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Goodwill Industries of Central North Carolina Hispanic/Latino Audience

Campaign Proposition  

Public Relations and Civic Responsibility Class

Compiled By:

Phoenix Public Relations Corporation

December 2, 2010 

Gregory Krzysiak gkrzysiak@elon.edu Kristen Greene kgreene3@elon.edu  

Chelsea Caplan ccaplan@elon.edu Jamie Wagner jwagner5@elon.edu

Sarah Dodge sdodge@elon.edu


Table of Contents Research Brief……………………………………………………………….……4 Introduction…………………………………………………………...…….5 Goodwill SWOT Analysis……………………………………………...…..5 Developing a Baseline……………………………………………………...6 Target Audience: Why We Are Talking to Them………………………….6 Culture of Hispanics Nationally……………………………………………7 Demographics of Hispanics Nationally…………………….………………8 Demographics of Hispanics Locally………………………..………………9 Demographics of Central North Carolina Counties………………………...9 Best Way to Reach the Hispanic Audience…………………………….…10 Preferred Media and Why…………………………………………………12 Cultural Differences and How to Appeal to them……………………...…13 Pitfalls and Consequences to Consider……………………………………14 Budget Breakdown……………………………………..…………………14 Summary and Implications………………………………………..………15 Action and Planning………………………………………………………...…..17 Introduction…………………………………………………………….…18 Goals……………………………………………………………………....18 Objectives…………………………………………………………………18 Strategies………………………………………………………….……….18 Tactics………………………………………..……………………………19 Budget…………………………………………………………….……….25 Communication…………………………………………………...……………..27 Introduction……………………………………………………………….28 Execution………………………………………………………………….28 Timelines………………………………………………………………….30 Work Samples and Demonstrations………………………………………35 Evaluation…………………………………………………………………….….41 Introduction………………………………………………………………..42 Campaign SWOT Analysis………………………………………….……42 Evaluation of Family Fun Series…………………………………….……43 Appendix……………………………………………………………………..….45

December 2, 2010 


Introduction In light of the recent recession, more Americans are struggling to maintain economic stability. In North Carolina, 9.7 percent of the population is unemployed. The downward spiral of the economy has resulted in “the highest unemployment rate in nearly six years for Hispanic workers” (Strength in Diversity). And for these reasons, we feel that a campaign directed at this population would be most effective. Goodwill Industries of Central North Carolina is seeking a Public Relations campaign that targets the Hispanic audience in the Central North Carolina area. The area of central North Carolina includes Alamance, Caswell, Guilford, Rockingham and Randolph County. The campaign must be in line with Goodwill’s mission to “promote the value of work through the provision of work opportunities for people with special employment needs” (Goodwill). The goal of the campaign will be to encourage Hispanics to use Goodwill’s employment services and shop at Goodwill stores both now, during this economic recession, and in future more economically productive times. This research brief will address characteristics of the Hispanic audience both nationally and more specifically to the Central North Carolina area. It will also determine the best ways to reach our audience through different mediums and the budget that might entail. In our research we will work to answer the following questions: ● What is the demographic breakdown in the area we are trying to target? ● Who is the target audience that we are trying to reach with our campaign(s), and why are we talking to them? ● What is the best way to reach the target audience? Particularly, what is the best medium to communicate with the target audience? ● What medium is preferred and why the audience prefers to receive information in this manner? ● What additional information on cultural differences is there that would add to our knowledge and further support our campaigns? ● What are the pitfalls that the agents should avoid when planning for this initiative? ● What is the budget breakdown for this proposal?

December 2, 2010 


Goodwill Industries of Central North Carolina Hispanic/Latino Audience

Research Brief

 

Public Relations and Civic Responsibility Class

December 2, 2010 


Goodwill S.W.O.T. Analysis Strengths Goodwill uses the revenue from sold clothes and other items to create programs that assist the needy in finding jobs. Sometimes this involves creating a resume or setting up an email account for a consumer, while other times it may involve teaching consumers business etiquette. Goodwill has created a cycle that starts with a donation and ends with job placement or assistance. Their career services center is free and open to any legal citizen, and can help consumers with anything job-related from punching in a time clock to the basics of Microsoft Word. Another program, the Jobs On The Outside program, or JOTO, was established by Goodwill and is another branch dedicated to helping the community. The JOTO program helps ex-convicts or criminals become reacquainted with society and helps find them jobs “on the outside” of prison. Goodwill “promotes the value of work through the provision of work opportunities for people with special employment needs.” This ranges from ex-convicts to older adults who may have lost their job in the recession. Goodwill is a not-for-profit company that strives to help all people no matter their age, income, race, or creed.

Weaknesses Goodwill has some weaknesses in relation to the Hispanic population of North Carolina; there are not enough translators to have multiple classes for English as a second language or other career service classes. Hispanics who speak little or no English have no reason to go to a class where they cannot understand the instructor. If Goodwill was more bilingual, it may be more appealing to the Hispanic population. Also, there is not a lot of free space and open areas to create more classrooms for more classes. The center in Greensboro is packed to its limits and cannot fit anything else additionally. New construction could be very expensive, time consuming, and counterproductive. It would also require the hiring of more staff, and Goodwill may not want to throw a lot of money towards a new project in such economically tough times. The number of donations recently has decreased and the number of items sold has increased. However, for the cycle to continue strongly donations need to be incoming as much as possible. In addition, Goodwill has no baseline to compare growth to. It is difficult to measure the success of any program because there is no quantitative data on the demographics of current Goodwill consumers.

Opportunities The Hispanic population is a huge, developing market that has yet to be tapped. Goodwill has the potential breach this market with both their career services branch and shopping center. The shopping center provides used items like clothing, children’s toys and entertainment, books and household furniture at a discounted price, and to a market that is not known for being rich with money the shopping center is reasonable.

December 2, 2010 


Threats Goodwill has multiple competitors like the Salvation Army, the Red Cross, and the Vietnam Vets who also collect used clothing. These not-for-profits are equally appealing to those who have no knowledge of where the clothes go when they are donated. If more people knew about the cycle of Goodwill and the services that are provided via the revenue from the donation, they may be more inclined to donate to Goodwill. Other donors are loyal to the company or organization their family has been giving to historically. This may be because one donation center is closer and more accessible, or a reason.  

Developing a Baseline Before Goodwill conducts any campaigns they need to establish a baseline for their consumer demographics. Phoenix PR suggests that Goodwill not only looks at its current consumers, but people that apply to be consumers as well. We propose that when potential consumers are applying that they fill out a three question survey addressing their age, ethnicity and level of education. Please see Figure 1 in the appendix for an example of what this survey would look like. If the potential consumer qualifies to begin Goodwill’s career services, their survey can be stamped accepted. These surveys can then be stored in two separate folders. This information can be compiled into quantitative data and later represented as a pie chart or other visual graphic.

Detailed Findings Target Audience: Why Are We Talking to Them? Phoenix PR will be aiming its campaign for Goodwill Industries towards the Hispanic population. The Hispanic population is our target audience for two reasons: its population in North Carolina, specifically the Triad, continues to grow and they are more likely to use Goodwill’s services because of their economical standing. In 2009, the median household income was almost $50,000, about $10,000 more than the median Hispanic income. The Hispanic population has the second lowest median household income in the nation, second only to the African American population so Goodwill’s services will be appealing to this generally low-income population. If Goodwill can tap into the large Hispanic population in the Triad area and gain a reputation of being a safe and productive service, the number of Hispanics using the service will increase. The program expected to be the most useful to the Hispanic population is the English as a Second Language (ESL). Since the program does not charge any fee and is considered one of high quality, it will most likely be used the most. There are other courses offered as well. Not only would the services teach them how to speak and write in English, but once they learn English more possibilities and services will be available. Goodwill offers a variety of courses on how to integrate properly into the business world, for both labor

December 2, 2010 


positions and desk positions. However, Goodwill only works with legal immigrants and can cause a problem for those who are not yet citizens. To get a consumer a job, Goodwill must provide accurate and truthful information to the potential employer. Many companies, both not-for-profits and large businesses, have targeted the Hispanic market before because of their large and growing population in America. Besides Mexico, America has the largest Hispanic population at 45 million, with an additional 11 or 12 million who are not documented. This group alone was predicted to spend trillions of dollars in the market by 2010, and for those who cannot afford to spend money in the market can benefit greatly from the services provided by Goodwill.  

Culture of Hispanics Nationally Culture is a profound aspect of the Hispanic community. According to a study by Associate Professor Rosanna M. Fiske from Florida International University, 67 percent of Hispanics in America are Mexican, 9 percent are Puerto Rican, 9 percent are from central America, 4 percent are Cuban, 3 percent are central American, and the rest are Latino or come from South America. No matter which country they arrive from, heritage and customs are tremendous factors in deciding how to appeal to the emotions and interest of this population. Fiske reported that loyalty, collectivism, Catholicism, and a common language are four shared values of all Hispanics. These four aspects will be implemented in order to reach the target consumer. Loyalty: The Hispanic population has been known to be very loyal to their products and ideals; if it works, don’t fix it. If they find a good or service they like and feel comfortable using, Hispanics will stay loyal to their good or service. Collectivism: Fiske reported that Hispanics also favor collectivism, or the value of the group over personal importance. Family is a huge part of Hispanic culture and always comes first. Since family and the group are more significant than the individual, group motivation and peer-driven approaches are more beneficial than trying to appeal to an individual. Catholicism: Catholicism is another common value that Hispanics share, and can be appealed to through religious outlets. In 2005 the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops discovered that over 65 percent of Hispanics are Catholic. Nationally this translates to about 26.4 million people or 39 percent of U.S. Catholics. Advertising in the church bulletin or asking the priest to encourage the use of our services could greatly impact our success. Please refer to the Figure 2 graph for a visual comparing the quantity of Hispanic Catholics with the quantity of Catholics in other demographics.

