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The Boston Artist Collaborative


THE

Table of Contents COLLABORATIVE ARTIST I. THESIS

IV. SITE ANALYSIS

PROBLEM STATEMENT PROBLEM DISCUSSION PROJECT GOALS USER GROUP

II. RESEARCH THE ARTIST IN SOCIETY: A DISCUSSION SUMMARY OF MARKET SEGMENT APPLICABLE BUILDING CODES ADA ACCESSIBLITY GREEN CONSIDERATIONS

III.

CASE STUDIES

AS 220 THE DREYFUS THE MERCANTILE EMPIRE STREET

ARTISTS FOR HUMANITY SMITHGROUP SAN FRANSISCO SKINNER STUDIO SEATTLE

SITE OVERVIEW SITE PLANS SITE PHOTOS

V.

SURVEY DATA SURVEY - RESIDENTS OF EXISTING ARTIST HOUSING ABOUT THE PARTICIPATING ARTISTS SELECTED SURVEY RESPONSES-ARTISTS SUMMARY OF PUBLIC SURVEY RESULTS SELECTED SURVEY RESPONSES-THE PUBLIC

VI. PROGRAM ELEMENTS SPAIAL SUMMARY CRITERIA MATRIX PLANNING DIAGRAMS ROOM DATA SHEETS CONCEPT STATEMENT PARTI DIAGRAM


PROBLEM STATEMENT To create an environment that encourages individual creativity, promotes cultural developement and evokes conversation between artists and the community.


PROBLEM DISCUSSION

PROBLEM DISCUSSION

The Boston community is comprised of many different types of occupational communities due to its historic nature and also it’s location. Boston has become known for its art community and it is evident in almost every area of the city. Galleries, studios and art installations can be found throughout Boston in a variety of locations. There are many local art and design schools , as well as craft and trade schools, in addition to thousands of local professional artists and designers of almost every discipline, making Boston’s art communtity one of the most diverse in New England. As many cities become more gentrified, warehousetype spaces that would typically be used for artist’s stuidios, are no longer available and are either demolished or become simply unaffordable to the average citizen due to rising real estate costs. Although Boston has taken some initiative in preserving space for artists, I believe there should be a more focused attention on designing a space that caters more specifically to artists and their individual needs. Preserving artist work space is neccesary for several reasons. Artists are an integral part of society. They bring a sense of creativity and innovative thinking to the community.

“Because artists

play such an integral role in forming and preserving culture in society, it is imperative that in return, society preserves space in which artist’s can create.”

Art fosters community interaction, provokes discussion and serves as an outlet for creativity and emotional thought. Artists preform a multitude of social and cultural duties and are one of the most important members of what has become known as the culture industry. Because artists play such an integral role in forming and preserving culture in society, it is imperative that in return, society preserves space in which artist’s can create. Keeping this diverse community in mind, it is my goal to create a live/work space for the artist community in Boston. I would like to create a space which adresses the needs and concerns of multiple types of artists, and give them a space which subtley seperates their work and home life (which many of the current live/work spaces in Boston do not). I would like to design a space which enhances the community and that is aesthetically beautiful, but foremost, I want to create a space that functions at its highest possible potential in order to provide Boston’s artists with the resources and space they need to create beautiful art now, and in the future.

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PROJECT GOALS

PROJECT GOALS

To address the needs and concerns of multiple types of artists To provide separation between the living and work space To enhance the community by encouraging interest in the arts To encourage interaction between artists To provide artists with a space which motivates them to create and express themselves freely

To encourage interaction between artists and the community


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USER GROUP

USER GROUP

The user group for my proposed space would predominantly include young/middle aged artists in the Boston area. They may be any type of artist, or hold any type of art related career, but it is critical that residents of this environment are highly committed to thier work in the industry. The space I am proposing will have private living spaces, but will create a focus on interaction between artists and the community. Tenants of this building must be willing to be part of a community within the building as well as contribute to the community outside the building.

Some examples of careers that residents may have include: - Graphic Designer - Art Director - Architect - Fine Artist - Sculptor - Art editor - Art educator - Curator - Illustrator - Painter - Preforming Artist

Shared work spaces will be available and may include:

- Woodshop - Metals Shop - Black Room - Printmaking Room - Group work space

All artists who live in the building will have access to thier own apartment, as well as a work space located on a seperate floor. Work spaces may also be shared between two people if a large amount of space is not required by a particular artist. Average Age group would be 21-45. Income restrictions may be employed in some apartments.


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The Artist in Society : Rights, Roles and Responsibilities


What do artists do? Why are they important? What is their role in society? The role of the artist is one that has been debated for centuries. The modern artist may assume a variety of roles, many of which are difficult to define. In recent times, artists have become known as cultural workers; persons who contribute to the creation and distribution of objects or ideas which stimulate cultural activity and creative thought. It is unclear to many members of society what it is that artists actually “do”. There are a variety of answers to this question, and perhaps no one definitive answer. The real answer to this question lies in a variety of places and is dependent on many factors, many of which involve personal opinion, which is why it is very difficult to define a very simple word: Artist. Historically, artists have often been criticized and misunderstood by the public. After World War II, artists, especially modernists, were widely considered to be deadbeats and undesirables. Artists became identified with everything edgy that America was afraid of. Being an artist was an un-relatable idea to many people, and thus it was not considered a legitimate profession. Being an artist was like being a non person (1). Creatives and artists were seen as outsiders, people who did not belong to a specific category of society. Being an artist is a curious circumstance; the artist belongs to society but also doesn’t, existing in a relationship between inside and outside that is extremely delicate (1).

makes him aware that our nation falls short of its highest potential. I see little more of importance to the future of our country and our civilization than full recognition of the place of the artist. If art is to nourish the roots of our culture, society must set the artist free to allow his vision wherever it takes him (1)” It was this acceptance into mainstream culture that allowed artists to flourish and become a realized member of a society that they had previously been rejected by. The artists of today serve as “border intellectuals that function in the space between high and popular culture.” They may assume a variety of roles in society: intellect, educator, border-crosser, civilizer, humanist. Some suggest that the role of an artist is to demolish the physical and symbolic boundaries that divide and order society; that the task of the artist is to destabilize hegemonic control of dominant ideologies and suggest the reconstruction of society. Artists are imagined to some as an individual who has a critical view of social structures and can discern how to mobilize thoughts into symbols which will challenge the boundaries which have been previously established in society (6).

“If art is to nourish the roots of our culture, society must set the artist free to allow his vision wherever it takes him”

Artists had long assumed a negative connotation and were likened to foreignness, communism and homosexuality during the Cold War. Eventually after the war, with the emersion of abstract expressionism, pop art, and minimalism, artists were able to establish a role for themselves in America. This role was solidified by the Kennedy administration in the 1960’s. Kennedy acknowledged and celebrated the role of the artist in America and he very wisely recognized the important impact art had on society. He said that “The men who create power make an indispensible contribution to the nation’s greatness…But the men who question power make a contribution just as indispensible.” He defended the American artists who had been criticized by the public and by the government for their “inappropriate” interpretations of religious and political subjects: “If sometimes our great artists have been the most critical of our society it is because their sensitivity and their concern for justice, which motivate any true artist,

One common theme underscored throughout many publications regarding the role of artists in society is the idea that artists are expected to challenge the public to think in new and different ways and to inspire intellectual dialogue. In recent history, artists have become regarded as “social agents” directing their work into various social outlets throughout society (6). They have become members of what has become known as the “Culture Industry”. Artists, designers and other creative thinkers are seen as employees of culture. Their role is to challenge dominant assumptions, encourage political awareness , secure social justice, economic equality and human rights across both national and global spheres (1). As cultural workers, artists confront the need for constructing a new ethical and political language to map the problems and challenges of citizenship in a newly constituted global public (1). It is imperative that the public recognize the role of the artist as a very important one. The artist must be celebrated as a reflector of society. Artists are forward thinkers, developers who help move society forward.

