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            Handbook for 

      Middle and Upper School         Students and Parents           2012 ­ 2013 

The Master’s School  36 Westledge Road  West Simsbury, CT 06092  860.651.9361  www.masterschool.org

   


TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction ................................................................................................ 1 Academics .................................................................................................. 4 Activities and Clubs .................................................................................... 8 Advisor System ........................................................................................... 8 After School ................................................................................................ 8 Athletics ...................................................................................................... 8 Attendance ................................................................................................. 8 Awards...................................................................................................... 11 Bus Policy……………………………………………………………………….11 Campus Stewardship ................................................................................ 11 Class Trips / Retreats ............................................................................... 11 Communication ......................................................................................... 11 Disciplinary System .................................................................................. 12 Documentation Standards ........................................................................ 17 Dress Code, Grooming and Appearance Standards ................................. 18 Driving, Parking, Motor Vehicles .............................................................. 21 Eligibility Requirements for Privileges ....................................................... 22 Field Trips ................................................................................................. 23 Fire Safety / Emergency ........................................................................... 23 Fundraising ............................................................................................... 23 Graduation Requirements ......................................................................... 24 Health Services......................................................................................... 24 Homeroom ................................................................................................ 26 Homework ................................................................................................ 26 Internet “Acceptable Use Policy”  .............................................................. 27 Library / Media Center .............................................................................. 28 Locks, Lockers, and Public Areas ............................................................. 28


Lost and Found Items ............................................................................... 29 Lunch ........................................................................................................ 29 Mandatory Reporting to Department of Children and Families.................. 29 National Honor Society ............................................................................. 30 Physical Education ................................................................................... 30 Publications .............................................................................................. 30 School Hours……………………………………………………………………31 Senior Privileges ....................................................................................... 31 Snow Days ............................................................................................... 32 Spiritual Life .............................................................................................. 32 Study Halls ............................................................................................... 33 Student Life .............................................................................................. 33 Teachers................................................................................................... 34 Telephones /cell phones/ Email ................................................................ 34 Transcripts ................................................................................................ 35 Transportation .......................................................................................... 35 Visitors ...................................................................................................... 36 A Brief Historical Sketch of The Master’s School ...................................... 36 Appendix................................................................................................... 40


INTRODUCTION

The Master's School is a Christian day school with distinctively Christian educational objectives to encourage and enable students to receive all that God has for them spiritually, intellectually, physically, emotionally, and socially. In addition to the goals related to students' academic development, it is our hope to afford every child the opportunity to experience the reality of God through Jesus Christ in a meaningful and personal way. As a non-church related Christian institution, we are committed to the traditional Christian faith as expressed in the Apostles' and Nicene Creeds. We believe that the Bible in its entirety contains God's plan for humankind and is essential to any reliable understanding of the human condition. We encourage our faculty members to share their faith in Christ in the course of their working relationship with students in addition to scheduled worship times, in which Christian leaders are invited to speak about the Christian life. It is important for students and faculty to worship together, encouraging and uplifting one another in our relationship with God. For this reason, students and teachers meet together each morning to begin the day in fellowship with God and each other. Regularly scheduled Chapels provide opportunities for teaching, sharing, singing and worship. We recognize the necessity of close cooperation between school and family in attempting to realize these goals and objectives. We trust that in your relationship to The Master's School you will support our goals and purposes as a Christian school. STATEMENT OF FAITH We believe the Bible to be the inspired, the only infallible, authoritative Word of God. We believe that there is one God, eternally existent in three persons: Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. We believe in the deity of Jesus Christ, His virgin birth, His sinless life, His miracles, His vicarious and atoning death through His shed blood, His bodily resurrection, His ascension to the right hand of the Father, and His personal return in power and glory. We believe that for the salvation of lost and sinful man regeneration by the Holy Spirit is absolutely essential. We believe in the present ministry of the Holy Spirit by whose indwelling the Christian is enabled to live a godly life. We believe in the resurrection of both the saved and the lost, they who are saved unto the resurrection of life and they who are lost unto the resurrection of damnation. We believe in the spiritual unity of believers in our Lord Jesus Christ. STATEMENT OF MISSION “We at  The  Master's  School  are  committed  to  the  integration  of  faith  and  learning  within  the  framework of a Christian world view. We challenge our students to strive for spiritual maturity and academic excellence in a supportive community that emphasizes “education from the inside  out!”


THE MASTER'S SCHOOL’S CORE VALUES Commitment to Biblical Truth The Truth as revealed through Jesus Christ is the foundation of all we do The Bible stands as the source for wisdom in all questions and calls us to bring glory to God The Holy Spirit leads us into all truth, and the truth, once known, sets us free Commitment to Integrity (in character, conduct & conversation) Christ is our model for character development We must pursue honesty in all communications We must demonstrate respect for each individual We must model intentional obedience to God We must be characterized by service to others We honor God by taking personal responsibility for our individual actions Commitment to Excellence in Education: The faculty and staff commit to: Grow professionally Remain current with academic trends and best practices in education Maintain accountability in and out of the classroom Establish clear objectives, guidelines and standards in all mission-related service Recognize each individual’s unique God-given design Equip students to discover and develop their God-given gifts & talents Empower students to use those gifts and talents to serve God by serving the world around them

AUTHENTIC CHRISTIAN EDUCATION Authentic Christian education has as its ultimate purpose the cultivation of mature and equipped followers of Christ. This purpose is realized by the carefully directed process of discovery of who God is, how He has shaped His creation, and how we as men and women created in His image ought to respond to such discovery. The academic disciplines become, then, simply the various doorways through which such lifechanging discovery occurs. And the Christian educator plays the role of guide and mentor in that unfolding process, utilizing his/her subject matter, relationships and life example as tools to shape the minds and hearts of their students. Once that process begins to bear fruit in the life of a student not only will his/her own thoughts and choices be transformed, but the student will also become an agent of change in the world around him/her as God uses them to accomplish His purposes.


PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION The Educational Program: We educate the whole child from early childhood through grade 12. The three strands of Christian education are the family, the church, and the Christian school. The Christian school trains the mind to think critically and to seek truth while simultaneously connecting that knowledge to the heart. This is accomplished through biblical integration, Christhonoring mentoring relationships and directed life experiences. As a Christian school we view all truth as His truth. It makes connections to the bigger picture of God as Creator, Savior, and Lord. Since education is His domain, a Christian school points to His role in history, His creatorship in the sciences, the beauty and aesthetics in the arts, the power of the written and spoken word in languages and literature, and the order and precision of God’s mind in math. While the Bible is  taught it is also integrated into all that we do, offering a framework for understanding our world. This Biblical perspective uncovers the unique design of a child and begins to unveil who he/she is  and  what  they  are  called  to  do  for  God’s  kingdom.  Each  student  will  be  nurtured  and  challenged to strive for personal excellence and spiritual maturity. We believe the rigorous pursuit of academic learning is one way to honor Christ. We understand that a student will achieve his or her highest potential when taught in such an environment. The ultimate aim of our educational program is to equip every mind and transform every heart to understand and experience God. By doing so, we prepare and equip the child to impact the world for Jesus Christ. The Teacher: Every teacher has a personal commitment to and relationship with the Lord Jesus Christ and demonstrates love to students, parents and others in The Master’s School community, as a natural outworking of that relationship. Our educational philosophy reflects and expects the highest principles and best practices of teaching for all of our educators. The Master's School teacher is committed to excellence in education as demonstrated through the mastery of their respective subject matter, and an informed understanding of child development and learning styles. We believe to love students is to hold students to high academic standards. The teacher is the backbone of the school. Each teacher is expected to possess and practice from a Biblical worldview perspective and continually pursue excellence in their craft. The Student: Every student is a unique individual, created in God's image. We believe every child has been endowed with distinct aptitudes and abilities in many areas; spiritually, intellectually, creatively, socially, emotionally and physically. In light of this, the student is encouraged  and  expected  to,  “…grow  in  wisdom  and  stature  and  in  favor  with  God  and  man."  Luke 2:52.

EDUCATIONAL GOALS Early Childhood Center To foster wonder and delight in learning To nurture a positive sense of self and respect for others To encourage creative expression and problem solving To support and develop emerging social and emotional skills To create an environment where young children can discover God and experience His love Lower School To establish a foundation of strong academic and social skills which students can utilize and apply with competency To nurture a positive sense of self-worth and a healthy respect for others


To foster a love for learning in an environment which supports each child and allows them to thrive, grow and be risk takers To maximize students' critical thinking skills and promote problem solving To create an environment in which the process of learning is as valuable as its output To create an atmosphere in which children come to discover and experience God and express His love

Middle School To help students achieve mastery of academic skills in all subject areas and learn to set attainable goals To nurture self-assurance, intellectual curiosity, and individual responsibility in students To create conditions in which students can experience success by identifying individual strengths and assisting students in areas in which they need help To enable students to see God as the Author of life and encourage them to seek a personal relationship with Him

Upper School To challenge students academically in preparation for the rigors of university education and the pursuit of being a lifelong learner To develop in young adults the ability to think critically, become problem solvers and increase their capacity toward mature decision-making To give students the experience of living and working together in a Christian community To help students develop their individual gifts and talents in realization of the potential given to them by God

ACADEMICS The Master’s  School  is  committed  to  academic  excellence.  As  a  college preparatory school, we seek to provide students with skills that will expand their capabilities and understanding while stimulating the development and critical use of the thinking process. The School’s emphasis is on  small class interaction. Our faculty and staff are also committed to working beyond the scope of the immediate classroom and campus, appreciating the learning and growing experiences that can take place in off-campus environments. Although our academic requirements are challenging, frequent opportunity for personal contact with the faculty provides encouragement and direction. Teachers at The Master’s School do more than  merely collect homework and give tests. They take personal and professional delight in responding to the interests and needs of their students. Upper School students are required to complete service according to the Learning and Serving Christian Service booklet. See booklet for details.


Academic Courses: Drop/Add Procedure If a student desires to drop/add a course, the form is available in the office. Check on schedule suitability first and then submit the completed form that must include a reason for the change and the following signatures: advisor, drop and add teachers, parent and director. Drops/adds must be done on or before the first mid-quarter of each semester. If it is necessary to drop a course after the mid-quarter, it will be recorded as “WP” withdrawn passing or “WF” withdrawn failing according to  the work that was completed. Grading System Teachers and advisors frequently communicate to parents about a student’s academics, effort and  behavior. Grades are sent home at the end of each quarter, comments by each teacher are sent at the end of the first and third quarters, and progress reports are sent at the midpoint of each quarter to parents of a student whose work needs improvement and requires closer monitoring. Progress reports may also be sent for students who have shown significant improvement. Either the parents or the school may initiate emails, telephone calls or personal conferences. The success  of  a  student  at  The  Master’s  School  is  directly  related  to  the  effectiveness  of  communication between the home and the school. Letter grades are used to report academic progress. To report progress in effort and behavior, a numerical system is used. (see next page) A

Outstanding: does excellent work; frequently exceeds expectations for assignments; displays excellent mastery of subject area; functions at highest level of performance.

B

Commendable: does very good work; completes all assignments accurately and consistently; displays good mastery of subject area; functions at high level of performance.

C

Satisfactory: does good work; completes most assignments accurately; displays consistent competence in subject area; functions at acceptable level of performance.