December 2, 2010 


Common Language: Research supports the idea that most second and third generation Hispanics prefer to speak English. At the same time, Hispanics live in very diverse communities with a mix of foreign-born and native-born Hispanics. In reaching this population, the message must be able to resonate across multiple acculturation levels. Fiske said “Spanish talks to the heart while English talks to the head.” It is important that as we try to appeal to our target group we use their language and ours by promoting bilingual advertising. Hispanic consumers prefer bilingual material for the following reasons: they may have different cultures and languages in one household (children, parents, grandparents), some people do not trust translations, some want to protect their cultural heritage, some want to teach themselves English through bilingual material, some feel that they are at an economic advantage being bilingual, and there is a trend amidst young Hispanics toward “retro-acculturation.” Bi-lingual pamphlets and handouts would cater to all members of the Hispanic household, including those who don’t speak English, can read what a program has to offer. However, when conducting bilingual communication it is important to focus less on the direct translation and more on translating the meaning of your message. A study done in 2005 found that when dealing with emotional meaning, Hispanics do prefer Spanish even though they admit that images and connotations can be different depending on the matter of the subject. What this implies is that we as communicators must be aware of the “emotionally charged connotations” in the Spanish speaking language. It is vital that translations are regarded with caution. Even though they are technically correct, the translations may not contain the emotional appeal that is intended.

Demographics of Hispanics Nationally Economics: In 2009, the real median household income was almost $50,000, about $10,000 more than the Hispanic income. The Hispanic population has the second lowest real median household income in the nation, second only to the black population. Age: In a study conducted by a professor at Florida International University on the U.S. Hispanic/Latino market, research shows that this market tends to be younger than other parts of the population. The study states, “Just over five percent of the Hispanic population is aged 65 and over, compared with 14 percent of non-Hispanic whites.” In reaching the Hispanic population, researchers have found the Hispanic youth market crucial in communicating with Hispanic audiences of all ages. In accordance with this research, the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops also found the demographic of Hispanic Catholics to be younger. Hispanics made up 41 percent of all Catholics under the age of thirty, and 44 percent of all Catholics under the age of ten.

December 2, 2010 


In addition, Hispanics have a tendency to respect towards a tradition, life experience, and age. In other words, respect for elders is a very important aspect of their culture.

Demographics of Hispanics Locally According to the Pew Hispanic Center analysis from 2008, the Hispanic population in North Carolina adds up to approximately 678,000 citizens. This number is about 7 percent of the entire North Carolina Population. Economics: Between the three main ethnicities in North Carolina, Caucasian, Hispanic AfricanAmerican, and Latino, Hispanic citizens earn the lowest annual income. The median income for Latinos 16 years and older is about $18, 331 a year. In addition, 32 percent of Hispanics younger than 17 years old are impoverished, and 46 percent of all Hispanics in North Carolina do not have health care. Age: The median age of all Hispanics in North Carolina is about 25 years old. The median age for Native-Born Hispanics is much younger than the median age for Foreign-Born Hispanics. The median age for Native-Born Hispanics is approximately 8 years old, and the median age of foreign-born Hispanics is about 32 years old. Overall, the median age for Hispanics in North Carolina is very low, a statistic consistent with the median age for Hispanics nationally. Language: Like many other Hispanics in America, Hispanics in North Carolina prefer to speak Spanish in their home rather than English. Only 91,000 people or 16 percent of the Hispanic population only speak English in their home. In comparison, 483,000 people or 84 percent of the Hispanic Population speak Spanish at home. Media Preferences: Hispanics in North Carolina frequently use social media, message boards and sports sites. They check advertisers’ Spanish-language sites, but find many of them wanting. It was discovered in 2010 that 29.6 million Hispanics would go online at least once a month. It is expected that by 2010, 39.2 million Hispanics will be online; representing 70 percent of the population, and that Hispanic consumers will wield $1.33 trillion in spending power.

Demographics of Central North Carolina Counties Goodwill Industries of Central North Carolina is involved with five counties: Alamance County, Caswell County, Guilford County, Rockingham County and Randolph County. It is important to understand the demographics of each county to target where our focus should be when conducting our campaign. The following information is accredited to the United States Census Bureau. Please refer to the Figure 3 Table in order see a visual comparing the demographics within each county.

December 2, 2010 


Population Number  Percent of population with  Hispanic origin  Percent of Hispanics born  outside of U.S.A.  Percent of population speak  English as a 2nd language  Number of people in  poverty  Percent of population in  poverty  Percent of population that  are women  Amount of Retail Money  Spent 

Alamance  150,358  11.5% 

Caswell  79,914  4.4% 

Guilford  480,362  6.5% 

Rockingham  Randolph  92,252  142,151  5.6%  11% 

6.3% 

1.9% 

6.5% 

2.7% 

5.7% 

9.3% 

3.5% 

9.2% 

4.7% 

7.8% 

22,864 

12,097 

62,528 

19,649 

14,749 

15.2% 

15.1% 

13% 

21.3% 

10.4% 

51.8% 

50.8% 

52% 

51.7% 

50.7% 

$1,630,194  $594,571 

$5,983,875  $748,225 

$993,158 

Best Way to Reach the Hispanic Audience Research supports the idea that the Spanish market is increasingly using a broad media spectrum. Certain television networks work really well to connect with the Hispanic market. Studies reveal that the number of Hispanics using cell phones, radio, and Internet are growing rapidly. Radio seems like a great way to reach the Hispanic market, however, online could be much more cost effective. In the example of Ford’s campaign, they relied heavily on educational tools in order to reach the Hispanic population. It was interesting that this campaign also relied on word of mouth. In addition, the younger generations of Hispanics are picking up quickly on different Medias. These finding imply that an effective way to reach Hispanics would be through educational tools online and in the community that will help them understand the different aspects of Goodwill. Furthermore another approach would be to find a way to reach Hispanics via the radio. ● Books/Magazines/TV – According to the study mentioned before on the U.S. Hispanic/Latino market, “86 percent of Spanish-speaking households purchased at least one Spanish book annually while 29 percent bought 10 or more.” In addition, the study found that more than half of the people who responded to the survey read a Spanish-language magazine at least once a week. 87 percent watch Spanish television daily. ● Newspaper- According to the same study, the most popular Spanish newspaper, El Nuevo Herald continues to acquire journalistic awards as well as advertising revenue which makes a worthy competitor for even English newspapers. ● Television- In 2007, an innovative Nielson Rating system that contains Hispanic media was revealed. Univision, which is the top Spanish-language network, is trying to make viewers and ad dollars by being the NO. 1 station in several Hispanic majority markets. Univision is a major way to reach the Spanish Community. It is joining the trend of influencing radio, TV, and interactive media in local markets. According to Adweek.com, local media have begun to “take center stage with companies that own radio and TV in multiple markets.” December 2, 2010 

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For example Cox Media and CBS Local Media. Even though Univision is not the first, the company offers unmatched reach among Hispanics in the top 16 Hispanic markets as well as Puerto Rico. Peter Walker who is the President of Univision will oversee the repositioning of all sales and operations for the companies’ 68 radio stations, 63 TV stations and local “interactive properties.” ● Radio- In a Arbitron Hispanic radio study it talks about radio being a fundamental medium for Hispanics in the U.S. “The study examined 10 Spanish-language formats and six English-language formats and culled audience data from 105 markets with significant Hispanic population.” Research found big shifts in listening patterns among Hispanics. Furthermore, they found that the number of people listening on the weekend is growing in proportion to weekday listening and that English-language formats are gaining in popularity. The study says that Hispanics are regular radio listeners in comparison with the normal population. “Radio is a valued and entrenched part of Hispanic consumers’ lives… from dawn until dusk, at home or away from home—radio is a primary media platform for this ethnic group.” The study also found that Hispanic listeners that are over the age of 12 spent about 16 hours per week listening to the radio which is 30 minutes more than the national audience as a whole. When discussing language preferences, findings showed that Spanish dominants at home demonstrated higher ratings than English dominants “across all demographics.” Also, even though “Spanish-language formats” are the most favored by Spanish-dominant listeners, “English-language formats” have grown significantly in popularity which reflects a rising bilingual society. “All six English-language formats included in the study registered an increase in Hispanic listeners, with three of them—adult contemporary, top 40 and classic hits—doubling the number of Hispanics they reached every week.” ● Internet/cell phones- According to a progressivegrocer.com article, “the U.S. Hispanic Internet population is young, vibrant and growing – in numbers, broadband connections and time spent online.” In 2009, nearly 23 million Hispanics were online. According to eMarketer this is 51 percent of the U.S. Hispanic population. In 2009, Hispanics made up about 12.3 percent of the U.S. Internet population and is estimated to grow to 13.9 percent in 2013. Internet users are young with 63 percent being under the age of 35. A Contextweb article discusses helpful ways to target the Spanish online market. These include geotargeting to certain states or countries which “segments Hispanics from different countries of origin or to segment different countries across Latin America,” behavioral targeting, contextual targeting, search which involves buying keywords that are both in Spanish and English to reach English-dominant and Hispanic-dominant U.S. Hispanics, content category targeting, and many other different avenues. According to the Pew Internet & American Life Project, 81 percent of Hispanics own a mobile phone and for 25 percent of these adults, their primary phone is their mobile device. The article says, “Hispanics use more phone features, including Internet access, at higher rates than other mobile subscribers.” In the article it says that online publishers and marketers are making campaigns and Web sites in Spanish and English to reach an audience that sways between cultures and languages. The article discusses how there is not any simple

