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THE SABETHA

WEEKLY RECIPE Smoked Oriental Sliced Beef FUN&GAMES 10B

ELECTION VOTER GUIDE Polling Place Listings Voter Registration Constitutional Amendment Court Justice Retention

October 12, 2016 A Special Supplement to

The Sabetha Herald

OCT 2016

HELP FOR HAITI

Mission continues following hurricane

City approves Plan, 3-1

AMBER DETERS Sabethans Rick and Komari Aberle have been living in Haiti with their three children since 2013. In that time, the Aberles have worked to serve their mission through work at the Hospital Lumiere in Bonne Fin, Haiti. As they waited near the inland airport in Haiti to take a holiday to Florida last week, Hurricane Matthew struck the southern peninsula of the island — and with it the Hospital Lumiere and surrounding area.

KRISTA WASINGER

From their blog, Komari writes, “Rick and I were able to take our children to Sabetha, KS to stay with family until the situation at HL [Hospital Lumiere] stabilizes.” On Sunday, Rick and Komari traveled back to Haiti. Rick writes, “Amid all the damage and destruction that is now Bonne Fin, God has created a beautiful morning this day. As I came down to the hospital this morning, I could sense His spirit’s presence.” View the Aberle’s blog — including contact information — at KomarickA.blogspot.com.

USD NO. 113

Madison Williams stands in front of her Charming display at the Sabetha Greenhouse. Williams placed third in the Washburn Be Ready! Entrepreneurship Challenge. Heather Stewart | Herald

WASHBURN BE READY! CHALLENGE

Sabetha senior earns third place in entrepreneurship challenge HEATHER STEWART Two Sabetha High School business students – senior Madison Williams and sophomore Lexie Phillips – were selected as finalists in the Washburn University Be Ready! Entrepreneurship Challenge. Williams and Phillips received awards of $500 per project courtesy of the Nemaha County Commission to implement their business ideas and were honored at a luncheon on the Washburn University campus on Wednesday, Sept. 28. The Be Ready! Challenge was established to encourage high school students to pitch and implement a new idea or an innovation for an existing business. The Challenge was open to all high school students in Brown, Jackson, Nemaha and Shawnee counties. This past spring, students who registered for the competition were given the opportunity to pitch their idea to a panel of local businessmen and women, receiving valuable feedback. Students then uploaded a three-minute video pitch and submitted it to Washburn Uni-

Sabetha High School senior Madison WIlliams and sophomore Lexie Phillips were named finalists at the Washburn University “Be Ready!” Entrepreneurship contest. Submitted | Nate Bauman

versity to compete for a finalist position as selected by School of Business professors. On Wednesday, Sept. 28, the 13 finalists were invited to Washburn University campus to report on their results and share their entrepreneurial experience in a

“trade show” with the other finalists and faculty. Washburn awarded the winning student entrepreneurs a total of $10,000 in scholarships from the Washburn University School of BEREADY.8A Business.

BLOOD DRIVE

Sabetha blood drive collects 83 units HERALD REPORT

The Sabetha blood drive held on Tuesday, Oct. 4, collected 83 units. Volunteers helping with the blood drive were Lyla Edelman, Jerre Lauer, JoAnn Walton and Ercilia McNett. Sponsors for the food for donors was Printing Impressions and United Bank and Trust. Ashley L. Martinez was the only first time donor. Steven L. Edelman, Michael A. Rokey and Robert Steiner were double red donors. Other donors included the following: Stephen J. Aberle, Kaylee Rae Allen, Janice Angell, William F. Arneson, Bradley J. Baker, Helen Bauerle, Larry H. Bauerle, Sue CITY.8A Ellen Brockhoff, Megan Brucken,

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SECTION C

Meet the Candidates

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WEDNESDAY

2016 Voter Guide

SABETHA CITY COMMISSION

The Sabetha City Commission met at 6 p.m. Monday, Oct. 10. Present were Mayor Doug Clark, Commissioners Nick Aberle, Maridel Wittmer and Julie Burenheide, City Administrator Doug Allen, Assistant City Administrator Bill Shroyer and City Clerk Steve Compo. Commissioner Kenny Miller was absent. Comprehensive Plan After the Sept. 26 commission meeting, City Administrator Allen presented the city commission’s list of suggested changes to the Comprehensive Plan to the Planning Commission. The Planning Commission accepted all but one of the suggestions. While commissioners were okay with the suggestion of hiring an economic director, they wanted to remove the timeline. As written, the Planning Commission wanted this to be accomplished within one to three years of approval of the Plan. Allen said the Planning Commission wanted the timeline in because this was something they really wanted to see happen. Commissioner Aberle said he didn’t feel bound by any of the timelines in the Plan because the entire document is just a guideline for the city commission. “We can keep it [the economic director] in there, but eliminate the timeline,” Commissioner Burenheide said. “It implies we are going to hire someone in three years and we might not.” Aberle said that every action point in the Plan had a timeline associated with it so he did not feel that eliminating the timeline for this was necessary. Burenheide said that she felt that by putting the timeline on it, people would expect to have an economic director hired within that three years. Commissioners had to have three votes to pass the Plan as presented or four votes against it in order to change the Plaln without it going back to the Planning Commission. With that in mind, Mayor Clark asked for a motion to approve the Plan as presented. It was approved, 3-1. Burenheide voted against it. Dog issue Commissioners discussed an issue with a stray dog that occurred a few months ago. The stray dog bit a woman. As a result, she had to get rabies shots. The Sabetha Police Department has since caught the dog and destroyed it. The victim submitted a letter to commissioners about her dissatisfaction with the way the situation was handled. Commissioner Burenheide said there was a lack of communication with the victim when the dog was caught. “It was a bad call on the police department,” Burenheide said. “It would have given the woman peace of mind if she had been notified that it was caught.” Police Chief Robert Wahwasuck was at the meeting and agreed that the SPD should have notified the victim and assured the commission that the lack of communication would not happen again. Other issues Commissioner Wittmer brought a few issues to the table that were not on the agenda. Wittmer said she was concerned about people walking at night and

