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KRISTEN GABRIELE architecture + p o r t f o

design l i o


Education MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE, Thesis Candidate, Expected September 2014 University at Buffalo + Arthur A. Schomburg Fellow + Architecture GSA President + Architecture and Education Program, 2013 B.S. ARCHITECTURE, Minor in Environmental Design, May 2012 University at Buffalo + Magna Cum Laude + Alpha Rho Chi Leadership Medal + Barcelona Study Abroad

Experience DEVELOPMENT INTERN, Summer 2012 & 2013, Winter 2013 & 2014 Ciminelli Real Estate Corporation 350 Essjay Road, Williamsville, NY 14221 GRADUATE ASSISTANT, January 2013 - January 2014 Department of Architecture, University at Buffalo 3435 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14214 GRADUATE TEACHING ASSISTANT, August 2012 - May 2013 Department of Architecture, University at Buffalo 3435 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14214 + ARC 121: Introduction to Architecture + ARC 211: American Diversity + Design

Skills + Compatibility Autocad, Rhinoceros, Vray for Rhinoceros, Google SketchUp, Revit Architecture Training Certificate, Laser Cutting, Hand Modeling, Hand Drafting, Adobe Creative Suite, Qualitative Research, Institutional Review Board (IRB) Training, Leadership, Public Speaking

Résumé


Design Studio Work COMPOSITE SYSTEMS Patterns of Operable Enclosures COMPREHENSIVE INHABITATION Live-Work Urban Housing + Brewing Community TIME-BASED ARCHITECTURES A Multi-Use Health Care Center in Buffalo, NY CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGIES Detail Drawing Work + Material Specifications INFORMAL SETTLEMENTS Redensification of Slum Housing in Mumbai DESIGN FOR INCLUSIVE ENVIRONMENTS Design Criteria for A Left-Hander’s Kitchen HOUSING THE HOUSELESS An Analysis of Transitional Dwellings in Homeless Villages

Professional Work BETHUNE LOFTS Interior + Exterior Building Renderings

Personal Work ARCHITECTURE + EDUCATION Education Experiences in the Public School System

Contents


Pattern Projection After locating both a textile and natural pattern, analytical systems were created to explore the properties of the selected patterns. The patterns of a plaid table napkin and sand ripples in water were explored, together yielding properties of reflection and grid systems. These qualities were then combined to project into a three dimensional spatial enclosure.

[1] Structural Grid

The resulting mechanical device was experimented with through a series of studies and later applied as a building faรงade.

Daylight Shadow Studies

[2] Double Grid Extrusion

Operable Model

Undergraduate Work

[3] Reflective Plates

Composite Systems

Model Photos

Prof. Martha Bohm


Operability Composed of a series of triangular plates, the operable system creates a visual aesthetic through capturing and reflecting natural light.

Capturing Light As the plates expand and contract, they become a threshold for natural light and ventilation. When light enters the double cavity wall, the interior is filled with reflections and light beams, revealing a variety of fashions of light display throughout the day. Scale Studies

reflected sunlight

incoming sunlight

closed position

open position

Application of System to Building

Fall 2010

Pattern Wall


Urban Housing Located in the Chippewa Entertainment District, this project focuses on the urban dwelling as a threshold between self and society. These conditions are thought of as being one, requiring a scheme that includes a living accommodation and public program that are strategically mixed.

Micro-Brewery

Unit Concept Sketches

In this scenario, the livework apartment complex is coupled with a microbrewery. The brewery concept reflects deep into the history of the BuffaloNiagara region, while also providing an appropriate program for the 24/7 life of the entertainment district.

Single Bedroom Unit Floor Plan

Undergraduate Work

Typical Residential Level Floor Plan

Comprehensive Inhabitation

Prof. Hiro Hata


Building Section Facing North

Fall 2011

Physical Models (Top: 1/4”, Bottom: 1/16”)

Mixed-Use Urban Housing


Performative Model As a way to explore time-based architectural design, various material surfaces that combined skin and structure were created, dynamically responding to the human body. At the conceptual stage, surface iterations were made to respond to actions of vigilance: waiting, discussing, looking and resting.