December 2, 2010 

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way to reach such a diverse population but the key is to “respect their broad cultural values.” ● An example of reaching a Hispanic market- Ford launched an educational campaign to reach U.S. Hispanics in partnership with Zubi advertising and Saberes-Poder. The campaign educated Hispanic consumers, particularly Mexican immigrants, how to buy a car in the Unites States. The assistant regional manager for Ford for the South Central Region, Alcaro Cabal, said that this isn’t something that they want to address with advertising. “Word of mouth is really important.” Consumers are able to go online to a local Mexican consulate and acquire educational resources created by Saberes-Poder. This provided “culturally relevant educational products.” The information is neutral because in the mind of Cabal, “an educated customer is better for us.” This campaign relied heavily on media relations and targeted digital, print, and TV outlets.

Preferred Media and Why Hispanics prefer to print media when choosing a medium to consume. According to  Lauren Sonderup, “the combination of direct mail… and print makes it possible for  the Hispanic consumer to obtain additional information and “close the sale” – with  each medium contributing to the total communication story.” With our given budget  we will not be able to access all media outlets at the same time, so we will but it is  worth noting that they are useful.    That being said, studies suggest that Hispanics much prefer print media to learn  about information. This is the form of media that we will focus on over the course of  this campaign. The Majic Consulting Group states, “Hispanics prefer reading at  leisure to gain information” (Majic). They use this medium as a way of assimilating  to United States culture. Additionally, the pass‐along readership in the Spanish  community is likely to be higher than that of other communities in the area. Further,  Hispanics tend to prefer Spanish‐first publications. Circulation of Spanish‐language  papers is growing, while the general trend for English newspapers is going down  (Majic).    As far as language is concerned, Hispanics much prefer a primarily Spanish media  outlet, or at least a Spanish alternative to an English one. Their preference is very  much based on which language they learned first. Spanish‐first consumers prefer  Spanish media but do consume some English while English‐first and those who  learned the language at the same time prefer English. That is not to say that those  speaking English dislike Spanish media. According to a study by the Association of  Hispanic Advertising agencies, while the assumption has been that Spanish‐ language media “older” Hispanics, but that is not necessarily the case (Cobo).  Because with our proposal we are targeting a number of different age groups this is  important to recognize. The AHAA also stated that, “In polling 10,000 Hispanics  across the U.S. aged 18‐34, the study found that the majority (68 percent) are either  bilingual or Spanish‐dominant and consume Spanish‐language (media) at slightly  higher rates than their English‐language alternative” (Cobo).   December 2, 2010 

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Cultural Differences and How to Appeal to Them Research supports the idea that most second and third generation Hispanics prefer  to speak English.  At the same time, Hispanics live in very diverse communities with  a mix of foreign‐born and native‐born Hispanics.  In reaching this population, the  message must be able to resonate across multiple acculturation levels.  Heritage and  customs are big factors in deciding how to appeal to the emotions and interest of  this population.  Furthermore, Spanish youth is the key ingredient in aiding the  message to be carried to all Hispanics audiences.   ● In a study conducted by a professor at Florida International University on the  U.S. Hispanic/Latino market, research shows that this market tends to be  younger than other parts of the population.  The study states, “Just over five  percent of the Hispanic population is aged 65 and over, compared with 14  percent of non‐Hispanic whites.”  In reaching the Hispanic population,  researchers have found the Hispanic youth market crucial in communicating  with Hispanic audiences of all ages.    ● According to this same study, there are certain cultural features that are  embedded into people with Latin American and Spanish heritage that help us  understand how to appeal to what matters most to them.    Since family and  the group are more significant than the individual, group motivation and  peer‐driven approaches are more beneficial than trying to appeal to an  individual.  Also, because Hispanics have had to adapt to a number of  different scenarios, they would rather do multiple activities at the same time  as opposed to doing one thing at a time.  Furthermore, “opinion leadership”  on a number of topics as well as areas of skill is only designated to a few  individuals rather than many specialized leaders.   Finally, Hispanics/Latinos  have a tendency to feel positive feelings of respect towards a tradition, life  experience, and age.  Respect for elders is very important.   ● In addition, the study discusses language preferences among the Hispanic  market.  The study found that most Hispanics feel that Spanish speaks to the  heart while English “talks to the head.”  A study done in 2005 found that  when dealing with emotional meaning, Hispanics do prefer Spanish even  though they admit that images and connotations can be different depending  on the matter of the subject.  What this implies is that we as communicators  must be aware of the “emotionally charged connotations” in the Spanish  speaking language.  It is vital that translations are regarded with caution.   Even though they are technically correct, the translations may not contain  the emotional appeal that is intended.  At a 2006 PRWeek gathering of  agency and corporate executives involved in the Spanish market, these  professionals did not understand the communications among the Hispanic  audiences.  Thus, those endeavoring to reach the Hispanic population must  understand and find the cultural relevance in communicating with them to  build “trust beyond the language.”   ● Findings in the study further suggest that most Hispanic consumers prefer  bilingual material for the following reasons: they may have different cultures  December 2, 2010 

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and languages in one household (children, parents, grandparents), those who  only speak Spanish want to learn English, some people do not trust  translations, Hispanics want to protect their cultural heritage, they feel that  they are at an economic advantage being bilingual, there is a trend amidst  young Hispanics toward “retro‐acculturation.”   ● This background about the Spanish culture helps determine the different  ways in which media reaches the Hispanic population.    

Pitfalls and Consequences to Consider The major risk of working with a Hispanic audience is the possibility of illegal immigrants. In reality, “employers can’t be held liable for unknowingly hiring and illegal immigrant” (Strength in Diversity), but if an illegal immigrant does turn-up it can give the business a bad name. It is important to do thorough background checks, so that Goodwill’s credibility as well as the employer’s credibility stays in tact.

Budget Breakdown Our estimated budget will be between $40,000 and $50,000 for this campaign. Below are the prices of different services we considered. Unfortunately, hiring a new employee such as a Spanish Interpreter/Translator or a Babysitter would use the majority of our budget. We still included the research on these services to demonstrate their expense and explain our decision. We also included our research on the cost for different communication services including radio, print, Internet and pamphlets. A formal and detailed budget will be included in the Action and Planning segment of our presentation. Spanish Interpreter or Translator: According to the United States Department of Labor, the annual earnings of a Spanish Interpreter or Translator are usually between $28, 940 and $52, 240. In the appendix are some graphs from payscale.com that give a clearer idea of the cost of a Spanish Translator/Interpreter for Goodwill. Please refer to Figure 3, Figure 4 and Figure 5 graphs. Based on all of these graphs, the minimum wage requirement would be about $30,000. Babysitter: Since Hispanics are so family-oriented, it would be beneficial to begin a babysitter program for the children to be at while their parents are attending classes and training. This program could only be available during after school hours to decrease cost. Using a website called sittercity.com, I estimated the typical rate for babysitters watching more than six children in Central North Carolina. To have a babysitter with two or more years of experience it would cost about $11 per hour if the sitter is between eighteen and twenty-one, and $11.25 per hour if the sitter is older than twenty-two. Radio:

December 2, 2010 

14 


There are three Spanish radio stations that are available in Randolph County. The first is WGOS-AM 1070 and Spanish Religious station that is daytime only. However, this station may not be helpful because it appears to only advertise religious advertisements. The next two stations, WYSR-AM 1590 and WWBG-AM 1470, seem to both be linked with the “QuéPasa” media network. “QuéPasa” Radio was ranked as number one in North Carolina Radio News, Sports and Entertainment. In order to find the cost of the ad we have to call 1-877-714-2892. Print: When searching for newspapers, we focused on the local newspapers in Alamance County and Randolph County since they had the highest percentage of Latino citizens. In Randolph County there is the Asheboro Courier-Tribune and The Randolph Guide. Asheboro Courier-Tribune: ● Have to call Shinette Crump at (336) 625-2101 ext. 250 for information on Classified Ad costs ● Call Wendy Walker at (336) 626-6104 for information on Website Ad costs. The Randolph Guide: ● Minimum price would be roughly $12.00 for a plain classified ad in the newspaper. Internet and Cell Phone: Univision has online advertising where you can build a campaign and potentially pay less than $15,000. We will have a more definite number for the price after we finalize the campaign idea and receive a pricing from Univision. Univision also offers mobile (cell phone) advertising. There is no price available, so we would have to contact Univision for a pricing on that as well. Our budget goal is to not exceed the 40,000-50,000 dollars at our disposal, and to strive to use less funds then the designated budget.