SINCE 1876

Nadine E. Champlin, Kristin G. Cole, Derek G. Deters, Amber N. Deters, Larke Breanne Edelman, Lyla M. Edelman, Melvin Edelman, Duane A. Eilert, Trenton L. Eilert, Todd J. Evans, John Hibbard Feek, Vickie J. Goodman, Rodney Grimm, Lori K. Gruber, Denise E. Hall, Beth R. Hartter, Charleen Kay Hartter, David D. Hartter, Joshua Hartter, Jed W. Hartter, Micah W. Hartter, Crystal Hartter, Kenneth L. Herbster, Ellen S. Hertzel, Gerry M. Hertzel, Wyatt Hoffman, Julie K. Holthaus, Crystal M. Hudson, Belinda J. Kellenberger, Marilyn S. Kellenberger, William M. Kent, Odetta Koch, Kay J. Krogmann, Geraldine J. Lauer, Rudolph M. Lehman, Steven R. Lukert, Sandra J. Matney, Roma Jean McCorkle,

Terri L. McKim, Susan J. Meyer, James C. Meyer, Joyce M. Meyer, Linda S. Montgomery, Brenda Nenadov, Keith G. Niehues, Alan Niehues, Ruth Oom, John P. Rebant, Gregory A. Renyer, Carol B. Rippe, Thomas J. Robinson, Alison R. Roggenkamp, Andrea M. Roggenkamp, Morris R. Rokey, Denise J. Rokey, Brian L. Rokey, Gary L. Schreiber, Leslie D. Scoby, Allan C. Spellmeier, Gloria J. Stoller, Clark David Strahm, Lorinda S. Strahm, Jocelyne V. Strahm, Joshua Tackett, Shannon M. Thompson, Randy J. Weda, Debra Denise Wenger, Jeffrey D. Wenger, Galen F. Wiltz and Ronald Wittmer. The next drive will be Tuesday, Nov. 29.

WWW.SABETHAHERALD.COM Email sabethaherald@sabethaherald.com

Board approves viability standards AMBER DETERS Years of sometimes-fiery discussions, filled board meetings and changed board members culminated at the Prairie Hills USD No. 113 Board of Education meeting Monday, Oct. 10. The board was presented with and subsequently approved a proposal for “Standards for Solvency and Viability” brought forth by the Finance Committee — comprised of board members Ed Reznicek, Kathy Lippert and Kent Saylor. See the Standards in Figure A on Page 8A of this week’s Herald. In comparison with past discussions on the same topic, this one might have seemed somewhat anti-climactic. However, when the board established the Finance Committee to work on these standards, that was the whole point. At a meeting more than a year ago, Superintendent Todd Evans suggested that the board appoint three members to a smaller committee to continue finance discussions and to eventually bring a proposal to the entire board. This would cut down on time spent during regular meetings having the same discussions that continued going nowhere, he said. The board agreed, and appointed Reznicek, Lippert and Saylor. Superintendent Evans presented the proposal to the board, explaining each point. He noted that the Finance Committee members were not in total agreement on each point, but they had agreed that the multitude of options had been narrowed enough to bring the proposal before the board as a whole. The proposal included Standards for the district as a whole, as well as individual campuses. The viability goal for both the district as a whole and individual campuses is to maintain budgets in which revenue equals expenditures — considered break-even level. However, the Standards note that if the district as a whole is meeting its standard, small campus deficits — 0 percent to less than 1.25 percent of total balanced operating budget — will be considered acceptable. Using figures for revenues and expenditures in 201415, Saylor said, 1.25 percent would have been approximately $135,000. Kuckelman asked how soon the 2015-16 figures would be available, and Evans responded that since the audit was now officially completed those figures should be ready soon. Saylor said that he already has updated the Financial Spreadsheet with the preliminary figures. Based on those figures, Axtell would be meeting the break-even level,

Volume 140 | Issue 41 3 Sections - 30 Pages

while Wetmore would have a 0.85 percent deficit. Discussion Reznicek suggested that the revenue statement be further defined by including a statement clarifying that revenue is currently figured using weighted full time equivalency enrollment. Lippert said she believes that is already how the revenue statement is understood, and as currently worded it leaves flexibility as the state’s school finance formula changes. Reznicek also suggested that he believes the standards should include the phrase “while meeting the needs of students” on the first point. Lippert said she believes that would make this a loaded document. She noted that the Strategic Plan is the overarching document the board follows, and it includes statements about student need. The Standards document, she said, it simply an evaluation of financial solvency as pointed to on the Strategic Plan. Board member Leslie Scoby agreed, saying that she believes the financial document should only include financial evaluation information. Lippert said she wrestles with the ability of the standards offering too much flexibility in regard to deficits. “When you put something down, it encourages people to rely upon it,” Lippert said. “I don’t want us to have schools relying on it being okay to have a regular and consistent deficit of $135,000, because that adds up fast. If we’re not fiscally responsible, then at the end of the day we are not doing our job.” Saylor said that, while the standards note that a small deficit will be acceptable if the district as a whole is meeting viability, it does state that the goal for each campus is to achieve the break-even level. “It just says we’re not going to have a heart attack if you have a little deficit once in awhile,” Saylor said. “I don’t think this states that we are going to be okay with it all the time.” Board member Jeff DeMint said he agreed that he does not want to see a regular, consistent deficit, but he believes it is okay for individual campuses to be “floated once in awhile” as circumstances require. Reznicek said that he would actually like to see that threshold raised from 1.25 percent to 1.5 percent. No board members responded in regard to Reznicek’s threshold suggestion. VIABILITY.8A

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community record

October 12, 2016  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  sabethaherald.com

SPECIAL SUPPLEMENTS Voter Guide - Section C

INSERTS

Garrett Country Mart

deadlines&information The Sabetha Herald is the official Newspaper for the cities of Sabetha, Morrill and Fairview and the Prairie Hills USD No. 113 School District. The Herald is published each Wednesday. Circulation for 2015 averaged 2,000 copies per week. The Herald is a member of the following: � Kansas Press Association � National Newspaper Association � Sabetha Chamber of Commerce DEADLINES � News: 10 a.m. Monday for Wednesday newspaper. � Advertising: 10 a.m. Monday for Wednesday newspaper. � Special Holiday Deadlines for News and Advertising are 5 p.m. Thursday for next Wednesday's newspaper unless otherwise noted. If the holiday falls on a Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday or Thursday, holiday deadlines apply. Holidays include the following: New Year's Day, President's Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Veterans Day, Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day.

PHOTOS � When submitting news photos, please submit by email or in person. Be sure to provide adequate information naming all persons in the photo and describing in detail what is going on in the picture. � Engagement, Wedding and Anniversary Photos are $25. The photos run two columns wide. � Anniversary Photos are $25 for (1) two-column photo, or (2) one-column photos. The charge is $35 to run (1) twocolumn photo AND (1) one-column photo. � Obituary Photos are $20. The photos run one column wide. � Birthday and Birth Photos are $10. The photos run one column wide.

