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Lava Centre

An interactive, high-tech educational exhibition depicting volcanic activity, earthquakes and the creation of Iceland over millions of years.


About Us Ásta, Atli, Bríet, Eiður, Geir, Heimir, Hermann, Hringur, Jónmundur, Kristín, Lemke, Maggi, Marel, Nils, Pétur, Samúel, Sebastian & Sveinbjörn.

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At Gagarin we believe in the power of interactive storytelling to inspire audiences when learning and playing. We strive to enrich people’s lives through the power of lively storytelling and experience design which engages, educates, and entertains visitors.

Table of contents

Lava Centre

Interactive, high-tech educational exhibition depicting volcanic activity, earthquakes and the creation of Iceland over millions of years.

Issue #5

Cover photo by Ragnar Th. Sigurðsson www.arctic-images.com

Augmenting Barcelona 3 The Spirit of a Place 4 Lava Centre 6 Making of Lava Centre 14 Perlan Museum 16 The Iron family 18 Seal Center 20 Folgefonna 21 Heart of a Nation 22 Red Terror 24 How we do it 26


Augmenting Barcelona

Nils, Sammi & KristĂ­n gave a workshop at the ADC*E Festival in Barcelona 2017. The workshop aimed at scrutinising a few aspects of digital communication in spatial environments using the new and emerging technologies of virtual, augmented and mixed realities.

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A new world is soon to be upon us, one were communication is no longer separated into digital or real. The worlds are about to blend together. But what does this for communication design within the new symbiotic world with qualities of both the real and the virtual? Nils, Sammi & Kristin gave a workshop at the ADC*E Festival in Barcelona 2017. The workshop aimed at scrutinising a few aspects of digital communication in spatial environments where they aimed to make participants explore what can be the new design requirements for the new and emerging technologies of virtual, augmented and mixed realities.

The workshop had the participants augment existing places/spaces with mockups of the digital graphics one would like to see there, drawn/built or sculpted in real hands on material. The end product of the workshop was in the shape of a before and after images where participants held up 3d representations of graphic elements in situ on the site they selected for the workshop. Each product was to be a representation of a wayfinding design in a heads up display with an automatic information visualization of information flows, capital, dog walker paths or whatever one may want to add to the existing public space.


The Spirit of a Place

Without people, without stories, without connections and belonging there is loneliness and emptiness. “Maður er manns gaman” as we say in Icelandic. Ásta shares her thoughts on what she loves about exhibitons and their potential to boost the spirit of a palce.

What I love about the exhibitions we make, is their potential to enhance the spirit of a place. The spirit, meaning the soul of the place, what makes it tick, what makes it unique and memorable, and what makes you want to return.

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Cities are spaces that we share with other people; being merely functional is not enough, we want them lively and engaging! Good urban design encourages people to meet. This is essential for most of us as we are by nature, social creatures. Without people, without stories, without connections and belonging, there is loneliness and emptiness. We say “Maður er manns gaman” in Icelandic.

Museums and exhibitions bring people together in stimulating architectural spaces and immerse guests in a story which each and every one can relate to. Whether the story encompasses a natural phenomenon or historical event, the exhibition will offer an opportunity to connect to the place and people around you on another level. I will never forget the taxi drivers in Winnipeg during the installation of our exhibition for the Canadian Museum of Human Rights. How excited they were about this new addition to the city of Winnipeg. Every single taxi ride conversation revolved around the expectations of the museum

Living Tree. One of the installations for the CMHR.

I will never forget the taxi drivers in Winnipeg during the installation of our exhibition for the Canadian Museum of Human Rights. How excited they were about this new addition to the city of Winnipeg. and its iconic architecture. I sensed pride, a sense of belonging and lots of excitement. The main idea with that exhibition was that it should engage in a constant dialogue with ongoing human rights issues, with current research, events, and seminars. In Nordfjordeid, a small town nestled deep in one of Norway's stunning remote fjords, we proposed a concept about the Myklebust Viking ship last year. It is the fascinating story of possibly the largest Viking ship in Norway and

Canadian Museum for Human Rights in Winnipeg, Canada. Photo: CMHR


its burial ceremony. The archaeological findings of which could potentially reveal untold stories of our ancestors and what life was like for them around the year 1000. At the local hotel where we stayed, the walls were covered with photographs of inhabitants of the village from the beginning of 20th century. All these stories and images spanning more than a century, along with encounters of locals with visions of the future for this town, wove themselves into the fabric of my stay. I left Nordfjordeid feeling a sense of identity and character and began envisioning the unfurnished exhibition space. It would be built in a beautiful building in the harbor, where people could contemplate the lives of people from the past, and then later, relate this to their future, all while sitting at the nearby cafe looking over the fjord.