Patient Room

Library/Reading Room

Patient Bathroom

Adaptability Using a Grasshopped script, the surfaces were designed to be interchangeable, acting as either a wall, floor or ceiling piece. Composed of planar glass surfaces and penetrating wood strips, the design created unique and adaptable areas of use. Plan/Section of Typical Corridor and Room Conditions

Concept Renderings

Scale Model of Corner Condition (3’x3’)

Undergraduate Work

Time-Based Architectures

Prof. Harry Warren


Storage

Administration Offices

Laundry Hospice Room 1

Women’s

Group Counseling Area Kitchen/Rest Area

Men’s

Nurses’ Station Hospice Room 2

Hospice Room 10

Hospice Room 3 Hospice Room 4 Hospice Room 5 Hospice Hospice Room 6 Room 7 Hospice Room 8

Typical Hospice Level Floor Plan

Hospice Room 9

Building Section Facing West

Health Care Center

1/16” Scale model

Fall 2011

Located at the corner of Fillmore and Broadway in the Polonia District, Buffalo, this project encompassed three programs; a birthing center, hospice and nexus center. Concepts for the building design were derived from the previous surface studies involving glass façades with penetrating strips. The vertical strips clip to the south façade of the building, acting as solar shading as well as housing and hiding the building’s mechanical systems. Lifecycles


Undergraduate Work

Construction Technologies

Reid House


Spring 2011

Conibear Shellhouse


Redensifying Dharavi Located deep inside Mumbai’s financial district, the squatter settlement of Dharavi is facing harsh redevelopment plans. The existing redevelopment project plan involves the creation of multi-family housing in apartment towers, diminishing the ground level market-oriented, characteristics that Dharavi currently thrives on. To remedy this, the design project provides a new suggestion for the establishment of multi-family housing structures that are appropriate for both government and resident needs. These structures are in the form of several story multi-family units that are adaptable to each family’s social and economic needs through architectural design.

Graduate Work

Informal Settlements

Prof. Korydon Smith


Urban Fabric Adaptation The proposal calls for three structural components that are constructed by both the residents and the local government. The concrete framework allows for personalized infill by each inhabiting family, allowing the units to adapt and conform to the needs and culture of each resident or family.

N

N

PRIMARY STRUCTURE

CIRCULATION CORE

INFILL STRUCTURE

The sitecast concrete framework, provided by the government, will allow for a safe and durable multi-story construction for the residents.

A singular concrete core stairway, also provided by the government, gives the residents a neutral access to each floor and the rooftop.

With training and assistance from NGOs, the residents can infill the concrete frame with local native materials to enclose and personalize their units.

N

Basic Floor Plans with Infill

Fall 2012

[re]Densifying Dharavi


Phased Development: A Collaborative Process

Graduate Work

Informal Settlements

Prof. Korydon Smith


Fall 2012

[re]Densifying Dharavi


A Left-Hander’s Kitchen Handedness throughout history has been subject to all types of product and environmental bias. Product design is perhaps the largest hurdle for left-handers, who adapt each day to right-hander items. Through a series of interviews focusing on the design of kitchens relative to handedness, a set of design strategies were created and used for an design intervention in one of the interviewee’s own homes. Concepts of Universal Design as well as the interviewee’s own personal interests were taken into consideration to create a newly renovated kitchen that would serve to accommodate a left-handed owner as well as other users.

1

RIGHT TO LEFT CONSECUTIVE LAYOUT | Follow a linear layout that moves smoothly from left to right according to typical food preparation patterns

2

APPLIANCE RELATIONSHIPS | Create efficient and intelligent relationships between major appliances as are conducive to left hand use

3

SUFFICIENT VARIABLE SPACE | Counter space should be readily available on either side of a major appliance to accommodate left or right hand use

Oven Mits REFRIGERATORS Can-Openers Spatulas DISHWASHERS Microwave Buttons Pots/pans SINKS Ladles/Spoons STOVES Butter Knives Cutting Knives Hand Mixers Corkscrews MICROWAVE OVENS Measuring Cups Toaster Ovens

Selected Design Features

Graduate Work

Design for Inclusive Environments

Prof. Jordana Maisel


PERSONAL USER REQUESTS a Visual access to living b Extension of linoleum

e

c Dishwasher to left of sink d “Back-to-back” counter

l

and appliance layout

d

UNVERSAL DESIGN FEATURES

c

a

e French door refrigerator f Pull-out drawer cabinets g Built-in/exposed storage

f

g

i

h 27” space below sink + stove i Rounded counter edges j Low gloss finishes k 6” raised dishwasher b

l Single level sink faucet m Task lighting n Extending upper cabinets o “C-shaped” cabinet handles Re-designed Kitchen Floor Plan

Fall 2012

Re-designed Kitchen Renderings

LEFT Out: Designing for Handedness


America’s homeless are a constantly changing population whose diverse needs are often underrepresented in architectural design. This research study focuses on the concept of transitional homeless villages as a form of homeless housing. The study includes a description and analysis of two micro-housing prototypes at a transitional homeless village in Eugene, Oregon that have the potential to serve as precedents for future micro-housing villages: The Conestoga Hut and the Bungalow.