D

Needs Improvement: does work of inconsistent quality; frequently does not complete assignments well; displays sporadic competence in subject area; functions at less than satisfactory level of performance.

F

Unsatisfactory: makes minimal progress in work; seldom completes assignments with any degree of accuracy; displays little competence in subject area; functions at unsatisfactory level of performance.


GRADE SCALE A+ A AB+ B BC+ C CD+ D DF

98-100 94-97 91-93 88-90 84-87 81-83 78-80 74-77 71-73 68-70 64-67 61-63 0-60

4.3 4.0 3.7 3.3 3.0 2.7 2.3 2.0 1.7 1.3 1.0 0.7 0

Honors* 4.8 4.5 4.2 3.8 3.5 3.2 2.8 2.3 1.7 1.3 1.0 0.7 0

AP 5.3 5.0 4.7 4.3 4.0 3.7 3.3 3.0 1.7 1.3 1.0 0.7 0

*Honors courses were not weighted prior to the 2008-2009 academic year. Beginning in 20082009, no weighting in either Honors or AP is given to grades of C- or below. At the end of each quarter, a grade point average (GPA) is computed for each student by averaging grades in each full-credit academic subject. At the end of the first semester, any student with a semester GPA below 1.70 is placed on academic probation. Unless the cumulative GPA at the end of the year improves above 1.70, such students may not be allowed to return to the School the following September. If a student successfully completes courses that meet the academic rigor of The Master’s School during a summer school, the student may reapply for admission. Students who miss more than the allotted number of classes (see Attendance) of a given course during the school year may not receive credit for the course. Students and parents will be warned in advance if an attendance/credit problem appears to be developing. Medical excuses will be considered on a case-by-case basis. School related absences such as college visits are not included. See the attendance section for more information. The High Honor Roll is published four times a year for students with a 3.50 GPA or better. The Honor Roll includes students whose GPA is 3.0–3.49.  An  academic  grade  of  an  “F”  makes  a  student ineligible for honor roll consideration. If a semester exam is given in January and/or June, the grade is counted as 20% of the semester grade. Academic credit will be granted only if the final grade is above 61. Summer school attendance may be required to advance to the next level.


Effort 1 Excellent: exhibits diligence beyond expectations; self-motivated; displays positive attitude; enthusiastically participates in classroom discussion; prepares consistently for class. 2 Above Expectations: exhibits sincere interest in subject area; usually self-motivated; displays positive attitude; participates in classroom discussion; completes assignments on time. 3 Expected: consistent with majority of class; pays attention in class; prepares consistently; usually displays positive attitude; responds to teacher-initiated motivation. 4 Below Expectations: displays inconsistent attitude; occasionally inattentive in class; erratic in completion of assignments; sometimes unprepared for class; requires unusual amount of teacher direction and assistance. 5 Inadequate: demonstrates poor attitude; frequently inattentive in class; seldom completes assignments on time; inconsistent in preparation for class; requires too much teacher direction and assistance. Behavior 1 Excellent: makes positive contribution to classroom environment; well-disciplined in word and action; courteous and respectful; model of consistency. 2 Above Expectations: consistently well behaved; respectful and helpful to peers; ready to assist with classroom projects when needed. 3 Expected: displays self-discipline consistent with majority of class; generally attentive and respectful; seldom needs to be cautioned by teacher. 4 Below Expectations: too often misbehaves; lacks consistent self-discipline; sometimes inconsiderate of others. 5 Inappropriate: consistently misbehaves; in danger of disciplinary suspension; frequently inconsiderate of others; disrespectful to students and faculty; lacks self-discipline. At the end of each quarter, the Director or Dean of Students may contact parents of students receiving 4’s or 5’s in behavior. Likewise, teacher conferences may be scheduled with parents of students receiving 4’s or 5’s in effort. See SENIOR PRIVILEGES SECTION for information on 2nd Semester Senior Exam Policy

ACADEMIC HONESTY Membership in a Christian academic community requires students and faculty alike to commit themselves to one of its fundamental purposes: the search for truth. Refer to the definitions under “Disciplinary System” and consider them carefully.

REPORT CARDS Report cards are given for each student four times per year. Each fall an official day of conferences is set aside for parents who wish to meet with classroom teachers. Parents are welcome to request a conference at any other time by calling the office.


ACTIVITIES and CLUBS At The Master's School there are a variety of activities in which students may participate. Special events on and off campus are scheduled throughout the year. Homecoming activities usually are held in the fall. In the spring the Junior class holds the Junior-Senior Banquet to honor the Seniors. Dates, times, locations and guidelines are generally available 1-2 months in advance. The regularly published Friday email provides information on upcoming dates to save. Many activities and all class trips are required as part of our curriculum. The major goals of such activities are to honor God and build a spiritual foundation, to build social skills within a Christian framework, to develop a sense of responsibility, independence and maturity, and to build community. Circumstances, problems, or concerns (whether financial or personal), which may interfere with  a  student’s  participation  in  an  event,  should  be  discussed  with  the  Director. See “Eligibility Requirements” for additional information.

ADVISOR SYSTEM The advisor system is an important element of life at The Master’s School. Each class will have  two or more faculty members assigned to them as Class Advisors. Class advisors will supervise the general social life, spiritual life, and fellowship of their individual grade. They will help organize and supervise events and activities which promote such growth.

AFTER SCHOOL Please see section on “School Hours”

ATHLETICS Please see section on “Eligibility Requirements” and the current edition of “Athletic Handbook”  on the school website.

ATTENDANCE IF YOU WILL BE ABSENT OR TARDY ON A PARTICULAR DAY, THE OFFICE MUST BE NOTIFIED VIA PHONE, EMAIL OR IN PERSON BY 8:30 AM Basic to all education is the understanding that the student must be present in order to participate in the learning process. Therefore, it is understood that all students will consistently and punctually attend all scheduled activities, including regular classes, study halls, electives, athletic practices, rehearsals and special functions (like service activities, field trips, concerts, graduations, etc.) when required.


1) Communication regarding Absences and/or tardiness The Master’s school must be notified about student Absences and/or tardiness by  8:30 AM. This can be done via phone (860-651-9361), email, or in person. Without communication from home by 8:30 a student will recorded as Unexcused Absent or Tardy. As explained below, Unexcused Absences will be recorded and may warrant further disciplinary action. The Master’s School may also report any patterns of  TRUANCY to the appropriate State agencies. Students who are Tardy to school must report to the Main Office before reporting to class. As with Absences, notification of Tardiness must occur before 8:30AM. 2) Definition of Excused Absences or Tardiness Home related reasons: o Student illness (after 3 consecutive days of illness, however, a physicians statement is necessary) o In cases of chronic illnesses or injuries, a written statement from a physician must be submitted in order for the school to determine if a specialized plan is feasible to complete the current school year. o In cases where a student has experienced chronic illness or injury future enrollment  as  student  of  The  Master’s  School  will  be  determined  by  the  Directors. o Family emergency o Death in the family o College visits o Medical appointment (although it is preferred that, if possible, medical appointments be made for after school hours) School related reasons: o School field trips o School Retreats o Testing (that is relevant to Academics) o Late Bus o In-school appointments such as the nurse, counselor, Administration, etc… o School sponsored athletics o Suspensions due to school disciplinary procedures 3) Definition of Unexcused Absence, Truancy or Tardiness Any student who misses school for reasons other than those found in the “Excused  Absences” section will be assumed to be an unexcused absence.


Truancy warrants Severe Disciplinary Action as described in the Disciplinary Code. The Master’s School may also report any patterns of TRUANCY to the  appropriate State agencies. Any student who is unexcused absent 15 minutes or more for a particular class will be assumed to be “skipping class”. Students will receive a Detention and the  missing class will be recorded as Absent for that class. Unexcused Tardiness to school (this is when a student is late to Homeroom, but not late to the first period class) will also warrant disciplinary action on the part of the school. The following is an outline of the disciplinary progression: o On the 5th Tardy-to-School the Homeroom Advisor will issue a Detention for the student and communicate with parents/guardians as to any issues the school should know about. o On the 10th Tardy-to-School the student will receive a ½ Day Internal Detention at a cost of $50.00 for supervision. o On the 15th Tardy-to-School the student will receive a Full Day Internal Detention at a cost of $100.00 for supervision. o On the 20th Tardy-to-School the student will receive a One Day External Suspension from school. o On the 21st Tardy-to-School the Faculty Senate will determine further consequences such as Suspension, Dismissal, or Expulsion. 4) Total Absences allowed. Because The Master’s School values community, it is expected that  students will make every effort to be in school. Toward that end, The Master’s School allows for  10 Absences per Semester, whether Excused or Unexcused. This is true for individual classes, partial days, or entire days missed. Any student who is absent more than 10 days (or misses 10 classes of a particular course) in a Semester may receive the following consequences: Parents will be contacted to inquire about the excessive absences. Communication from home should already be occurring as stated earlier, but a meeting may be necessary to clarify the necessity of such absences. (For example, family vacations during school time should be kept to a minimum to avoid possible issues with the total number of absences allowed.) An Individual Academic plan for each course may be created by the Director and Dean of Students to address the lack of participation. This plan may include, but is not limited to, the student receiving an “Incomplete” as a grade for the time period  involved. The student may receive credit for the course after the Individual Academic plan has been satisfied. A 10% reduction in the Semester grade (or quarterly grade, if all the Absences occur in one quarter) may be enforced. A Failing grade may be received for each course in the time period where excessive absences occurred. The Master’s School reserves the right to Dismiss any student for missing more than the allotted classes. This is likely to occur if the aforementioned consequences prove ineffective in improving attendance.


The Master’s School reserves the right to utilize any of the aforementioned consequences for  excessive absence. It is very important to communicate to the school ahead of time concerning possible absences that are known in advance.  1) Early Dismissal. A student who needs to be excused from classes during the school day must present to the office a written request from parents. This note must contain the date, time and reason for the requested dismissal. Please send the note a day in advance if at all possible. Medical and dental appointments should not be scheduled during the school day unless this in unavoidable. Students must sign out in the Administration Building before leaving. They must also sign back in if they return to school during the school day. 2) Make-Up Work. Work may be made up under the following conditions: Students who are absent on the day of a previously announced test or quiz will be expected to take the test or quiz on the first day they are back in school. Exceptions to this rule will be made only in cases of an excused extended absence. Assignments missed for any reason other than illness, such as extracurricular activities, must be submitted the following school day or must be made up according to the time schedule established with the individual teacher. Homework assignments, quizzes, tests and exams missed because of illness must be made up in a timely fashion. All missed work must be completed in to more than two days for each day absent unless a special arrangement has been made with the teacher. Parents and students should understand that it is never possible for a student to make up in a substantive manner work missed because of absence and this it is unreasonable to expect teachers to work individually with students so that families may enjoy extended vacations. Should parents desire to remove the student from classes for such occasions, students will be solely responsible to make up work. Teachers are not required to prepare assignments ahead of time. 3) Attendance at Extracurricular Events. See  section  on  “Eligibility  Requirements”  for  information. **The Director and Dean of Students have the right to amend this policy. 4) Early Dismissal. A student who needs to be excused from classes during the school day must present to the office a written request from parents. This note must contain the date, time and reason for the requested dismissal. Please send the note a day in advance if at all possible. Medical and dental appointments should not be scheduled during the school day unless this in unavoidable. Students must sign out in the Administration Building before leaving. They must also sign back in if they return to school during the school day.