to enjoy. Hvolsvöllur is now an essential stop for anyone exploring Iceland as it is the central hub for information and the meeting point in case of volcanic eruptions and earthquakes. I believe these kinds of thoughtfully created places together with the public spaces they inhabit, play a huge role in our cities' culture. I am as excited about this integral aspect of our projects and their ability to enhance public life, as I am about the magic that each installation brings to visitors. When designing our exhibitions, we

Concept drawing of the biggest Viking ship in Nordfjord, Norway. Photo: Nordplan.

Hvolsvöllur is now a must stop before exploring Iceland as well as being the hub for information and meeting around the topic of volcanic eruptions and earthquakes. consider the following principles. How will it add to the urban landscape? How does it function in relation to its surroundings? What are the public spaces or semi-public spaces like in this place? For example, the exterior around the building, the entrance, the café? Does the proposed concept capture and add to the current spirit of the place? When successful, the result will add to the growing list of exciting destinations we can explore in our physical world while uplifting the spirit of a place for generations to come!

Ásta Olga Magnúsdóttir, Project Manager.

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The Lava Centre where Gagarin recently created an exhibit relating the story of Iceland's creation, has made a positive impact on the village Hvolsvöllur. The center is a place where Icelanders and tourists visit to get a much closer look at the geology of the country; closer than ever before. The center greets visitors with a vast and compelling entrance of expansive windows framed in timber, bringing with it a new kind of restaurant for the surrounding area

Concept drawing of the Lava Centre at Hvolsvöllur, Iceland. Photo: Basalt Architects.


Lava Centre

The Lava Centre is an interactive, high-tech educational exhibition depicting volcanic activity, earthquakes and the creation of Iceland over millions of years. It is an interactive display of nature's epic forces that shape our planet.

6 Iceland has some of the most active volcanic systems in the world with volcanic eruptions every two to three years. The land is shaped by these epic forces with ever changing landscapes wherever you go. Located just 100 km east of Reykjavík at Hvolsvöllur, the new Lava Centre sits between five of Iceland’s greatest volcanoes. The main exhibition of the Centre reveals the epic forces of nature that shape our planet and created Iceland. In addition visitors get a crash-course in Volcanology while experiencing the extreme forces associated with volcanic eruptions and earthquakes.

volcanic systems in Iceland, let visitors feel the underlying activity and teach them how to "read" the landscape on their travel around the island. How was Iceland created? What causes the earth to shake? Which types of volcanoes are there and how can I “read the

landscape”? These are just few of the questions people get answers to, and all through immersive experiences and tangible interaction. The exhibition was designed by Gagarin in collaboration with Basalt architects.

The challenge was to give people an in depth understanding of the geological powers that can be found in the different Lava Centre at Hvolsvöllur. Architecture by Basalt Architects.


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Monitoring of Iceland This installation uses real-time data to show the seismic activity in seven different volcanic systems.


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Bravo! A world class innovative museum experience. Lava Centre: Gold for Information Design, Interactive Design and Grand prize; Best of Show. The Association of Icelandic Graphic Designers Awards 2018 (FĂ?T Awards).

Volcano Corridor Walking from present day into the past, visitors learn about every eruption in Iceland for the last 100 years while triggering explosive lava flow. Every eruption is coded to show how much a specific volcano erupts each time. When passing the corridor the visitor triggers the light and sound sculpture that rips through its entire length.


Geology Globe By turning a large wheel visitors learn that Iceland was created when the tectonic-plate margins drifted over a stationary Mantle plume that lies underneath the island today. 9

Earthquake Corridor Here visitors experience known earthquakes that shook Iceland in the last 20 years. The earthquake simulator uses actual seismic data that was recorded when the quakes occur.


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Seismic Zones An interactive wall that responds to visitors movements and three shaking stands. At once this installation surprises the visitors and educates them about the Rift zone, the Shear zone and the Volcanic flank zone.


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The Fiery Heart of Iceland This is an exhibit which shows the size of the Mantle plume relative to Iceland. The reconstruction is in accordance with analyses done by scientists who measured the phenomena.