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RESIDENTIAL

SUMMARY OF MARKET SEGMENT

As of 2011, about 250 million Americans live in or around urban areas. That means more than three quarters of the U.S. population shares just about three percent of the U.S. land area (2).

What is a Residence? A dwelling place or home considered as a refuge from the elements

Project types: homes multifamily housing apartments mobile homes dormitories mixed use condominiums vacation homes

User Groups: -Renters - Families - Owners - Individuals

Trends in Residential Design -Sustainable design - Indoor Air Quality - Flexible Spaces - Open floor plans - Use of LED lighting - Renovation of existing space - Incorportation of technology to Enhance comfort/accessibility


STATISTICS AND TRENDS

Conclusion: There has been a huge shift in cultural ideals in recent years regarding living accomodations. Large numbers of people are flocking to urban areas, as opposed to suburban areas, as we’ve seen in decades past. “Residence” has assumed a new definition. As cities become more populous, people will need to find new ways to adapt living space in order to fit their needs.

It is quite possible that what was once the ideal home (single family house with plenty of land) will become obselete to the high rise condos and apartment buildings of the future. People want to be in the city. The city is where oppoutunity lies, the city is where people can connect. The city is the future.

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BUILDING CODES

APPLICABLE BUIDLING CODES SECTION 303 ASSEMBLY GROUP A

SECTION 508 MIXED USE AND OCCUPANCY

303.1 Assembly Group A. Assembly Group A occupancy includes, among others, the use of a building or structure, or a portion thereof, for the gathering of persons for purposes such as civic, social or religious functions; recreation, food or drink consumption or awaiting transportation.

508.1 General. Each portion of a building shall be individually classified in accordance with Section 302.1. Where a building contains more than one occupancy group, the building or portion thereof shall comply with the applicable provisions of Section 508.2, 508.3 or 508.4, or a combination of Chapter 5 - General Building Heights Areas http://publicecodes.citation.com/icod/ibc/2009/icod_ibc_2009_5_sec00... these and sections.

A-3 Assembly uses intended for worship, recreation or amusement and other assembly uses not classified elsewhere in Group A including, but not limited to: Amusement arcades Art galleries

Code occupancies shall 508.2.1 Area limitations. International AggregateBuilding accessory [ 2009 (Fifth Printing) ] Chapter 5 General Building Heights notSECTION occupy508 more than 10 percent of the building areaand ofAreas the MIXED USE AND OCCUPANCY 508.2 Accessory occupancies. story in which they are located and shall not exceed the tabular values in Table 503, without building area increases in ac508.2.1 Area limitations. 508.2.2 Occupancy classification. 508.2.3 Allowable building area and height. cordance with Section 506 for such accessory occupancies. 508.2.4 Separation of occupancies. 508.2.5 Separation of incidental accessory occupancies. Top Previous Section Next Section To view the next subsection please select the Next Section option.

508.2.5 Separation of incidental accessory occupancies. The incidental accessory occupancies listed in Table 508.2.5 shall be separated from the remainder of the building or equipped with an automatic fire-extinguishing system, or both, in accordance with Table 508.2.5. Exception: Incidental accessory occupancies within and serving a dwelling unit are not required to comply with this section.

Bowling alleys Community halls

TABLE 508.2.5 INCIDENTAL ACCESSORY OCCUPANCIES ROOM OR AREA Furnace room where any piece of equipment is over 400,000 Btu per hour input Rooms with boilers where the largest piece of equipment is over 15 psi and 10 horsepower Refrigerant machinery room Hydrogen cutoff rooms, not classified as Group H

Courtrooms Dance halls (not including food or drink consumption)

Incinerator rooms Paint shops, not classified as Group H, located in occupancies other than Group F Laboratories and vocational shops, not classified as Group H, located in a Group E or I-2 occupancy Laundry rooms over 100 square feet Group I-3 cells equipped with padded surfaces Group I-2 waste and linen collection rooms Waste and linen collection rooms over 100 square feet Stationary storage battery systems having a liquid electrolyte capacity of more than 50 gallons, or a lithium-ion capacity of 1,000 pounds used for facility standby power, emergency power or uninterrupted power supplies Rooms containing fire pumps in nonhigh-rise buildings Rooms containing fire pumps in high-rise buildings

SEPARATION AND/OR PROTECTION 1 hour or provide automatic fire-extinguishing system 1 hour or provide automatic fire-extinguishing system 1 hour or provide automatic sprinkler system 1 hour in Group B, F, M, S and U occupancies; 2 hours in Group A, E, I and R occupancies. 2 hours and automatic sprinkler system 2 hours; or 1 hour and provide automatic fire-extinguishing system 1 hour or provide automatic fire-extinguishing system 1 1 1 1

hour or provide automatic fire-extinguishing system hour hour hour or provide automatic fire-extinguishing system

1 hour in Group B, F, M, S and U occupancies; 2 hours in Group A, E, I and R occupancies. 2 hours; or 1 hour and provide automatic sprinkler system throughout the building 2 hours

For SI: 1 square foot = 0.0929 m2, 1 pound per square inch (psi) = 6.9 kPa, 1 British thermal unit (Btu) per hour = 0.293 watts, 1 horsepower = 746 watts, 1 gallon = 3.785 L.

Top Previous Section Next Section

To view the next subsection please select the Next Section option.


Definitions “Art use”, the creation, manufacture, or assemblage of visual art, including two- or three-dimensional works of fine art or craft, or other fine artobjects created, manufactured, or assembled for the purpose of sale, display,commission, consignment, or trade by artists or artisans; or classes held for art instruction. “Artists’ mixed-use”, the use of all or a portion of a Building for both habitation and either Art Use or Arts Studio use, or a combination thereof,provided that any portion of a Building devoted to such use shall be (a) occupiedby persons certified as artists pursuant to the Boston Redevelopment Authority’sArtist Certification Process, (b) design in accordance with Boston RedevelopmentAuthority standards and guidelines for artists’ mixed-use space, and (c) subject to an agreement for artists’ housing with the Boston Redevelopment Authority.

Residential Code Considerations Every dwelling unit must provide 150-sq. ft. of total habitable space for the first occupant and 100-sq. ft. for each additional occupant. Total habitable space is the sum of the floor area of the kitchen, living room, dining area and all bedrooms.

Screens are required on all windows intended for occupants use. Screening season is April 1 through October 30th. Screens are only required on windows on the fourth floor and down.

If the floor to ceiling height is less than 5ft, that floor area less than 5 ft. is not included in the total habitable space. Either one electrical fixture and a wall outlet or two separate wall-type electrical outlets practically located at least ten feet apart.

The owner shall provide heat (unless tenant is required) at a minimum temperature of 68 degrees Fahrenheit from 7AM to 11PM. From 11PM to 7 AM, temperature in unit may not drop below 64 degrees Fahrenheit. Heating season starts September 15 and runs through June 15.

Natural lighting (windows) equal to 8% of the entire floor area. In addition, 4% of the floor area must be represented in openable window space.

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ACCESIBILITY

ADA ACCESSIBILITY

304.3 Size. Turning space shall comply with 304.3.1 or 304.3.2. 304.3.1 Circular Space. The turning space shall be a space of 60 inches (1525 mm) diameter minimum. The space shall be permitted to include knee and toe clearance complying with 306. 304.3.2 T-Shaped Space. The turning space shall be a T-shaped space within a 60 inch (1525 mm) square minimum with arms and base 36 inches (915 mm) wide minimum. Each arm of the T shall be clear of obstructions 12 inches (305 mm) minimum in each direction and the base shall be clear of obstructions 24 inches (610 mm) minimum. The space shall be permitted to include knee and toe clearance complying with 306 only at the end of either the base or one arm (5).

Advisory 302.2 Carpet. Carpets and permanently affixed mats can significantly increase the amount of force (roll resistance) needed to propel a wheelchair over a surface. The firmer the carpeting and backing, the lower the roll resistance. A pile thickness up to ½ inch (13 mm) (measured to the backing, cushion, or pad) is allowed, although a lower pile provides easier wheelchair maneuvering. If a backing, cushion or pad is used, it must be firm. Preferably, carpet pad should not be used because the soft padding increases roll resistance (5.)