5) Make-Up Work. Work may be made up under the following conditions: Students who are absent on the day of a previously announced test or quiz will be expected to take the test or quiz on the first day they are back in school. Exceptions to this rule will be made only in cases of an excused extended absence. Assignments missed for any reason other than illness, such as extracurricular activities, must be submitted the following school day or must be made up according to the time schedule established with the individual teacher. Homework assignments, quizzes, tests and exams missed because of illness must be made up in a timely fashion. All missed work must be completed in to more than two days for each day absent unless a special arrangement has been made with the teacher. Parents and students should understand that it is never possible for a student to make up in a substantive manner work missed because of absence and this it is unreasonable to expect teachers to work individually with students so that families may enjoy extended vacations. Should parents desire to remove the student from classes for such occasions, students will be solely responsible to make up work. Teachers are not required to prepare assignments ahead of time. 6) Attendance at Extracurricular Events. See section on “Eligibility Requirements”  for  information. **The Director and Dean of Students have the right to amend this policy.

AWARDS A number of awards are presented to students by the faculty during the course of the year. We encourage parents to attend our various awards ceremonies, during which we seek not only to recognize the gifts and accomplishments of the students, but also simply to enjoy the students as they continue to grow and become all that God has intended them to be.

BUS POLICY __________________________________________________________ The Master’s School places a priority on safety in considering rules for behavior on the bus.   These rules are meant to ensure the physical and emotional safety of both students and adults riding the bus. As the highest authority, the bus driver is responsible for order and discipline. Drivers are required to report any misconduct to the Dean of Students. These rules apply to any bus used for transportation to and from school for purposes such as daily commuting, athletic events, and field trips. In addition, students shall agree to the rules stated below and may be denied transportation if they do not obey the rules. Rules:


1. Students shall observe the behavior standards of The Master’s School as explained in The  Master’s School Handbook. (This includes all behavioral expectations contained in the  Disciplinary section as well as the Appendix) 2. Infractions occurring on the bus will handled in accordance with The Master’s School  Handbook. (This includes Regular disciplinary matters as well as Severe Disciplinary matters such as bullying, flagrant disrespect, harassment, threatening another person, fighting, etc…) 3. Reasonable rules necessary for safe travel according to common sense need to be observed, such as: The directions of the bus driver are to be followed at all times to maintain a safe experience for all. (This includes directions regarding volume of any noises and/or bodily movements on the bus) All students must stay in their seats with their seat belts fastened, if available, while the bus is in motion. Students will not lie down on the seats. Students should talk, rather than shout or scream. Nothing is to be thrown in the bus or from the bus. Students are to respect each other’s space, keeping hands and materials to  themselves. Students are to respect each other’s dignity, keeping their words and physical  gestures in alignment with common courtesy and school expectations (ie – no inappropriate speech or gestures). Students are to respect the fact that some students prefer to have quiet time or to rest while riding the bus. 4. The bus driver needs to communicate with the Dean of Students of The Master’s School if  issues arise.

CAMPUS STEWARDSHIP We thank God for the privilege of using these facilities and trust that all students, families, and friends will respect all School property. Please take the greatest care not to litter the grounds, abuse the natural surroundings, or deface the buildings or their contents. Any damage to School property should be reported to the office immediately. Willful damage to School property will be cause for disciplinary action.

CLASS TRIPS/RETREATS The cost for extended class trips that involve a one or more overnight stay is included in the student activity account.


COMMUNICATION The School’s website is our primary communication tool for parents, students and prospective  families. Information pertaining to campus activities, sports, new articles, the school calendar, summer assignments, faculty and course outlines can all be found here. The website address is www.masterschool.org. Friday Mail is a weekly communication to parents that highlights events, dates to remember, etc. Should a parent need to reach a teacher, the best form of communication is his/her email address at the School. Conferences There are numerous opportunities during the year for parents and teachers to meet and discuss student progress. There are two formal parent teacher conference opportunities and a team meeting can be arranged at any time by contacting the Middle or Upper School Director. In addition there are several other parent/teacher meetings in the evening during the school year, such as the Academic Open House in September, the College Fair and College Night and a variety of college planning meetings for parents of juniors and seniors.

DISCIPLINARY SYSTEM PHILOSOPHY OF DISCIPLINE Attendance at The Master's School is a privilege. The hope and desire of The Master's School community is that each student will remain a member of our school for as long as he/she chooses. However, because of poor choices or habitual discipline problems, it may become necessary to remove a student from The Master's School. This relates to behavior both on and off campus. The Scriptures remind us that it is the love of God which calls us to account for our actions and that it is His desire for us to grow through His discipline. The Master’s School  takes seriously the responsibility to partner with the family in discipline. We believe that when even minor infractions are not addressed swiftly and sincerely, they tend to grow and evolve. It is our philosophy that discipline needs to be proactive and needs to offer hope and redemption in addition to punitive action. This is done with the intent of preventing more serious behavior before it occurs and identifying and helping those who might be making poor choices. The system of discipline must offer the right degree of grace, balanced with appropriate consequences. It must enhance the level of physical, emotional and spiritual safety on campus. Offenses of a serious nature will not be tolerated. Students and parents must understand that the student  body  and  The  Master’s  School  in  general  might  be  best  served  by  ending  our  formal  relationship with the individual through dismissal or expulsion from the school.


OFF CAMPUS BEHAVIOR Out of a desire to honor God and our community we seek to set behavioral standards that are based on Biblical truth. As a community we believe that all actions and attitudes both on and off campus should be consistent. Our community stands upon the core values of Truth, Integrity and Excellence. They are the guiding principles for a productive faculty and student culture. A student’s behavior will reflect and affect the school, the family and the individual. We intend to take a proactive approach to behavior off campus, working with parents, helping to keep students safe and within appropriate societal and legal boundaries. However, we reserve the right to take disciplinary action when school rules or laws are broken. DISCIPLINARY SYSTEM DESCRIPTION PLEASE REFER TO THE APPENDIX AT THE BACK OF THIS HANDBOOK FOR FURTHER DEFINITIONS AND DESCRIPTIONS OF GUIDELINES FOR DISCIPLINARY PURPOSES. Teachers and staff have the authority and the responsibility to discipline students both within their classroom and on the campus at large. Disciplinary consequences have priority over all prior commitments. In order for our students to develop an increasing level of personal responsibility, The Master’s School has created a procedure of progressive discipline that is generally applied to  less serious matters. The goal of this system is to correct behavior and encourage responsibility. Discipline will be accomplished in multiple parts: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Regular disciplinary action Severe disciplinary action Preventative disciplinary action Redemption to God, self and community Rectification of behavior Communal Reward and Punishment

A. Part 1: Regular Disciplinary Action The purpose of all discipline is discipleship, in other words, character formation. Our role as a school is to complement and come alongside the primary part that the parents have in this process. Disciplinary Warning Report – A teacher may assign a student a disciplinary warning for any misbehavior or irresponsibility on the part of the student. The teacher may assign a consequence to this warning, although its primary purpose is to inform parents. This communication along with consequences at home should resolve the disciplinary situation. Teacher Assigned Detention Report - A teacher may assign a student a Detention for any misbehavior or irresponsibility on the part of the student that is deemed more serious than those deserving a warning. Detentions will be served at the convenience of the teacher, but generally will be the next day from 3:05 PM – 3:45 PM . The intention of this more severe form of discipline is to provide time for the teacher and student to discuss the disciplinary situation more completely. As with the disciplinary warning report, the main purpose is to correct the student behavior and give parents the opportunity to support the prescribed change in behavior.


Each of these Disciplinary Actions taken above may be assigned for infractions such as (but not limited to): Disrespect Disobedience Disruptive Behavior Endangering the safety or health of others Inappropriate Language Irresponsibility o Dress Code noncompliance o Not properly filling out Attendance form o Not returning parent-signed Disciplinary Warning, Teacher-Assigned Detention, or Office Detention o Not bringing appropriate materials to class o Other Public Display of Affection Skipping responsibilities o Class o Assigned duties o Disciplinary Action o Other Late to class (unexcused Tardiness) Absent 15 minutes (unexcused) The intention of this progressive system of Discipline is that a student who exhibits irresponsibility or misbehavior on the school campus will quickly be held accountable in order to change their behavior expeditiously. The idea is for initial mistakes to be handled with verbal warnings and reasonable classroom management practices. Disciplinary Warning Reports would follow and may culminate in a Teacher-Assigned Detention. However, this progression is only a guideline and any level of Discipline may occur depending on the infraction. The following is a general guideline to be used by the Dean of Students in determining the consequences for students with multiple detentions. Number of Detentions 1-5 6-10 11-15 16-20 21+

Consequence Parents and student meet with Class Advisor(s) Student serves a Half-Day Internal Detention and parents/student meet with Class Advisor(s) and Dean of Students Student serves a Full-Day Internal Detention and parents/student meet with Class Advisor(s) and Dean of Students Student serves a One to Three Day External Suspension and parents/student meets with Dean of Students and Director Faculty Senate will decide further consequences including possible Suspensions, Dismissal, or Expulsion.


Parents and student meet with the Dean of Students. This will happen at the discretion of the Dean of Students and is meant to get everyone together (possibly teachers as well) to discuss the reasons behind the detentions earned up to this point. Half-Day Internal Detention. This will happen when a student has accumulated 6-10 detentions. The student will come on the assigned school day and report directly to the Dean of Students. For this day the student will be in isolation from the student body from 8:00 AM until lunch. Work may be assigned for this time period. The student will be dismissed from this detention for lunch time in the Dining Hall; the student will resume taking classes for the rest of the day. Parents will be billed $50.00 for the supervision of the student during this time. Full Day Internal Detention. This will happen when a student has accumulated 11-15 detentions. The student will come on the assigned school day and report directly to the Dean of Students. For this day the student will be in isolation from the student body from 8:00 AM until 3:05 PM. Work may be assigned for this time period. The student should bring a lunch. Parents will be billed $100 for the supervision of the student during this time. 1 – 3 Day External Suspension. This will happen when a student has accumulated 16-20 detentions. The student will stay at home for the assigned days. Work may be assigned for this time period. Suspension may be reported on official transcripts. Faculty Senate Review. This is a convening of the Faculty Senate and automatically triggers the second level of the Disciplinary System. Further consequences such as Dismissal or Expulsion are possible at this level. All Expulsions will be recorded on a student’s permanent record. The Director and Dean of  Students reserve the right to add suspensions and dismissals to a student’s permanent record in  cases where a student is determined to be a threat to himself or others. A.

Part 2: Severe Disciplinary Action

PLEASE REFER TO THE APPENDIX AT THE BACK OF THIS HANDBOOK FOR FURTHER DEFINITIONS AND DESCRIPTIONS OF GUIDELINES FOR DISCIPLINARY PURPOSES.

Actions that are of a more serious nature will be reviewed directly by the Dean. Disciplinary action will depend on the seriousness of the infraction and on the honesty and cooperativeness of the student. Immediate and full honesty will typically garnish a lighter punishment. Dishonesty will typically constitute a heavier punishment. Matters of Severe Disciplinary Action will be reviewed by the Faculty Senate unless the issue constitutes an immediate threat to any part of the community as determined by the Headmaster. The Faculty Senate will consist of faculty and/or staff  from  The  Master’s  School. They will be presented all the facts of the matter and will interview the Student with the family. After a private discussion, they will render a recommendation in the form of a plan of discipline to the Headmaster, who will make the final decision.