A project on a grand scale with attention to detail. Attention to type, use of color and graphics where every angle of the project meets in a captivating interactive environment. Lava Centre: Gold for Information Design, Interactive Design and Grand prize; Best of Show. The Association of Icelandic Graphic Designers Awards 2018 (FĂ?T Awards).

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Intro to Volcanology In this room, visitors can learn about all the different types of volcanoes and volcanic systems found in Iceland through interactive displays.


Site of Actual Volcanos An immersive world showing the five different Volcanoes around Lava Centre. Full body interaction allows visitors to learn about the different mountains.

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The whole experience is sensual, informative, slick, and fascinating. Lava Centre: Project of the Year. The Reykjavik Grapevine Design Award 2018 jury.


Making of Lava Centre

Hringur Hafsteinsson, Creative Director talks about the main challenges in designing the Lava Centre exhibiton, vistior experience, scientific knowledge and why it is not a good idea to compete with the nature.

The inspiration for the museum came when one of the founders of the project, Skuli Gunnar Sigfusson was stranded in Florida during the ash cloud eruption in 2010. All the American TV coverage was beamed from his native country and it led him to wonder why there wasn’t something back home to represent the island’s incredible natural landscape. Seven years later the Lava Centre was opened in Iceland.

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In the design process the challenge was to give people an in depth understanding of the geological powers that can be found in the different volcanic systems in Iceland, let visitors feel the underlying activity and teach them how to “read” the landscape on their travel around the island. We instantly decided to make it a fully immersive exhibition. How else could we communicate the extreme natural forces? We played a lot with sizes/scales because after all we humans are tiny in comparison to nature.

We knew that Nature has its own platform one can’t compete with, but we still wanted to deliver the right feeling so we also recreated elements with a certain abstraction in mind allowing the essence of the phenomenon too shine through.

every exhibit is either triggered or shaped by visitors’ motion or behaviour. Visitors get to create Iceland, shape the crust with magma intrusions and eruptions that then result in mountains, rift valleys, islands, floods, craters and more. We knew that nature has its own platform one can’t compete with, but we still wanted to deliver the right feeling so we also recreated elements with a certain abstraction in mind allowing the essence of the phenomenon to shine through.

Every installation was built on the best scientific knowledge available where we equally worked with both recorded data and live data from leading geological institutions and Universities in Iceland. As a result visitors experience earthquakes created by real seismic data and even hear the movement of magma within Eyjafjallajökull Central Volcano. The exhibition is fully interactive so Hringur Hafsteinsson, Creative Director.


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Perlan Museum

We welcome visitors to experience Iceland’s largest glacier from a perspective that is inaccessible to most. The Glacier Exhibition in the Perlan Museum allows the visitor to look out from the top of Vatnajökull and interactively explore the wonders of Iceland’s ice-capped mountains.

16 We welcome visitors to experience Iceland’s largest glacier from a perspective that is inaccessible to most. The Glacier Exhibition in the Perlan Museum allows the visitor to look out from the top of Vatnajökull and interactively explore the wonders of Iceland’s ice-capped mountains. Iceland’s first glacier exhibition opened the summer of 2017 at the Perlan Museum in the iconic domed building in the center of Reykjavik. The first part of the exhibition gives visitors a freezing cold “glacial walk” through actual ice tunnels, which culminates

in an enjoyable view from the top of Iceland’s (and Europe’s) largest glacier, Vatnajökull. Through uniquely immersive experiences, visitors gain extensive knowledge about the different types of glaciers, their behavior, the life they support and much more. Gagarin was responsible for the design of three interactive installations, produced in collaboration with leading scientists in glaciology. Other collaborators included Bowen Technovation, Lord Cultural Resources, Xibitz, Kontrast, Samey, and Upptekið.

Disappearing glaciers The timetable presented in the exhibition allows visitors to visualize the predicted lifespan of Iceland's glaciers. As the scientific truth is revealed, visitors watch the shrinking glaciers which result in floods, land rise, the increase of volcanic activity and more, before learning the shocking conclusion.


On top of Vatnajokull After roaming through tunnels of ice, the visitor emerges through the ice's surface to find themselves standing on top of Vatnajรถkull. The 360 degree panoramic view was constructed using over a thousand images of the glacier, which were captured during winter through the open window of a tiny airplane.

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The interactive part of the panorama spans 32 meters and illustrates natural phenomena through different perspectives, depending on where the visitor stands. Through deictic interaction, the panorama immerses the audience in the landscape and allows the visitor explore these phenomena from biological, geological and human perspectives. The visitor has to physically move to change viewpoint, also enforcing a shift of mindset because the unconscious muscle memory of moving, reinforces that shift. This perspective on shifting originated from the emerging philosophical field of object-oriented ontology. This shift is achieved in such a way that is entirely transparent to the audience. To visitors, however, it feels as if they are merely enjoying the view from the top of Vatnajรถkull.