Summary and Implications ●

Based on the demographics of central North Carolina under the jurisdiction of  Triad Goodwill, we found that Alamance and Randolph counties have the highest  percentage of Hispanics. In respect to the population of Alamance County, 11.5  percent of the population is Hispanic, whereas 11 percent of the Randolph  County population is Hispanic. Therefore, as we implement our research and  plans to increase awareness and participation within Goodwill Industries, we  will primarily focus on Alamance and Randolph counties.  Hispanics prefer to consume their media in tangible forms. Print media,  especially if offered in both Spanish and English, is a method that Hispanics use  to inform themselves and assimilate to American culture. Additionally, the pass  along readership levels of print media in the Hispanic community is much  higher than others. For these reasons, we feel that it would be most effective for  our campaigns to be run on a primarily print‐oriented platform.   

December 2, 2010 

15 


Culture and respect is very important to Hispanics.  They have more of a group  mindset rather than individual.  Also, when it comes to communicating with this  population, communicators have to understand that translations must be  regarded with caution because even if they are technically correct, they may not  contain the intended emotional meaning.  Furthermore, findings suggest that  most Hispanics prefer bilingual material because they have many cultures living  in the house (parents, children, grandparents, etc.), those who speak Spanish  want to learn English, they feel they are at more of an economic advantage being  bilingual, and many other reasons.    The number of Hispanics using different forms of media is continuously growing.   The younger generation is quickly picking up on these other medias.  Findings  imply that the best way to reach Hispanics would be educational tools online  and in the community that will help them learn the different aspects of Goodwill.    Also, word of mouth is another good way to get the message out there.     

To advertise messages and begin programs, it is important to consider the costs of Spanish translators, babysitters, radio advertisements, print advertisements, Internet and mobile advertisements and pamphlets, so that the budget does not exceed 40,000-50,000 dollars. 

The main risk when working with the Hispanic population is the possibility of  illegal immigrants.  There are 3 reasons Phoenix PR will be focusing on the Hispanic population: the  Hispanic population is generally in need of goods and services at lower prices,  they are loyal to their products and services, and the Hispanic population in the  Triad area of North Carolina is large and full of potential. If Goodwill can tap into  this large market, Goodwill will see a constant and steady growth of Hispanic  consumers. 

   

                                      December 2, 2010 

16 


Goodwill Industries of Central North Carolina Hispanic/Latino Audience

Action and Planning

 

Public Relations and Civic Responsibility Class

        December 2, 2010 

17 


Intro to Action and Planning   

Based on the information found from the research brief, we are now able to use this to come up with goals, objectives, strategies, tactics, and then figure out the budget. In this step we are answering three important questions. The first one is “Exactly who are we talking to?” in other words, defining our publics which is the Hispanic population. The second question is “What do we want to achieve?” which includes the goals and objectives. The final question is “What will we do?” which demonstrates action and strategies. Since family is very important to the Hispanic population, we decided that for out tactics we would do a “family fun series” because this emphasizes family bonding. The series consists of four different nights of fun activities for both adults and children.  

Goals Our goal is to build loyalty towards Goodwill Industries of North Carolina in the Hispanic Community, and increase the Hispanic participation in the career services and shopping aspects of Goodwill by 3 to 5 percent.  

Objectives    

Make professional resources more accessible in retail Develop loyalty from Hispanic Goodwill consumers and shoppers Stress “family values” through events, in order to build Hispanic support Create an accessible Goodwill environment in a venue specifically geared toward Hispanics  See a 3 to 5 percent increase in Hispanic participation in Goodwill stores and career services in Alamance County as a result of these events over the course of six months.  Communicate effectively with the Hispanic audience through print mediums in order to build interest in our campaign and loyalty to Goodwill Industries of Central North Carolina.  Look for a 1 percent increase in Hispanic event attendees after each event

Strategies Our main way to accurately tap into the Hispanic market is to appeal to them through collectivism, religion, family bonding, and written media. We rolled all of these specific traits into one idea and decided on creating multiple events for the community. These monthly or weekly events would be held at Blessed Sacrament Catholic Church in Alamance County where our target population is highest. At each event, information would be given out on how to use Goodwill’s career service center, and what Goodwill has to offer to the community whether it be providing low-priced items or career training services. The events would take place after a Spanish mass to make it more convenient for our market. Since transportation could be an issue, using the same ride to church for a ride to

December 2, 2010 

18 


the event could be an easy solution. The events would be similar to community builders where some sort of information is given out to benefit those attending, who usually all share a common goal. At our events, everyone attending would be looking for a safe, free and reliable way to better their opportunities in the job market. This way, the community could use the events sponsored by Goodwill to bond with each other and the neighborhood through Goodwill. These events would help create loyalty and trustworthiness to Goodwill by the Spanish community. It will also help prepare the Hispanic citizens learn about the services Goodwill offers and teach them for real-world jobs. A strategy like social media outreach in this case would be ineffective because of the low use of social media by the Hispanic market. Creating a Face book page for the events or even tweeting about the events would be of little or no help. Not only is the number of Hispanics who regularly use a computer very low, but also, many Hispanics have not shown interest in popular social media outlets. Goodwill has the means to promote the events through printed media, which has proven to be more effective for reaching the Hispanic market.  

Tactics Family Bingo Event This section of the “Fun Series” will be a family-focused Bingo Event. Taking place at the same block of time as the others, the Bingo night would capitalize on building loyalty and relations with the Hispanic community. Ideally, a community member (Hispanic) would be hired to be the caller, and this would help to overcome any language barrier that might exist. Families would pay $1 per game sheet and be able to purchase an unlimited number for the evening. Prizes would include discounts to the Goodwill retail stores, a few big-ticket items (computers, large toys etc.) from the store as well as a number of professional consultation opportunities with Goodwill employees. These opportunities would include, but would not be limited to one on one resume building, a professionalism workshop at home (to establish what is and is not appropriate in the workplace) and mock interviews.

December 2, 2010 

19 


BUDGET: FAMILY BINGO EVENT Account Categories Category

Amount

Essentials

$

Entertainment

$

(643.40) 0.00

Catering

$

(3,000.00)

Transportation

$

0.00

Communication

$

(160.00)

Wages

$

(315.00)

Miscellaneous

$

0.00

Total

$

(4,118.40)

TRANSACTIONS Quantity

Description

Category

Beginning Balance

$10,000.00

Amount

Balance

200 1

Bingo Sheet

Essentials

$

(55.00) $

9,945.00

Bingo Set

Essentials

$

(32.15) $

9,912.85

25

60 inch Round Tables (seats 8) Essentials

$

(275.00) $

9,637.85

225

Plastic Folding Chairs

Essentials

$

(281.25) $

9,356.60

Feeds 200 Guests Food 400 Flyers

Catering

$

(3,000.00) $

6,356.60

Communication

$

(110.00) $

6,246.60

40

Table Tri-Fold

Communication

$

(50.00) $

6,196.60

N/A

Press Release

Communication

$

0.00 $

6,196.60

N/A

Church Bulletin

Communication

$

0.00 $

6,196.60

10

Flyer Hanger (3 hours time)

Wages

$

(300.00) $

5,896.60

1

Caller (2 hours time)

Wages

$

(15.00) $

5,881.60

Professional Swap N’ Shop Event The professional clothing drive swap n shop is relevant to the family fun series because according to our research brief, “The Hispanic population has the second lowest median household income in the nation, second only to the African American ‘population so Goodwill’s services will be appealing to this generally low-income population.” This event would provide our demographic with the opportunity to switch out old clothes with new professional clothes for the workplace instead of having to pay the price of buying clothes (especially for the professional word) at a department store. It would be a swap n shop where we collect donations from various sources including: high school students that need community service hours, sororities and fraternities at Elon, local churches, neighborhoods, and businesses. These sources would donate professional clothes, which could even include scrubs and other uniforms. Those coming to the event (our demographic) would bring clothes to donate and based on the number of clothes they bring, they can pick out that same number from the clothes donated. Parents can bring their children because there will be crafts for all ages while parents can try on clothes (we would have a mock dressing room provided.) This would be covered by a press release in the local newspaper as well as fliers passed around the community and churches with a strong Hispanic population. This would create a sense of connectedness to the good will industries in the Hispanic community because the people at the event will feel that Goodwill is not doing this for their own profit, but for the profit of those at the event. It would be Goodwill’s way of giving the population something that will really benefit them which will create loyalty among the Hispanic community. There will be fliers and December 2, 2010 

20 


poster board at the even advertising the “career night” which goes hand and hand with the professional clothing drive.

