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Kristie Lane Anderson Design Portfolio // 2018


If I had to distill my life down to one driving element, it would be curiosity. I am always asking the what and the how and the why, always looking for the pieces and connections that illustrate the larger picture of the universe. Curiosity and the joy of discovery drives my creative process. I seek not only to create what is beautiful, but also to weave it into the world at large. How does it work: ecologically, socially, psychologically, pedagogically, aesthetically? But most of all, to me curiosity is playful. It is wonderment. It is fun. It is going a little further down the trail just to see what I might find. It is the essential question that moves me through the days: What else? What next?


Kristie Lane Anderson, ASLA, LEED AP B.Arch, 2011 M.L.ARCH Candidate, 2018

813.494.0031 KristieLaneAnderson@gmail.com https://issuu.com/kristielane/docs/portfolio

Education Temple University // Philadelphia, PA, 2015-present (through May 2018) Master of Landscape Architecture Candidate --

Specialization in ecological restoration

University of Oregon // Eugene & Portland, OR, 2011 Bachelor of Architecture, Minor in Landscape Architecture ---

Specialization in design of educational spaces Graduated Magna Cum Laude

Professional Experience Bowman’s Hill Wildflower Preserve // Summer 2017 Horticulture Intern -----

Native plant seed collection and propagation Plant installation in natural areas Invasive species removal Restoration planning & implementation

Fielding Nair International // 2011-2017 Design Associate -------

Building design and documentation from concept to design development Landscape planning and concept design School campus and district master planning Expertise in educational facility design and programming Research and preparation for new projects, especially regarding site analysis, sustainability, climate, cultural context, and architectural precedents Workshops and presentations for clients and communities

Certifications Permaculture Design Certificate // Chesapeake Education, Arts and Research Society, 2014 LEED Accredited Professional // 2009

Community Service Society for Ecological Restoration // Temple University Student Association, 2015-present President Maryland Search & Rescue // 2013-2016 Call-Out Qualified Volunteer Searcher

Additional Skills Digital Media // Adobe Creative Cloud, ArcGIS, AutoCAD, Revit, SketchUp, MS Office Hand Media // Hand sketching, Pen & pencil rendering, Watercolor Plant Identification // Native woody & herbaceous plants, invasive species of the Mid-Atlantic


Contents 6

Bowman’s Hill Wildflower Preserve // M.L.Arch Capstone

10

Pleasant Hill Park // M.L.Arch Design Studio

14

Woodland Garden // M.L.Arch Planting Design Studio

16

Anne Frank Inspire Academy // Fielding Nair International

20

S.T.E.A.M. School // Fielding Nair International

22

Mid-Pacific Institute Master Plan // Fielding Nair International

26

Fernhill Trailhead School // B.Arch Terminal Studio

30

Quaker Permaculture Garden // Permaculture Design Certificate Program

32

Art & Illustration // Personal & Professional Work


Bowman’s Hill Temple University M.L.Arch Capstone Project

historic forest and tourist destination with an observation tower to overlook the valley.

Role // project conception, site analysis, The separate management of each master planning, design park has led to visitor confusion, operational challenges, and ecological Details // Bucks Cty, PA degradation in the regions outside To be completed May 2018 of the Wildflower Preserve’s deer This is the story of two parks. One, the exclosure fence. state’s first wildflower preserve, has This project aims to reunite the whole been intensively studied and managed of Bowman’s Hill, and to celebrate for ecological diversity for over eighty the human, ecological, and geological years. The other, a monument to the richness of the site. Revolutionary War, was created as a

Above: View of Bowman’s Hill Wildflower Preserve from Observation Tower Opposite Above: Bowman’s Hill Site Plan Opposite Below: Site Conditions Photos


Aque tong

Road

Delaware River De erF en ce

Thompson-Neely Farmstead

Del

awa re

Bowman’s Hill

Wildflower Preserve

Visitor Center & Nursery

r Dee

ce Fen

ine r ty L e p Pro Andrassy House

Bowman’s Hill

Tower

Bowman’s Hill

100’ N

0’

500’ 200’

Bowman’sHillObservationTower

l

Victorian Neely House

k

ree kC

c co Pid

Can a

1000’

Bowman’sHillWildflowerPreserve

oad nR e g Lur

Riv erR oa d


Delaware River New Visitor Center

Expand Nursery Improve Trail System

Renovate Tower

100’ N

0’

500’ 200’

1000’

