Line: is the path of a moving point Form: height, width, and depth Shape: is the area enclosed by an outline Value: differences in a hue or neutral ranging from the lightest to darkest, for example, white to black Texture: those which can felt or implied textures, which can be seen Space: organizes elements in a composition Color: hue, tone, tint Repetition: use of line or color in more than one place in a composition Pattern: is created though a repetitious use of the same element to create an overall design Rhythm: is the repeated use of similar elements such as color, line, shape—the smooth transition from one part to another Balance: is the equilibrium of various elements in the work of art Emphasis: given to the center of interest, which might be the largest, brightest, or lightest subject Contrast: shows differences between the elements of art which are line, color, shape, value, space, and texture Unity: the harmony of all the visual elements in a composition

Procedure— Anticipatory Set The first day of the lesson will be devoted to learning elements of art and principles of design. This includes but is not limited to definitions and examples. Students’ homework will be to record ideas of elements of art and sounds. Body of Lesson The second day the teacher will demonstrate use of colored pencils and techniques. Then the students will use their artist journals while listening to short music selections chosen by the teacher and sketch lines and values of color in their artists’ journal. The third day of the lesson (the following week) students will chose from the previous music selections of the teacher and will create a final drawing from that selection. They will begin this drawing in class. The students will be instructed to create a line


drawing on paper stemming from emotions they feel while listening. The following day in class they will begin to add color to their line drawings using a color scheme chosen depicting the emotions felt. They will have the next week, consisting of two more class periods, to work on their drawing. Closure This lesson is a brief three week introduction that provides knowledge and structure for the next two lessons of the unit.

Assessment— The teacher will review each students’ artists’ journals and final drawing. The class will have a discussion about the experience. Each student is expected to participate.

Lesson Title (Two) Medium: Colored pencil Grade Level:

Rationale and goals for this lesson— Music has been and continues to be a source of inspiration for artists. Students will explore musical inspiration of Georgia O’Keeffe. Georgia O’Keeffe inspiration was found through relationships between color, form, music, and nature. As an artist she was involved in abstraction and her compositions included balance, rhythmic movement, and symmetry. Students will then explore how musical inspiration can be expressed in their art making, conversation, and writing.

Enduring ideas— Art and music are closely related. Georgia O’Keeffe stated that music can be translated into something for the eye. Georgia O’Keeffe’s music that inspired her are expressed in her artworks Blue and Green Music and Music, Pink and Blue No. 2. Students will create an artwork through exploration to connect meaning of art and music using sensory properties.

Essential Questions— What does music look like?


How does music inspire an artist?—How can music inspire an artwork? What are similar elements of art and music? How can personal artwork be inspired by ideas explored by past artists? How does the artist lead your eye through the painting?—How is it done? Example: moving line, repetition of shape or color

Key Instructional Concepts— Students will further their understanding of how to incorporate more than two elements in an artwork; focusing on the relationship between color, line, form, and music. They will become more involved in abstraction. Students will learn how to work with restricted vocabulary of colors, lines, and shapes. Discovering how the combinations of color and forms create visual rhythms and harmonies similar to those you can hear in music. Expanding more on how to rely on senses to evoke comprehension for what feeling must be conveyed through artwork.

Objectives— Students will analyze the work of Georgia O’Keeffe’s paintings Blue and Green Music and Music, Pink and Blue No. 2; expanding their concept and understanding of art. They will continue their discovery of how one art form can be used to generate another applying new acquired knowledge to create own artwork. Creating their artwork they will effectively use elements of art and principles of design. After creating artworks students will be able to identify and describe what is included in each artwork.

Vocabulary— Abstract Symmetry

Procedure— Anticipatory Set First day of the lesson watch brief part of the film—Great Women Artists: Georgia O’Keeffe. Introduce artworks Blue and Green Music and Music, Pink and Blue No. 2 to class and have discussion


about Georgia O’Keeffe’s idea that music can be translated into something for the eye; paintings were production to music and its’ elements, and her motivation by music. For homework students will need to each select a song that serves to inspire for an original artwork and brainstorm. Body of Lesson The second day of class students will have brought their selected song with them to class and are ready to discuss their idea and possibilities. Then make marks and sketches in their artist journal. The next two weeks (four class periods) will be devoted as time for the students to create an artwork that best reflects, in their depiction characteristics of Georgia O’Keeffe’s styles, elements of art, principles of design, and their song selection.