BUDGET: SWAP N’ SHOP EVENT Account Categories Category

Amount

Essentials

$

Entertainment

$

(2,161.20) (399.87)

Catering

$

(3,000.00)

Transportation

$

(42.87)

Communication

$

(160.00)

Wages

$

(517.50)

Miscellaneous

$

(209.85)

Total

$

(6,491.29)

TRANSACTIONS Beginning Balance Quantity 10 1 25 225 15 boxes 15 boxes 1 pack 12 packs/288 sheets 20 packs Feeds 200 Guests 1 400 40 N/A N/A 10 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 300

Description Clothing Racks Dressing Screen 60 inch Round Tables (seats 8) Plastic Folding Chairs Crayons Markers Plato Origami Paper Beads Food Uhaul Flyers Table Tri-Fold Press Release Church Bulletin Flyer Hanger (3 hours time) Uhaul Driver (5 hours time) Greeter/Inventory Assigner (4 hours time) Dressing Room Worker (4 hours time) Employee 1 (4 hours time) Employee 2 (4 hours time) Employee 3 (4 hours time) Employee 4 (4 hours time) Hangers

Category Essentials Essentials Essentials Essentials Entertainment Entertainment Entertainment Entertainment Entertainment Catering Transportation Communication Communication Communication Communication Wages Wages Wages Wages Wages Wages Wages Wages Miscellaneous

$10,000.00

Amount $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

(1,300.00) (304.95) (275.00) (281.25) (13.35) (56.85) (9.99) (59.88) (259.80) (3,000.00) (42.87) (110.00) (50.00) 0.00 0.00 (300.00) (37.50) (30.00) (30.00) (30.00) (30.00) (30.00) (30.00) (209.85)

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

Balance 8,700.00 8,395.05 8,120.05 7,838.80 7,825.45 7,768.60 7,758.61 7,698.73 7,438.93 4,438.93 4,396.06 4,286.06 4,236.06 4,236.06 4,236.06 3,936.06 3,898.56 3,868.56 3,838.56 3,808.56 3,778.56 3,748.56 3,718.56 3,508.71

Career Fair Event The third event in the family fun series is a Career Fair inspired by the success of Goodwill’s first annual career fair. However, this career fair will be smaller and more localized. The career fair will be located at Blessed Sacrament Catholic Church in Burlington, NC, and will include four businesses acting as potential employees. In addition, there will be coloring books and board games for children to play with while their parents speak to potential employers. Dinner will be provided at the event for families and potential employers to enjoy. Prior to the event we will hang 400 flyers. Two hundred of the flyers will be in English and the other 200 flyers will be in Spanish. In addition, there will be an announcement in the local church bulletin and a press release in the local newspaper. A table triad will be placed in the middle of each table to inform people about Goodwill’s mission and career services.

December 2, 2010 

21 


In this career fair we want to address the four core values shared among Hispanics nationwide: loyalty, collectivism, Catholicism and common language. The first goal of this career fair is to promote loyalty in Goodwill’s career service by hosting the career fair in an area that is more comfortable and familiar to the families. The second goal of this career fair is to address the Hispanic value of collectivism by giving parents the opportunity to explore job opportunities without sacrificing their family time. The third goal is to create a relationship with the Hispanic community by hosting the event with a Catholic church, and receiving help from current Goodwill consumers. The final goal is to create a common language by hanging the flyers in both English and Spanish, and providing Spanish translations on the table triads.

BUDGET: CAREER FAIR EVENT A C C O U N T C AT E G O R I E S Category

Amount

Essentials Entertainment

$ $

(556.25) (165.06)

Catering

$

(3,000.00)

Transportation

$

0.00

Communication

$

(160.00)

Wages

$

(450.00)

Miscellaneous

$

(1.61)

Total

$

(4,332.92)

TRANSACTIONS Quantity

Category

Description

Beginning Balance

$10,000.00

Amount

Balance

25

60 inch Round Tables (seats 8)

Essentials

$

(275.00) $

9,725.00

225

Plastic Folding Chairs

Essentials

$

(281.25) $

9,443.75

18 Sets

Face Paint: Stencil Sets

Entertainment

$

(4.50) $

9,439.25

6 Palettes

Face Paint: Carnival Makeup Palette Entertainment

$

(29.70) $

9,409.55

72

Coloring Books

Entertainment

$

(9.99) $

9,399.56

1

Board Games: Operation

Entertainment

$

(8.99) $

9,390.57

1

Board Games: Candy Land

Entertainment

$

(4.99) $

9,385.58

4

Board Games: Connect Four

Entertainment

$

(43.96) $

9,341.62

5

Board Games: Uno Original

Entertainment

$

(35.95) $

9,305.67

1

Board Games: Jenga

Entertainment

$

(15.99) $

9,289.68

1

Board Games: Monopoly

Entertainment

$

(10.99) $

9,278.69

Feeds 200 Guests Food 400 Flyers

Catering

$

(3,000.00) $

6,278.69

Communication

$

(110.00) $

6,168.69

40

Table Tri-Fold

Communication

$

(50.00) $

6,118.69

N/A

Press Release

Communication

$

0.00 $

6,118.69

N/A

Church Bulletin

Communication

$

0.00 $

6,118.69

10

Flyer Hangers

Wages

$

(300.00) $

5,818.69

1

Employee 1

Wages

$

(30.00) $

5,788.69

1

Employee 2

Wages

$

(30.00) $

5,758.69

1

Employee 3

Wages

$

(30.00) $

5,728.69

1

Employee 4

Wages

$

(30.00) $

5,698.69

1

Employee 5

Wages

$

(30.00) $

5,668.69

90

Complementary Deck of Cards

Miscellaneous

$

(1.61) $

5,667.08

Holiday Fun Event The Holiday Fun event is an event in which families throughout the community can come together to celebrate upcoming holidays. Families can pay a small fee of five dollars, to participate in a craft that correlates with the chosen holiday, and fill a container with a December 2, 2010 

22 


variety of gifts, toys, and books. An order of small items will be purchased from Oriental Trading company will be available, as well as toys and books that Goodwill has not been able to sell in its stores. In our presentation, we will be using the Easter Holiday has an example because it connects two of the Hispanic community’s main values: Catholicism and Collectivism. In addition, we believe the event will create loyalty to Goodwill as a store, and that our communication tactics will provide a common language. The Holiday Fun event has the capability to appeal to the four main values of the Hispanic community (Collectivism, Catholicism, Loyalty and Common Language), and will encourage relationships between the community and Goodwill. By hosting the event at a local Catholic church we will appeal to the collectivism value in the Hispanic community. This event will appeal to the Hispanic community because it promotes Collectivism in the community. Since the Hispanic community greatly values the importance of a group, the event will allow for all community members, including children, to celebrate the holiday together and bond as a whole. The unity and the familyoriented aspects of the event will make members of the community very likely to attend. This event will also appeal to the importance of Catholicism within the Hispanic community by being hosted at a local Catholic church. In addition, a holiday such as Easter will hold a lot of religious value in the community. This makes the event more personal for our targeted audience and creates a connection between Goodwill and family and religious values. This will encourage Hispanic participation as well as developing a sense of loyalty with Goodwill. This event alone will promote loyalty between Hispanic shoppers and Goodwill because it makes Goodwill look like it values the community’s religious traditions and family values. In addition, having the event at a local church will create less transportation issues. Many Hispanics will find a way to get to church, and those who have cars will offer to carpool with others who do not have means of transportation. This event presented as a part of the Family Fun Series will create even more loyalty among Hispanic users. Our hope is that by having two events that promote using Goodwill career services and having two events that promote shopping at Goodwill stores, Goodwill will encouraging Hispanic participation in all realms of Goodwill, such as job training, donations, and consumerism.

December 2, 2010 

23 


BUDGET: HOLIDAY FUN EVENT Account Categories Category

Amount

Essentials Entertainment

$ $

(581.20) (44.91)

Catering

$

(3,000.00)

Transportation

$

(42.87)

Communication

$

(160.00)

Wages

$

(457.50)

Miscellaneous

$

(682.11)

Total

$

(4,968.59)

TRANSACTIONS Quantity

Description

Category

Beginning Balance

$10,000.00

Amount

Balance

180 25

Easter Bags

Essentials

$

(24.95) $

9,975.05

60 inch Round Tables (seats 8)

Essentials

$

(275.00) $

9,700.05

225

Plastic Folding Chairs

Essentials

$

(281.25) $

9,418.80

108

Color you own Easter Basket

Entertainment

$

(44.91) $

9,373.89

Feeds 200 Guests Food

Catering

$

(3,000.00) $

6,373.89

1

Uhaul

Transportation

$

(42.87) $

6,331.02

400

Flyers

Communication

$

(110.00) $

6,221.02

40

Table Tri-Fold

Communication

$

(50.00) $

6,171.02

N/A

Press Release

Deposit

$

0.00 $

6,171.02

N/A

Church Bulletin

Deposit

$

0.00 $

6,171.02

10

Flyer Hanger (3 hours time)

Wages

$

(300.00) $

5,871.02

1

Uhaul Driver (5 hours time)

Wages

$

(37.50) $

5,833.52

1

Employee 1 (4 hours time)

Wages

$

(30.00) $

5,803.52

1

Employee 2 (4 hours time)

Wages

$

(30.00) $

5,773.52

1

Employee 3 (4 hours time)

Wages

$

(30.00) $

5,743.52

1

Employee 4 (4 hours time)

Wages

$

(30.00) $

5,713.52

144

Toys: Holiday Spin Top

Miscellaneous

$

(5.99) $

5,707.53

192

Toys: Religious Pencils

Miscellaneous

$

(47.92) $

5,659.61

180

Toys: Easter Bunny Bulls Eye Game Miscellaneous

$

(628.20) $

5,031.41

Communication Tactics We will be using five different tactics of communication in order to engage the Hispanic audience. We will be using flyers, table tri-folds, press releases, church bulletins and a mailing list to promote our Family Fun Series and continue interaction with the Hispanic community. We chose to use print communication because our research showed that Hispanics like to read everything and then pass the written word on or verbally tell a friend. In addition, we discovered it was one of the most popular forms of communication amongst the Hispanic audience. We will promote common language in all four of our events through our location and our communication tactics. We believe the best place to host this event is at Blessed Sacrament Catholic Church in Burlington, North Carolina. Our first reason is that Alamance County has the highest population of Hispanics out of the five counties connected with the Goodwill Industries of Central North Carolina. Our second reason is that Blessed Sacrament has a strong connection to the Hispanic community; it even conducts two of its masses in Spanish. To bridge the language barrier when communicating and promoting our events we will print 200 flyers in English and 200 December 2, 2010 

24 


flyers in Spanish. In addition our table tri-folds will be partially in Spanish. All of this will make Goodwill seem more inviting to the Hispanic Community without being too obvious about its target audience.