EVENT COVERAGE � If event coverage is desired, please notify The Sabetha Herald at least one month before the event is scheduled to take place.

SUNDAY

MONDAY 9

Beginning at 8 a.m., Old Time Autumn at Brownville, Nebraska

11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Fairview Soup and Chili Meal, at Fairview Community Center in Fairview, with proceeds to benefit Veterans’ Dinner. 5 p.m., Free Fall Festival, at Grace Bible Church in Morrill, with free hot dogs, bonfire, hayrack rides, face painting and a bounce house 7:30 p.m., Too Young to Die Narcotics Anonymous, held at Midtown Building, First and Main Streets

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9:30 a.m. to Noon, Bible Conference at Grace Bible Church in Morrill, view more information at GraceBibleChurchMorrill.com 2 to 4 p.m., 90th Birthday Celebration for Mary Dornes, at Sabetha Community Building 4 to 7 p.m., Pancake Feed and Fall Festival, at Bern Community Center 7:30 p.m., Too Young to Die Narcotics Anonymous, held at Midtown Building, First and Main Streets

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8:30-10 a.m., Coffeehouse at Morrill Community Building

9 a.m., Sabetha Christian Women meeting, at Buzz Cafe

9 a.m., Nemaha County Commission meeting, at Nemaha County Courthouse

9-10 a.m., Coffee Hour, at Sabetha Nutrition Center

9:30 a.m., Coffee Hour at Sabetha Manor

eHerald: $27.95/year In-State Print: $41.00/year In-State Print+eHerald: $53.00/year Out-of-State Print: $48.00/year Out-of-State Print+eHerald: $60.00/year (tax included in all prices)

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6 p.m., Prairie Hills USD No. 113 Board of Education meeting, at District Office in Sabetha

FRIDAY 13

10-10:30 a.m., Rural Mobile Food Pantry Distribution, Sabetha Community Food Pantry at NorthRidge parking lot

8 a.m., Free Quit Smoking Class, at NCCHS in Seneca

Noon to 3 p.m., Game Day, at Sabetha Nutrition Center

9 a.m., Exercise Class at Sabetha Manor. Free to the public.

1 to 4 p.m., Flu Shot Clinic at Sabetha Community Hospital

9-10 a.m., Coffee Hour, at Sabetha Nutrition Center

7:30 p.m., VFW Post 7285 meeting, Sabetha VFW Hall 7:30 p.m., Women’s Bible Study at United Brethren in Christ, 301 S. 12th Street in Sabetha

SATURDAY 14

8:30-10 a.m., Coffeehouse at Morrill

Menu: Hamburger Beef Soup, Crackers, Kolache, Broccoli and Cauliflower, Salad, Sliced Peaches

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8 a.m., Brown County Commission 9 a.m., Exercise Class at Sabetha meeting, at Brown County Courthouse Manor. Free to the public.

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8:30-10 a.m., Coffeehouse at Morrill Community Building

9-10 a.m., Coffee Hour, at Sabetha Nutrition Center

9 a.m., Nemaha County Commission meeting, at Nemaha County Courthouse

Close of Business Day, Voter Registration Deadline for November General Election

9:30 a.m., Coffee Hour at Sabetha Manor

Menu: Italian Chicken, ww Roll, Scalloped Potatoes, Italian Vegetables, Strawberry Shortcake

Noon, Sabetha Chamber Meeting 6:30 p.m., Alzheimer’s Support Group, at Sabetha Community Building

10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Munchies and Mimosas at The Shoe Center in Seneca

6:30 p.m., Nemaha County Republican Party Candidate Dinner, at Bern Community Building 7 p.m., SES Fourth Grade Music Program, at SMS

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Menu: Roast Pork, Cranberry Bread, Mashed Potatoes, Brussels Sprouts, Fruit Crisp

Menu: Fish Fillets, Muffin, Buttered Potatoes, Mixed Vegetables, Raspberry Delight

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7:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., United Methodist Church Fall Bazaar

8 a.m., Free Quit Smoking Class, at Nemaha County Community Health Services in Seneca

1 to 4 p.m., Flu Shot Clinic at Sabetha Community Hospital

8:30-10 a.m., Coffeehouse at Morrill Community Building

7:30 p.m., Women’s Bible Study at United Brethren in Christ, 301 S. 12th Street in Sabetha

9 a.m., Exercise Class at Sabetha Manor. Free to the public.

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7:30 a.m. to 8 p.m., Bible Conference at Grace Bible Church in Morrill, view more information at GraceBibleChurchMorrill.com 8 a.m., Sabetha CAPS Race for the Rescues 5K, begining at Sabetha Dog Park, walk with or without pet

NUTRITION CENTER NUTRITION CENTER NUTRITION CENTER NUTRITION CENTER NUTRITION CENTER

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5 p.m., Bunco & Co. fundraiser for NCTC, at Willows in Seneca, order tickets online at www. nemahactc.org/events

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9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Axtell Pride Association’s 2nd annual Fall Craft Show, at Axtell American Legion Building

4:30 to 8 p.m., Thad Lambrecht Benefit Supper, at Bern Community Center

9-10 a.m., Coffee Hour, at Sabetha Nutrition Center

Noon to 1 p.m., Sabetha Hospital Guild meeting (284-1535) 6:30 p.m., NAMI meeting at Hiawatha Community Hospital. Call 785-7423989 for more information 7:30 p.m., Quilt Lovers Guild meeting at Seneca Library

NUTRITION CENTER NUTRITION CENTER NUTRITION CENTER NUTRITION CENTER NUTRITION CENTER Menu: Meat Loaf, Biscuit, Baked Potato, Seasoned Green Beans, Pineapple Chunks, Cake

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8 a.m., Brown County Commission 9 a.m., Exercise Class at Sabetha meeting, at Brown County Courthouse Manor. Free to the public. 8:30-10 a.m., Coffeehouse at Morrill Community Building

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9-10 a.m., Coffee Hour, at Sabetha Nutrition Center

9 a.m., Nemaha County Commission meeting, at Nemaha County Courthouse

SUBSCRIPTION RATES

THURSDAY

6:30 p.m., VFW Post 7285 Auxiliary meeting, Sabetha VFW Hall

6 p.m., Sabetha City Commission Meeting, at Sabetha City Hall

Menu: BBQ Pork Chop, Roll, Augratin Potatoes, Seasoned Cauliflower, Fruit Cup

7:30 p.m., Too Young to Die Narcotics Anonymous, held at Midtown Building, First and Main Streets

WEDNESDAY

8 a.m., Brown County Commission 9 a.m., Exercise Class at Sabetha meeting, at Brown County Courthouse Manor. Free to the public.

