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kristian morse architecture portfolio


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ARCTIC_RESEARCH_CENTRE EVENT_BOX DIGIFAB_SUNSCREEN

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UNIVERSITY OF MANITOBA 2007-2011

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MAW’S_GARAGE WOHNUNG CONTAINER

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McGILL UNIVERSITY 2012-2013

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arctic_research_stationM3 Advisors: Aaron Sprecher + Elisabeth Bouchard Group: Kristian Morse + Darren Soobrayen

Week 1 & 2 | Form-making will focus on the analysis of historical and current projects located in the Arctic and Antarctic regions. Based on a form-making process, team members will establish a strategy of superimposition of information originated from drawings, scale models and computer simulation. This first design phase will lead to a specific research track and design topic to pursue. 25 case studies will be investigated and will lead to the building of a lexicon to be shared in the class. Each case study will be approached in terms of the following 5 aspects or parameters: Programmatic distribution, structural solution, material definition, construction process, and environmental responsiveness. Week 3 to 6 | Form-finding aims at transforming the architectural object from a static to a dynamic condition. Here, the protocol will lead to the development of a computational engine that propels architectural morphologies. While the development of the building design and its relation to the computational procedure is an important aspect, the association of parameters will provide a handle on complexity as it hints to directions in which the solution can be developed. Week 6 to 8 | Form-manufacturing will unite techniques to investigate consequences of envisioning the architecture as a sensitive system that reacts to its extreme environment. This last phase will culminate with the fabrication of full-scale prototypes using digital fabrication technologies such as multimaterial 3d printing and CNC milling. Each one of these three protocols will be analyzed on the level of ontology (the principles shaping the discourse), design strategy (design organization and process), and the approach toward technological tools. These three subjects will be analyzed in a broader context of theories and practices related to technology and in particular its influence on the architectural object.


EVOLUTION OF FORM · As wind is captured by the wind tunnel, air is compressed, increasing the velocity

· Connection established between elements

· Connection is shaped to keep wind path constant, second level is added to two elements

· Entry points are established

· Building skin is sculpted to become more aerodynamic

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GROUND FLOOR PLAN

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MEZZANINE LEVEL 01_Dining Room 02_Kitchen 03_Meeting Room / Research Space 04_Machine Room / Snow Melter

05_Hot Tubs 06_Lobby 07_Theatre 08_Library

09_Washroom / Changing Room 10_Ski Entrance / Storage 11_Exercise Room 12_Garage

13_Research Space 14_Hotel Room 15_Permanent Dormitories 16_Temporary Dormitories


WALL DETAIL SECTION

The wall of the wind tunnel is lined with multiple miniature wind turbines (36 cm x 20 cm) that are connected to a gear box with a dynamo. The interior wall contains wiring with AC current running down to the converter on the ground level.

ENERGY COLLECTOR Since positively (+) charged snow particles are attracted to the negatively (-) charged electrode, voltage of the collector rises due to a gain in potential energy. This potential energy can be converted and stored as electrical energy.

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collector

storage


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event_box M2

Advisors: Manon Asselin + Katsuhiro Yamazaki + Sinisha Brdar

step 1: PHYSICAL PROTOTYPE

Kristian Morse, Kim Landry, Alexandre Lapierre, Nathan Bonneville

This phase of the work looks at the iterative and speculative modelling of physical prototypes. The team will build a 1:1 scale mockup considering material, light, fabrication techniques, and budget. The mock-up serves to translate the material effect from step 1 into a full-scale architectural protype. The mock-up phase will serve as a database that will foster reflection for step 3.

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step 2: EVENT BOX

Group: Kristian Morse + Nathan Bonneville

PROGRAM The intention is to orchestrate a vibrant place for activities celebrating life and arts. It is meant to be open [or closed], dynamic and informal. It aims to be a uniquely free and inclusive cultural playground - an open platform allowing for as many diverse manifestations as possible. With this as an overarching objective, we are proposing a programmatic cocktail in the range of 1500 m2. The main components of the programme are listed below. The definition of the programme in this case should be thought of as a field of relationships and as a process of creation of desirable situations rather than as a mere functional programming. There is a flexibility allowing for adjustment along individual groups’ programmatic scenarios. Lecture/ Gathering/Concert Hall/ [~300 people capacity] [500m2, including support spaces, a/v, change/prep, etc] Multipourpose/Exhibition/QdS information area [200m2] Reading Room /Arts Lounge [150m2] Bistro/Restaurant/Karaoke Lounge [~50 seat capacity] [250m2] Entrance/Lobby/Vestibule [75m2] Reception/Tickets/Cloak Room [25m2] Administration [100m2] Youth lounge [75m2] Washrooms [~75m2] Storage/Maintenance [~200m2] Mechanical [~200m2] Outdoor public space able to accommodate and foster a variety of public events and activities, formal and informal, day and night, all seasons.