Budget There are a couple of ways to decrease the budget amount, but we wanted to present a more conservative number. One main way to minimize the budget would be to bring books, crafts, boards games and coloring supplies that haven’t been able to sell in Goodwill stores, or have not been put on the shelf yet, rather than buying new crafts and board games. A second suggestion would be to see if the church has any tables or chair available for use before renting. This way you may avoid renting any tables and chair or you may get to pay for a fewer quantity. Phoenix PR would also like to note the importance of a Spanish Interpreter. We did not include one in our current plan or budget because it would consume our entire budget; however, we would like to note that when Goodwill does have the proper funds they should look into hiring someone. The person hired can even be hired as only a part time employee. This is important because Goodwill needs someone to bridge the language barrier in order to connect with the Hispanic audience. In addition, our research showed that it’s important to translate the emotion of a piece, not just the language, so simply using an online source would be insufficient. (Budget Available on Next Page)

December 2, 2010 

25 


CAMPAIGN BUDGET Account Categories Category

Amount

Essentials Entertainment

$ $

(3,942.05) (609.84)

Catering

$

(12,000.00)

Transportation

$

(85.74)

Communication

$

(640.00)

Wages

$

(1,740.00)

Miscellaneous

$

(5,908.57)

Total

$

(24,926.20)

TRANSACTIONS Category

Beginning Balance

$40,000.00

Amount

Balance

Quantity Description (x# is the number events, ie. x2 would be 2 events) 25 x4 60 inch Round Tables (seats 8)

Essentials

$

(1,100.00) $

38,900.00

225 x4

Plastic Folding Chairs

Essentials

$

(1,125.00) $

37,775.00

Feeds 200 Guests x4

Food

Catering

$

(12,000.00) $

25,775.00

400 x4

Flyers

Communication

$

(440.00) $

25,335.00

40 x4

Table Tri-Fold

Communication

$

(200.00) $

25,135.00

N/A x4

Press Release

Communication

$

0.00 $

25,135.00

N/A x4

Church Bulletin

Communication

$

0.00 $

25,135.00

10 x4

Flyer Hanger (3 hours time)

Wages

$

(1,200.00) $

23,935.00

200 x1

Bingo Sheet

Essentials

$

(55.00) $

23,880.00

1 x1

Bingo Set

Essentials

$

(32.15) $

23,847.85

1 x1

Caller (2 hours time)

Wages

$

(15.00) $

23,832.85

10 x1

Clothing Racks

Essentials

$

(1,300.00) $

22,532.85

1 x1

Dressing Screen

Essentials

$

(304.95) $

22,227.90

15 boxes x1

Crayons

Entertainment

$

(13.35) $

22,214.55

15 boxes x1

Markers

Entertainment

$

(56.85) $

22,157.70

1 pack x1

Plato

Entertainment

$

(9.99) $

22,147.71

12 packs/288 sheets x1

Origami Paper

Entertainment

$

(59.88) $

22,087.83

20 packs x1

Beads

Entertainment

$

(259.80) $

21,828.03

1 x2

Uhaul

Transportation

$

(85.74) $

21,742.29

1 x2

Uhaul Driver (5 hours time)

Wages

$

(75.00) $

21,667.29

1 x1

Greeter/Inventory Assigner (4 hours time) Wages

$

21,637.29

1 x1

Dressing Room Worker (4 hours time)

Wages

$

(30.00) $ (30.00) $

13

Employee (4 hours time)

Wages

$

(390.00) $

21,217.29

300 x1

Hangers

Miscellaneous

$

(209.85) $

21,007.44

18 Sets x1

Face Paint: Stencil Sets

Entertainment

$

(4.50) $

21,002.94

6 Palettes x1

Face Paint: Carnival Makeup Palette

Entertainment

$

(29.70) $

20,973.24

72 x1

Coloring Books

Entertainment

$

(9.99) $

20,963.25

1 x1

Board Games: Operation

Entertainment

$

(8.99) $

20,954.26

1 x1

Board Games: Candy Land

Entertainment

$

(4.99) $

20,949.27

4 x1

Board Games: Connect Four

Entertainment

$

(43.96) $

20,905.31

5 x1

Board Games: Uno Original

Entertainment

$

(35.95) $

20,869.36

1 x1

Board Games: Jenga

Entertainment

$

(15.99) $

20,853.37

1 x1

Board Games: Monopoly

Entertainment

$

(10.99) $

20,842.38

150 x1

Complementary Deck of Cards

Miscellaneous

$

(1.61) $

20,840.77

180 x1

Easter Bags

Essentials

$

(24.95) $

20,815.82

108 x1

Color you own Easter Basket

Entertainment

$

(44.91) $

20,770.91

144 x1

Toys: Holiday Spin Top

Miscellaneous

$

(5.99) $

20,764.92

192 x1

Toys: Religious Pencils

Miscellaneous

$

(47.92) $

20,717.00

180 x1

Toys: Easter Bunny Bulls Eye Game

Miscellaneous

$

(628.20) $

20,088.80

3 x0

“Accepted” Stamps

Miscellaneous

$

(15.00) $

20,073.80

N/A

Extra Money allotted for shipping

Miscellaneous

$

(2,000.00) $

18,073.80

N/A

Extra Money allotted for taxes

Miscellaneous

$

16,073.80

N/A

Room for Error

Miscellaneous

$

(2,000.00) $ (1,000.00) $

$

15,073.80

December 2, 2010 

21,607.29

15,073.80

26 


Goodwill Industries of Central North Carolina Hispanic/Latino Audience

Communication

 

Public Relations and Civic Responsibility Class

December 2, 2010 

27 


Intro To Communication Section  

In communications section we are implementing the ideas from the action and planning section. The communications section includes the execution of the tactics, timelines for each tactic, and a Gantt chart that helps describe the timeline. We go into detail about the four nights (family bingo, professional swap n’ shop, career fair, and holiday fun), of the “family fun series” and how each night will be conducted and set up. Following the execution of each night is a timeline that lays out what will be done months and weeks prior to the event.  

Execution Family Bingo Event Execution A month prior to the Family Bingo night, one Goodwill employee will begin to establish the logistical workings of the event. They will enlist the help of those that come to Goodwill in need of employment to execute the event. Those individuals will be responsible for distributing flyers, packing mailers and set up and break down of the event. All of these actions will be overseen by the Goodwill employee overseeing the event. Additionally, a popular member of the church (potentially the minister) will be contacted to be the “caller” at the bingo event. In conjunction with the church, Goodwill workers will write an advertisement for the event to go into the bulletin for the Spanish masses. The night of the event, Goodwill workers will be responsible for selling bingo sheets as well as making sure prizes are distributed to the correct people. They will provide assistance with the catering as needed and work as facilitators for the event. The caterer will be a Goodwill partner such as K&W Cafeteria in order to keep a strong and apparent connection between Goodwill and the event.

Professional Swap N’ Shop Event Execution Three months prior to the Swap N’ Shop, local high-schools, sororities or fraternities at Elon, local businesses, and churches will be contacted in order to collect donated professional clothes. For the high schools, guidance counselors will be contacted to see if there are any high school students who need community service hours who would be willing to donate and collect donations or work the night of the event. Fliers will be given out to these venues as well as church announcements and a possible press release. Two months prior to the Swap N’ Shop, five of Goodwill’s current consumers will be hired to help out at the event, figure out logistics, and conduct the crafts for the children. One of Goodwill’s consumers will be hired to drive around the Uhaul and pick up donated clothing as well as the racks donated for the event. Members of the church will also be asked a month in advance if they would like to help out at the event. A week before the event, volunteers and workers will sort through the clothes and sort them into

December 2, 2010 

28 


sizes, men/women, and to see if the clothes donated are intact and wearable. An important factor is to try and gage the expectancy. If a lot of parents come with their children, then more help may be needed for crafts, and for helping adults swap clothes. Before the event, workers and volunteers will help set up tables and chairs on one side of the room as well as set up crafts for the children. Others will help set up the donated clothes on a rack and be sure to label the sizes and whether the clothes are for men and women. Dressing rooms/mirrors also need to be set up at this time. When people start arriving, the key is organization. An adult who arrives with clothes to swap out will be asked if they have brought any professional clothes. If so, they will be told to grab a hanger and will be pointed in the direction to hang up their clothes based on the size. If the clothes an adult brings are not professional, then we will have an area for people to put these other clothes. After he/she hangs up or drops off the clothes they brought, then they can begin to look through the donated clothes and find outfits for their specific profession. It is important that this is monitored because a person can only take the number of clothes that they brought to donate. The caterer will be a Goodwill partner such as K&W Cafeteria in order to keep a strong and apparent connection between Goodwill and the event.