North Garfield Street

Homeless Housing

16

22

Graduate Work

15 20 21

14 13

24

11

10

23

12

Visitor Parking

Fire Lane

1

9

5

2

4

6

8 7

3

January 2014 Existing SiteINTERVIEW Plan of Opportunity Village Eugene COMMENTS - POSITIVE/NEGATIVE

Through interviews with microhousing prototype designers, village organizers, and residents of Opportunity Village Eugene, this study gathered a variety of perspectives that were analyzed, as a way to generate a stronger understanding of the architectural needs of homeless individuals in a transitional setting. The results of this study provide guidelines and recommendations that can assist architects, planners, and other housing activists in addressing and creating future microhousing prototype designs in the transitional village environment.

17

18 19

CONESTOGA HUT (+)

SIZE

INTERVIEW COMMENTS - DESIGN CHANGES BUNGALOW

(-)

(+)

CONESTOGA HUT (-)

Changes Made

Comfort

Comfort

Transportation

Transportation

Storage

SIZE

Multi-person

PERSONALIZATION

Building Form

Building Form

Storage

Storage

Insulate

Insulate Lofts

PERSONALIZATION

Flooring

Furniture

Paint

Paint

Curtains

Curtains

Exterior Alterations

Exterior Alterations

Temperature

Temperature

Body Heat

Body Heat Heating Systems

INSULATION

Orientation

Cold Clothing

Cold Clothing

Interior Alterations

Interior Alterations Orientation

Unit Spacing

Unit Spacing

CONTEXT

Path of Travel Privacy

Privacy

Noise

Noise Clean/Organized

AESTHETICS

Boxy Unique

Construction

Weather Construction Open Bottom

BUILDING FORM

Porch Loft

SECURITY

Boxy Unique Material Lifespan

DURABILITY

Weather

Open Bottom

BUILDING FORM

Path of Travel

Clean/Organized

Material Lifespan

DURABILITY

Orientation Ventilation

Orientation

AESTHETICS

Flooring

Furniture

Ventilation

CONTEXT

Changes Anticipated

Storage

Volume Dimensions

Heating Systems

INSULATION

BUNGALOW Changes Made

Multi-person

Volume Dimensions

Lofts

Changes Anticipated

Porch Loft

Lockable Doors

SECURITY

Front Gate

Interview Comments - Positive vs Negative

Housing the Houseless

Lockable Doors Front Gate

Interview Comments - Design Changes

Prof. Korydon Smith


Micro-housing Prototypes at Opportunity Village Eugene

Fall 2013 - Spring 2014

Master’s Thesis


Marketing Renderings Interior and exterior renderings were created as supplementary presentation material to advertise to project investors , future building tenants, and for use on the leasing website.

Professional Work

Bethune Lofts

Ciminelli Real Estate Corporation


Fall 2012

Buffalo, NY


Architecture + Education In correlation with the Buffalo Architecture Foundation, an opportunity for teaching was presented through the Architecture and Education program. Working with a first grade teacher and classes at the Discovery School in Lackawanna, NY, ideas of architecture were exchanged and developed that highlighted students’ intellectual and creative strengths.

Fall 2011: “There Goes the Sun” The first graders worked in groups of two to create window frames with shading devices that minimized the sunlight coming through their windows and maximized their view through those same windows. Using a transformation of 2D to 3D shapes, students created an aesthetic pattern systems for their shading devices.

Personal Work

Architecture + Education

Buffalo Architecture Foundation


Fall 2013: “Modern Mesopotamia� Working again with first grade students at the Discovery School, architecture was brought to the classroom in the form of a Mesopotamian ziggurat. Using principles of 1st grade mathematics, patterning, and teamwork, the students constructed a model ziggurat of chipboard bricks. This project helped students to realize 2D to 3D transformations, count in multiples, and develop patterns. Forming groups identified as Brick Makers, Brick Inspecters, Brick Repairers, and Brick Layers, the students were able to work together and develop strong teamworking strategies and respect for the different tasks required as a part of the construction process.

Fall 2011, Fall 2013

Buffalo Public School 67, 1st Grade


kgabriele23@gmail.com 716.512.5292


Kristen Gabriele Architecture + Design Portfolio