Delaware River New Visitor Center

Expand Nursery Improve Trail System

Above: Master Plan Concept I Unified Site Experience

Renovate Tower

Below: Master Plan Concept II Multiple Access Points Opposite Above: Visitor Center Concept Sketch Opposite Center: Plant Communities & Restoration Plan Improve Entrance Visibility

Opposite Below: Environmental Damage From Deer Browse 100’ N

0’

500’ 200’

1000’

New Trailhead Parking


Delaware River

Delaware River er

De

Wet Meadow

ce

Floodplain Forest

n Fe

Dry Meadow Upland Mesic Slope Mesic Forest Forest

nce

r Fe

Diabase Slope Forest

Dee

Conifer Stand

Ecological Restoration Area

Upland Mesic Forest

100’ N

0’

500’ 200’

100’ 1000’

Inside the fence (BHWP)

N

0’

500’ 200’

1000’

Deerexclosurefence.Insideistotheright,outsidetotheleft.

Outside the fence (Tower site)


100-Year Floodplain

High Tide Marker

Mean Tide Marker

Low Tide Marker

Pleasant Hill Park Temple University M.L.Arch Intermediate Studio Role // project conception, design, & development Details // Philadelphia, PA, 2017 Pleasant Hill Park is a neighborhood park on the Delaware River, well used by local community members yet awash with unused or unprogrammed spaces. The jumble of active areas on site-sports fields, fishing ponds, historic buildings,

boat ramps-float in a sea of lawn without ever seeming to interact. Even the hydrological flows of the site move in counter-intuitive ways between the ponds, wetlands, rain gardens, and the river. This design aims to create a cohesive vision of Pleasant Hill Park both as a place for neighbors and visitors to enjoy, and for ecological and hydrological systems to function. In essence, it reconnects people, water, and ecology with the Delaware River.

Above: Swimming Beach & Tidal Art Opposite Above: Existing Site Opposite Below: Proposed Site Plan


n

de

Lin e Av

Fishing Ponds

e ar

e Av

law

N

De

Environmental Center

Boat Ramps Observation Tower

Upland Forest

Tidal Ponds

Floodplain Forest

Upland Meadow

Restored Tidal Wetland

Delaware River

Swimming Beach


Below: Detail Plan: Environmental Center & Native Plant Demonstration Garden Opposite Above: Tidal Wetland Planting Zones Opposite Below: Tidal Wetland Section

1. Native Woody Garden

2. Native Wildflower Garden

3. Native Trees & Shady Plants

Carolina Silverbell (Halesia carolina)

Butterfly weed (Asclepias tuberosa)

American hornbeam (Carpinus caroliniana)

Smooth hydrangea (Hydrangea arborescens)

Milkweed (Asclepias syriaca )

Wild geranium (Geranium maculatum)

Beautyberry (Callicarpa americana )

New York Aster (Symphyotrichum novi-belgii)

White Wood Aster (Eurybia divaricata)

Ninebark (Physocarpus opulifolius)

Bee Balm (Monarda didyma)

Wood lily (Trillium grandiflorum)

Carolina allspice (Calycanthus floridus)

Garden phlox (Phlox paniculata)

Ostrich Fern (Matteuccia struthiopteris)

Black elderberry (Sambucus canadensis)

Threadleaf tickseed (Coreopsis verticillata)

Cinnamon Fern (Osmundastrum cinnamomeum)

Black-eyed Susan (Rudbeckia hirta)

Christmas Fern (Polystichum acrostichoides)

Rugby Fields

1 Bicycle Racks & Repair Stand

2

Native Plant Demonstration Garden

Nature Playground

3


Wooded Wetland Buttonbush (Cephalanthus occidentalis) Pussy willow (Salix discolor) River birch (Betula nigra) Black gum (Nyssa sylvatica) Wax myrtle (Morella cerifera) Jewelweed (Impatiens capensis)

8' 6' 4' 2' -1.5'

River Birch

Buttonbush

Pussy Willow

Soft Rush

Jewelweed

Swamp Milkweed

Wild Rice

Arrow Arum

Bur-Marigold

Sweet Flag

Smartweed

Pickerelweed

Emergent Wetland Three-square rush (Schoenoplectus americanus) Soft rush (Juncus effusus) Swamp milkweed (Asclepias incarnata) Jewelweed (Impatiens capensis) Swamp rosemallow (Hibiscus moscheutos)