The Faculty Senate will utilize the guidelines for severe disciplinary actions listed below in deciding punishment, but their recommendation shall not be dictated by these guidelines. A plan of discipline will normally include, in addition to punishment, redemptive actions aimed to change the individual’s behavior, to bring them to harmony with themselves, the community and to God. The Faculty Senate may additionally consider a student’s level of honesty, remorse, disciplinary history, mitigating or aggravating factors, endangerment to other students (especially younger students), academic performance and family support of the school in general and in regards to the infraction and its consequences. Guidelines for Severe Disciplinary Actions (not limited to the following list): The following may result in one or more days of Suspension or Dismissal or Expulsion. ( * indicates categories that are more thoroughly defined in the Appendix) Bullying * Chronic disciplinary problems Drug and/or alcohol use and related issues Fighting Flagrant disrespect Gambling * Harassment * Hazing * Homosexual activity * Major vandalism Multiple Suspensions Plagiarism/Cheating (will also result in academic consequences) * Possession of fireworks or weapons Racial hate Recurring infractions/ongoing disciplinary problems * Sexual harassment * Sexual misconduct * Theft/Stealing * Threatening a fellow community member Tobacco use Truancy

Prohibition from Ceremonies or other public assemblies. If a serious disciplinary matter occurs near the time of a school related ceremony or assembly, such as Graduation, Athletic awards, National Honor Society, Theater productions, Concerts, Recitals or other significant events a student may be prohibited from attending. This is especially true for Graduations. Serious disciplinary matters in the 4th Quarter for any 8th Grader or 12th Grader will likely result in their prohibition from the Graduation ceremony.


Suspension Suspension is the temporary removal of the privilege to partake in the school community. Students who are suspended will be required to serve either an internal or external suspension. Students who fail to meet their responsibility to behave as mature students following suspension will jeopardize their continued education at The Master’s School. Dismissal Dismissal is defined as the removal of the student from the School community for the remainder of the academic year, but with the understanding that the student may apply for readmission to the School upon the conclusion of the academic year. Expulsion Expulsion is defined as the removal of the student from the School community with the understanding that there shall be little to no possibility of the student’s return. Conditions Conditions may be added to any of the consequences and will typically be done for the following reasons: 1) to further protect the student body, 2) to protect the individual, 3) to aid in the redemptive process.  The Master’s School reserves the right to stipulate any and all conditions that it deems to be necessary and/or beneficial. B.

Part 3: Preventative Disciplinary Action

When a student shows a pattern of disciplinary problems, they may be approached by the Dean and their actions will be reviewed. An agreed upon plan will be put into place to immediately change the offending behavior. Triggers for this action might be multiple infractions in a single day, single infractions for multiple days or multiple infractions with a single teacher. If the pattern continues, a parent will be expected to meet with the Dean and the student to discuss the plan, modify it as may be required and further action at home will be agreed upon. If no correction is made in the behavior of the student within a short period of time, the matter will be considered as an Ongoing Disciplinary Problem, requiring Severe Disciplinary Action (see Part 2) C.

Part 4: Redemption to God, Self and Community

In addition to any punishment garnished, a student will be expected to make any and all possible reparations to faculty, staff, and peers. This may include material reparations to the school and others. Amends might include discussion with a faculty member centering on the infraction and how best to not let it happen again. It might include an apology to a faculty member or to peers for actions taken. Material amends might include replacement of damaged or stolen goods. It might include removal of offensive vandalism. We recommend making amends to God through careful prayer and consideration. This will typically be made through the family, but advisors or mentors can be made available on campus whenever necessary.


D. Part 5: Rectification of Behavior It will be expected that any punitive action given to a student will serve as a warning and will signal the requirement for a change in behavior. It is expected that parents and the school will act as a team in corrective and punitive action in an attempt to bring about positive change in the actions of the student. Parents should not necessarily await a call to take action at home, but should consistently review  their  student’s  record  and  take  immediate  action.    The  parent  is  always  welcome to contact the advisor or the Dean whenever they would like to discuss a matter. E.

Part 6: Communal Reward and Punishment

In accordance with Galatians 6:2, “Carry each other’s burdens, and this way you will fulfill the law of  Christ,”  communal reward and punishment allows the community to celebrate the successes and share in the burdens of the rest of the community. Rewards will typically be instituted for 100% community compliance to the rules and codes of The Master’s School.  The issuances of rewards, and the decision of what rewards are to be, are at the discretion of the Dean of Students. Punishments will typically be instituted when two or more students violate a school rule, code or policy or when a violation occurs and the perpetrator does not come forward to admit it. The issuances of communal punishments, and the decision of what the punishments are to be, are at the discretion of the Dean of Students.

More specific descriptions of the disciplinary code can be found in the Appendix. DOCUMENTATION STANDARDS Items that must be documented are facts, quotations, paraphrases, summaries, charts, figures, diagrams and pictures. Writing that  expresses  one’s  own  thoughts,  experiences,  or  interpretations  and  is  stated  in  one’s  own  words  does  not  require  documentation.  Also  when  information is common knowledge or is from a specific text, it does not need citation. As a standard  for  the  proper  documentation,  The  Master’s  School  will  use  Modern Language Association’s “The MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers”, current edition, for the Upper School. A good reference for aiding the student in proper documentation can be found at the Citation Machine: http://citationmachine.net. Students in grades 7-12 will receive specific written instructions and examples of appropriate and inappropriate referencing at the beginning of each school year.


DRESS, GROOMING AND APPEARANCE STANDARDS The Master’s  School  is  a  place  for  learning.  Consequently,  our  appearance  should  encourage  concentrated  study  and  should  in  no  way  distract  from  the  learning  process.  Students’  appearance should also reflect the Christian value of encouraging the focus on the inner self, not the outer. Therefore, a student who draws undue attention to his/her appearance would be considered in violation of the spirit and intent of our dress code. We want students at The Master’s  School  to  be  comfortable  but  we  also  expect  that  they  meet  certain  basic  standards.  Our standards of neat and clean, modest and moderate, non-distracting and appropriate dress and grooming are clearly described.

Responsibility Since students purchase their clothing as part of the family unit and dress at home, a great responsibility rests upon the parents to give proper guidance. We would much prefer appropriate clothing and appearance decisions be handled at home to insure compliance with the standards of The Master’s School. Students and parents are expected to evaluate their comfort level about  the appearance standards prior to enrolling, not after. If a student or parent has a question about whether a specific garment or style is appropriate, the time to check is before wearing it. Appearance standards apply when students are on campus or at any school activity, unless otherwise specified. Each student will be held responsible for the appropriateness of his/her appearance. Instances of deviation from established standards will be handled justly on an individual basis. The administration will be the final judge of neatness, cleanliness and modesty and retains the sole discretion to  determine  whether  a  student’s  appearance  is  appropriate.  Parents’  support for consequences applied when the standards are violated is expected and is helpful in the students’  maturation process. It is important to note that a student out of dress code is expected to rectify the matter immediately when it is first brought to their attention. Cumulating and compounding punitive actions will occur, even in a single day, if the student does not change their dress or get a pass from the Dean of Students. In some cases parents may need to bring their child different clothes during the day. We also desire to have a dress code that is enforceable and yet flexible enough to account for different types of activities. The following is a guideline for appropriate dress including specifics for regular dress days, chapel dress days, casual dress days and events sponsored by The Master’s School. The intent of the Dress Code is to prevent attire that is inappropriate for school.  The school reserves the right to determine the appropriateness of student dress.


Boy’s Dress Regular Dress Days Bottoms: Loose fitting pants (Chinos, khakis, corduroys) Dress shorts (except December through March). These can be no shorter than 3” above  the knee. * Belts must be worn everyday Tops: Collared shirts with collar visible at all times (only top button may remain unbuttoned) Turtlenecks or mock turtlenecks Official TMS uniform tops and official warm up suits are allowed on game days. (Uniform tops may be worn with Dress Code appropriate bottoms. Dress Code appropriate tops may be worn with the official TMS nylon warm-up bottoms. Non-TMS athletic apparel, like sweat suits, are not allowed) Footwear: Leather sandals, flip-flops, sneakers, shoes, boots, crocs and clogs

Boys Chapel Dress Days Bottoms:

Dress pants with no outside patch pockets

Tops:

Oxford style shirt (completely buttoned) with coordinated tie. Sweaters and sport coats optional. No hoodies, sweatshirts or athletic wear on Chapel Day

Footwear:

Dress shoes or leather sandals (Boots as weather demands)

Girl’s Dress Regular Dress Days Bottoms: Loose fitting pants (Chinos, khakis, corduroys) Dress shorts, skorts, or skirts (except December through March). These can be no shorter than 3” above the knee.

*

Leggings may be worn under a dress or skirt, but the 3” from the knee rule still applies.

*


Tops: Collared shirts with collar visible at all times (only top button may remain unbuttoned). Neckline can be no lower than the collarbone) Turtlenecks or mock turtlenecks Official TMS uniform tops and official warm up suits are allowed on game days. (Uniform tops may be worn with Dress Code appropriate bottoms. Dress Code appropriate tops may be worn with the official TMS nylon warm-up bottoms. Non-TMS athletic apparel, like sweat suits, are not allowed) Footwear: Leather sandals, flip-flops, sneakers, shoes, dress boots (or weather appropriate boots), crocs and clogs

Girls Chapel Dress Day Bottoms: Dress with neckline no lower than the collarbone and length not more than 3” above the  knee.* Skirt or jumper with a blouse or top that has a neckline no lower than the collarbone and a length no more than 3” above the knee. * From December through March Dress pants may be worn due to colder weather. If pants are worn then a collared shirt must also be worn Tops: Dress shirts, blouses, oxfords, sweaters, button-downs, or polos with a neckline no lower than the collarbone. (If during December through March a student elects to wear pants instead of a dress, jumper, or skirt – a collared shirt must be worn as well) Dress jacket is optional. No hoodies, sweatshirts, or athletic wear is allowed on Chapel Day. Footwear: Leather sandals, including slides, dress shoes or dress boots (for women). No flip-flops of any kind or outside boots unless weather appropriate.

*To accurately measure the 3” standard for shorts, skirts, dresses, etc… the  measurement should be taken while the student is kneeling. So while kneeling, the shorts, skirt, or dress should be no more than 3”from the floor.


Special Dress Code Days for Both Boy’s and Girl’s Dress down Days In addition to dress allowed on Regular Dress Days and Chapel Days, the following items are allowed on those days set aside by the Director as “Dress down day”: Jeans and athletic wear T-shirts(but not undershirts) and sweatshirts Plastic sandals

Spirit Days Spirit Days will be determined by the Director with specific instructions given in advance. The website will also clarify.