307.3 Post-Mounted Objects. Free-standing objects mounted on posts or pylons shall overhang circulation paths 12 inches (305 mm) maximum when located 27 inches (685 mm) minimum and 80 inches (2030 mm) maximum above the finish floor or ground. Where a sign or other obstruction is mounted between posts or pylons and the clear distance between the posts or pylons is greater than 12 inches (305 mm), the lowest edge of such sign or obstruction shall be 27 inches (685 mm) maximum or 80 inches (2030 mm) minimum above the finish floor or ground (5).

Figure 403.5.1 Clear Width of an Accessible Route

Figure 403.5.2 Clear Width at Turn

307.4 Vertical Clearance. Vertical clearance shall be 80 inches (2030 mm) high minimum. Guardrails or other barriers shall be provided where the vertical clearance is less than 80 inches (2030 mm) high. The leading edge of such guardrail or barrier shall be located 27 inches (685 mm) maximum above the finish floor or ground. EXCEPTION: Door closers and door stops shall be permitted to be 78 inches (1980 mm) minimum above the finish floor or ground (5.)

Figure 404.2.3 Clear Width of Doorways

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GREEN DESIGN

GREEN CONSIDERATIONS

My building will employ the use of green products for most of the predominant surfaces in the building (ie. flooring, wallcovering, ceiling) The use of low VOC paints will also be a priority. Opitmizing natural daylight will also be a main element for consideration when determining the efficacy of the lighting and desire to lower energy consumption within the space. I would also like to obtain the majority of my materials from local companies within 500 miles of the site in order to reduce the carbon foorprint of the project on the environment. Bicycle Racks and Storage will be provided to discourage driving and also to encourage excercise and fitness. There will also be a large outdoor area which houses a multitude of plants, allowing for increased air quality in the location proposed. Rainwater will be collected and used as greywater for irrigation and slop sinks within the studio spaces. It may also be used for toilets if a large enough storage tank can be accomodated for. I will implement a green roofing system in order to provide insulation for the building, consequently diminishing the need for electric heating. Providing a green roof will also allow the roof to become a usable space for the tenants fo the building and also for the public. The roof could also be used as a secondary function space. Utilizing the roof as a public space will raise awareness about responsible design practices and encourage the public to become interested in green design.


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AS


22O


CASE STUDY: AS220 AS220 seeks artists and other members of the creative community who demonstrate a serious commitment to their creative work and a genuine need for affordable space. Studios of varying price ranges are available, some having an income cap requirement, while other rentable studios have no income cap.

AS220 is a non-profit community arts space in downtown Providence. Their mission is to provide an unjuried and uncensored forum for the arts. Residents of Rhode Island are invited to exhibit or perform in this space. AS220 describes itself as “an incubator for the arts”. They build new audiences and infrastructure for artists in order to “stimulate the cultural mulch” in the community. AS220 provides space to artists who seek a diverse, stable and affordable studio environment. The goal of the live work spaces is to create a cooperative living environment driven by the artistic energy of its inhabitants (10).


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CASE STUDY: AS220 The Dreyfus The Dreyfus Hotel, located at the corner of Washington and Mathewson streets in downtown Providence, was purchased by AS220 from Johnson & Wales University in April of 2005. Originally built in 1890, it was most recently used as a dormitory from 1975-2000 by JWU. The Dreyfus has a long history as a hotel, lounge, and restaurant that served the bustling downtown theater district and weary travelers searching for lodging from the nearby train station. AS220’s adaptive re-use of the Dreyfus was undertaken as a historic preservation project that brought new life to the exquisite historical building as well as the pub adjoining it. All of the interior detailing as well as the facade were carefully restored. By May 2007 the building was fully restored and fully occupied.

The Dreyfus building currently houses AS220’s Main Offices, the Community Printshop, the Project Space art gallery, fourteen affordable living facilities and four work rental studios for lowincome artists, as well as a restaurant

owned by a local chef called Local 121. The third and fourth floors of the Dreyfus building contain a total of 14 residential studios, ranging in size from 356 to 516 sf. Each unit has its own bathroom, containing a tub/ shower and a kitchen equipped with a refrigerator and gas stove. Floors are hardwood and each studio has oversized windows. Residential laundry facilities are located on the 4th floor. Rents for 11 of the 14 studios are affordable and a resident’s income must not exceed a specified maximum. The remaining 3 studios are unrestricted, both in rent and income. AS220 maintains four galleries, three of which are located within the Empire Street complex, while the fourth resides in a street level space at the Dreyfus. Also known as the Project Space, this gallery features artwork on a monthly rotating basis and displays work that is usually three-dimensional or requires specialized installation needs (10).


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ARCHITECTURAL PLANS:

work_studios.jpg (JPEG Image, 1830x849 pixels) - Scaled (69%)

The Dreyfus

http://www.as220.org/about/work_studios.jpg


typical unit types

.jpg (JPEG Image, 1575x2025 pixels) - Scaled (42%)

http://www.as220.org/about/303_403.jpg 301_401.jpg (JPEG Image, 1575x2025 pixels) - Scaled (42%)

1 of 1

11/22/2011 3:26 PM

http://www.as220.org/about/301

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11/22/201


CASE STUDY: AS220 The Mercantile In 2008, AS220 purchased their third downtown building, the Mercantile Block, located on Washington Street and directly abutting the Dreyfus. This four story (plus basement) building totals 50,000 square feet and presents a tremendous opportunity to provide more spaces for artists to live, work and create in the heart of Providence. The Mercantile building dates back to 1901 and is composed of several buildings that were joined over time. Every effort has been made to restore the historic beauty of this mercantile building; throughout the building you will find hardwood floors, architectural detailing and exceptionally high tin ceilings. The buildings facade was once entirely concealed from view has been painstakingly restored to its former grace.

AS220’s adaptive re-use of the historic Mercantile Block provides for a vibrant mix of live and work studios, arts related offices and one-of-a kind, local retail and commercial spaces. The restoration of the Mercantile led to the revitalization of Martha Street. Once regarded as a “back alley”, Martha Street is being transformed into a vibrant pedestrian way, revitalizing the neighborhood and enhancing safety. The first floor is home to two long time Mercantile tenants: Clark the Locksmith and The Stable bar. The first floor also contains an affordable food and beverage venue; as well the AS220 Print Shop and AS220 Labs. The first floor also offers a bicycle storage area and a mailbox alcove for tenant use. Floor 2 contains 11 studios, several of which have been joined to provide larger spaces. The second floor tenant mix includes two AS220 programs: the Community Print Shop and AS220 Labs, several non profits such as College Visions and the Rhode Island Council on the Humanities (RICH), some individual work studios and 2 common bathrooms. Floors 3 & 4 contain a total of 22 residential studios ranging in size from 600 to 880 sq ft and the building’s 4th floor residential laundry facilities. (10).


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ARCHITECTURAL PLANS The Mercantile

            

           

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CASE STUDY: AS220 Empire Street In 1992, AS 220 acquired a 21,000 square foot, three floor building on Empire Street that was severely blighted and almost totally abandoned. By the following year they achieved code compliance and 100% occupancy, This was accomplished with a very limited budget of $1.2 million dollars, and tremendous community support. What was once an almost lifeless block in downtown Providence is today a thriving mixed-use arts complex and a destination visited by an estimated 50,000 people each year. This project was one of the first significant steps in the creation of the Providence Arts and Entertainment District.