Assessment— The teacher will evaluate each student’s response to the idea of sound generating an image and use of elements of art and principles of design. Students will be assessed as to their creativity and understanding of how sound can generate art via the application of this process to their own work. Each student will be responsible for writing an artist statement for their finished artwork, followed by a critique or discussion.

Lesson Title (Three) Medium: Watercolor Grade Level:

Rationale and goals for this lesson— Music has been and continues to be a source of inspiration for artists. Students will explore inspiration of Wassily Kandinsky who was inspired by and took titles from pieces of music. As an artist he is known for his abstract style of painting that was based on the non-representational properties of color and form. Wassily Kandinsky’s compositions were the culmination of his efforts to create a pure painting that would provide the same emotional power as a musical composition.

Enduring ideas— Wassily Kandinsky was influenced by the sensorial properties of color and sound. As an artist he emphasized spontaneous activity and the subconscious. Students will create an artwork through exploration to connect meaning of art and music using sensory properties.


Essential Questions— What does music look like? What does art sound like?—When looking at an artwork what do you hear? If someone couldn’t hear the music or sound, how would you draw it to show the rhythm? How does music inspire an artist?—How can music inspire artwork? What are similar elements of art and music? How do we analyze the use of the elements and principles of design in an artwork? How can personal artwork be inspired by ideas explored by past artists?

Key Instructional Concepts— Students will explore color symbolism and further their acquired knowledge of how to work with color, form, line, and point; discovering non-objective art.

Objectives— Students will compare and contrast between developments in music and visual arts, demonstrating musical ideas through their composition. Students will also emphasize their use of sensory properties of color and sound to abstract within the composition.

Vocabulary— Symbolism

Procedure— Anticipatory Set On the first day of the lesson the teacher will introduce Composition VII by Wassily Kandinsky, followed by a discussion about Wassily Kandinsky’s inspiration and style. The teacher will have the class listen to brief segments of classical music and symphonies. For homework each student will select a


song from the genre of classical music, preferably a symphony—keeping selection limited to five minutes. This song selection serves to inspire for an original artwork. Body of Lesson The second day of class students will have brought their selected song with them to class and are ready to discuss their idea and possibilities. Then make marks and sketches in their artist journal. The third day of class the teacher will demonstrate the use of watercolor and techniques. The next seven class periods will be devoted as time for the students to create an artwork that best reflects, in their depiction characteristics of Wassily Kandinsky’s styles, elements of art, principles of design, and their song selection.

Assessment— Students will be assessed by their awareness of art history and influence of music on Wassily Kandinsky. As well as to their creativity and understanding of how sound can generate the art via the application of this process to their own work. Students will be expected to use elements and principles of design and music. Each student will be responsible for writing an artist statement for their finished artwork, followed by a critique or discussion.

Unit Evaluation and Assessment The unit addresses enduring ideas about art The unit addresses essential questions and key concepts The enduring ideas, key concepts, and essential questions provide focus and cohesiveness throughout the unit The unit plan aligns with unit objectives and assessment tasks Students are aware of assessment expectations The enduring ideas, key concepts, and important skills are assessed Students provide evidence of learning

Constraints Allotment of time for class work is not sufficient Shortage of materials


Students who are more advanced with creating art Students who haven’t been exposed to creating art

Integrative Options and Cross Circular Correlation Art Therapy Direct cross circular correlation with music

Relationship to the Developmental Needs of Children Students are developmentally ready to be successful Students will demonstrate their abilities and skills Students communicate effectively with adults and peers

Opportunities for student responses to art from historical, critical, and aesthetic perspectives What is art? Why do responses vary? Discuss interpretations of art Analyze the use of elements and principles in the work Expressing feelings—Emotionalism, Expressionism Compare and contrast student artwork with professional artworks

Using Sound to Create Art  

Unit plan for TDP 4730

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