The following list includes attire that is unacceptable for school Bottoms Denim clothing (except on the designated “Dress Down Days”) Any dress, jumper, skirt, skort, or shorts that is worn more than 3” above the knee.  (This 3” rule includes any slits as well.) Visible underwear Clothing that exposes midriff Clothing that is too tight or oversized Low-rise or short-waisted bottoms. All bottoms must be worn at the waist. Athletic wear – including T-shirts, velour, sweatpants, fleece, or wind pants(except on the designated “Dress Down Days” or when used for PE class) Lounge wear, pajamas, or similar clothing No flannel pants or shorts Worn, stained, tattered, frayed, or ripped clothing. Clothing with graphics, text and/or logo’s containing offensive pictures or writing – including musical groups. Military or camouflage wear Bottoms containing writing and/or graphics on backside

Tops No tank tops or spaghetti straps Denim clothing (except on the designated “Dress Down Days”) Visible underwear Clothing that exposes midriff Clothing that is too tight or oversized


Athletic wear – including T-shirts, velour, sweatpants, fleece, or wind pants(except on the designated “Dress Down Days” or when used for PE class) Lounge wear, pajamas, or similar clothing Worn, stained, tattered, frayed, or ripped clothing. Clothing with graphics, text and/or logo’s containing offensive pictures or writing – including musical groups. Sleeveless and see-through shirts are not allowed, Military or camouflage wear

Other Prohibitions(accessories, hair, fabric, etc…) Visible body piercing including plugs, gauges, or ear expanders (Conventional ear piercing is obviously allowed) No visible tattoos Hair that is not neat or clean. Hair that is distracting due to an extreme “style” or unnatural color Hats and other head coverings are not allowed inside buildings.

DRIVING/PARKING/MOTOR VEHICLES Students wishing to park a car on campus must complete a registration form available from the Office or Dean of Students. Student vehicles must be parked in the designated area of the main parking lot during the school day and are not to be used from the time of arrival at school until departure from the campus for the day. As an earned privilege, and subject to parental permission and any restrictions imposed by the Director, seniors may be granted an exception to this rule. They must sign out each time they leave campus and sign back in when they return. Except for regular carpool arrangements, seniors are not to drive underclassmen in their cars at any time - including the break between exam times in January and June. Infractions of these regulations or reckless driving of any sort may result in the suspension of driving privileges  and  further  disciplinary  action.    See  section  “Eligibility  Requirements”  for  additional information. Automobile guidelines are as follows: 1. Pedestrians always have the right of way. 2. Drive slowly and safely at all times. 3. Obey speed limits. a. 15 mph on the back road and parking lot. b. 25 mph for the driveway. 4. Students are to park in the main parking lot only; they are not to park in the back by the fields. 5. No driving on the inner-campus roads during school hours.


6. No transporting of unauthorized students. 7. No riding on the hood, trunk, roof or bed of a car or truck. 8. No loud music playing. 9. No racing and/or speeding. 10. No driving during school hours without permission. 11. No missing classes. 12. No access to the parking lot during school hours without specific permission. 13. No driving on the grass 14. Any form of skidding or unsafe driving is prohibited

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS FOR PRIVILEGES Participation in extracurricular activities at The Master’s  School  is  a  privilege  and  is  an  opportunity that must be earned and maintained. Participants in all extracurricular activities are expected to conduct themselves in a manner that reflects The Master, as we are His representatives. Failure to comply with these expectations may result in disciplinary action by the Athletic Director and/or the Dean of Students. Eligibility requirements for school privileges: 1. GPA ........................................................ C- Average (1.7 Minimum GPA) 2. Excessive failure to comply with the school disciplinary system may be cause for ineligibility. This will be determined by the Athletic Director and/or the Dean of Students. 3. Attendance: a. The student must be in attendance for the entire school day to participate in an activity that same day. Students who attend school but are excused from any academic requirements due to illness or injury may or may not be allowed to participate in an activity that day. (This includes circumstances such as, but not limited  to,  concussions,  migraines,  “feeling  sick”,  dizziness,  feeling tired, sore throat, etc.) This will be decided on a case by case basis by the Director and/or Dean of Students and/or the school Nurse. b. The student must be in attendance for the entire school day on the Friday before any weekend activities to participate. c. Exceptions, such as doctor’s  appointments,  funerals,  non-health related emergencies, scheduled testing outside of the school, (i.e.:  Driver’s  License,  educational) and other circumstances deemed acceptable by the Athletic Director and/or the Dean of Students will be considered.

These requirements apply to the following privileges: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Extracurricular Activities and Clubs Performances Social Events Athletics Senior Privileges Driving Privileges

7. Student Life 8. Academic Related Events 9. Voluntary missions or community service


Students participating in the above mentioned activities will have their GPA checked approximately every four weeks (at the mid-quarter point and at the end of each quarter). If the student has a GPA of 1.7 or higher they will continue to be eligible for the next four weeks. If the GPA is below a 1.7 (or the student has a failing grade in any class) then that student will be ineligible for one week. Every Monday an ineligible student’s GPA will be checked to determine if they can return. This weekly check will happen until the next mid-quarter or end of quarter, or until the activity concludes.

FIELD TRIPS Field trips are a very important part of the total educational experience at The Master's School. All Middle and Upper School field trips are mandatory. The cost to parents for these trips is based on expenses being shared by all. At the beginning of the year parents must sign a general permission slip covering day trips for the entire school year. When applicable, an information sheet will be sent home prior to the event. For any trips including an overnight, a separate permission slip will be sent.

FIRE SAFETY/EMERGENCY Fire Drills Fire drills and other safety practices will be held periodically throughout the school year, as required by Connecticut state law. During periodic fire drills, students are to proceed quietly to designated areas, the main parking lot and the athletic fields and remain there until directed to return to their classrooms. Fire Safety Equipment There is a campus-wide fire alarm system connecting the main campus with the Simsbury Fire Department. Do not tamper with fire alarm boxes, fire extinguishers, and fire hoses.

FUNDRAISING Fundraising is reserved for the Senior class to support their selected mission project and for occasional special projects sponsored by the National Honor Society and Student Life. All these projects require a faculty advisor and the permission of the Upper School Director. All fundraisers must be approved by the Development Office before implementation


GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS The Master’s School is fully accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges  and approved by the State of Connecticut. Each student must take at least six subjects each semester. Beginning with the Class of 2009, students will need 26 credits to graduate. English (4 credits) Mathematics (4 credits) World Language (3 credits) Science (3 credits) History (4 credits) Fine Arts (2 credits) Bible (4 credits) Physical Education/Health (2 credits) Please see Upper School curriculum guide for specific graduation requirements. Prohibition from Ceremonies or other public assemblies. If a serious disciplinary matter occurs near the time of a school related ceremony or assembly, such as Graduation, Athletic awards, National Honor Society, Theater productions, Concerts, Recitals or other significant events a student may be prohibited from attending. This is especially true for Graduations. Serious disciplinary matters in the 4th Quarter for any 8th Grader or 12th Grader will likely result in their prohibition from the Graduation ceremony.

HEALTH SERVICES Health Office Location The Health Office is located on the main campus in the Lower School building. A registered nurse is available during the school day from 8:00 am to 1:00 pm. Rules for the Health Office Students with health problems may request to be admitted to the Health Office. If the nurse is not in her office, the student should follow the instructions left on the door of the Health Office. If the nurse is not on the school grounds, the receptionist in the office knows where she is and how to contact her. Students will return to class. If a student is unable to get to the nurse alone, someone should be asked to reach the nurse. If a student does not have any definite symptoms and the nurse cannot do anything to help, the student will be expected to return to class.


Communicable Diseases Parents should report all cases of strep throat, pneumonia, mononucleosis, Lyme disease, Fifth disease, head lice, impetigo, conjunctivitis, ringworm or Scarlet Fever or any ongoing health condition to the school nurse. Students are to be excluded from school with any of the following conditions: head lice, scabies, conjunctivitis, impetigo, and ringworm. The school nurse must be called for instructions on how to proceed or a written statement must be obtained from the physician stating the student is receiving treatment. Immunizations As mandated by Connecticut state law, all students must be successfully immunized against polio, diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus, measles (Rubeola), German measles (Rubella), mumps, Hepatitis B, Varicella and screened for tuberculosis before entering the school system. Medication at School As directed by Connecticut state law, students may not keep medication on their person at school. (Exceptions would be for asthma inhalers and Epi-Pens for older students with parental authorization.) Parents must make arrangements with the nurse if it is necessary for a child to take medication while at school. State law requires that medication be left in the Health Office in the original pharmacy container, with the child's name, medication name, dosage, frequency, physician or dentist's name, and date of the original prescription. In addition, written authorization from the physician or dentist and the parent or guardian must accompany all medication in order for the nurse to administer it. Authorization forms are available from the Health Office.

Connecticut state law also stipulates that over-the-counter (non-prescription) drugs, including Advil and Tylenol, will not be given by the nurse without written orders from a physician or dentist and written permission from a parent or guardian. Over-the-counter topical drugs (e.g., calamine lotion, antibiotic ointment) may be administered by the school nurse with the written permission of the parent or guardian indicated on the student's emergency information card. A special permission form will be sent home to cover medications needed when a student goes on a field trip. Illness and Accidents If a child becomes ill or is injured at school, parents are notified immediately and are asked to provide immediate transportation. If the parent cannot be reached, the nurse calls the individual(s) listed on the emergency data card and/or the physician. For this reason, parents should ensure that emergency data cards are promptly filled out, signed and returned to the School. It is the parents’ responsibility to keep the nurse informed of any changes that occur  during the school year (address, phone number, job, doctor, emergency arrangements, etc.). See page 10 for makeup work policy. In case of a severe injury or illness “911” will be called.


Physical Examination New students must present complete health information to the nurse and may not begin classes until all health data is approved. School health legislation requires that each student entering grade 10 must present proof of a recent physical examination before the first day of school or the child will not be permitted to begin classes. Students will also need physical examinations to be eligible for sports.

HOMEROOM All students in Grades 7-12 will be assigned a homeroom. Each morning students need to report to homeroom by 8:00 am. Since students support of homeroom as a community time is as important to class identity as all extracurricular activities, retreats, field trips and class trips— students who are repeatedly tardy to homeroom may also be excluded from those other community times.

HOMEWORK The Master’s School is an academic institution seeking to glorify God. Homework is assigned on a  regular basis as part of the educational process. Daily completion of homework assignments is one way for students to respond to the Lord’s call upon their lives.  Students are expected to use  homework assignment books/planners effectively. Except in case of illness or other extenuating circumstances recognized by the School, late homework assignments will not receive full credit. They must, however, be completed. Failure to successfully complete homework in a timely fashion may result in poor grades and may lead to ineligibility to take part in extra-curricular activities. Because of this, students and parents should seriously consider the advisability of each non-school activity undertaken during the year. When students’ schedules become congested because of special School events, concerts, plays,  sports tournaments, etc., teachers will endeavor to furnish assignments more than one day in advance. Generally, Upper School students may expect to be assigned at least 30 minutes of homework each night in each of their major subjects. Work on long term papers or projects will require additional time. It would not be unusual for a junior or senior to be spending 12-16 hours a week on homework and projects. Students enrolled in AP or honors courses should expect to have more than this amount. During holiday weekends of three or four days, there may be one half hour of homework per class. If there is a vacation consisting of 5 or more days, there may be an hour of homework per class. This especially applies to students in Honors and AP classes. Major projects, reading assignments or papers due within 1 to 2 days of the end of the vacation will be assigned at least two weeks prior to the beginning of the vacation.