Empire Street has 11 residential studios that range from 245 sq ft to 410 sq ft. Rent for these spaces range from $333 to $446 and include all utilities. The Empire Street residences are reserved for artists who qualify for low income housing by earning less than $25,250 annually. Accommodations include a private room, but the kitchen and bath facilities are shared. Artists-in-Residence at Empire Street must be committed to its cooperative living structure which requires communal chores, attendance at monthly floor meetings, respectful use of common facilities and a general good will. There is a 5 year term limit for residencies on Empire Street. Today, Empire Street provides a home to AS220’s Performance Space, The AS220 Bar, AS220 Foo(d), AS220 Youth Studio, the Paul Krot B&W Community Darkrooms 3 of the 4 Gallery Spaces, and twenty live/work studios for artists (10).


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ARCHITECTURAL PLANS Empire Street

BSS AS

CV

AS

BSS

CV

AS220 DARKROOM

AS Classroom

BSS

BSS

BSS

BSS

AS

Perishable Offices

AS22Artist Work Studios (AS), Broad Street Studio (BSS), College Visions (CV)

S e c o n d F l o o r P l a n 2.0 Scale: 1/16”=1’-0”

AS220 Empire Street 121 Empire Street, Providence, RI

DURKEE BROWN


Kitchen

BR

BR

Perishable Rehearsal Space/ Dance Floor

12 Residential Studios with Common Kitchen and Bathrooms

T h i r d F l o o r P l a n 3.0 Scale: 1/16”=1’-0”

AS220 Empire Street

DURKEE BROWN

121 Empire Street, Providence, RI

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ARTISTS FOR


HUMANITY


CASE STUDY: ARTISTS FOR HUMANITY Boston Headquarters Founded in 1991, Artists For Humanity’s

mission is to bridge economic, racial and social divisions by providing underserved youth with the keys to self-sufficiency through paid employment in the arts.

With fully equipped, staffed studios in Painting/Murals, Sculpture/Industrial Design, Screen-Printing, Graphic Design, Digital Media, and Photography/Web Design, youth and mentors collaborate on creative projects, many specifically commissioned by clients. In the process, young artists develop entrepreneurial skills as they participate in planning, product development, outreach and marketing of projects. The paid apprentices meet during their out-of-school time. The AFH model has received national recognition and has been studied extensively as an exemplar of effective mentorship, youth empowerment and social entrepreneurship. Their model has been disseminated internationally to organizations that utilize their framework of respect, relationships, and responsibility to empower young people in their communities (3).

In 2004, AFH completed its headquarters, the Platinum LEED Certified Artists For Humanity EpiCenter. Built to the highest levels of sustainability of the U.S. Green Building Council, it serves to inform its youth of issues of environmental stewardship, and serves as an inspiration and backdrop for their creativity. Named one of the “Top Ten Green Buildings” in the country, and one of the “5 Most Beautiful Buildings in Boston” it provides a fitting venue for perhaps the largest permanent display of youth-created fine art in the nation (3).

“At the heart of Artists for Humanity is the belief that skills equal power and opportunity.” AFH Boston is meant to serve as a comminuty center, and is utilized not only as an art education center, but also as a function space. The space may be rented out for various events such as weddings and charity events.

AFH’s central program, the Arts Micro-Enterprise, is a paid apprenticeship and leadership program employing urban teens. Youth are partnered in small groups with professional artists, designers and young artist mentors to create, market and sell fine art and design services (3). AFH partners youth in small groups with professional artists/designers to design, create, market and sell art products. Youth gain hands-on experience in:

Digital Media/Video Graphic Design/Motion Graphics Painting/Murals Photography/Web Design Screen Printing Sculpture/Industrial Design 3D Design Web Design


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CASE STUDY: ARTISTS FOR HUMANITY Boston Headquarters


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SMITHGROUP


SAN FRANSISCO


PRECEDENT STUDY:

SmithGroup San Francisco

Designer’s left the industrial shell of materials as a backdrop for a progressive interior scheme Leaving the shell exposed retained the character of the historical building but also showed the design companies commitment to sustainability. Openness is accentuated by 20 ft. floor to ceiling heights which can be seen from the main stair case. Roof terrace provides area of refuge/gathering space Reuse of existing materials such as concrete Pillars and bricks. Open plan emphasizes interaction Studios are placed in low rise work stations which are clustered around common areas that have impromptu meeting tables and chairs. Isolation between floors is resolved by a large staircase between floors made from glass steel and reclaimed teak. Common spaces such as the kitchen and conference rooms are spread between floors to encourage interaction between colleagues


SKINNER


STUDIO


PRECEDENT STUDY: Skinner Studio, Seattle Washington Space alludes to its earlier industrial function in a subtle way Adaptive Reuse of space/materials Focuses on accommodating multiple uses in a space that changes depending on the need Drywall panels which pivot/slide on steel tracks Simple lighting fixtures Informal Design “This design is not to be viewed as a museum piece, but as a daily tool that must be altered, expanded or tweaked according to changing needs.� - Tom Kundig, architect


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500 HARRISON AVE

SITE ANALYSIS

LOCATED IN ONE OF BOSTON’S ART DISTRICTS

PROXIMAL TO AREA RESTURUANTS

WAS PREVIOUSLY A MILL

CENTRAL COURTYARD

150,000 SQUARE FEET

WITHIN WALKING DISTANCE FROM PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION

WINDOWS ON ALL SIDES

CLOSE TO A MAJOR HIGHWAY

PROXIMAL TO ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

ABOUT THE SOUTH END Architecturally, the South End consists mostly of mid-nineteenth century bowfronts aesthetically uniform rows of five-story, predominantly red-brick structures, of mixed residential and commercial uses. The most common styles are Renaissance Revival, Italianate and French Second Empire, though there are Greek Revival, Egyptian Revival, Gothic Revival, and Queen Anne style houses, among several other styles. Across styles, a common palette of red brick, slate, limestone or granite trim, and cast iron railings provide great visual unity. Today, the South End is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and is a Boston Landmark District. It is North America’s largest extant Victorian residential district. A series of eleven residential parks are located across the South End, most are elliptical in shape with passive-use green space located in the middle. These residential squares vary in size, and take inspiration from English-inspired

residential squares first laid out by Charles Bulfinch downtown. The South End is one of Boston’s main restaurant districts offering a diverse mix of cuisines, many at a relatively high price point. Tremont Street is often called “Restaurant Row.” The South End’s range of restaurants include American southern “Low Country”, French, Ethiopian, Brazilian, Indian, Italian, Venezuelan, African, Peruvian, Latin American , Thai and Japanese among others. The South End has a growing retail presence, much of it aimed primarily at upper-middle class shoppers. New retail shops offer a range of handmade gifts by local artists, home furnishings, men’s and women’s clothing, stationery, specialty foods, spa services, and a rapidly growing number of manicure and pedicure shops (11).


In the Immediate Area: Sibling Rivalry SOWA vintage market Peters Park The South End Buttery Rotch Playground DScale Boston Sculptors Gallery Bead and Fiber Howard Yezerski Gallery

Transportation Kingston Gallery Walker Contemporary Boston Sports Club Pompeii Design Group Brix Wine Shop Arts Alliance Boston Center for the Arts Design Within Reach: Boston

MBTA Orange Line to Back Bay Station: Take the Clarendon Street exit and walk with traffic (Clarendon Street is one-way) to the end of Clarendon Street into the South End. MBTA Green Line to Copley: Continue along Boylston Street with traffic (Boylston Street is one-way). Take a right onto Clarendon Street. Continue on Clarendon Street into the South End. MBTA Bus #43 travels along Tremont Street into the South End. Please ask the driver for the proper stop. MBTA Bus #49 Silver Line travels along Washington Street into the South End. Please ask the driver for the proper stop.

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In your experience, how has living in an artist housing development affected your work personally as an artist? Has it been a positive effect? Do you prefer to work in isolation or in a group studio setting? Please list some reasons for your choice.

Do you feel artist housing is important in urban communities? Why or why not?

What are some of the amenities you feel would be helpful/relevant to this type of building?

In your opinion, what do you think the role of the artist is in society?

Would you prefer to have separation between your studio and your living space, as opposed to an open loft style live/work space? Please list some reasons for your choice.