High Marsh Jewelweed (Impatiens capensis) Smartweed (Polygonum amphibium) Wild rice (Zizania aquatica) Bur-marigold (Bidens spp.) Arrow arum (Peltandra virginica) Pickerelweed (Pontederia cordata)

12'

10'

8'

8'

-1.5'

Low Marsh

6'

Bur-marigold (Bidens spp.) Sweet flag (Acorus americanus) Bur-reed (Sparganium spp.) Wild rice (Zizania aquatica) Smartweed (Polygonum amphibium) Arrow arum (Peltandra virginica) Pickerelweed (Pontederia cordata) Spatterdock (Nuphar lutea)

a1

4' 2' 0' -2'

a0

-4'

-4'

Low Marsh

100 Year Flood

11.00'

Mean High Water 3.75' Mean Sea Level 0.58' Mean Low Tide -2.87'

-5'

-2'0' 2'

images from http://www.missouribotanicalgarden.org/ & https://plants.usda.gov/

Open Water 3'

Spatterdock (Nuphar lutea) Rooted Aquatics

Mud Flat

Open Water

Mud Flat

Low Marsh


FG HA

QA CC

CF

QA

CC

QA LR LR

N

1/16” = 1’-0”

Woodland Garden Temple University M.L.Arch Coursework Planting Design Role // planting design Details // PA Piedmont Region, 2018 This resting place within a woodland garden is designed for visitors to experience the richness in foliage texture and color by simplifying the color palette to greens and whites. The richly varied herbaceous understory of

the space is given the suggestion of enclosure by shrubs and understory trees.

Above: Planting Plan & Section Opposite Above: Plant Schedule Opposite Below: Plant Palette Image Credits: [1] Missouri Botanical Gardens [2] Fine Gardening [3] North Creek Nurseries [4] Casey Trees [5] USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


Key

Botanical Name

Common Name

Ht. (ft) Spread (ft)

Qty.

CF

Cornus florida

Flowering dogwood

15-30

15-30

1

CC

Carpinus caroliniana

Musclewood

20-35

20-35

2

QA

Quercus alba

White oak

50-80

50-80

3

J

F M A M J x

x

x

x

FG

Fothergilla gardenii

Dwarf fothergilla

3

4

24

HA

Hydrangea arborescens

Smooth hydrangea

5

5

6

LR

8

4

9

x

x

2.5

3

175

x

x

Leucothoe racemosa

Fetter bush

2

Actaea pachypoda

White baneberry

4

Actaea racemosa

Black cohosh

2

Anemone americana

Hepatica

4

Asarum canadense

1

6

4

225

0.5

0.5

15

Wild ginger

1

1

525

Carex pensylvanica

Pennsylvania sedge

1

1

600

Dryopteris marginalis

Wood fern

2

2

425

2

Eurybia divaricata

White wood aster

2

2

175

5

Maianthemum racemosum

False solomon’s seal

3

2

175

3

Onoclea sensibilis

Sensitive fern

6

Podophyllum peltatum

Mayapple

6

Porteranthus trifoliata

Bowman’s root

1,5

4

4

115

1.5

1

225

4

3

100

x

x

Zone 3

Zone 4

x

x x

Fothergilla gardenii [1]

Zone 2

x

x

Quercus alba [3]

Zone 1

x

x x

Understory Shrubs

Cornus florida [1]

x

x

Canopy & Understory Trees

Carpinus caroliniana [4]

J A S O N D

x

Hydrangea arborescens [1]

Zone 5

Carex pensylvanica [1]

Actaea pachypoda [2]

Anemone americana [1]

Actaea racemosa [1]

Dryopteris marginalis [1]

Dryopteris marginalis [1]

Eurybia divaricata [1]

Onoclea sensibilis [1]

Asarum canadense [1]

Maianthemum racemosum [1]

Porteranthus trifoliata [3]

Leucothoe racemosa [5]

Zone 6

Podophyllum peltatum [1]


S.T.E.A.M. School Fielding Nair International Role // lead landscape concept design, site analysis and graphics Details // Greenville, SC, 2012 As the central space of a school emphasizing science, technology, engineering, arts, and math (STEAM), this courtyard is designed as a “learning landscape� that is at once functional, educational, beautiful, and enjoyable. This space contains natural areas for study, an amphitheater for presentation and performance and project yards

for larger, messy projects. The central walkway illustrates the geomorphology of a river, and lays astride a rain garden.