It is expected that computer or printer problems will not keep students from having assignments on the due date. Students may bring work on a disk, flash drive or CD, or may email it to their specific teacher or fax it to 651-9363 in order to submit it on time. However, staff or equipment may not always be available to retrieve the work. Students must make arrangements convenient to staff being asked for this assistance. Printing must be kept to a minimum and the student may be charged at 10 cents per page. It is the student’s responsibility to verify receipt of any assignments  handed in. Summer Academic Requirements All students in Grades 7-12 are expected to complete required summer reading and mathematics assignments according to the process outlined in a letter sent home over vacation. Academic consequences will be assigned if the summer work assignments are not submitted in the first week of school. Late enrollees will be given a revised timetable for the completion of the work according to their acceptance date.

INTERNET ACCEPTABLE USE POLICY Copies of the full policy are posted on the School’s website and in printed form in the Office. Adherence to these guidelines and policies is a condition for continued use of Internet resources. Any violation may result in disciplinary action and may also have legal consequences. 1) Students may not disclose any User ID or password, including their own, and may not have, use or attempt to use any other person’s User ID or password under any  circumstances. 2) Students may not post anything to the Internet or send/receive any electronic communication (e-mail). 3) Transmission of any threatening, intimidating or discriminatory communication, any communication  that  reveals  private  facts  about  another  without  that  person’s  permission or any communication that is intended to harass, annoy or intimidate another person is against School policy. 4) The intentional use of a School computer to access any of the following is forbidden: i. Any site displaying sexual or pornographic content ii. Any site promoting violence, use of controlled substances or other illegal activity iii. Online games or gambling iv. Any site promoting moneymaking schemes v. Any site that provides for the unpaid use of copyrighted materials The School has the right to review all material sent/received using its facilities and will do so.


LIBRARY/MEDIA CENTER

Purpose of the Library/Media Center To provide resources for research projects and special reports To offer instruction in locating and using materials and services available To provide a place for quiet study. Since the library is a place for study and reflection, a quiet atmosphere needs to be maintained. If it is necessary to speak, please do so in a soft voice. Enter and leave the library quietly. The library will be open from 8:15 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Monday through Friday.

Book Check-out Procedure 1) All books may be checked out for a period of two weeks and may be renewed for two more weeks. 2) Books needed for research or for book reports may be checked out for a period of one month and may be renewed for another month. 3) All reference material and reserved material must be used in the library. 4) Magazines are to be checked out as books are, except that the current issue cannot be checked out. They are also subject to fines.

Use of Computers in Library/Media Center Only students with a current, signed Acceptable Use Policy agreement on file may use the computers. Improper use of this resource will result in loss of privileges and/or disciplinary action. The pass system is explained to all students and reminders posted. It must be followed in order to maintain privileges.

LOCKS, LOCKERS, AND PUBLIC AREAS Lockers are the property of the school, and their use is with the understanding that access to them by the administration is allowed at any time for any reason. Students are allowed to purchase locks and use them for their lockers provided that they register the lock with the Dean of Students. Students must register their serial number and combination. Locks can be cut off by the administration if ready access cannot be obtained. Students must keep all their possessions either in their assigned locker or gym locker. Items such as clothing, book bags, athletic gear, musical instruments, textbooks, and other student belongings found  elsewhere  will  be  considered  “clutter”  and  placed  in  a designated area. All public access areas like hallways, the campus center, locker rooms, and the Math/Science Building well need to be clear. Students may retrieve items from the designated areas for $1.00 per item. This needs to be done before school, between periods, after school, and always at a teacher’s convenience.


Locks for athletic locker rooms are provided by the athletic department and are expected to be used in the locker rooms. The locker rooms are used by the public for outside activities. Expensive equipment or large sums of money on campus for any reason should be brought to the main office in the Administration Building for safekeeping.

LOST, BROKEN and FOUND ITEMS The School assumes no responsibility for lost, broken or stolen items. Items that have been lost, broken, or presumed stolen should be reported to the Director or Dean.

LUNCH A varied selection of hot and cold entrees, snacks, desserts and beverages is available. Meal tickets for different amounts may be purchased from the office. As a community service, students assigned to cleanup are expected to fulfill their obligations. A duty list is posted in the Dining Hall. Trash must be deposited in the containers provided for this purpose and care should be taken to leave the Dining Room in good condition for those who will follow. All eating will take place exclusively within the area designated for that purpose unless the Director announces an alternative or a teacher gives specific permission. Students must remain in the dining hall area for the entire lunch period.

MANDATORY REPORTING TO DEPARTMENT OF CHILDREN AND FAMILIES In accordance with state law and School policy, School staff is obligated under penalty of fine and jail term to report the reasonable suspicion of physical abuse, sexual abuse or child neglect. In this very serious and legally narrow area, the School will not contact parents in advance of making a report to authorities, which would be the procedure followed in most other legal matters. The clear intent of the law, based on the seriousness of the crimes listed above, is to mandate that a report of reasonable suspicion of abuse be made. School staff will make such reports in the best interest of the affected child and do not, once reasonable suspicion is established, have any legal alternative except to make the report to the proper authorities for their investigation and review.


NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY The Master’s  School  is  a  member  of  the  National  Honor  Society.  Each  spring  the  Upper School faculty considers the members of the junior and senior classes to determine which students, if any, qualify for selection. The constitution of the National Honor Society provides clear and specific guidelines for selecting members. Selection is based on four criteria: scholarship, leadership, service, and character. To fulfill the scholarship requirement, students must have a cumulative scholastic average of a 3.3 GPA or B+ average on a 4.0 scale Students who are academically eligible will be notified and encouraged to submit an application to be reviewed by the faculty in the areas of character, service, and leadership. There will be an induction ceremony scheduled when new members are to be received.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION The Master's School believes that Physical Education is an important part of the curriculum. Students need to be dressed appropriately so that they can participate fully in P.E. class. Proper clothing includes: T-shirt or sweatshirt, shorts or sweat pants, socks, and sneakers. The determination of what is or is not appropriate in any particular instance remains with the P.E. teacher. Students who do not participate in P.E. due to illness, injury, or a dress-related problem will not be allowed to participate in after-school sports that day.

PUBLICATIONS Each student in Grades 7-12 will receive a yearbook. The Master’s School yearbook is part of the education fee paid with the tuition bill. The yearbooks are generally distributed in June. The School’s newsletter The Lion’s Den is published twice a year.

SCHOOL HOURS For Grades 7-12 the school hours are 8:00 a.m. – 3:05 p.m. Because of the size and extent of the main campus, the school cannot accept responsibility for students for an extended period of time before or after school hours. Students in car pools should be dropped off no earlier than 7:45 a.m. and picked up no later than 3:25 p.m. unless they are involved in a school sponsored activity with official supervision. Examples of official supervision are team sports, drama, extra help with a teacher, clubs, etc. Students not under the


direct care of adult supervision (parents, coaches, teachers, etc.) should not be on campus after 3:25 p.m. All students need to indicate their after school activities on the morning attendance forms. A location will be provided for students still on campus after 3:25 p.m. School supervision of an after school program may result in fees being assessed for participants. This may also occur for students dropped off in the morning before 7:45 a.m.

SENIOR PRIVILEGES AND RESPONSIBILITIES The senior class is eligible to receive senior privileges at the discretion of the Dean of Students at the beginning of the second quarter after the completion of certain requirements and a review of the first quarter report cards. Additionally, the overall effort behavior and attitude of the class will be considered prior to granting senior privileges. After privileges are granted, students are reviewed individually. Parents will be notified if a student has had his/her privileges revoked. A written request or appeal for reinstatement may be made to the Dean of Students.  See “Eligibility Requirements” for additional information. After obtaining parental permission, the seniors may leave the campus during lunch and any unscheduled academic periods. They must individually sign in and out in the main office. They may not be in the parking lot, gymnasium or other areas without faculty permission. It is expected that Seniors will exhibit greater maturity and levels of responsibility than underclassmen. Therefore a higher level of scrutiny will be utilized in disciplinary matters with the revocation of Senior Privileges as a possible consequence. It also needs to be stated that participation in the Graduation ceremony is a privilege and not a right. Although any serious disciplinary matter may prohibit a Senior from Graduation at any point in the school year, it is very likely for any serious matter that occurs in the 4th Quarter. Second Semester Senior Exam Policy Seniors will also have the opportunity to become exempt from the second semester exams if the following requirements are met. Seniors who achieve an 85% or better average for the third and the fourth quarters in a subject will be exempted from taking the final exam in that subject. This is a subject by subject exemption and is not based upon GPA. Therefore, if a student misses the 85% in 3 rd quarter, he/she has the opportunity to improve his/her grade in the 4th quarter to achieve the average of 85%.


SNOW DAYS On days when snow, sleet, or other weather conditions make travel especially difficult, the Headmaster and Director of Maintenance make a decision by 5:30 a.m. regarding whether classes will be held. If a decision is made to cancel School or open later than usual on any day, the announcement will be carried beginning after 5:30 a.m. on the following radio/television stations: WTIC-AM 1080 WTIC-FM 96.5

WDRC-AM 1360 WDRC-FM 102.9

WRCH-FM 100.5

WVIT Channel 30 WFSB Channel 3

This announcement is carried independently as "The Master's School” or “Master’s School” and is not as part of the Simsbury public schools announcement. If the decision is made to close School early (before 3:05 p.m.) because of impending weather conditions, the announcement will be made as outlined above. (The School’s answering machine  will also have specific information.) In such a case, the main campus will close at NOON and there will be no afternoon or evening activities. All students in grades 7-12 should be picked up at noon but no later than 1:00 p.m. with proper notification to the School by the parent. Students should not leave campus before the dismissal time. If an early closing announcement has not been, School will not close early that day but parents may call ahead and pick up students early if they wish. Students are not to call parents to ask to be picked up. Students leaving early with parental permission must sign out in the office. Delayed opening times: One Hour Late: Grades 6-12 start at 9:00 a.m. 90 Minutes Late: Grades 6-12 start at 9:30 a.m. 2 Hours Late: Grades 6-12 start at 10:00 a.m. Unlike public schools, The Master's School is not required to make up each snow day. However, each spring the Board of Trustees determines whether it is advisable to make up snow days in order to present the program adequately.

SPIRITUAL LIFE Spiritual life at The Master's School is not confined to a few events or special programs. We seek to integrate our Christian walk into every aspect of the life of the school. We do, however, set aside special times for reflection and service. Bible is taught at every grade level by laying a strong foundation in the Bible and addressing issues that affect the lives of students (see course catalog). The Bible classes are enhanced by weekly chapel services and community building times. Individual classes take retreats and give themselves to service projects. One of the highlights of


the year is the two-day winter retreat. Another highlight is Spiritual Focus week, which is held the week before Easter. Our “Learning and Serving” program is expanding every year.  All students are involved in service  to those outside the school. Seniors serve regularly in the greater Hartford community. Over the past 15 years we have been involved with elementary school tutoring, adult day care facilities, handicap centers, Head Start programs, Habitat for Humanity, hospital help, homeless shelters and food pantries. Each day begins with devotions and prayer. Because we believe that all truth is God's truth, academic classes focus not only on skills but also on discovering the greater truths that reflect God's glory.