Additional comments or suggestions

Residents of Existing

Artist Housing This survey is part of my primary research for my senior thesis project. I’m designing a live/work space for artists in the Boston area. The building would be somewhat large and house 30-40 working artists and would also provide them with a work space ( it may be communal or individual). It is likely that the first floor of this building would have a public space (such as a gallery) and may include an attached restaurant. Possible jobs that residents might have include illustrators, painters, sculptors, art educators, designers and architects. -Kristen Kelly, Class of 2012, The New England School of Art and Design at Suffolk University, Boston


About the Participating

Artists

The WAV - Working Artists Ventura - is a state-of-the-art community, designed for artists and creative businesses, and is located in the Downtown Cultural District of Ventura, California. WAV offers affordable living and work space for 82 artists from 21 countries, who are painters, sculptors, dancers, musicians, writers, actors, filmmakers, and more.They offer a Theater Gallery space which facilitates performances, film showings, art exhibitions, concerts, workshops and classes. WAV also offers its venue for public use. The WAV complex was designed and built to the highest standards of green technology and is LEED™ Certified, and includes the use of recycled building materials, car sharing, water and energy conservation, with renewable solar power (12). I surveyed a number of the residents at WAV ventura to gather infomation about the functionality of thier space. The following are a collection of responses that were most helpful and informative.

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What is the role of the artist in society? Here’s what 50 artists and designers said.


to motivate

to provide abstract solutions for moving on

To provoke

to inspire

To make life better somehow. To help draw the creativity out of others.

To help others find things out about themselves that they cannot express on their own

to improve

Artists are commentators, educators and (frankly) entertainers.

The artist reflects society back onto itself

to intrigue.

To breathe life into culture and spread new ideas.

“

“

to imitate

To exhibit work that is provoking and constructive and ultimately betters societal consciousness

To Reflect what the people of the time are about.


Selected Survey Responses Artists and Designers


In your experience, how has living in an artist housing development affected your work personally as an artist? Has it been a positive effect? It is very stimulating and inspiring to be constantly exposed to so many creative people and their work. Living at the WĂƒV is like living in a small village where everyone knows one another. We don’t all get along well together, however those that do collaborate and our experiences are extremely rewarding.

Do you prefer to work in isolation or in a group studio setting? Please list some reasons for your choice. I like to work both in solitude and with others. Since we are a diversified group, musicians, painters, writers etc, we have so much to share with one another. But as a painter I like to work alone. Sometimes we have group workshops and then it is great fun to be doing this together.

Do you feel artist housing is important in urban communities? Why or why not? Yes it is important because artists are a breed of their own. We are not easily understood by those who do not value art and creativity as much as we do. Living and working in the same building is a plus because we are constantly exposed to one another. It is like a family.

What are some of the amenities you feel would be helpful/relevant to this type of building? It would be nice to have a cafe where we could sit, eat and visit with each other in a public situation. Having outside guests mingle with us in a casual manner would be good for us and them. There is a need for storage here. Although our studios are large, there is never enough space to store art and supplies. A common area created for storage would be a plus.

In your opinion, what do you think the role of the artist is in society? The artist brings more beauty into the world and if not beauty more challenge to those who view provocative works. The artists reflects society back to itself and that mirror is a great way that people can ponder about their existence. What would the world be without art? A rose bush without roses - only thorns.�

Would you prefer to have separation between your studio and your living space, as opposed to an open loft style live/work space? Please list some reasons for your choice. Our spaces here are separated and that is a great way to live. We have studio space and then what is called live space. Some of us have separate bedrooms as well. It is much like a cross between a loft and an apartment. The only drawback here is that our building is right next to a busy freeway. Terrible idea to put us right next to all that noise. The double pane windows block out the sound however. Build your space in a quiet neighborhood so you can sit outside and breathe fresh air and enjoy silence.

Additional comments or suggestions

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In your experience, how has living in an artist housing development affected your work personally as an artist? Has it been a positive effect? It is very stimulating and inspiring to be constantly exposed to so many creative people and their work. Living at the WĂƒV is like living in a small village where everyone knows one another. We don’t all get along well together, however those that do collaborate and our experiences are extremely rewarding.

Do you prefer to work in isolation or in a group studio setting? Please list some reasons for your choice. I like to work both in solitude and with others. Since we are a diversified group, musicians, painters, writers etc, we have so much to share with one another. But as a painter I like to work alone. Sometimes we have group workshops and then it is great fun to be doing this together.

Do you feel artist housing is important in urban communities? Why or why not? Yes it is important because artists are a breed of their own. We are not easily understood by those who do not value art and creativity as much as we do. Living and working in the same building is a plus because we are constantly exposed to one another. It is like a family.

What are some of the amenities you feel would be helpful/relevant to this type of building? It would be nice to have a cafe where we could sit, eat and visit with each other in a public situation. Having outside guests mingle with us in a casual manner would be good for us and them. There is a need for storage here. Although our studios are large, there is never enough space to store art and supplies. A common area created for storage would be a plus.

In your opinion, what do you think the role of the artist is in society? The artist brings more beauty into the world and if not beauty more challenge to those who view provocative works. The artists reflects society back to itself and that mirror is a great way that people can ponder about their existence. What would the world be without art? A rose bush without roses - only thorns.�

Would you prefer to have separation between your studio and your living space, as opposed to an open loft style live/work space? Please list some reasons for your choice. Our spaces here are separated and that is a great way to live. We have studio space and then what is called live space. Some of us have separate bedrooms as well. It is much like a cross between a loft and an apartment. The only drawback here is that our building is right next to a busy freeway. Terrible idea to put us right next to all that noise. The double pane windows block out the sound however. Build your space in a quiet neighborhood so you can sit outside and breathe fresh air and enjoy silence.

Additional comments or suggestions


In your experience, how has living in an artist housing development affected your work personally as an artist? Has it been a positive effect? We have emerging 77 artists from 21 countries. All have different styles and are willing to share ideas. Doors are always open and brainstorming is going on all day long. Look up a book titled “Life With The Painters of La Ruche”, by Marevna. It tells the story of a building in Paris 100 years ago. In that building lived Picasso, Braque, Leger, Chagall, Soutine, Modigliani, Rivera, Matisse and more, before they became famous.

Do you prefer to work in isolation or in a group studio setting? Please list some reasons for your choice. Im a film maker and painter. When I paint I paint alone. When I think about scripts I do it with a few people who are on the same page as me.

Do you feel artist housing is important in urban communities? Why or why not? Art makes us all more civilized.

What are some of the amenities you feel would be helpful/relevant to this type of building? Too far from the restaurants. There are no closets. Kitchen appliances are cheap. No publicity about WAV yet. Management didn’t budget for it. Parking is a huge problem.

In your opinion, what do you think the role of the artist is in society? To add culture and and beauty.

Would you prefer to have separation between your studio and your living space, as opposed to an open loft style live/work space? Please list some reasons for your choice. I like open flowing space, and large windows for light.

Additional comments or suggestions Bathroom should be off the master bedroom. Not on a different floor.

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In your experience, how has living in an artist housing development affected your work personally as an artist? Has it been a positive effect? Yes. I now have adequate space for my practice in an environment that is conducive to creativity.

Do you prefer to work in isolation or in a group studio setting? Please list some reasons for your choice. Isolation. my music taste and desire for red wine would surely dissuade others from desiring to work alongside me.

Do you feel artist housing is important in urban communities? Why or why not? Completely. i think it’s crucial for urban planners to be inventive and open minded. the cultural enrichment of a community behooves those that are apart of it.

What are some of the amenities you feel would be helpful/relevant to this type of building? Work space, live space, gallery/theater and coffee shop

In your opinion, what do you think the role of the artist is in society? Art should make us feel more clearly and intelligently. it challenge us and provoke us. the artist role is to facilitate this.

Would you prefer to have separation between your studio and your living space, as opposed to an open loft style live/work space? Please list some reasons for your choice. Yes. Having that here at the wav is a blessing. I would hate to be saturated by my art at all times. I personally feel it’s best to have a disconnection between the two so as to allow for fresh viewpoints and time away.