Above: Courtyard Perspective Design by Kristie Anderson Rendering in collab with FNI team Opposite Above: Courtyard Plan Design and graphics by Kristie Anderson Opposite Below: Courtyard Aerial Design by Kristie Anderson Rendering in collab with FNI team


Music Commons

Oxbow

Cafe

Towhead

Point Bar Cut Bank Delta

Tributary

Learning Community Commons

Riverbed Trail As part of a Learning Landscape, the main path through the courtyard demonstrates examples of river geomorphology, such as tributaries and river deltas.

Project Yards The Learning Community Commons open onto the Project Yards to allow students to easily work on large or messy projects outdoors.

Learning Community Commons

Amphitheater The Amphitheater provides a performance space for music, drama, and presentations. The back wall of the Amphitheater displays a geological time line of South Carolina’s natural history.

Learning Community Commons

Native Plants Rain Garden Sloped roofs capture water and direct it to courtyard for reclamation and reuse as gray water, as a water feature, and as habitat.


Mid-Pacific Institute Master Plan Fielding Nair International Role // landscape & building concept design, site & program analysis, graphics Details // Honolulu, HI, 2014 The Master Facilities Plan was a collaborative process with the MidPacific Institute leadership and community to create a new vision for the K-12 campus. The school had many goals and desires, from renewing academic programs and spaces, to

enhancing the natural beauty of the campus, to providing better facilities for arts and athletics. The final plan reorganized the campus around a central greenway, the Ke Ala Kuamo’o, that serves as both an organizing structure and a cultural axis for the school.

Above: The Piko (Wailele Spring) Concept sketch by Kristie Anderson Opposite Above: Key Places Plan Graphics by Kristie Anderson Opposite Below: Ke Ala Kuamo’o (Greenway) Plan Graphics by Kristie Anderson


Hale Laua’e (Visitor Center) Centrally located and near the main campus entrance, this is where prospective families and visitors can learn about and tour the school

21st Century Center for Teaching and Learning The mansions perched on the hill will be transformed into a center for Alumni, school advancement, conferences, and housing for guests visiting the school

Kawaiaha’o Hall Kawaiaha’o is a beautiful stone building and the oldest on campus. Ill-suited for the dance programs it currently houses, it will see new life as a learning center for the high school.

Armstrong Dr

Kaala St

Kumukahi A new loggia, Curiosity Center and Ke Kahua create a stronger first impression of the campus, and welcome visitors with the stories of MPI’s past, present and future

University Ave

160

15

0

170

130 13

0

12

0

11

14

0

120

0

16

0

15

0

160

130

120

15

0

110

Middle School Quad 110

12

0

100

New Performing Arts Center 13

0

110

100

ile

Ma y Wa

Athletic Center

170

130

Lanai Hala An outdoor water feature and garden extend the dining space in Scudder, and connect the space to Ke Ala Kuamo’o

Ke Kahua A place for families and 120 faculty, school leaders and students to go for go for support, meetings, advice, information and resources

Ke Ala Kuamo’o Connecting the lower and upper parts of campus, Ke Ala Kuamo’o includes rain gardens, nature walks, and shaded spaces for people to gather or retreat and enjoy the lush surroundings

Ka Piko The new center of campus,14 Wailele Spring 0 connects multiple paths and reemerges as an environmental and cultural learning resource

Middle School Quad with new amphitheater & rain110garden

Lanai Hala

Ka Pi’ina 16 0 A0 social space for informal gathering with great views to the fields and mountains

15

Ka Pi’ina

Middle School Pilot Project Solar Canopy

12

0

Ke Ala Kuamo’o (Greenway)

New canopy trees and outdoor gathering places Three-Lane Track

Running Trail

Ka Piko (Wailele Spring)

13

0

PAC Cafe Terrace

110


Below: New Performing Arts Center Concept sketch by K. Anderson Opposite Above: Middle School Pilot Project Design & Modeling by K. Anderson Graphics by FNI

Music Space for band, orchestra, and choir, with storage for instruments and soundisolated practice rooms

Garden Theater A place for outdoor gathering and theater in the park

Terrace Garden Flowering garden to celebrate the lush beauty of the Manoa Valley

Black Box Theater A flexible, dynamic performance space that can open to the cafe and the Garden Theater

Cafe Part of the distributed dining scheme for the campus, the new PAC cafe will offer food services as well as casual indoor and outdoor seating

Dance Five dance studios provide the program with comfortable practice space

Teacher Workshop Space for MPSA faculty to coordinate and create new curricula and arts events