Life in and on glaciers Through monoculars, visitors can zoom into the glacier and study the surreal flora and fauna often found there. Every level of magnification is accompanied by information and a microscopic perspective of the different life forms living in and on top of the glacier.


The Iron family

Járnsmiðja Óðins or “Odin´s metal workshop” is a family firm with the third generation of metallers carrying the kindle have been responsible for designing and constructing almost every physical metal installation Gagarin have produced.

18 Even though Gagarin is a studio which specializes in visual and interaction design, we have always strived to make our solutions tangible. The physical realm adds an essential dimension to the user experience. "Handling" things comes naturally to people and helps humans understand and memorize even the most abstract phenomena. However, the design and construction of physical structures and objects are not

an in-house skillset at Gagarin, so this is something we gain by partnering with others. Meet Óðin, the blacksmith! Carrying the name of the ancient Germanic God, he has built his legacy through a lifetime of outstanding craftsmanship where metal is the dough he bakes with. Járnsmiðja Óðins (Óðinns’s metal workshop) is a family firm with three

When the craziest ideas are allowed to fly we usually, at the end of our design process, place them in front of Óðinn´s team just to have them confirm that it is a “no go zone”.


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generations of blacksmiths wielding the fire. With twelve employees including Óðin, Auður his wife (CFO), daughter Kata (architect) and son Daníel (mechanic), they have been responsible for designing and constructing almost every physical metal installation we have produced. By the end of our design process, when we have come up with the most unimaginable ideas, we usually present these to team Óðinn, if only to have them confirm that they are indeed a "no-go zone". Strangely enough, there has never been an idea we have fashioned out of imagination, that they have not been able to manifest in physical metal. This team has this invaluable quality of never seeing problems, but instead, brilliant solutions.


Seal Center

We’ve been fortunate enough to work on a variety of installations which give the user a neverbefore-seen look into the daily lives of animals that tend to shy away from human interaction. One of the installations is for The Icelandic Seal Center located in Hvammstangi, Iceland.

20 We at Gagarin are incredibly enthusiastic about sparking an interest in the majestic wildlife found all over our planet. Especially if the animals in question tend to shy away from human interaction. We’ve been fortunate enough to work on a variety of installations which give the user a neverbefore-seen look into the daily lives of these animals. The Icelandic Seal Center located in Hvammstangi, in the North of Iceland has a clear mission to research, investigate and exhibit its findings about the seal population found around Iceland. In the autumn of 2016, the scientists glued GPS based trackers on newly born seal pups, and often very reclusive, grey seal cubs, to better understand their behavior. In 2017 when it came time to share the findings with the public they contacted us.

Gagarin designed and produced an interactive map installation, which chronologically tracked the movement of Snorri, a grey seal cub, from birth.

Gagarin designed an interactive map installation, which chronologically tracked the movement of Snorri, a grey seal cub, from birth. The exhibition was installed at the seal center in 2017 giving visitors a never-before-seen look into the lives of grey seals.


Folgefonna

New interactive exhibition at the Visitor Centre Folgefonna National Park in Norway focuses on telling the story about our climate, the life in Hardanger fjord and what the Folgefonna National Park has to offer. Gagarin made three interactive installations for the exhibition.

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An inspiring knowledge center has opened in the Folgefonna National Park situated in Rosendal, Norway. The exhibition focuses on the life in Hardanger fjord and what the Folgefonna Park has to offer. The exhibition also addresses nature’s most significant threat – climate change. Gagarin produced three interactive installations for the first phase of the exhibition, an interactive table on the historical highlights of the Folgefonna peninsula, and an interactive physical map of the area.

The third installation phase is on its way; a pair of binoculars that allow visitors to go bird watching in the park using virtual reality technology.

Prime Minister of Norway, Erna Solberg gets information about the installation from professor Anders Lundberg. Photo: folgefonnsenteret.no


Heart of a Nation

Gagarin was asked to create an exhibition that brought the less visible aspects of its history to life at Thingvellir, one of the most visited places in Iceland. This is the place where the nation held its first assembly in 944 – the Althing.