Menu: Chicken Tetrazzini, Noodles, ww Bread, Peas and Carrots, Mandarin Oranges, Cookies

HOW TO SUBMIT NEWS &ADVERTISING (1) Stop in our office at 1024 Main Street, Sabetha. (2) Mail the information (typed of printed legibly) to P.O. Box 208, Sabetha, KS 66534. (3) Email the news to news@sabethaherald.com; Email the advertisement to advertising@sabethaherald.com. (4) Fax the information (typed or printed legibly) to 785-284-2320.

TUESDAY

Menu: Roast Turkey, ww Bread, Baked Sweet Potato, Peas and Onions, Banana Pudding, Vanilla Wafers

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Noon to 3 p.m., Game Day, at Sabetha Nutrition Center

1 to 4 p.m., Flu Shot Clinic at Sabetha Community Hospital 7:30 p.m., Women’s Bible Study at United Brethren in Christ, 301 S. 12th Street in Sabetha

9:30 a.m., Coffee Hour at Sabetha Manor 6 p.m., Sabetha City Commission Meeting, at Sabetha City Hall

Menu: Smothered Steak, ww Roll, Mashed Potatoes, Japanese Mix Vegetables, Apricots

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8 a.m., Free Quit Smoking Class, at Nemaha County Community Health Services in Seneca

8:30-10 a.m., Coffeehouse at Morrill Community Building

Menu: Chicken and Rice Soup, Crackers, Raisin Bread, Copper Carrot Penny, Salad, Pear and Apples with Jello

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Vietnam Traveling Wall open Vietnam Traveling Wall open to public, at Ray Miller Park to public, at Ray Miller Park in Leavenworth in Leavenworth 6 to 10 p.m., Old Albany Horrorfest and Hayrack Tour

9 a.m., Exercise Class at Sabetha Manor. Free to the public. 9-10 a.m., Coffee Hour, at Sabetha Nutrition Center

12 p.m., Vietnam Traveling Wall opening ceremonies, at Ray Miller Park in Leavenworth 7 p.m., Cancer support group meeting at Morrison Speech Clinic in Hiawatha

POSTMASTER

NUTRITION CENTER NUTRITION CENTER NUTRITION CENTER NUTRITION CENTER NUTRITION CENTER

� Form 3573 should be sent to: The Sabetha Herald, P.O. Box 208, Sabetha, KS 66534.

SUBSCRIBE TODAY! Please cut along this line and return with payment.

Menu: Chicken Patty, ww Roll, Mashed Potatoes, California Blend, Plums, Brownie

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Vietnam Traveling Wall open to public, at Ray Miller Park in Leavenworth 7:30 p.m., Too Young to Die Narcotics Anonymous, held at Midtown Building, First and Main Streets

NAME: ADDRESS: CITY/STATE:

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Menu: Lasagna, W.G. Noodles, Lettuce Salad, Mandarin Oranges with Jello

NOV. 1

8 a.m., Brown County Commission 9 a.m., Exercise Class at Sabetha meeting, at Brown County Courthouse Manor. Free to the public. 8:30-10 a.m., Coffeehouse at Morrill Community Building

9-10 a.m., Coffee Hour, at Sabetha Nutrition Center

Menu: Chili Soup, Cinnamon Menu: Roast Beef, ww Bread, Menu: Salmon Loaf, Roll, Roll, Cabbage Parfait, Fruit Mashed Potatoes, Green Baked Potato, Japanese Mix Cup Beans, Strawberries and Vegetables, Pie Bananas

NOV. 2

1 to 4 p.m., Flu Shot Clinic at Sabetha Community Hospital

NOV. 3

8 a.m., Free Quit Smoking Class, at Nemaha County Community Health Services in Seneca

NOV. 4

NOV. 5

8:30-10 a.m., Coffeehouse at Morrill Community Building

9 a.m., Nemaha County Commission meeting, at Nemaha County Courthouse

9 a.m., Exercise Class at Sabetha Manor. Free to the public.

9:30 a.m., Coffee Hour at Sabetha Manor

9-10 a.m., Coffee Hour, at Sabetha Nutrition Center

4 p.m., Spooktacular Story Time at Mary Cotton Public Library

7:30 p.m., American Legion Post 126 Meeting, at Sabetha Community Building

4:30 to 5:30 p.m., Trick or Treat on Main Street

PHONE #:

NUTRITION CENTER

EMAIL:

Menu: Goulash, ww Bread, Seasoned Corn, Tropical Fruit Blend

LOCAL SUBSCRIPTIONS ❏Newspaper ONLY: $41.00 ❏Newspaper & Digital All Access: $53.00 ❏Digital All Access ONLY: $27.95

OUT-OF-STATE SUBSCRIPTIONS ❏Newspaper ONLY: $48.00 ❏Newspaper & Digital All Access: $60.00 ❏Digital All Access ONLY: $27.95

Please mark your selection and be sure your address is complete and correct.

MAIL TO: The Sabetha Herald P.O. Box 208 Sabetha, KS 66534

NOV. 6

7:30 p.m., Too Young to Die Narcotics Anonymous, held at Midtown Building, First and Main Streets

NOV. 7

NOV. 8

8 a.m., Brown County Commission 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., Ge neral Election meeting, at Brown County Courthouse 9 a.m., Exercise Class at Sabetha 8:30-10 a.m., Coffeehouse at Morrill Manor. Free to the public. Community Building 9 a.m., Sabetha Christian Women 9 a.m., Nemaha County Commission meeting, at Buzz Cafe meeting, at Nemaha County 9-10 a.m., Coffee Hour, at Sabetha Courthouse Nutrition Center 9:30 a.m., Coffee Hour at Sabetha Manor 7 p.m., CAPS meeting, basement of Community National Bank 7 p.m., Sabetha PTO meeting, at Sabetha Elementary School library

NOV. 9

10-10:30 a.m., Rural Mobile Food Pantry Distribution, Sabetha Community Food Pantry at NorthRidge parking lot

Noon to 3 p.m., Game Day, at Sabetha Nutrition Center

1 to 4 p.m., Flu Shot Clinic at Sabetha Community Hospital

NOV. 10

8:30-10 a.m., Coffeehouse at Morrill Community Building 9 a.m., Exercise Class at Sabetha Manor. Free to the public. 9-10 a.m., Coffee Hour, at Sabetha Nutrition Center

Noon, Sabetha Chamber of Commerce Meeting, at Sabetha City Hall

6:30 p.m., VFW Post 7285 Auxiliary meeting, Sabetha VFW Hall

6:30 p.m., Alzheimer’s Support Group, at Sabetha Community Building

7:30 p.m., VFW Post 7285 meeting, Sabetha VFW Hall

7 p.m., SES Third Grade Veterans Day Music Program, at Sabetha High School

7:30 p.m., Women’s Bible Study at United Brethren in Christ, 301 S. 12th Street in Sabetha

NOV. 11

7 a.m., Veterans Day Breakfast, at Buzz Cafe. Veterans eat for free, courtesy of Sabetha Memorial VFW Post No. 7285.