STUDY HALLS All students in grades 6-12 are assigned to a study hall during any period in which they do not have a class. Students in assigned study halls are expected to treat attendance at study hall with the same degree of seriousness as attendance at an academic class. The study hall teacher will not excuse students from study hall for any reason except to do work, arranged in advance, under the immediate supervision of another teacher. Seniors, who have earned unsupervised study privileges, may spend that time in designated areas with teacher permission. They are not to be in the parking lot, in the gymnasium, in the Administration building or any other part of campus without faculty supervision. Students who wish to work in the library or computer center during study hall need to get a pass in advance to the library from their teacher. If the library or computer lab is not available for work when a student arrives from study hall, the student must return to the study hall. Students who go to the library in order to use the computers must follow the pass procedure for that purpose or risk loss of privilege.

STUDENT LIFE Student Life is a student government organization comprised of students from grades nine through twelve with a growing commitment to Jesus Christ who are called to enrich the spiritual and community  life  of  the  Upper  School  of  The  Master’s  School.    They are led by a Senior Leadership Group to represent the Upper School in seeking to fulfill the school’s mission through  the guidance of the Holy Spirit. The biblical concept of leadership through service is key to the group’s focus on the health and care of the school community. Mission Student Life of The Master’s School shall be charged to follow the will of God as it pertains to the  spiritual and community life of the student body. Student Life shall: Listen to the student body that they represent and be their voice within the school Identify and minister to the needs and concerns of the Upper School student body Develop and execute opportunities and events for community and spiritual growth


Pray for and encourage the school and larger community Expand the vision and ministry of the school even beyond the campus Applying to Student Life 1. Step 1 QUESTIONAIRES: Students wishing to participate in Student Life will obtain a questionnaire from the advisor and fill it out truthfully and honestly. Current freshmen, sophomores and juniors will typically have a due date of May 15 for their questionnaires. Incoming freshmen will have questionnaires due September 30. 2. Step 2 FACULTY SPONSORSHIP: To be considered an official candidate, students will have 1 faculty member sign their questionnaire, indicating that the faculty member vouches for the student’s character and willingness to participate in Student Life. 3. Step 3 INTERVIEWS: Students will be interviewed by a panel of faculty and current Senior Leadership to determine level of commitment and to identify potential goals. Some candidates may be eliminated. 4. Step 4 STUDENT VOTE: A student body vote will take place to determine final candidates. The entire student body will vote in May. Only freshman will vote in early October.

TEACHERS The role of the teacher is primarily academic. Teachers oversee their individual classrooms and specific curriculum for which they are responsible. In addition, because the mission of The Master’s School  is  “education  from  the  inside  out”  every  faculty  member  has  the  privilege  and  responsibility to encourage not only the academic growth of the student, but the spiritual, social, and physical as well.

TELEPHONES /CELL PHONES/EMAIL The Master's School telephone numbers: Main Campus 36 Westledge Road, West Simsbury, CT 06092 Phone: 860/651-9361 Fax: 860/651-9363 Feel free to call the School from 7:45 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Teachers and administrators are always willing to discuss any question or concern. If a staff member is not available, leave your name and number and he or she will return the call as soon as possible. Please do not call the School to leave messages for students unless there is an emergency. As a reminder, students’ use of cell phones is restricted. Please refer to Electronics, cell phones, and computer use, found on page 1 of the appendix. Email addresses follow the convention of first initial followed by last name (i.e.: jdoe@masterschool.org).


CELL PHONE POLICY Cell phones must be off and must be out of sight at all times while on campus and may not be used at all during school hours. Specific permission may be granted by a faculty or staff member under the following circumstances: o To contact a parent or family member o To contact someone when school or an event have been cancelled for that same day o On a school sponsored trip Upper School Students have been granted the privilege of reasonable use of their cell phones during their lunch period. Should students choose to use their phones inappropriately during the day, teachers and staff persons will take the phones away and issue an immediate detention. Teachers reserve the right to request that cell phones be visible during class time as needed and especially during exams, tests or quizzes.

TRANSCRIPTS There is a $5.00 fee to cover administrative costs associated with releasing records. Records will only be released if there is no outstanding balance with the Business Office. All documents received from outside sources will be kept confidential and used only by those who are directly involved in helping or evaluating the student.

TRANSPORTATION Parents are responsible for transporting their children to School. Students should arrive by 7:45 a.m. and be picked up by 3:25 p.m. (or within one half-hour after the end of an extracurricular activity.) Simsbury residents are eligible for a transportation reimbursement from the Town of Simsbury. Information is available from the Simsbury Business Manager.

VISITORS Visitors are welcome to The Master's School. All visitors must check in at the front desk in the Administration building. Students who wish to have a guest accompany them to classes must obtain permission from the Director prior to the visit. Upon arrival, the visitor must register at the Administration Office and remain with his or her student host at all times. The student host is responsible for the guest's behavior and for providing dress code information. Any visitor, including parents of prospective students, should call the School to make an appointment. Notification must be given to the Director when any visit is to take place. If possible, no visits should take place during the first two weeks and the last two weeks of school.


A BRIEF HISTORICAL SKETCH OF THE MASTER'S SCHOOL The Master's School was founded in 1970 as part of a Christian ministry in West Simsbury, Connecticut, and originally incorporated as the Center for Renewal. It was clear from its initial bylaws that education was only one of its objectives. Though it was essentially nondenominational, there was a close relationship with Covenant Presbyterian Church whose property adjoined that of the Center for Renewal. Shared ministry with the church ultimately resulted in The Master's School carrying out the educational aims while the church bore the responsibility for other activities such as the retreat program. Recognizing the reality of these developments, the name "Center for Renewal" was replaced by the "The Master's School" as the designation for the corporation in 1973. The school began the process of establishing its own bylaws in September of 1976 and completed them in June of 1977. Originally the school was housed in a building rented from the Town of Simsbury. Later the Lower School moved into a different building and the Middle and Upper Schools moved into a site that the school had purchased. In 1980-81 the final move for grades one through twelve was made to the present site at 36 Westledge Road. The Early Childhood Center remained at the Covenant Presbyterian Church. There was also a branch of the ECC in the First Church of Christ in Unionville. After leasing the present campus for three years, The Master's School purchased the property in 1984. Subsequently the Unionville branch of ECC was turned over to the First Church of Christ. A new branch for early kindergarten and kindergarten was opened at the New Life in Christ Fellowship in Simsbury. In 2005 the EK and K moved to the brand new lower school building completed in September, 2005. The original Early Childhood Center is currently housed at CPC, 124 Old Farms Road in Simsbury. The Master's School has four Schools, the Early Childhood Center, Lower School, Middle School and Upper School. It is currently under the leadership of its fifth headmaster. Despite these physical changes, the Mission and Purpose of The Master's School has not changed significantly. Our purpose is to glorify the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ. Our mission is to train our youth to be wise in what is good and innocent and in what is evil, so that they will develop a character that is interwoven with Christian values. We have examined and revised some of our educational objectives and continue to make appropriate changes and recommendations for improvement in curriculum. The purchase of the campus set in motion several things that have created stability and confidence in the school. We have seen community awareness of The Master's School increase dramatically. Financial support for the school through the Annual Fund has also continued. We give thanks to our Lord who made this all possible, and with Whom we strive to touch more lives. The Master's School is a Christian school with distinctively Christian educational objectives - to encourage and enable students to receive all that God has for them physically, intellectually, socially, and spiritually. In addition to the goals related to students' academic development, it is our hope to afford every child the opportunity to experience the reality of God through Jesus Christ in a meaningful and personal way. As a nondenominational Christian institution, we are committed to the traditional Christian faith as expressed in the Apostles' and Nicene Creeds. We believe the Bible in its entirety contains God's plan for humankind and is essential to any reliable understanding of the human condition.


We encourage our faculty members to share their faith in Christ in the course of their working relationship with students in addition to scheduled worship times, in which Christian leaders are invited to speak about the Christian life. We admit mission appropriate students regardless of race, color or creed, and our faculty and staff sign a statement of faith and are expected to carry out their walk in a mature, growing manner. We recognize the necessity of close cooperation between school and family in attempting to realize these goals and objectives. We trust that each faculty and staff member at The Master's School supports our goals and purposes as a Christian school. TIMELINE March 1970

The Master's School is established as a Christian educational alternative under the direction of the Center for Renewal, Inc.

May 1970

The first Headmaster, Ralph T. Mattson, is appointed by the Board of Trustees.

September 1970

The Master's School opens for grades K-3 and 8-9 at the Old South School in Simsbury with 52 students and 17 staff members.

December 1972

The Lower School moves into another location in Simsbury, now the Center for Renewal.

June 1973

The first class of seniors graduates.

September 1973

Kindergarten and Early Kindergarten combine with the Nursery School at Covenant Presbyterian Church to become the Early Childhood Center.

December 1976

The Master's School receives full accreditation from the New England Association of Schools and Colleges.

September 1977

The first Early Childhood Center satellite nursery opens in Unionville.

May 1979

The second Headmaster, Dr. J. Stanley Mattson, is appointed by the Board of Trustees.

August 1980

Grades 1-12 are united on our 225-acre campus on Westledge Road in West Simsbury.

July 1983

The third Headmaster, Don W. Steele, is appointed by the Board of Trustees.

July 1984

The purchase of the Westledge Road campus including nine buildings is completed.


June 1986

The Master's School entered its second decade of full accreditation by NEASC.

January 1989

The newly-constructed gymnasium was dedicated.

November 1990

The centralized library located in the Campus Center was dedicated.

September 1996

The Master's School relocated the Early Kindergarten and Kindergarten, part of the ECC program at New Life in Christ Fellowship on Firetown Road.

December 1996

The Master's School entered its third decade of full accreditation by NEASC.

September 1997

New classrooms are built that connect the locker rooms and gymnasium to accommodate increased enrollment in the Upper School.

1999

Sale of land to Simsbury Land Trust, bringing us to 149 acres.

June 2000

The new Dining Hall which included a complete kitchen is constructed to provide better food service and to free space to improve Lower School Fine Arts facilities. Campus now has 10 buildings.

September 2004

The fourth headmaster, Bruce Libonn, is appointed by the Board of Trustees as interim.

July 2005

The fifth headmaster, Rick Burslem, is appointed by the Board of Trustees.

September 2005

The New Lower School Building opens with 10,000 square feet of new classroom, office and community space. Campus now has 11 buildings.

November 2006

The Master’s School entered the fourth decade of full accreditation by  NEASC.

January 8, 2007

The school received an anonymous gift of $2.78 million. Mortgage and line of credit were paid in full. Additional funds were given to complete the Lower School building.

March 2007

Sale of 75 acres to Simsbury Land Trust.  A “partnership” is established.

September 2007

The Lower School building is completed, adding 4000 square feet which includes a science lab.

April 2008

The sixth headmaster, Jon F. Holley, is appointed by the Board of Trustees.

July 2012

The seventh headmaster, Brian Meek, is appointed by the Board of Trustees.