DaVinci Studio/Maker Space This wet-and-messy space connects to an outdoor patio to allow for investigative student projects

Media Bar Students can access space and power for using mobile devices and other technology, either for independent study or as a group

Project Commons The Project Commons is a collaborative space that opens to the DaVinci Studio, the Commons, the Learning Suite, and Ke Ala Kuamo’o

Rain Gardens Rain gardens replace concrete trench drains to better manage on site storm water

Learning Suite Two Learning Studios connect to allow teachers to co-teach or work with medium-sized groups of students

Teacher Collab Space Critical to the success of a Learning Community is the ability of teachers to meet, brainstorm, share resources, and collaborate

Ke Ala Kuamo’o (Greenway)

Commons The commons connects all of the learning spaces together, providing areas suited for large groups, small groups, and individuals


Anne Frank Inspire Academy Fielding Nair International Role // collaboration on interior and architectural design, lead landscape conceptual design, site analysis and graphics Details // San Antonio, TX, 2013 The Anne Frank Inspire Academy is the flagship school for the Inspire Academy Charter Schools, a charter organization that seeks to “increase the capacity for human greatness” through the foundation of inspiring 21st century

schools. Constructed on a wooded site in San Antonio, Texas, this middle school will be shortly followed an elementary and high school, as well as a rich landscape for outdoor learning and exploration. Making the best use of limited space, the Master Plan unites all three Inspire Academies around a central campus heart, allowing the back of the site to remain a wooded space for student nature walks.

Above: The Plaza (West) “Tree cookie” wall & lighting design by Kristie Anderson Photo credit: Kathy Castañon, RVK Architects Opposite Above: The Plaza (East) “Nest” & lighting design by Kristie Anderson Photo credit: Kathy Castañon, RVK Opposite Below: The Nest Design, Revit modeling, & Photoshop editing by Kristie Anderson Rendering in collaboration with FNI team


Winter

Typ. speeds ranging 4-16 mph Avg air temp: H 64, L 41 SCALE: 1” = 50’

80

70

60

50

40

30

20

10

N

E

ANNE FRANK INSPIRE ACADEMY

Summer

W

S

Typ. speeds ranging 4-16 mph Avg air temp: H 95, L 74

Above: Site Analysis Research & Diagram by Kristie Anderson Below: Concept Sketches Hand Sketches by Kristie Anderson Opposite Above: Conceptual Site Plan Design & Graphics by Kristie Anderson Opposite Below: Rain Garden Photo credit: Kathy Castañon, RVK


ES Playground

Elementary Inspire Academy

Meditation Garden

Butterfly Gardens

Nature Walk with Activity Centers

High School Inspire Academy

Council Ring

Rain Lab & Fish Pond

Anne Frank Inspire Academy

Garden & Maintenance Shed

Tree House


Fernhill Trailhead School University of Oregon B.Arch Terminal Studio Role // project conception, design, & development Details // Portland, OR, 2011 The future of sustainable cities relies on urban spaces that function simultaneously as human and wildlife habitat. The Fernhill Trailhead School is an exercise in a different way to design buildings in urban spaces. Deep site analysis, neighborhood- and

regional-scale habitat planning, and buildings that reach across the barriers between indoors and outdoors open the possibilities for the future of our cities and urban spaces.


Opposite Above: Fernhill Trailhead School Perspectives Opposite Below: Campus Concept Diagram Above: “Forest” Learning Community Structure Center: “Forest” Learning Community Passive Heating & Cooling Strategies Below: “Forest” Learning Community Perspective

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sum

g

lsti

rin

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sp tice

°

sols

45

Forest 1/8" = 1'-0"

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3

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Fir & Hemlock Forest Climax Habitat