NOV. 12

7 a.m., Morrill Men’s Community Breakfast sponsored by Morrill churches, Old Community Center in Morrill

8 a.m., Sabetha Lions Club Paper Pick-up. Place newspapers by the curb, tied or in paper bags. No plastic bags, please


community record This Week’s Obituaries SABETHA Josh Mayfield

sabethaherald.com  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  October 12, 2016

3A

PHOTO FROM YESTERYEAR

Obituaries printed in The Sabetha Herald are printed for free up to 250 words. For anything beyond that, the charge is $.50 per word. A photo can be added for $20. For more information, contact us at 785-284-3300 or news@sabethaherald.com.

Obituary Josh Mayfield

Josh Mayfield, 43, died Saturday, Oct. 8, 2016 at Lakeside Terrace in Sabetha. Josh was born April 19, 1973, in Shawnee Mission to Ron and Sue (McQuillan) Mayfield. He had two brothers – Wade and Brett – who adored him. Josh has resided at Lakeside Terrace since 1993. He attended Nemaha County Training Center part-time in Sabetha. He is survived by his parents Ron and Sue of Papillion, Neb.; brothers, Brett (Sarah) of Cokato, Minn., and Wade (Denae) of Omaha, Neb.; nieces; nephew; his extended family at Lakeside Terrace; and many friends in Sabetha. Memorial service will be at 1 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 15, at the AC Fellowship Center. Donations in honor of Josh can be sent to Lakeside Terrace in Sabetha. The Sabetha Herald 10/12/2016

This Week’s Announcements BIRTHS Alice Eleanor Grimm

MARRIAGES Wallace-Plattner

Announcements printed in The Sabetha Herald are printed for free up to 250 words. For anything beyond that, the charge is $.50 per word. Photos can be added for an additional charge. For more information on photo charges, visit our website at http://sabethaherald.com/about/submit-anannouncement/ or contact us.

Marriage

This picture was taken was taken May 12, 1949, of babies born at the St. Anthony’s Hospital in Sabetha in 1948. Two Herald readers have made separate contacts to The Herald for help identifying mothers and/or babies in this photo. Phyllis Marmet Gall would like help identifying mothers and babies. Her address is Mrs. Gene Gall, 1000 S. Qunicy, Clinton, IL 61727. Ron and Alice Stone of Raytown, Missouri, are also interesting in identification. Alice (Berggren) Stone was one of the babies pictured. She is the daughter of Katherine and Roy (Dayton) Berggren. Ron and Alice can be contacted at ron_stone@sbcglobal.net. Submitted

Babies born in St. Anthony’s Hospital in Sabetha in 1948 Birth

Alice Eleanor Grimm

Loren and Lena Grim of Sabetha are thankful to announce the birth of their daughter, Alice Eleanor Grimm, on Tuesday, Aug. 23, 2016. She weighed 7 pounds, 15 ounces, and was 21 inches long. She is welcomed home by big brother Charlie and loved from Heaven by big brother Russell. Maternal grandparents are David and Beth Hartter of Sabetha. Maternal great grandmother is Waneta Plattner of Sabetha. Paternal grandparents are Kevin and Nita Grimm of Morrill. Paternal great grandmothers are Eleanor Baer of Eureka, Ill., and Lois Grimm of Sabetha.

90th Birthday Celebration for Mary Dornes Oct. 16, 2016 | 2 to 4 pm

SABETHA COMMUNITY BUILDING | 1116 MAIN STREET

The Sabetha Herald 10/12/2016

Bern Community Center

Pancake Feed & Fall Festival

Sunday, October 16th

FREE WILL DONATION

4:00 - 7:00 pm

Serving Pancakes with toppings, Eggs, Sausage, Coffee and Juice We will have wagon rides, bounce house, kettle corn, hot cider, quilt show, local craft booths & several games for all ages sponsored by our Bern families, businesses and clubs. Proceeds to Bern Community Center

Questions: Contact Kristin Meyer at 785-336-3846 or jakmeyer@bbwi.net or Cindy Myers at 785-336-3601

No gifts requested. Card Shower

Mary Plattner’s

90th Birthday will be celebrated on October 21st

In honor of the occasion, cards may be sent to her at: 513 Paramount, Apt. 4 | Sabetha, KS 66534

Thank You

The Prairie Hills FFA Alumni would like to thank the community for their support of our October 7 Pre Game Meal at Sabetha High School. A special thank you goes to all the Alumni and FFA Families who donated food and their time to make the night a success!

Prairie Hills FFA Alumni

Thank you!

Wallace-Plattner

The family of Betty J. Hartter would like to express their heartfelt gratitude to all who remembered her with visits, prayers, flowers, cards and memorial contributions. A special thank you to Dr. Longabaugh, Sabetha Community Hospital and the staff of the Apostolic Christian Home.

Emily Elizabeth Wallace and Broc Kolton Plattner were married on Jan. 16, 2016, at Town Square in Paola. Friend of the couple Pastor Andrew Campbell officiated the ceremony. Parents of the bride are Quentin and Jozelle Wallace of Wichita. Parents of the groom are Doug and Sue Plattner of Sabetha. Grandparents from the Sabetha area include Clayton and Miriam Strahm and the late Hank and Loree Plattner. The couple resides and works in Kansas City. The Sabetha Herald 10/12/2016

MEMORIES

Compiled by Laura Edelman from past issues of The Sabetha Herald

125 YEARS AGO

Friday, October 9, 1891 Thus, another one of the fairest of Sabetha young ladies goes away. Mr. and Mrs. Saylor will be at home to their friends at their farm near the town of Morrill where The Herald hopes richest blessings and happiness may dwell with them. Both are favorably known and greatly liked by a large circle of acquaintances in Nemaha and Brown counties. The exodus to the Salt River valley in Arizona leaves a great and aching void in Sabetha. Some go for health, some for change of scene, and climate and some for betterment of fortune. To those who go for climate there is plenty of evidence that it is a specific for asthma, and we trust they may live to a ripe, genial old age. Those who go to make their fortune, while they have our best wishes and sincerest hopes, are, we feel, less certain of finding what they seek. A Georgia mother is reported to have sold her two babies for a dollar. That would be a pretty steep price for babies indicated with such a mother’s instincts.