In your experience, how has living in an artist housing development affected your work personally as an artist? Has it been a positive effect? I have been inspired by the dedication and talent of my fellow artists. I went through several very difficult personal circumstances during the first 18 months I have lived at WAV, and were it not for the love, friendship and support of my community, I would not have made it through these times nearly as well as I have.

Do you prefer to work in isolation or in a group studio setting? Please list some reasons for your choice. I prefer not to work in isolation, but we have no communal work space except the theatre gallery from time to time. Some of us chose to have “work nites” in our individual studios, inviting those who wanted to - to join us for the evening. I enjoyed that and got to know many more people better by working with them. We weren’t working on each other’s work, just working on our own work in the same geographic space.

Do you feel artist housing is important in urban communities? Why or why not? Yes. The arts are essential in every community whether urban or not. Affordable housing and studio space together is a godsend.

What are some of the amenities you feel would be helpful/relevant to this type of building? Two types of spaces are missing in the WAV model - in my opinion. We do not have a retail space through which we may sell the various things that we produce. We are allowed to sell from our studio spaces, or the gallery during shows, but we do not have a venue with regular predictible hours to which we can attract a following and clients. This would serve to create an income stream collectively rather than individually. A portion of this revenue could be set aside to complete the theatre/gallery, and maintain and staff the store. The second space that is missing - in my opinion - is a sort of Student Union concept for WAV artists. I envision that communal social space as having simple food and refreshments available 24-7 - a place where anyone could go to hang out at any time. The theatre/gallery was never finished, so we have received donations of necessary things - like chairs - from local folks who had extras, so we are able to conduct concerts and exhibitions there. Having trees, flowers and bushes landscaped into the grounds helps to relieve the fact that so many of us live in such a compressed space. Having a courtyard with space for an audience to sit allows for outdoor performances. Security would be one of my top priorities. But I would not like to see any surveillance cameras. It is helpful that our building is LEED certified, no smoking allowed.

In your opinion, what do you think the role of the artist is in society? To make life better somehow. To help draw out the creativity of others.

Would you prefer to have separation between your studio and your living space, as opposed to an open loft style live/work space? Please list some reasons for your choice. I prefer to have my studio separated from my living space which I have done with the use of furniture. When we have open studio nights, I don’t want the public to be waltzing through my home. It is easy to become a work a holic if you don’t have a space in which your work is not “in your face” - you keep thinking you just want to do a little bit more...

“ Some of us

chose to have “work nites” in our individual studios, inviting those who wanted to, join us for the evening. I enjoyed that and got to know many more people better by working with them. 79


In your experience, how has living in an artist housing development affected your work personally as an artist? Has it been a positive effect? Living in an artist housing development has had an unambiguously positive effect on my work. I have felt encouraged, nurtured and inspired by creativity being the norm rather than the exception. Thanks to subsidised rent I have also had more time to create and to work on projects that won’t necessarily lead to a financial benefit. There has also been an abundance of collaborators.

Do you prefer to work in isolation or in a group studio setting? Please list some reasons for your choice. Writing for the theatre as I do, much of my work must take place in solitude, but the process could not be completed without working with others. Thus for most of the time I benefit from isolation, but on the other hand it’s great to have both people and a communal space on hand to try things out, discuss etc.

Do you feel artist housing is important in urban communities? Why or why not? History has shown that where art leads, commerce follows. Typically communities enjoy the kudos that comes from having a thriving arts community (surely every city’s promotional literature tries to play up how active the arts are in that area) yet those same communities are not always so eager to pay for the arts to thrive. Geography is as important as economics; simply having the artists’ housing in the midst of an urban environment affects even people who don’t think they have any interest in the arts.

What are some of the amenities you feel would be helpful/relevant to this type of building? A gallery or communal space is perhaps the most important thing, both to exhibit work, congregate and to foster a sense of community. I like the way the WAV is designed so that one can interact with others as much as one likes but equally one can shut up shop and hibernate too. The sole negative is being right next to a busy, loud and filthy motorway but you can’t have a picnic without flies.

In your opinion, what do you think the role of the artist is in society? Artists are commentators, educators and (frankly) entertainers. All other human activities are essentially geared towards trying to get food and shelter, which is clearly vital, but no more vital than the question: ‘and then what?’.

Would you prefer to have separation between your studio and your living space, as opposed to an open loft style live/work space? Please list some reasons for your choice. I’m divided about this. Sometimes if one’s creative work is very taxing psychologically one can’t get away from it all by going home and relaxing - indeed sometimes one may dread returning home, knowing the work is waiting there for you. On the other hand what a glory not to have to commute, and to casually pop upstairs and write a few casual sentences when inspiration strikes.

Additional comments or suggestions


Selected Survey Responses The Public


What location do you feel would be best suited for an artists residence/work space in Boston? Back Bay South End North End Downtown Boston What do you think the purpose of artist housing is? What type of services/amenities do you think should be included in an artist residence? How important do you think artist housing is in urban areas? Very Important Important Moderately Important Somewhat Important Not Important In your opinion, what is the role of the artist in society? Do you think that artist housing should be made available for professional artists with limited incomes? Why or why not? Have you ever lived in an artist live/work space? If yes, please list the location and some reasons why you liked or did not like the residence Do you have any formal education or background in an art/design related field? If yes, please list your name and educational background/job title

The Public This survey is part of my primary research for my senior thesis project. I’m designing a live/work space for artists in the Boston area. The building would be somewhat large and house 30-40 working artists and would also provide them with a work space ( it may be communal or individual). It is likely that the first floor of this building would have a public space (such as a gallery) and may include an attached restaurant. Possible jobs that residents might have include illustrators, painters, sculptors, art educators, designers and architects. -Kristen Kelly, Class of 2012, The New England School of Art and Design at Suffolk University, Boston


Summary of Results from

Public Survey Participating Schools and Institutions:

Back Bay South End North End Downtown Boston

31% 44% 6% 19%

Rhode Island School of Design School of the Museum of Fine Arts Clevland Institute of Art The University of Rhode Island NESAD at Suffolk University Wentworth Institute of Technology Florida Institute of Technology

Very Important Important Moderately Important Somewhat Important Not Important

50% 31% 6% 6% 6%

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What location do you feel would be best suited for an artists residence/work space in Boston? Back Bay

What do you think the purpose of artist housing is? To make having a studio, an exhibition space and housing affordable and efficient. Also having a more immediate network for fostering of ideas and spreading them.

What type of services/amenities do you think should be included in an artist residence? I think the things listed in the description sound pretty good. Only thing is that a group working space should be intelligently compartmentalized- open spaces only work in some cases from my experience and weird office cardboard spaces dont work either. And yeah the public space should definitely be a gallery.

How important do you think artist housing is in urban areas? Very Important

In your opinion, what is the role of the artist in society? Nowadays I guess the role of artists could be extended as far as “creative people�- many businesses are hiring artists to come up with more abstract solutions for moving on. if were just talking about fine art then probably reflection. Its like the phenotype of civilization or at least a part of it.

Do you think that artist housing should be made available for professional artists with limited incomes? Why or why not? I think they should be made for people 10 years and below into the game. Everyone else should be able to figure it out themselves, split off into their own thing. But mainly even at risd so many people are preoccupied with themselves and their workload not necessarily with some greater goal or communal effort or idealism. So after 4 years of sort of forceful ego tripping you egt tossed into the real world and most people drop any idealism at all wether ego or collectively driven... And just slip into a mindless corporate grid. And mostly because they cant necessarily afford all those things the residence would provide or under the pressure of getting a job immediately. If their was a communal effort to have exhibits together and again nurture the crazy things you come up with in college because youre actually able to sustain them it could make for leaps in creative progress.