Career Fair Event Execution Two months before the Career Fair, five of Goodwill’s current consumers will be hired to help perform the logistics of the event and to help watch the children while their parents speak to potential employers. In addition to the five people hired, members of the church will be able to volunteer to help setup by writing “Goodwill Career Fair Volunteer” in the weekly member book passed around at church services. These workers and volunteers will help set up most tables and chairs on the far side of the room. Four tables will be reserved for the companies to use and will be arranged on the opposite side, giving slight separation between the business aspect of the fair and the family aspect of the fair. The caterer will be a Goodwill partner such as K&W Cafeteria in order to keep a strong and apparent connection between Goodwill and the event.

Holiday Fun Event Execution Prior to the Holiday Cheer event, executers must ensure three factors pertinent to the events success. These factors include: determining the source of the toys, determining a general number of how many people are expected to attend, and hiring employees to work at the event. One of the most important factors, in order to best prepare for the event, is to determine the expectancy. By selling tickets in advance after mass or at a local business, executers will be able to gauge interest rates, as opposed to attendees blindly arriving the day of the event. The source of the toys is also a major factor in the success of the Holiday Cheer Event. A December 2, 2010 

29 


large quantity of various toys and trinkets can be purchased from Oriental Trading Company for a low cost. These items can be used to fill the Easter baskets or holiday bags. Additionally, a mass quantity of holiday candy can also be purchased from a wholesale club. Thirdly, Goodwill should offer extra hours to persons who have gone through the jobtraining program. These employees can help set up and take down the event, as well as assist in distribution of toys once the craft has been completed. This aspect allows those who have already gone through the job-training program to clock more hours, as well as promote the various elements Goodwill has to offer.

Communication Execution: Flyers We found from our research that Pip Printing in Greensboro, NC had the lowest printing. They agreed to print 200 colored flyers for $55. We would have one of the English as a second language teachers help translate the flyer into Spanish and then send Pip Printing both flyers. For each event we would print 200 flyers in English and 200 flyers in Spanish. To hang the flyers we would pay ten Goodwill consumers $10 an hour to hang flyers around Burlington. We would divide the city of Burlington up into sections and have the consumers hang flyers. To try and avoid transportation issues we would either look for consumers that do have a car or designate a section that is within walking distance of the consumer’s home. Having at least a few Hispanic consumers will also be useful because they can hang the flyers in places that target our audience.

Communication Execution: Table Tri-Folds The table tri-folds will also be printed at Pip Printing. The best idea is to have the trifolds cut and stapled to their true form at Pip Printing, but if this is not plausible there is another way to conduct this project. There can be two or three staplers at the venue, so that workers and volunteers can staple the tri-folds together while they are setting up tables. Then each tri-fold can be placed in the center of each table as they continue with the set up.

Timelines Family Bingo Event Timeline  2 months prior- Announce event, begin advertising with announcement in bulletin, press release, contact other Goodwill employees and ask them to participate in the professionalism aspect of the fair.  1 month prior- Higher Goodwill workers, begin hanging flyers and further publicize event, contact community member to be caller, organize catering and order necessary supplies  2 weeks prior- start collecting and setting aside prizes for bingo, continue advertising  1 week prior- confirm resources and begin set up  Day Before and Day Of- Setup, execute, break down December 2, 2010 

30 


 Post- event- pay workers, analyze success for improvement in upcoming event

Swap N’ Shop Event Timeline  Announce clothing drive for gently used suits and business attire  3 months prior to donation period:  Contact guidance counselor’s at local high schools to see if any students need community service hours. Students will be asked to hand out fliers at their school and in their neighborhoods in order to collect clothes. They will be told that at a particular date, someone will come around with an U-Haul and pick up the collected clothes. Let students know that it will be 10 hours of service to distribute fliers and collect clothes and then if they want to help sort through clothes, that will be another 5 hours.  Flyers, announcement in local newspaper and church bulletins  Press release should be written and ready to be distributed for publication one month prior to donation period  An press release can be placed in the paper to educate and inform the public of the clothing drive, in accordance with the career fair to establish awareness and relevancy.  The releases should contain information for who the donations are intended for and the purpose for donations, in bettering the quality of lives for those less fortunate. It should also contain the dates for the clothing drive, and locations of all possible donation bins placed within the area.  We may also want to work with Goodwill to arrange for the business attire to be picked up in the new Goodwill program of picking up donations from specific neighborhoods.  A description of the clothing drive and it’s purpose can be inserted into weekly church bulletins to generate awareness and participation among parishioners.  1-2 months prior to donation period:  Place clothing bins in various locations Local businesses in the area should be contacted to see if donation bins can be placed on their property, as well as possible flyers to be posted at the location.  Including:  § School locations  · For parents, accessibility  § Churches who are willing to participate  § Community Centers  · Joblink Career center  Contact: 336-633-0304  § Randolph Community College  · Contact: (336) 862-7980  Could also contact Elon sororities/fraternities whose philanthropy corresponds with the drive.  · Bin placement:  Once businesses are contacted and are willing to participate we should distribute the donation bins to the given location. A vibrant color and sign should be chosen for the bins to attract attention, and encourage participation. December 2, 2010 

31 


 The bins should remain at the given location for a month’s time, in order to give community members enough time to locate unused items and bring them to the given location.  One week before the donation period ends:  A public radio announcement should be made a week before the drive is set to end, to inform the public of its conclusion and encourage last minute donations.

Career Fair Event Timeline 6 months before  Reserve Facility (Blessed Sacrament Catholic Church)  Contact company representatives  Discover who is willing to present themselves as potential employers 3 Months Before  Contact Printing Service-Have flyers and table triad printed  Call Churches to double-check on facility reservation,  Receive permission to hang flyers from church and/or other places  Talk to caterer and/or food vendor 2 Months Before  Purchase face paint, coloring books and board games  Go to church and discuss set up  Notify local and regional newspapers of upcoming event for publicity  Follow up with Businesses that will be represented  Ask for volunteers  Hire five current Goodwill consumers 1.5 Months Before  Meet with churches volunteers and discuss event, expectations and specific setup Place an ad in church bulletin and request announcement during service o Ask interested parties to write “Goodwill Career Fair” in the membership book 1 Month Before  Create and edit press release  Contact church and set up appointment to meet with Caterer at the church  Contact caterer and set up appointment to meet at the church 2 Weeks Before  Send press release to local papers  Call food vendors and confirm purchases  Meet vendors at church to discuss setup  Contact company reps and remind them of event o Give them times to arrive o Estimate of how many people will be there

December 2, 2010 

32 


Day of Event  Setup tables, chairs with help from church volunteers and current consumer employees  Assist food vendors in setting up and directing them where to go  Place table ads  Group meeting with business volunteers, tell them where they will setup  Assign volunteers and consumers tasks and positions (e.g. Watching children)

Holiday Fun Event Timeline 2 months prior to event Reserve space in church, for a 5 hour time block Order toys and gifts from Oriental Trading company 1 ½ months prior to event Create advertisement for local newspapers announcing event Should run until weekend of event Issue press release from Goodwill to receive possible news coverage of event Create advertisement, awareness statement for church bulletin Should run until event 1 month prior to event Offer additional hours to Goodwill employees who have gone through job training program to set up, work at, and clean up after event Begin ticket sales Set up tables after each mass for parishioners to sign up and purchase tickets Church volunteers or Goodwill employees may work at these tables Give local community center tickets, which people can purchase from the front desk of the location if willing Order X amount of Christmas stockings or Easter baskets, depending on season and ticket sales 1 week prior to event Goodwill should begin holding toys or books that do not sell in the storefront (Requires storage) Purchase holiday candy in bulk Day of the Event Employees should arrive 4 hours before event in order to set up Books and Toys from Goodwill transported to location 3 hours prior to the event (Require transportation) Clean up

December 2, 2010 

33 


Task Family Bingo Fashion Show Holiday Cheer Career Fair

Start Date 10/15/10 10/1/10 10/20/10 20-Sep

End Date 4/9/11 4/16/11 4/23/11 5/7/11

Days Completed 41 56 36 66

Days Remaining 156 198 185 229

10/15/10  10/1/10  10/20/10  20‐Sep 

Family  Bingo 

Fashion  Holiday  Show  Cheer 

Career  Fair 

0  50  100 150 200 250 300 350 

December 2, 2010 

5/7/11 

4/23/11 

Days Completed  Days Remaining 

4/16/11 

4/9/11 

34 


Working Examples (over the next 5 pages)

December 2, 2010 

35 


English As A Second Language

Inglés Como Segundo Lengua

kjdlghasdf;lkja;lkfajeruhljkagdadfasdkladf;lsdjvnajl krnawlhjnvkal;sfnajlkehjdfnasmfweadsufkljfnamers dfiawejfmnfweoarljkdfsnmweadsiofjhknweamsdfio weakldsfmweoai;kfnmwa,edfhopl3;jkrdfm.q43tdsjl mfn4weidsrfkj4mwedsrifopkl4nwe,drfio4klweds,nf 4qowejkdsfn24pweoidsrkfn,wepoisdfknmweadsifok nm4wefdsioklmn4wedsfiknm3werdsfikn4mewdfpio wkesdnfaw0[eiosdfkn23wesdidfknmwesdfik3nwea ms,dfipo4qwlkendfp4iqoweaksdnfmfqp4oweirkdfm lnasdfdf dfakljdfa;eflkandm,fweahfdjklaemnwra;djklsnfweal; kdfnawe;kdflweadfkmwraedfjal;kdfja;weklhf;lk4edi fadfkl;aswriodkjnrdiohwkendsfxioawekdf9wiaeodk fasdf9iawkedfiokwedsfiaewkldff8iwoaefkdawedfiok hedfiwkehdfsiekdfhcdkslfjasd;lkasdjfsld;kfjsdlf;kjsa df;lsafjksad;flksdajfals;dfkjasdlfkjsdflksdjflsdfkjsdlf kjsdflksdjfasldfkjasdflkjsdflksdjflasdkfjsdlfkjadlfkjs adflkajdflasdkfjasldkfjsdflkjasdlkfjwreg9ijvmthvjsk dfnvvhuopwekjvcm,triohjknmwediovknardiohjknr mghurijdlknvads[sd