Appendix


Appendix A – Definitions and Descriptions The following is a partial list of descriptions and definitions utilized for disciplinary purposes. In no way is this list meant to be all inclusive. It is intended as a guideline for the understanding and execution of discipline. Bullying Definition: Bullying means any overt acts, repeated against the same student over a period of time, by a student or a group of students with the intent to ridicule, humiliate or intimidate that student. Cheating Definition: Using or attempting to use unauthorized assistance or advantage in academic work that is submitted as one's own individual efforts or the giving of such assistance to others. (Minor offenses of cheating will be defined as less than 5% of a body of work being non-original work or not as assigned or as non-subject related communication between students during an exam, test or quiz.) Examples of cheating include, but are not limited to: Turning in work that was not entirely done by the student and giving the impression that the work was done by the student. o Copying homework without the consent or approval of the teacher. o Using translation sites off the internet or software in foreign language classes. o Using workbooks from a previous year with answers already written in. o Working with others on any assignment which is intended to be an independent effort. o Dividing up work among group members that was intended to be done together. Using a similar assignment from a past class (book report, essay, etc.) Allowing one’s academic work to be used in place of  another’s. Having notes or textbooks visible during tests or quizzes. Giving or receiving information about a test, quiz, or other assignment prior to starting the assignment. o This includes receiving from someone unauthorized specific test questions or information about topics included in the assignment. Glancing at someone else’s test or quiz or allowing  someone to glance at your test or quiz during the administration of the test or quiz. Using a calculator when instructed not to use it. Not telling your teacher that the score on your test is added wrong. Not telling your teacher when a wrong answer was not marked wrong. Instead of reading the original book or original literary work: o Reading a condensed version. o Seeing the film or video. o Using Cliff’s Notes o Reading an English version of a work assigned in a foreign language. Dress Code Definition:  Refer to the “Dress Code” section of this handbook  for a detailed description. It is important to note that a student out of dress code is expected to rectify the matter immediately when it is first brought to their attention or obtain a pass from the Dean of Students. Students may receive demerits in EVERY class if they do not take the appropriate action.

Electronics, cell phones, and computers use Definition: the use of any personal electronic, telephone or computerized device. Explanations and examples of the use of electronics, cell phones and computers include, but are not limited to: Laptops/Handheld Computers are to be used only for valid educational purposes. Use of Radios, CD Players, MP3 Devices and other musical devices are not allowed during school hours and must be kept completely out of sight and are subject to confiscation otherwise. Specific permission for use may be given by a faculty member under the following circumstances: o Within a teacher’s classroom under their supervision. o On a bus or van trip. o On a school sponsored trip Cell phones must be off and must be out of sight at all times while on campus and may not be used at all during school hours. Specific permission may be granted by a faculty or staff member under the following circumstances: o To contact a parent or family member o To contact someone when school or an event have been cancelled for that same day o On a school sponsored trip o Upper School Students have been granted the privilege of reasonable use of their cell phones during their lunch period. Should students choose to use their phones inappropriately during the day, teachers and staff persons will take the phones away and issue an immediate detention. Teachers reserve the right to request that cell phones be visible during class time as needed and especially during exams, tests or quizzes. Handheld, console or computer based gaming is not allowed during school hours. Gambling Definition: Participating in games of chance or situations where money or property change hands or actions are performed based on the outcome of the event. Explanations of gambling include, but are not limited to: Playing traditional games of chance not limited to the following examples: o Poker (and variations) o Blackjack o Craps o 3-card Monte Playing any game where betting or prizes are involved Pooling or betting money, property or actions that are given to an individual completing an action (i.e.: giving someone $5 if they shave their head). Gum Chewing Definition: Gum chewing is not allowed on campus because it creates a maintenance condition when it gets into carpet and under tables or other furniture. Harassment Definition: Harassment means any unwelcome verbal or physical abuse, repeated against the same student over a period of time, that creates an intimidating, hostile, or offensive educational environment, regardless of the means by which they are made or communicated.


Hazing Definition: Hazing means any action or activity that endangers the health or safety of a student for the purpose of initiation, admission into or affiliation with, or as a condition for continued membership in a student organization or activity such as an athletic team. Inappropriate language or gestures Definition: the use of language that one could find offensive. Explanations of inappropriate language include, but are not limited to: Using foul language (using words considered swears) Using racial slurs, even when joking around. Using sexual explicit or suggestive language. Raising of the middle finger. Inappropriate public displays of affection Definition: Any action, appearance, or statement, which can be considered or interpreted as sexual in nature. Examples of inappropriate conduct include, but are not limited to: Kissing. Hugging or touching. Sexually suggestive speech or gestures. Lack of attentiveness Definition: not giving your complete attention to the individual in charge and/or the task at hand. Explanations of lack of attentiveness include, but are not limited to: Sleeping in class. Keeping your head down on the desk during class. Working on work unrelated to the class at hand. Lying Definition: Any action, appearance, or statement, which an individual knows, or should know, to be untrue, given with intention to deceive. Examples of lying include, but are not limited to: Making a false statement in an attempt to gain an unfair advantage. Giving false excuses and explanations for being absent or tardy. Bending the truth or pretending not to understand information that one is expected to know. Lying by omission. Leaving out pertinent information in order to gain an unfair advantage or to protect others. Receiving permission from a teacher to go one place and going someplace else. Forgery Messiness Definition: contributing to the messiness or disarray of the campus. Explanations of Messiness include, but are not limited to: Littering. Leaving backpack or other personal effects lying about in non-designated areas. Leaving a mess in the dining hall or a restroom. Personal appearance (See “Dress, Grooming and  Appearance Standards”)

Parking lot safety Definition: Student shall maintain safety in the parking lot at all times. This is generally an unsupervised area and no student is allowed to be in the parking lot during school hours except by specific permission of a faculty member. Explanations and examples of parking lot safety issues include, but are not limited to: Being in the parking lot during school hours. Exception include: o Students being picked up or dropped off with the knowledge and permission of a parent or guardian. o Seniors with privileges, ONLY if they are leaving from or arriving to campus. o Students retrieving an item from their car ONLY with the permission of a faculty member. Violating driving rules (See section “Diving Privileges”) Plagiarism Definition: literary theft, misrepresentation, and falsification. Minor plagiarism will be considered to be 1 in 10 references or less being omitted. Explanations of plagiarism include, but are not limited to: To plagiarize is to steal someone’s ideas or thoughts or to  borrow dishonestly from another. To sign one’s name to a daily assignment or major work is  to declare that work totally one’s own.  By not clearly  marking the source of the information, thoughts or ideas, a student commits plagiarism. To copy directly, paraphrase, or summarize with premeditation and without documentation is to deliberately plagiarize. Inadvertent documentation mistakes that allow another’s  words, thoughts, or ideas to be credited as one’s own due  to improper referencing are considered plagiarism. “Plagiarism is a serious violation of another person’s rights,  whether the material stolen is great or small; it is not a matter of degree or intent” (“Academic Writing at TMS: Statement on Plagiarism”). Plagiarism is prevented when the proper form of documentation is followed. Physical boundary limitations on campus Definition: Students are welcome to be in and about and enjoy the appropriate places on campus, at the appropriate times. These areas include the buildings utilized by the Upper School. Students should not exceed these privileges by going outside of the places and times allotted without specific permission from faculty member. Explanations of exceeding physical boundary limitations include, but are not limited to: Going to any the lower school buildings or their outside facilities. Going to the middle school building except for the library or computer room. Being at the athletic fields during school hours. Going to any area off the campus proper. o Peripheral wooded areas o Reservoir o Hiking paths Being in any building after 5:00 PM or on weekends. Being in the parking lot or on the drive during school hours.


Piercing Definition: Piercing means the penetrating of the skin or body with jewelry or another object. Visible piercing is limited to the ears only and should not draw undue attention. Explanations of piercing violations include, but are not limited to: Having excessive piercing that violates the intent of the “dress, grooming and appearance standards” Earlobe “plugs” Recurring infractions and ongoing disciplinary problems Definition: any matter of discipline that occurs more than two or three times. Even minor issues such as gum chewing that recur are signs of disrespect for authority and for the community and will be handled with severity. Explanations of recurring infractions and ongoing disciplinary problems include, but are not limited to: Breaking the same school rule more than 2 or 3 times. Breaking 2 or 3 different school rules, even just one time each, over a relatively short period of time. Multiple infractions (whether they are the same or different in nature) with the same teacher. Failure to follow through with agreed upon corrective action. Respect for school Definition: Any action that mars, harms or otherwise defaces any portion of the campus, including inside and outside of buildings and of the grounds or unattached property. Examples of disrespecting the school include, but are not limited to: Vandalism. Dropping/leaving trash or items on the floor. Defacing a textbook. “Burn-outs” with a vehicle in the parking lot. Respect For school staff Definition: Any action, appearance, or statement, which lowers the admiration or esteem of a faculty or staff member or any inconsideration toward them. Examples of disrespecting a faculty or staff member include, but are not limited to: Talking back. Using derogatory or defaming language toward an individual. Uninvited observation of papers or effects on or in a teacher’s desk or personal belongings. Respect for peers Definition: Any action, appearance, or statement, which lowers the admiration or esteem of a peer or any inconsideration toward them. Examples of disrespecting a peer include, but are not limited to: Slander or slurs. Using derogatory or defaming language toward a peer. Uninvited observation of papers or effects in a peer’s  locker or personal belongings. Sexual harassment Definition: Sexual Harassment includes any unwelcome sexual advance and/or affection, request for sexual favors or other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive educational environment, regardless of the means by which they are made or communicated. In brief, our Sexual Harassment Policy is as follows:

TMS does not tolerate sexual harassment or other forms of harassment, retaliation, or discrimination on the basis of race, gender, color, sexual orientation, national origin, religion, physical or mental disability, or ancestry. TMS takes complaints very seriously. TMS will investigate claims promptly. There will be no retaliation for bringing a claim or providing information in good faith. TMS will take appropriate disciplinary action, if warranted, up to and including Expulsion from school and mandated reporting to proper authorities as appropriate. Sexual misconduct Definition: Based on the Bible, The Master’s School believes  that God intended human sexuality to be enjoyed only in a monogamous marriage relationship between a man and a woman. Therefore, any sexual activity or expression outside of heterosexual marriage, including but not limited to premarital or extramarital sex, use and/or distribution of pornography, homosexuality, sexual abuse or improprieties towards minors, and all sexual harassment, as defined herein, are prohibited. Sexual misconduct includes any of the aforementioned prohibited actions whether done in person, through social media, or other means of communication. Stealing Definition: Taking or attempting to take property, whether physical or intellectual, without right or permission. Examples of stealing include, but are not limited to: Taking something without permission of the owner even if the intention is to return whatever is taken. Borrowing something without permission even if the intention is to return whatever is borrowed. Finding something and making little or no effort to locate the rightful owner. Unauthorized removal of academic materials from a teacher. Tardiness (Unexcused) Definition: Arriving late to a scheduled class, community time or event without a parent note or teacher pass. It is the student’s  responsibility  to  obtain  a  pass  when  the  possibility  exists that they might be late. Explanations and examples of tardiness include, but are not limited to: Arriving to school late. Arriving to a class late. Arriving at a class on time, placing personal items at the student’s desk and leaving, not to arrive back until after the  start of class. Arriving late to a class, requesting that a pass be obtained at a later time. Tattooing Definition: Tattooing means the marking of the skin, either permanently or temporarily with lettering or graphics. Tattoos are not allowed to be visible at any time and must be covered while on campus or at any school related event (i.e.: sporting events, trips, etc.)


Unprepared for class or physical education Definition: Students are expected to arrive at each class on time with ALL of the materials items necessary for that class. Explanations and examples of unpreparedness include, but are not limited to: Arriving to P.E. without appropriate dress. Arriving to a class without a writing utensil. Arriving to a class without books or notebooks as directed by the teacher. *Requesting to go to the lockers to retrieve an item once class has begun.

Revised July 2012

2012-2013 Middle and Upper School Student Handbook  

Handbook for The Master's School

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