Have you ever lived in an artist live/work space? If yes, please list the location and some reasons why you liked or did not like the residence Yes

Do you have any formal education or background in an art/design related field? If yes, please list your name and educational background/job title RISD Graduate

RISD GRADUATE


What location do you feel would be best suited for an artists residence/work space in Boston? North End

What do you think the purpose of artist housing is? An affordable place to live/work for cultural workers and creatives. If artists stay in the city, the city ultimately benefits. this has been proven time and time again. Artist housing also helps build community.

What type of services/amenities do you think should be included in an artist residence? Freight elevator very important. laundry, possibly gallery/performance space. meeting space

How important do you think artist housing is in urban areas? Very Important

In your opinion, what is the role of the artist in society? Without the creative culture there is no advancement, no new ideas, no inventions. Our histories fall away, our imaginations wither, and the society becomes fascist.

Do you think that artist housing should be made available for professional artists with limited incomes? Why or why not?

Masters in Fine Art, School of the Museum of fine arts Professor at Suffolk University

I’m not sure what you are asking. Are you limiting housing to lower income artists? Are you limiting housing to professionals who exhibit widely? So no young beginners? Housing should be provided at all levels.

Have you ever lived in an artist live/work space? If yes, please list the location and some reasons why you liked or did not like the residence Not legally. Have lived in several illegal live/work studios in Boston. Loved living in my studio. Wish I had heat at night and on weekends.

Do you have any formal education or background in an art/design related field? If yes, please list your name and educational background/job title Masters in Fine Art, School of the Museum of fine arts Professor at Suffolk University

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What location do you feel would be best suited for an artists residence/work space in Boston? South End

What do you think the purpose of artist housing is? The purpose of artist housing is to group those of a similar mindset in the same area to spark collaboration and creativity. This would also allow a large variety of artists to learn from one another and gather inspiration.

What type of services/amenities do you think should be included in an artist residence? I think it would be important to have: both private and public studio spaces and a variety of food services from sit down restaurants to quick take out vendors as well as coffee shops. Although some artists may disagree it may also be important to have a fitness facility. A small art supply store might also be helpful.

How important do you think artist housing is in urban areas? Very Important

In your opinion, what is the role of the artist in society? An artist can be anything from a painter to an architect, therefore it is the role of any artist to develop an opinion of society’s state of being and create a representation of this through their medium of choice in hopes to instill an emotion on members of society.

WENTWORTH ARCHITECTURE STUDENT

Do you think that artist housing should be made available for professional artists with limited incomes? Why or why not?

Yes, to a certain degree. I think it could be helpful in the sense of inspiring others to create and foster collaboration to hopefully make profitable opportunities. However, given the general mindset of most artists I can see this being disastrous and resulting in slum-like conditions and heavy drugs use.

Have you ever lived in an artist live/work space? If yes, please list the location and some reasons why you liked or did not like the residence No.

Do you have any formal education or background in an art/design related field? If yes, please list your name and educational background/job title Stephen Akerblom, Bachelor of Science in Architecture 2012 Junior Designer at S3Design Inc.

JUNIOR DESIGNER AT S3 DESIGNS


What location do you feel would be best suited for an artists residence/work space in Boston? South End

What do you think the purpose of artist housing is? House Artists, give them a space to live/work, fuel creativity, assist them with networking.

What type of services/amenities do you think should be included in an artist residence? Coffee shop (that also serves food) extended hours, Gallery space, I hear north facing sunlight is good for painters.

How important do you think artist housing is in urban areas? Important

In your opinion, what is the role of the artist in society? Creative minds contribute greatly to make a well rounded society.

Do you think that artist housing should be made available for professional artists with limited incomes? Why or why not?

MASTER’S STUDENT

INTERIOR DESIGN

Yes, many artists work odd jobs to help pay the rent, which in turn pulls them away from being able to focus solely on their art work. It becomes more about money/survival and creativity gets lost in the daily grind. Any help artists can get finanically can only help them focus and succeed at what they are meant to be doing.

Have you ever lived in an artist live/work space? If yes, please list the location and some reasons why you liked or did not like the residence No, but I have a friend who does. It’s an interesting place, but it’s not cheap that’s for sure. He sublets from a man who owns the apt. in a CO-OP building. The apt. is in an old warehouse and isn’t exactly “homey”...there are a lot of bugs, exposed pipes, etc.

Do you have any formal education or background in an art/design related field? If yes, please list your name and educational background/job title Working towards my Master’s of Interior Design.

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OOT AGE Q. F IMA TE S

LOC ATIO N

..

APR OX

.

NUM

BER  OF  INST ANC ES

PROPOSED PROGRAM ELEMENTS

SPACIAL SUMMARY  1. WORK STUDIOS 2. APARTMENTS 3. WOOD SHOP 4. METALS SHOP 5. GROUP WORK SPACE 6. GALLERY SPACE 7. LOBBY 8. STUDIO STORAGE 9. PUBLIC RESTROOMS 10. BLACKROOM 11. PRINTMAKING ROOM 12. TECHNOLOGY LAB 13. CAFÉ/PUBLIC SPACE 14. OUTDOOR SPACE 15. BUILDING STORAGE 16. CIRCULATION TOTAL SQ. FOOTAGE: TOTAL + CIRCULATION

20 20 1 1 1 1 1 20 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 N/A 

300‐400 SQ. FT. 800‐1300 SQ FT. 500 SQ FT. 500 SQ FT. 500 SQ FT. 2000 SQ. FT. SHARED W/GALLERY 10 SQ. FT. EA. 100 SQ FT. 200 SQ. FT. 200 SQ. FT. 300 SQ. F.T  1,000 SQ. FT. 600 SQ. FT. 100 SQ FT. 20 % OF TOTAL 38, 200 SQ. FT. 45, 840 SQ FT. 

FLOORS 2‐4 FLOORS 2‐4 BASEMENT BASEMENT FLOORS 2‐4 FIRST FLOOR FIRST FLOOR FLOORS 2‐4 FIRST FLOOR BASEMENT BASEMENT BASEMENT/SECOND FLOOR FIRST FLOOR FIRST FLOOR BASEMENT N/A


NS ATIO SIDE R  CO N SPE CIAL

PLU MBI NG

PRIV ACY

DAY LIGH T/V IEW

IC A CCE SS PUB L

ENC IES ..

ADJ AC

.

CRITERIA MATRIX  1. WORK STUDIOS 2. APARTMENTS 3. WOOD SHOP 4. METALS SHOP 5. GROUP WORK SPACE 6. GALLERY SPACE 7. LOBBY 8. STUDIO STORAGE 9. PUBLIC RESTROOMS 10. BLACKROOM 11. PRINTMAKING ROOM 12. TECHNOLOGY LAB 13. CAFÉ/PUBLIC SPACE 14. OUTDOOR SPACE 15. BUILDING STORAGE 16. CIRCULATION

CENTRAL CENTRAL 2,4,5,10 3,5,10,12,8  CENTRAL CENTRAL CENTRAL 1, 3,12, 15 CENTRAL 3, 4, 8, 1   1, 8, 3, 4 1,2, 9 7, 14 13,14, 7,5 1, 3, 4,  N/A 

L L L L L H H L H L L L H H L N/A

Y Y I I Y Y Y N I N I Y Y Y N N/A

Y Y M M Y N N Y Y Y Y Y N N Y

Y y N N Y Y Y N Y N N N Y N N

ACCESSIBLE BY STUDIOS PRIVATE/STUDIO ACCESS

PROXIMAL TO STUDIOS PROXIMAL TO ALL AREAS PROXIMAL TO ALL AREAS PROXIMAL TO STUDIOS

  PROXIMAL TO GALLERY

C ACCESS VIA GALLERY S VIA GALLERY/LOBBY

LEGEND: H= M= L= Y= N= I=

HIGH MEDIUM LOW YES NO N/A IMPORTANT BUT NOT REQUIRED

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stacking diagram


93


DIAGRAMMING OF UNITS

Apartments will be on the upper floors, with an adjoining studio beneath accessible by a staircase within the apartment. The studios will have pivoting walls, so that interaction can occour between artists if they wish to colaborate.