Greensboro

Reidsville

English Class Time/El Tiempo de Clase de Inlés Asheboro

Career Services/ Los Servicios de Ocupación lhjdkasgnads;clkfdgdfgdssaEfdsdfklasfdadfjkas djd;dakg;ljrtw8gfurjbefgiaew;adgjwrtnz;rwjklna gi;wejklngvgeirofghvknqre[fdokntgepoigl;kfgja; lsgejroyhbnerfbv;qwekdfvnerjfkgdverkltgjvnas d;lkvads;lkjcl;kafnckeldnvcjakwcn[adslkcnawle fncolcn;adcklwenac;lsdcnewlfkccnsdaif;anx ansd;lnz;x dfgdfgasdflasdfko;flgdj’a;lsdkfkljdafahlkjdfsal;k dgfnvirekgnv;adjkjhrtgjklvnad;klfjrgkhviakdsnv ckashgafkldjvasdklfkas’dghegjakdsfhirgnvrkjyg cheqrgahfgaskdnahgjkdawieurjgnhtgvcuhewan hgkjdfhaslkjadhfaklsdfhaasd sadfasdfjaksdlhderiogvnkewidknfrtidknfeqwidf knrfionqewdfiknrfdiknewrdfsirtknfdqweiodfjkn mtrifgknredfienrwfdiokrgnfiqertghdknvirhegfn byhgisfknvmewaufabjnbmhtgifjnmq rfubnjmtyrgfijnkqrmfgioyjklntgfmiqorjklfndmio qrknfdqrieogfjknqregfdijnkm

WEBSITE: WWW.TRIADGOODWILL.ORG You can also follow our twitter and facebook accounts, as well as our blog. Locations/Ubicaciónes Asheboro Community Resource Center 1064 East Dixie Drive Asheboro NC 27203 (336) 610-0400 or (336) 610-0404 (fax) Greensboro Community Resource Center 1235 South Eugene Street Greensboro NC 27406 (336) 275-9801 or (336) 274-1352 (fax) Reidsville Community Resource Center 1551 Freeway Drive Reidsville NC 27320 (336) 637-1010 or (336) 637-1020 (fax)

GOODWILL

CENTRAL NORTH CAROLINA

Mission Statement/Declaratión de Misión

Goodwill Industries of Central North Carolina, Inc. promotes the value of work through the provision of work opportunities for with special employment needs.

Values/Valores

We value work and its accomplishments, our reputation as a trustworthy entity, respect for the independence and intrinsic worth of individuals we serve, and communication with all stake holder groups.

36 

December 2, 2010 


December 2, 2010 

37 


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38 


December 2, 2010 

39 


December 2, 2010 

 

40 


Goodwill Industries of Central North Carolina Hispanic/Latino Audience

Evaluation

 

Public Relations and Civic Responsibility Class

December 2, 2010 

41 


Intro to Evaluation The evaluation of our campaign is crucial in determining the quality and success of Goodwill’s resources. The evaluation will include a SWOT analysis of the overall campaign, and suggested ways to measure the effectiveness of the campaign as well.

Campaign S.W.O.T. Analysis The campaign SWOT analysis takes an in-depth look into the events to be held on behalf of the Goodwill Industries of Central North Carolina and the Family Fun Series campaign. Just like a company SWOT analysis, it examines the positive and negative expectations of the campaign events and offers an unbiased, overall evaluation.

Strengths By setting up events that cater specifically to the Hispanic people of North Carolina, Goodwill will be able to capitalize on the large market that Hispanics make up in this region. The setting of the events will take place in a Catholic church, and will incorporate family and unity in the community. Religion, family, and community are three of the most important aspects in the Hispanic culture; by appealing to all three Goodwill will become a more realistic and favored option for their career help. These events will be publicized throughout the region and possibly the state, further boosting the positive reputation Goodwill has acquired.

Weaknesses Transportation to certain events could be a problem, especially if there are no forms of public transportation nearby. If a Hispanic family does not have a car or relies on another form of transportation, it may be hard to get a large turnout especially if the event is at night. For events that will follow a service at the church, it is more realistic to expect a large turnout. Otherwise, it may be a problem. Another weakness may be lack of funds for the Hispanic people. If there are any prices involved that charges for each person attending, the reality may be that Hispanics would rather spend their money elsewhere. Also, there may be a language barrier. At events where there will be a lot of talking and questions from both parties, things could get lost in translation. Questions may go unanswered and work description and qualifications may be misconstrued.

Opportunities The Hispanic population is one of the largest, untouched markets in the United States. If the Triad Goodwill can tap into this untouched market then Goodwill can expect to see a significant spike in sales and participants in the job center. Holding these events is also a way to become well-known and trusted in the community. Depending on how well these events go, this could be an annual or semi-annual event. If the increase in participants increases from one year to the next, the project could become an anticipated event bringing in a large number of sponsors each year. This could also become a multi-

December 2, 2010 

42 


regional event, setting up similar projects around North Carolina and possibly around the country.

Threats The number-one threat to the events scheduled is a lack of interest in the programs offered by Goodwill because of illegal immigration. Goodwill requires verification of residency or a driver’s license in order to register for their program, and most, if not all, illegal immigrations cannot produce that information. Depending on how much of the Hispanic population our designated region consists of illegal immigrants, these events promoting the career center may be in danger of a low turnout. The group that may show up in large numbers is the older, Catholic, unemployed adult population suffering from job-loss during the economy crash. This group is not our intended audience. Other threats may be programs offering similar career help for Hispanics in the area.

Evaluation of the Goodwill Family Fun Series After the campaign has been run and the events held it is important know if the money and effort put into the campaign was worth it. One way to make a strong conclusion about the campaign is to measure how well the strategies and tactics used helped move Goodwill closer to reaching their goals and objectives. In our case the goal of the campaign was to see an increase in Hispanic population by 2 to 3 percent. Some objectives we wanted to complete while moving towards our final goal was to make Goodwill’s professional resources more accessible to the Hispanic population, build Hispanic support and loyalty for Goodwill and their resources, and increase awareness about Goodwill’s shopping centers. To see if these objectives were met, the new Hispanic consumers would have to give us information on what brought them to Goodwill. However, it may be a challenge measuring the success of our campaign since Goodwill does not currently ask their consumers to fill out paperwork or answer questions about their ethnicity, race or other personal information. But a new way to measure the success of the campaign would be to hold interviews or pass out short, easy questionnaires to the next five or six groups of participants in the career service classes after the campaign. Asking a question as simple as, “how did you hear about the class” with multiple answers given could be an easy indicator of success. It would at least show whether or not there was a positive or negative reaction to the campaign. Did the number of participants increase from the number of participants at this time last year? Are the classes filling up faster than before the campaign? Analyzing the class demographics could also be a way to measure our success. To find the class demographics some type of paperwork may need to be handed out or online survey set up. Something as easy as asking a couple questions about ethnicity on the career service application could help measure our success greatly, even if the questions were only asked for a short while. Once we have the new information gathered, we must ask ourselves what did we do that worked and what did we do that did not work? If the campaign was somewhat successful, a new and improved campaign could be held the following year. Conversely, if the December 2, 2010 

43 


campaign were a flop, the idea would be tossed. Maybe these events were held at an inconvenient time or place, or maybe the events did not offer the right information. The research that will be compiled post-campaign is very valuable to the company because it is not only an indicator of success, but also a new tool that can be used for future campaigns.                                                                                   December 2, 2010 

44 


Goodwill Industries of Central North Carolina Hispanic/Latino Audience

Appendix

 

Public Relations and Civic Responsibility Class

December 2, 2010 

45 


Figure 1: Demographic Survey      Demographic Survey     

Please specify your age.        Please specify your ethnicity.      Caucasian    African American    Hispanic/Latin American    Native American    Asian    Other _________________________________________________________________________________      Please specify you level of education.      Less than High School    High School Diploma    Some College, No Degree    Associate Degree    Bachelor Degree    Master Degree or Higher                                     

December 2, 2010 

46 


Figure 2: Percentage of Ethical/Racial Groups that Identify as Catholic                                 Figure 3: Median Salary of Spanish Translator by Years of Experience (I would suggest someone with 1-4 years of experience: $24,367-$34,869)

Figure 4: Median Salary of Spanish Translator by State (North Carolina is $23,160-$35,669)

December 2, 2010 

47 


Figure 5: Median Salary by Employer Type (Nonprofit Organization is $27, 632-$39,740)

         

December 2, 2010 

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Goodwill Industries of Central North Carolina Hispanic/Latino Audience Campaign Proposition