100 YEARS AGO

Thursday, October 12, 1916 Otto Porr and John Paulf, of Bern, captured the grand sweep prize of $400 in gold at the interstate fair at Wichita last week. In addition to the $400 the two exhibitors will receive many small premiums for individual exhibits. There were 21 other counties exhibiting from Kansas and Oklahoma. The contest was open to the world. The Sabetha boys represented Nemaha county. They exhibited products of all kinds, grains, corn, grasses, vegetables, everything in farm products. They had fierce competition, some of the best exhibitors in the business. Their winnings place Nemaha county big in the limelight.

75 YEARS AGO

Mary D

Wednesday, October 8, 1941 This town has definitely gone pioneer minded with all thoughts turned toward the Junior Chamber of Commerce Prairie Schooner Days celebration which opened this Wednesday afternoon at the city park. Townsfolk have been gathering old fashioned costumes to wear for this festival, something new in its kind to the community. Many men have been hiding behind heavy beards for the past month awaiting the Thursday night judging contest, and citizens say they have trouble recognizing some of the furry residents. Just this week many old time displays have appeared in business windows.

50 YEARS AGO

Tuesday, October 11, 1966 Three young Sabetha lads found a toothbrush belonging to Orville Smart, missing 63 year old resident of Fountain Villa in Sabetha, Saturday afternoon. The three boys, Brent Stoller, Doug Sell and Jim Christman, were walking along the Rock Island railroad tracks between Sabetha and “double-bridge” west of town when they found the toothbrush with Mr. Smart’s name on it. They reported the find to the local police who verified that it belonged to Mr. Smart. The American Legion and American Legion Auxiliary entertained guests, members, and friends to the annual Coffee Tour held at the Legion Home, Wednesday evening Sept. 28th. A good attendance enjoyed a lovely meal, and pleasant evening together.

25 YEARS AGO

Wednesday, October 9, 1991 An associate with Gernon, Collins and Burdock Attorneys has been named the new city attorney. Michael Riley was appointed to the post Sept. 30 by the Sabetha City Commission. He replaces Steve Deiter, who resigned earlier this year when he moved to Texas. Because children often think of ghosts, witches and haunted houses at Halloween, First Lutheran Church of Sabetha is planning a Halloween alternative. All children and their families are invited for a tour through the scriptures as a “fun” house that’s Bible-based is created. Called “Bible Land,” it will be set up in the church basement and will have tour guides lead small groups through rooms depicting Bible stories.

10 YEARS AGO

Wednesday, October 11, 2006 The Bern Community Theatre presented the musical production, “Forty-Five Minutes From Broadway,” Saturday evening in a dinnertheatre format, and Sunday as an afternoon matinee. On Aug 20, 2006, Bill and Susan Montgomery Hodge of 155545 Mary Ave., Fort Lupton, Colo., were riding their motorcycle near Loveland, Colo., when they were hit by a car that did not stop at a stop sign and pushed them 69 feet across the highway. Bill suffered a crushed right foot and is in a walking cast, so he is able to walk around, but has much pain. Susan’s right leg was broken two inches above her ankle and is in a removable cast so that she can remove the cast to put ice on her leg.


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October 12, 2016  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  sabethaherald.com

opinion EDITORIAL And in good news... The election, police shootings, ISIS and creepy clowns are some of the topics that are dominating the national headlines. It’s sad that the majority of these are negative. If you’re like me, I’m tired of seeing the negative so I sought out the positive news stories. Strangers raise $80,000 to buy wheelchair-friendly van for brothers who are paralyzed – Huffington Post A group of strangers raised $80,000 for Matthew and Adam Chaffee of Grand Rapids, Mich., to get a wheelchair-accessible minivan. The van is customized so the brothers can drive it on their own, which gives them more independence. The brothers were paralyzed in two separate incidents, but they remained positive. After a number of local people heard about their story and were touched by their outlook, they began raising money for the van by setting up a page online. Teacher gives student a livesaving surprise – Today The parents of Lyla Carreyn, 4, of Madison, Wisc., have been scouring the country trying to find a kidney donor match to help save their daughter’s life. When Lyla’s teacher Beth Battista, 36, heard about her condition – microscopic polyangiiltis (MPA), a rare autoimmune disorder – she decided to see if she was a match. When doctors confirmed she had the matching antibodies for Lyla, Beth surprised Lyla’s mother, Dena Carreyn, with the news. Isn’t it nice to hear some good news now and again? I wish more of these stories would top the headlines. Heather Stewart Reporter

LETTER Lack of downtown handicapped parking

Dear Editor, I am a handicapped person. I have been handicapped since 1986. On the north side of Main Street, from 6th to 11th Street there are no handicapped parking spaces. I want to know if the City of Sabetha is trying to run handicapped people out of Sabetha like they did trucks on 75 Highway. They moved 75 Highway out of town, which hurt Sabetha. I think Sabetha is hurting themselves by cutting handicapped people out. I went to eat at the new Panda restaurant, and I couldn’t find a place to park. I cannot walk half a block from a parking spot. I think Sabetha needs to think about handicapped people. If they lose the handicapped people, it will hurt Sabetha. I will be a spokesman for the handicapped people. It’s disgusting to go to town and not be able to park where you want to go. Eleanor Latham Morrill

LETTERS POLICY WRITE: Letters to the Editor, The Sabetha Herald, P.O. Box 208, Sabetha, KS 66534. EMAIL: news@sabethaherald.com We welcome letters of general interest to the community and reserve the right to edit for clarification or length. Letters should be fewer than 400 words, and writers are limited to one letter every other week. Letters are due by 10 a.m. on Monday before publication and must be signed with the writer's name, address and phone number for verification purposes. Only the name and hometown will be included in the printed letter. We do not publish anonymous letters or letters printed elsewhere.

DISCLAIMER The opinions expressed in editorial, columns or letters tot he editor do not necessarily reflect those of The Sabetha Herald or its staff. United Methodist Church

Fall Church Bazaar

Wednesday, Oct. 19 DOORS OPEN: 7:30 am - 1 pm

Turkey dinner with trimmings & homemade pie Served: 11 am - 1 pm (Free Will Donation) Baked goods, candies & crafts Quilt Drawing will be at 1 pm Make $1.00 donation per ticket at the church office or Bazaar. Bountiful Blessings Cookbook $15 available at Bazaar.