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AXONOMETRIC 1. Existing building converted into a squat (co-op) for artists 2. Program integrated into the cloud including spaces for performing and producing art 3. Sky pathway as a public sky park 4. Cloud pathway with main structure 5. Cloud composed of laminated lumber walls 6. Ground flood converted into a public market 7. Bike shop and repair-center 8. CafĂŠ-bar 9. Multi-function public plaza 10. Theatre / performance space

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digifab_sunscreenM1 Advisor: Maria Mingallon Group: Kristian Morse, Ji Won Jun, Jason Treherne, Vi Ngo, Maxime Madeck

CHALLENGE The project consists of the design and fabrication of a sunscreen aimed to prevent excessive sunlight through the windows of the first-year studio. The goal of this assignment is to find a sustainable solution that works in all seasons, capable of eliminating the disadvantages of a southwest facing room, without compromising its advantages. DESIGN / CONCEPT Our sunscreen provides users with local control and freedom over their exposure to sun, glare, heat, and shade at any given time. Glare and heat-gain are the main issues in the studio at the Macdonald-Harrington building. However, instead of blocking the sun out altogether, we wanted to reduce glare while still providing a welllight room. We envisioned our sunscreen as multiple local light fixtures based on a single design concept. Using the sun as our light source, we wanted to achieve a device that is playful, beautiful, and effective. We opted to use a fabric with enough translucency to diffuse the light throughout the space. The user, through a simple act of pushing or pulling, can stretch the fabric to various degrees in order to allow for a different concentration of light and shade. When opened, the fabric stretches in a radial direction and protrudes toward the user, as if the light fixture was blossoming. The structural grid produces a parallax effect and the depth creates varying conditions of light and heat. The device becomes an object that resembles a jellyfish, stretching over a curved surface to diffuse light in multiple directions. We sought fabrication techniques and materials readily available at the School of Architecture at McGill University. The plasma cutter allowed us to generate a form with steel that would otherwise not be possible through traditional construction methods. This particular means of fabrication also allowed us to fully explore the future of digital parametric design and further push the limits of the material and uncover the potential for advanced fabrication. As such, our sunscreen seeks to blur the boundaries between a functional shading device and art installation.

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maw’s_garageED4 Advisor: Neil Minuk Individual

More often than not, architecture is designed without the consideration of how it might be activated or lived. Not necessarily how it might function but in the larger sense, how it might support meaningful actions and how lives already existing on a site can be engaged and enhanced. Select a program that you have a set of conditions to design for. The program is developed from the narrative or poetic activation of the site. The site conditions, activations and speculation of poetic enactments on site will shape and generate the architectural proposition. Work in drawing, model, and active medias. Please work in a manner that thinks about the architecture as a living setting. -Enacting Studio Brief

“THE ARCADES AND INTERIORS ARE RESIDUES OF THE DREAM WORLD” -Walter Benjamin, The Arcades Project


By keeping the parking at ground level and elevating the arcade to the +15’-0� level, the arcade extends overtop the nightclub through to Princess street. This creates a public street that cuts through the city block. The public street consists of a series of catwalks that meander through the trusses and into the shops, offices, rental studios, picnic areas, and the adjacent bars and taverns. By inserting a series of courtyards, the public street and the apartment units above receive sufficient daylight at all times.


Maw’s Garage was built in 1907 for the purpose of storing and showcasing automobiles. Today the structure is intact while the roof has degraded over time. Maw’s Garage consists of sloped trusses spanning 60’0” at every 15 foot interval. The distance from the bottom chord is 15’-0”, as is the distance from the bottom chord to the ground. The trusses are steel construction and the walls/pilasters are brick. By inverting the trusses, the existing trusses can be used to accomodate housing units above without compromising the integrity of the existing building. Therefore, the space below serves as a public arcade with shops, offices, and studios that extend across the entire lot from King Street to Princess Street. Similarly the housing units, whose sizes range from 700-900 sq/ft., extend from King Street to Princess Street for a total of fourteen units.

+30 LIVING UNITS +15 PUBLIC STREET 0PARKING TRUSS CONNECTION DETAIL

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wohnungED2 Advisor: Sasa Radulovic | 5468796 architects Individual

INTENT Students are to design a dwelling for a family of 3 + 1 dog + 1 vehicle. Total project area: 729 sq/ft x 3 floors = 2,187 sq/ft. Total volume: 19,683 cubic feet. While maintaining the volume and area through addition, subtraction, composition, overlapping, intersecting, stretching, skewing, morphing - as modifiers of the initial condition, students are to produce individual designs following their discoveries and explorations from framework and composition stages. Introduction of programme and function offers an opportunity to produce spatial and formal configurations through careful consideration and exploration of domestic conditions. -ED2 studio brief

SOUTH ELEVATION

SOUTH SECTION

WEST ELEVATION

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MOKSHA HOUSE Moksha (sanskrit: liberation) refers, in general, to the liberation from the cycle of death and rebirth. In higher Hindu philosophy, it is seen as a transcendence of phenomenal being, of any sense of consciousness of time, space, and causation (karma)

WEST SECTION


FIRST FLOOR PLAN

SECOND FLOOR PLAN

THIRD FLOOR PLAN

ROOF PLAN


containerED2 Advisor: Jae-Song Chon Individual

OBSERVE real people in real life situations to fin out what makes them tick, what confuses them, what they like, what they hate, where they have latent needs not addressed by current products and services. VISUALIZE new-to-the-world concepts and the customers who will use them. This is often the most intense phase of the process. This can be done by drawings and models. Visualize the user’s experience by creating composite characters and storyboard scenarios. EVALUATE the prototype in a series of quick iterations. No idea is too good that it cannot be improved upon. Think of the process as a series of improvements. IMPLEMENT the concept for production. This phase is often the longest and most technically challenging in the development process. -(ED2 studio brief)

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ARTWORK

church in Saint John, New Brunswick (ink and watercolour on stathmore)

girl sitting in cafĂŠ (contĂŠ on stathmore)


sketch of Notre-Dame cathedral in Montréal - exterior (conté on stathmore)

sketch of Notre-Dame cathedral in Montréal - interior (conté on stathmore)


study of female form contĂŠ on newsprint

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study of female form

pastel on construction paper


study of female form ink on newsprint

study of female form ink on newsprint

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academic portfolio - architecture