22 The origins of Icelandic natural history as well as its cultural and political history can be traced back to the crack in the tectonic plates, visible at Thingvellir. This is the place where the nation held its first assembly in 944 – the Althing, which is the name of our parliament to this day. Iceland exists because of the interaction between a tectonic rift and the underlying magma plume emanating from the centre of the earth.

Our cultural history, however, is less tangible. It is derived from ancient manuscripts, in which Thingvellir and the events that took place there are extensively described. While this heritage might not be immediately visible in the landscape, Thingvellir acts as a symbol that we identify with as a nation. In 2004 UNESCO designated Thingvellir National Park as a World Heritage Site, in recognition of its cultural value.

At Thingvellir, the geological evidence of Iceland’s beginning is obvious. The tall walls of rock, the long, parallel cracks and the distinctive lava fields show how the island was created over hundreds of thousands of years.

Þingvellir is one of the most visited places in Iceland, so Gagarin was asked to create an exhibition that brought the less visible aspects of its history to life. The crack in the earth is where it all started, and we felt that this was also the

Visitors are encouraged to look at the events and stories of Thingvellir from different perspectives. We let the visitor see events both from a close perspective and observing it from far away.


perfect place for the exhibition to start. The 350 m2 exhibition space is divided in half by an interactive crack, aligned with the actual crack just outside. From this crack, interactive installations emerge, each one illustrating key events in the history of Thingvellir and drawing on the relationship between our natural and cultural history. In this way the interaction of geology, nature and culture is central to exhibition’s concept.

Exhibition Highlights • Participate in the Lögrétta, the Icelandic law council from the year 1000, through a virtual reality experience. • Learn about the geopolitical relationships of the past and how they influenced events at Thingvellir, as time is slipping through your fingers. • Travel over mountains and traverse rivers with famous characters from the Sagas on their journey to Thingvellir. • Experience the World Heritage Site through the eyes of an archaeologist. The Heart of a Nation exhibition will open its doors in the summer of 2018, when Iceland celebrates 100 years of independence. We hope to welcome you there!

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Visitors are encouraged to look at the events and stories of Þingvellir from different perspectives. We let the visitor see events both from a close perspective and observing it from far away. We let them look at Thingvellir zoomed out in time or being present at the time. We let the visitor put themselves in the shoes of a convicted felon from a thousand years ago, experience important historical events from different points of view, and catch a glimpse of what the future might look like. Through these perspectives, visitors can come to a holistic understanding of Thingvellir.


Red Terror

Gagarin, together with Tvíhorf architects and H2E exhibition designers, have been awarded for their submission to the competition for the design of a new museum in Tallinn, the Red Terror – a Museum for the Crimes of Communism. Together with Tvíhorf architects and H2E exhibition designers, Gagarin have been awarded for their submission to the competition for the design of a new museum in Tallinn, “The Red Terror”, – a Museum for the Crimes of Communism. Installed in the Patarei fortress, a historical prison, the exhibition meets challenging topics head on. It illustrates the methodology of communist terror and shows how the shifting regimes which occupied Estonia during the 20th century, used the prison to exert control over Estonia's citizens. 24

Special care was taken to accurately represent the shifting ideologies that swept across the country, the prison conditions, and the horrible crimes perpetrated there. Our goal with the design was to incorporate as much of the decaying building in its original state to allow it to speak for itself. Rather than refurbishing everything, we employed the design concept of creating an exhibition layer over the original features in stark contrast to the historic building. As such, the building, the traces of peoples’ time there, and their stories take center stage. This collaboration and its meaningful outcomes demonstrated exciting possibilities in transcontinental collaborations which highlight the benefits of cooperating with parties in different countries with different backgrounds. Receiving the silver award in this open competition is very exciting for us and we look forward to taking it, and the collaborations it spawned, much further.


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Jury comments “The author has made sense of the building in such a way that both old and new would function side by side. This applies within the building, where the authors see completely unrenovated rooms above which visitors seem to float on purpose-built passageways, alongside rooms designed in a contemporary fashion. The same sort of approach is

used outdoors as well, where an annex that is bold in regard to cultural heritage preservation is added to the existing building volume, which will likely cause considerable passionate responses. The jury particularly likes the design of the so-called inner courtyard entrance. The choice of material for the annex

ranges from pale to red glass, which may be excessive for conservative tastes. Corten steel is offered as a compromise for conservative taste, and this fits in well with the existing context. This is an entrance as a monument. The ideas for the exposition are very well thought out and their implementation is innovative.�


How we do it

Geir Borg, CEO of Gagarin talks about the collaborative journey of making any new interactive exhibiton. The overall process, challenging parts, user tests and why the client is always a part of the decision making throughout the whole process.