ROOM DATA SHEET: PUBLIC GALLERY Name: Gallery Size: 2,000- 2,500 square feet Quantity: 1 Occupants/User: Residents, Public

FUNCTION: The Gallery will serve as the main public space in the building. It will be located on the first floor, and will accessible to the public during certain hours. Work from resident artists will be displayed here on a rotating basis. Guest artists may also be invited to exhibit in the gallery, however, this space is cheifly meant to serve as a connector between the resident artists and the public.

QUANTITATIVE CRITERIA: The gallery will comfortably hold about 100-125 people. There will be a public use restroom located on the first floor convienence purposes, as well as an entry to the adjacent cafe/resturaunt.

QUALITATIVE CRITERIA: The overall quality of the space will be quite modern and open, with a considerable cieling height and comfortable seating in designated areas. Light levels will be concentrated on the artwork itself and all other ambient lighting will play a secondary role to the main display lighting.


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ROOM DATA SHEET:

RESIDENT APARTMENT Name: Resident Apartment Size: 600-1100 square feet Quantity: 15-20 Occupants/User: Residents

FUNCTION: The resident apartments will serve as the living quarters for renters/owners. They will include a variety of amentities and may be intented either for a single person, or for 2-3 persons. There will be a kitchen, bathroom and private bedrooms, as well as ample storage and access to a private studio on the floor below/above. The apartments are meant to act as a place of refuge from the work environment, and will be adjacent to, but not directly connected to the artists work space.

QUANTITATIVE CRITERIA: Depending on the occupancy of the particular apartment (1-3 people) there may be a variety of space plan options. Regardless of occupancy however, each artist will have their own bedroom and access to a semi-private bathroom and living area within their apartment. Each apartment will have a kitchen and a living area, as well as personal storage space and private access to the studio floor.

-

QUALITATIVE CRITERIA: The resident apartments will be outfitted with comfortable, stylish materials and modern fixtures. The lighting will be integrated nicely to allow for the possibility of display within the space.


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ROOM DATA SHEET: RESIDENT STUDIO Name: Resident Studio Size: 600-1100 square feet Quantity: 15-20 Occupants/User: Residents

FUNCTION: The resident studios will serve as the work space for the occupants. There will be a corresponding studio space for each apartment, they will both be rented/purchased together. Included in the studio space will be both storage and work space for each of the artists occupying the corresponding apartment. The sole purpose of this space is to allow the artists to work creatively without restraint.

QUANTITATIVE CRITERIA: Each studio will house 1-3 working areas, as well as 1-3 storage areas. There will be a single bathroom in each studio for convenience purposes.

QUALITATIVE CRITERIA: The studios will have large windows and plenty of natural light. They will be as spacious as possible, and also flexible to meet the needs of individual artists. There may be moveable partitions incorportated as well as movable work tables and storage units.


101


CONCEPT STATEMENT The concept for my design will focus on creating separation between work and living space, while simultaneously connecting residents to the community and to other artists. This concept is represented by three lines (work, life,community) which are both connected and separated by a single line which runs transversely though the three categories. The concept is illustrated through the use of transformable interfaces and flexible environments which allow for various degrees of connection and separation.


103


Level 5 Level 4 Level 3 Level 2 Level 1

- Roof Terrace - Resident Studios - Residences - Flex Studios - Public Gallery/Cafe


SITE & SUN STUDIES


109


SCHEMATIC SKETCHES


111


LEVEL 1 : gallery & cafe


1

eNTRY/rECEPTION

2

cAFE

3

pUBLIC gALLERY

4

COURTYARD/OUTDOOR EXHIBITION

5

RESIDENT ENTRY

6.

gALLERY/CAFE STORAGE


13’- 0”

OPEN TO below

115


LEVEL 1 : ALTERNATIVE GALLERY CONFIGURATIONS


117


LEVEL 1 : MOVING GALLERY


119


LEVEL 1 : PUBLIC CAFE SPACE


121


FIXTURE DESIGN


123


LEVEL 2 : flex studios


127


CROSS SECTION


129


LONGTITUDINAL SECTION


131


LEVEL 3 : residences


LEVEL 3 : Residences


135


EXPLODED AXONOMETRIC


137


level 3 :

ff & e


139


level 3 :

loft perspective


141


level 3 : kitchen perspective


143


LEVEL 4 : resident studios


LEVEL 4 : Resident studios


LEVEL 4 : alternate use/open studio

147


LEVEL 4 : diagram of panels open/closed


149


level 4: resident studio perspective


151


BIBLIOGRAPHY: 1.

Acker, Kathy, Carol Becker, and Ann Wiens. The Artist in Society: Rights, Roles, and Responsibilities. Chicago: Chicago New Art Association, New Art Examiner, 1995. Print.

2.

“American Cities on the Rebound - CBS News.” Breaking News Headlines: Business, Entertainment & World News - CBS News. CBS News, 22 May 2011. Web. 24 Oct. 2011. <http://www.cbsnews.com/ stories/2011/05/22/sunday/main20065117.shtml>.

3.

“Artists for Humanity - About Us@AFHBOSTON.COM.” Artists for Humanity - Home@AFHBOSTON.COM. Artists for Humanity, 2009. Web. 04 Dec. 2011. <http://www.afhboston.com/aboutus.php>.

4.

“CIS: Safe and Sanitary Housing for Massachusetts Residents.” William Francis Galvin, Secretary of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 21 Sept. 2011.

5.

“Department of Justice ADA Title III Regulation 28 CFR Part 36.” ADA Home Page - Ada.gov - Information and Technical Assistance on the Americans with Disabilities Act. ADA. Web. 04 Dec. 2011. <http://www.ada.gov/reg3a.html>.

6.

Fernandez, Ruben. “The Artist in Society: Understandings, Expectations, and Curriculum Implications.” InfoTrac Custom Journals. Gale, 1 June 2008. Web. 11 Nov. 2011. <http://0-ehis.ebscohost.com. library.law.suffolk.edu/ehost/detail?vid=3&hid=2&sid=6b79b3d2e107-4304-968c-b83788e1acfc%40sessionmgr13&bdata=JnNpdGU9 ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ%3d%3d#db=fd9da7dd&AN=>.

7.

“Green Building Provides Fertile Ground for Artists.” Architectural Record. Architectural Record. Web. 16 Oct. 2011. <http://archrecord. construction.com/projects/bts/archives/k-12/05_artists4humanity/ overview.asp>.

8.

Lippens, Nate. “Tom Kundig Adapts a Seattle Warehouse Into Flex Space.” Architectural Record June 2007: 204-06. \ 9.

Marcelo, Philip. “AS220 Project Includes Artist Residences, and a Restaurant” The Providence Journal. 21 Sept. 2011.

10. “Live/Work - About AS220.” AS220.ORG. AS220 Providence, 6 Mar.

2008. Web. 04 Dec. 2011. <http://www.as220.org/about/2008/03/ studio-rentals.html>.

11. “South End, Boston.” Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Web. 04 Dec.

2011. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_End,_Boston>.

12. WAV Working Artists Ventura. Web. 04 Dec. 2011. <http://wavar-

tists.com/about.html>.


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DANIEL MATHERS 2009 PEN AND INK

ARCHITECTURE DAILY

US BUREAU OF THE CENSUS

US BUREAU OF THE CENSUS

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ISTOCKPHOTO.COM

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SHEPARD FAIREY 2010

AS220.ORG

ALL PLANS/PHOTOS AS220.ORG

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11/22/2011 3:30 PM


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S e c o n d F l o o r P l a n 2.0 Scale: 1/16”=1’-0”

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DURKEE BROWN

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GOOGLE MAPS

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DANIEL MATHERS 2009 PEN AND INK

LUCINDA THOMPSON SCREENPRINT 2010

WORKING ARTISTS OF VENTURA

KRISTEN KELLY PHOTO MONTAGE 2011

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MARK BRADFORD STRAWBERRY FOUND OBJECT COLLAGE 2010


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Kristen Kelly Thesis Book