Deadline for Take-Out and Delivered Meals is Monday, Oct. 17 by 2 pm. Call 785-284-3921 to order.

COLUMNS

StudentsFirst@ks.gov

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overnor Sam Brownback is inviting comment on the development of a new K-12 funding formula in Kansas. The governor has asked Kansans to submit their comments by Nov. 30, 2016, to StudentsFirst@ks gov. Some facts to keep in mind as you consider input that would have a positive impact on the children of Prairie Hills USD No. 113: * In 2015 the Kansas Legislature voted to repeal the 1992 school finance formula, citing the complexity and unpredictability of the formula. * The “Block Grant” system passed by the legislature in 2015 expires in 2017, and a new school finance plan must be developed. * The Kansas constitution requires the Kansas Legislature to “provide for intellectual, educational, vocational, and scientific improvement by establishing and maintaining public schools...” The constitution continues to direct the state legislature to “make suitable provision for finance of the

educational interests of the state.” As Kansans consider information for providing input to the Governor, it is important to identify how schools and the future educational finance formula will be measured. The following criteria have Notes been est ablished by the from USD Kansas State Board of Edu- No. 113 cation: BY: TODD EVANS O u t c o m e s SUPERINTENDENT for Measuring Progress: • Kindergarten readiness • Individual Plan of Study focused on career interest • High school graduation rates • Postsecondary completion/ attendance • Social/emotional growth measured locally While the previous formula was considered to be complex by some, when funded it was considered to be constitutional. So, it is reason-

able to assume that some components of the previous formula will need to be present to maintain the test of constitutionality. Considering that kindergarten readiness is one of the indicators for progress, providing additional funding for programs that help prepare students for kindergarten is a reasonable expectation. The town of Sabetha and USD No. 113 has struggled with the loss of the Head Start program in this community. This loss has resulted in increased enrollment and expenditures for USD No. 113’s pre-K programs. In what way can/should resources be used to support kindergarten readiness? What would that look like in our district schools? Under the previous formula, education for kindergarten students

has only been funded for half day students. A number of years ago, in the best interest of educating children, district schools expanded their kindergarten programs to full day instruction. Parents still have the option of students going half time, but the majority are all day students. Would it be reasonable to request the state to fund all-day kindergarten? A number of school districts and various organizations were specifically invited to provide input. My desire is for the voices of USD No. 113 to be heard regarding the value we place on education. If you have any questions about the previous formula or current block grant formula, please contact me at evanst@usd113.org. In addition to emailing your input to StudentsFirst@ks.gov, please forward your input to schoolfundinginput@kasb.org. Thank you for your efforts to have a positive impact on the education of our kids! * Indicates information provided by the Kansas Association of School Boards.

Guard against identity theft, protect your finances

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n 2015 alone, more than 13 million Americans were victimized by identity theft, according to the U.S. Department of Justice. What can you do to guard your identity and protect yourself from potential financial losses? Here are some ideas to consider: Review your statements. Closely review the monthly statements from your checking and other financial accounts. If you find any unfamiliar charges, contact your bank or other financial services provider immediately. Order your credit reports. The three credit reporting agencies – TransUnion, Equifax and Experian – are each required by law to provide you one free credit report a year. Make sure your name, address and other information are correct on your credit report, and if you find old or inaccurate information, have it removed. Place a fraud alert. If you suspect you have become a victim of identity theft, place a “fraud alert” on your credit reports by contact-

ing any of the three credit reporting agencies. You can choose a short-term or long-term alert. And if you’re an active member of the military, you can request a special, one-year alert. Feed your shredder. Shred all old bank and investment s t a t e m e n t s , Edward appl ic at ion s Jones for new credit cards and any Financial ot her documents that con- Focus tain personal BY: JEFF RUSSELL information. Destroy digital data. If you have a variety of financial accounts, you’re not just creating a paper trail – you’re also establishing a digital “footprint.” So, when you sell or otherwise dispose of a computer system or hard drive, you may want to take steps to destroy personal data. You might think that simply deleting it would be sufficient, but techsavvy identity thieves can “unde-

lete” files or recover information from a formatted drive. However, products are available that allow you to completely wipe out data on hard drives. Change passwords. It’s a good idea to change your internet passwords every so often – especia l ly t hose passwords that provide access to financial accounts. Leave your Social Security card home. Snagging someone’s Social Security number is a real “catch” for identity thieves, so do everything you can to thwart them. And you can start by leaving your Social Security card safely at home – after all, there’s probably never a good reason to bring it out, anyway. In fact, be wary of anyone, or any business, that asks for your Social Security number, either in person or online. Except

for a few obvious exceptions, such as your tax preparer, most reputable businesses don’t need to know anything about your Social Security information. Watch for “phishers.” If you’ve ever gotten an e-mail, supposedly from your bank, advising you that your account will be “frozen” unless you provide personal details about your account, it’s a good bet that someone is “phishing” for this information – and they’re using the “freezing” threat as bait. What’s particularly alarming is that these “phishers” have gotten quite good at duplicating logos and using official-sounding language. However, a legitimate bank would never threaten you this way with an e-mail, so, if you get such a message, contact the bank’s fraud department. You can go a long way toward protecting yourself against identity theft by following these suggestions — so put them to work soon.


opinion

sabethaherald.com  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  October 12, 2016

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COLUMNS

Work garden soil in the fall

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all is the preferred time to prepare garden soil for next spring’s vegetable garden. Spring is often wet making it difficult to work soil without forming clods that remain the rest of the season. Fall usually is drier allowing more time to work the soil when it is at the correct soil moisture content. Even if you work soil wet in the fall and form clods, the freezing and thawing that takes place in the winter will break them down, leaving a mellow soil the following spring. Insects often hide in garden debris. If that debris is worked into the soil, insects will be less likely to survive the winter. Diseases are also less likely to overwinter if old plants are worked under. Also, garden debris will increase the organic matter content of the soil. Working the debris into the soil is easier if you mow the old vegetable plants several times to reduce the size of the debris. Fall is an excellent time to add organic matter. Not only are organic materials usually more available in the fall (leaves, rotten hay or silage, grass clippings) but fresher materials can be added in the fall than in the spring because there is more time for them to break down before planting. As a general rule, add two inches of organic material to the surface of