Forest

Playground

Wetland

Oak Savanna Intermediate Successional Habitat

Soccer Fields

Oak Savanna New School Building

Prairie Early Successional Habitat Native Prairie

red-tailed hawk

fender’s blue butterfly streaked horned lark

Site western meadowlark

Neighborhood Habitat Patches and Corridors


Forest Learning Community The layers of a forest play important roles for different forest-dwelling species. Thus, the commons are elevated to a mezzanine level, looking out over the double-height library and providing a kitchen and access to student gardens and greenhouses on the roof. This learning garden is a rain garden, which dramatically collects runoff from the building into a retention pond, which in turn connects to the constructed wetland in the forested habitat of the site. Oak Savanna Learning Community With its spreading, dome-like canopy, the Oregon White Oak is the characterizing feature in its landscape, both visually and ecologically. Distinctive plant communities emerge where these oaks thrive. Thus, the commons at the center of the Savanna learning community is a domed, theater-like space. The “uncommons” radiate out from the circular commons, their shape and arrangement heavily influenced by its presence. The Oak Savanna’s garden is more anthropological in nature, expressing the intricate relationship between Native Americans and disturbance regimes (by fire) that made savanna habitats suitable for both humans and other species. Prairie Learning Community The Prairie learning community draws heavily on the planar qualities of prairie landscapes, and incorporates grassy greenroofs over each space and rammed earth walls that extend outwards into the landscape. Its commons are open and versatile, easily used as an active space, a gallery, or an assembly. The Prairie garden is a display of biodiversity. To many, prairies seem to merely be “empty land,” as devoid of value as they are seemingly devoid of structure. This, of course, is far from the truth. This garden will showcase the many and varied species that thrive in a native prairie; as students learn from this garden, they can begin to see the diversity of the prairie landscape beyond.

Forest Commons Library

Forest Learning Savanna Garden Learning Garden Savanna Commons

Nurse Log Display

Bus Lane

Prairie Commons

Prairie Learning Garden

Parking Outdoor Amphitheater


Pollinator Garden Aesthetic flowers to attract bees, butterflies, & hummingbirds

‘A Way will Open’ Labyrinth laid into the grass to allow space for both walking meditation and group meeting Supporting Habitat Existing trees & new plantings to provide shelter & food for pollinators

Oak Polyculture Plantings to complement existing oak • • •

Comfrey (for deep roots and green manure) Chives (for pest repellent) Clover (beneficial insect habitat, & ground cover)

Community Gleaning Garden Layered fruit trees and berry shrubs accessible from the public sidewalk • •

Dwarf Fruit Tree (apple, pear, peach, etc) Fruiting Shrubs (raspberry, blueberry, highbush cranberry)

Quaker Permaculture Garden Permaculture Design Course Role // project conception, design, & development Details // Washington, DC, 2014 The Friends Meeting of Washington is a Quaker community in Washington, DC. With input from Meeting attendees and members, this permaculture design enhances the beauty, function, and production of the Meeting’s gardens. In addition to beautifying spaces for meditation, ceremonies, and worship, food-producing plants are made

accessible to the public, complimenting the Meeting’s social justice work and support of the city’s homeless populations.

Above: East Garden Plan Pen and Photoshop Opposite Above: Wedding Trellis Elevation Opposite Below: West Garden Plan


Fruit Forest Garden Primarily cared for by First Day School students, annual native fruiting trees (such as paw paw) get southern exposure at the edge of open lawn for events and play

Sunflower Polyculture This modified “three sisters” polyculture refers to quaker teachings about “the inner light.” • • •

Sunflowers, as a source of food, beauty, and habitat Vine beans, such as scarlet runner, as nitrogen fixers Summer squash, as weed suppressant (ground cover) and food source

Wedding Trellis This trellis sets a backdrop for events such as weddings (an important revenue source for meetinghouse upkeep). Vines, such as maypop, scarlet runner beans, or grapes, add both beauty and function to the space.

Supporting Habitat Existing trees and strategic new plantings provide food and shelter for pollinators


Art & Illustration The following is a collection of art and creative work I have done independently, or as part of art and media classes.

Above: Fall Meadow Watercolor, 2017 Opposite, above: Hamamelis virginiana Watercolor, 2017 Opposite, below: View from Bowman’s Hill Observation Tower Watercolor, 2017


Above: Shade Garden, Hummingbird Garden for Bowman’s Hill Wildflower Preserve Pencil, 2017 `Opposite: Excerpts from Native Plants of Eastern North America Self-published Pen, 2015


Above & Opposite: Illustrations for Spaces for Learning Upcoming book by Prakash Nair and Roni Zimmer Doctory Pen & Photoshop, 2018


All images and works done with FNI Š Fielding Nair International All images and works done with RVK Š RVK Architecture All other images are held by Kristie Lane Anderson under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License

Cover: Hamamelis virginiana Watercolor, 2017

Design Portfolio 2018  

Kristie Lane Anderson // Landscape Architecture, Ecological Restoration, Educational Design, & Art

Design Portfolio 2018  

Kristie Lane Anderson // Landscape Architecture, Ecological Restoration, Educational Design, & Art

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