"How much will it cost and how soon can you deliver it?" These are common questions asked by our clients, for which there is no common answer. It depends on the level of quality they want to achieve and how fast they need to achieve it. We often ask our clients to describe those two variables.

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The creation of any new interactive exhibition is a collaborative journey, be it a museum exhibition or a bespoke one-off display. The resulting product usually begins with an initial idea from our client. They specify the topics to be covered, describe the available exhibition space and outline goals for the visitor's experience. They often come to us with an idea of their preferred timeline and cost for the exhibit. From this point on, we begin our work together by allocating a dedicated team of employees to work on the project according to its scope, budget and time constraints.

The Narrative For us at Gagarin, the story our client wishes to tell is of paramount importance. Our goal is to hone this story, decide what should be told and how to best serve a compelling narrative. With this in mind, we must carefully consider how to immerse and engage the visitor in an inspiring experience. This is the truly challenging part and as a creative company, we are always pushing the limits of what is possible.

For us at Gagarin, the story our client wishes to tell is of paramount importance. Our goal is to hone this story, decide what should be told and how to best serve a compelling narrative.

Pre-Production Once we have outlined a general concept and drafted the bigger picture, we begin working on pre-production designs, complete with detailed concepts design of each part of the exhibition. This stage often requires us to gather necessary content including

reference material, photos, videos, images, illustrations and more. We refine and develop this material through collaborative discussions and experiments where prototypes of all sorts and shapes are made.

Development Once we finish the pre-production phase, complete with wireframes, storyboards, manuscripts and detailed designs, the development process begins. We know from experience that if the preparation and pre-production phase is well thought out, the development process has a much better chance of running smoothly.


Testing & Installation

we try to react quickly to resolve any issues to save time and cost. Our clients are part of this collaborative decisionmaking process and are invited to take part in deciding how best to solve these issues to swiftly move on.

Frequently we test out our ideas and concepts on potential visitors and make adjustments accordingly. This can sometimes result in starting over from a scratch on the design of an exhibition. We are willing to take this course of action if necessary because dumping an ineffective exhibition is a much smaller cost in the long run than having an ineffective exhibit stand in a museum for several years.

Once the development phase is complete, we move on to user testing and making the necessary final adjustments. We perform a test run of the entire exhibition at Gagarin's headquarters using the actual hardware

To avoid as much risk as possible, we do a risk assessment ahead of time to discuss what possible situations might arise. However, in our work, there are times when we are confronted with unforeseen circumstances. This is a natural part of the creative process and

After the grand opening, we find it normally takes between three to six months to discover and solve any further malfunctions or flaws.

Once the exhibition is installed, we maintain a vested interest in seeing that it remains in pristine working condition for the enjoyment and inspiration of visitors. After the grand opening, we find it normally takes between three to six months to discover and solve any further malfunctions or flaws. Following that period, we narrow our focus, using a keen eye to watch out for any minor problems as we continue to streamline the experience. After all, this show must go on and on.

Geir Borg, CEO.

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and custom builds. Upon client approval, we begin the exhibition installation on location. In our experience, it is beneficial to conduct a soft opening of the exhibition with no entrance fee or advertised opening for a period of time, usually a few weeks. This gives us a live, meaningful environment to streamline and perfect the exhibition’s flow.


Red Dot Award for Powering the Future Gagarin has been awarded the muchcoveted Red Dot as part of the Red Dot Award: Communication Design, the globally renowned design competition for the exhibition “Powering the Future”. “Powering the Future” is located in one of Iceland's oldest hydroelectric power stations, Ljósafossstöð. The ehibition was designed and fabricated for the 50th anniversary of Landsvirkjun, the National Power Company of Iceland. Gagarín designed the exhibition in collaboration with Tvíhorf Architects. Once again, we thank Landsvirkjun for this extraordinary cooperation and for being so forward thinking.

We moved! Our beautiful new studio helps us to be even more creative: more space to think bigger thoughts and develop great ideas. Gagarin Brúarvogur 1–3 104 Reykjavík Iceland (+354) 510 9300 gagarin@gagarin.is www.gagarin.is

Gagarin Newsletter 2018  

Gagarin develops highly interactive media solutions that allow people to uniquely experience, understand & share

Gagarin Newsletter 2018  

Gagarin develops highly interactive media solutions that allow people to uniquely experience, understand & share

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