On the Extension Line BY: MATT YOUNG BROWN COUNTY EXTENSION

the soil and till it in. Be careful not to over till. You should end up with particles the size of grape nuts or larger. If you work garden soil into the consistency of dust, you have destroyed the soil structure. Tree Leaves and Turf It’s that time of year again. Leaves are rapidly falling from deciduous trees so it’s a good time to stop and think about options for handling the litter. Although a scattering of leaves won’t harm the lawn, excessive cover prevents sunlight from reaching turfgrass plants. Turf left in this state for an extended period will be unable to make the carbohydrates needed to carry it through the winter. There are options for dealing with the fallen leaves other than bagging them up and putting them out for the trash collector. Composting is a great way to handle the refuse. Compost can then be used in the vegetable garden and flowerbeds. If you do

Getting the skinny on carbs not compost, you can mow leaves with a mulching mower and let shredded leaves filter into the turf canopy. A side-discharge mower also will work, but it won’t shred the leaves as thoroughly. This method will be most effective if you do it often enough that leaf litter doesn’t become too thick. Mow while you can still see grass peeking through the leaves. You may wonder whether this practice will be detrimental to the lawn in the long run. Research at Michigan State University in which they used a mulching mower to shred up to about one pound of leaves per square yard of lawn (one pound is equal to approximately six inches of leaves piled on the grass) for five consecutive years, found no long-term effects of the shredded leaves on turf quality, thatch thickness, organic content of the thatch, or soil test results (pH, nutrients, etc.). If you mow leaves and have a cool-season lawn, it makes sense to be on a fall nitrogen fertilization program and core-aerate in the fall (things you should be doing anyway). If you have a warmseason lawn, you can still use this technique but wait to fertilize and core-aerate until next late May or early June.

Letting turf grow tall before winter

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n the surface, allowing turfgrass mowing heights to exceed typically recommended heights before winter sets in might seem reasonable. The thinking typically is that the extra foliage will insulate plant crowns to provide them some extra winter hardiness. If mowing height has been lower than it should have been all summer, allowing turf to get a little taller might be fine. If you’ve been mowing at an appropriate height, continue to do so! Allowing turf height to exceed typically recommended mowing heights does little, if anything to increase winter hardiness and can actually increase winter diseases such as snow mold when turf gets laid over and matted down The best way to increase cold tolerance is to increase plant health going in to winter via

Crops & Soils BY: DAVID HALLAUER MEADOWLARK EXTENSION DISTRICT

the use of good fertility, watering and mowing programs year round! That may mean a soil test and appropriate fertilizer applications (the second most important fertilizer application window for cool season turf grasses: November), watering if conditions are dry, and mowing at a normally recommended height. For tall fescue laws, that’s two and a half to three and a half inches and two to three inches in height for bluegrass species. If you stay within these recommended

ranges throughout the season, turf should be in good shape for winter. Grain storage considerations Whether it be harvest time savings, the ability to better market grain – or both – the value of on farm grain storage capacity to producers is great. It’s only great, however, if storage results in good quality grain exiting the bin! One of the better clearinghouses I’ve come across for grain storage information is from the CropWatch site at the University of Nebraska at http://cropwatch. unl.edu/grainstorage2. It’s a great resource for everything from aeration to emergency storage, with links to information from a number of other states as well. If you are storing grain – it’s worth a look!

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ith so many fallacies about carbohydrates out there today, fall is a nice time to discuss the confusion surrounding carbs. Low carb diets and books targeting grains and wheat have given carbohydrates a bad rap. However, when it comes to the health of carbs, the devil is in the details. Carbohydrates are made up of short or long chains of carbons and their length and shape determines the type of carbohydrate. Carbohydrates are classified into two main categories: simple and complex. Each type also has subcategories such as monosaccharides, disaccharides, starches and fiber. Carbohydrates can be found in a variety of foods from bread, beans, fruit and milk to cookies, soft drinks and pie. Grains provide many nutrients vital for health. Eating whole grains as a part of a healthy diet has been shown to reduce the risk of different chronic diseases. Whole grains are foods that are made with all parts of the grain kernel (the bran, germ and endosperm). Refined grains have been put through a process that removes parts of the kernel, mean-

Nutrition & Finance BY: CINDY WILLIAMS MEADOWLARK EXTENSION DISTRICT

ing fiber, iron, B vitamins, and even antioxidants are lost. When shopping for whole grains be sure to find the words whole as the first ingredient. For example, wheat bread does not mean whole wheat bread. Just because you are eating whole grain spaghetti or brown rice, does not mean that you can go overboard. The amount of grains you need each day depends on your age, sex and physical activity level. Someone who requires 2,000 calories per day should aim for six ounces of grains each day, with at least three ounces being whole grains. One ounce of grains equals one slice of bread, one cup of cereal, two cup of pasta, rice, and oatmeal, and two English muffin or bun. Try searching beyond the bread

isle for other whole grain options. Wild rice, brown rice and black rice are great ways to add variety to your plate. Ancient grains such as amaranth, quinoa, farro and teff are also gaining popularity in the whole grain world. Consider making the recipe listed below that uses farro. It is a grain that is very chewy and has a nutty flavor that is perfect for salads, side dishes and soups. Farro can be cooked just like pasta and is a good source of fiber, protein and iron. Mediterranean Farro Salad (makes six servings) 3 Tablespoons red wine vinegar 2 Tablespoons olive oil 1 cup cooked farro 2 cup Kalamata olives, pitted and halved 1/3 cup red onions, chopped 1 cup cherry tomatoes, sliced or quartered 1 cup cucumbers, diced 2 cup feta cheese crumbles Salt and pepper to taste Combine vinegar, oil and farro in large bowl and stir. Add olives, onions, tomatoes, cucumbers and feta. Toss to combine. Refrigerate for at least two hours before serving.

Weaning time

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awling calves. Heard any lately? There’s been considerable research on the best method to wean calves — complete removal, fenceline weaning and more. Whatever method you choose, it should best suit your needs and minimize weight loss, sickness and stress. Weaning calves is mostly about common sense. Provide palatable grass hay, start them off slowly on grain, if you want them to gain. Provide salt and mineral and keep a watchful eye, for sickness. Pre-weaning vaccinations are preferred. If not done then, vaccinate the day of weaning. Your vet can help you with your health pro-

Fenceline BY: JODY HOLTHAUS MEADOWLARK EXTENSION DISTRICT AGENT

gram, but usually they are given Blackleg, IBR, BVD and RSV. The vet might suggest deworming, lice and grub control. Don’t mix cattle from different sources, if you can help it. Weaning is a big stress on calves. Research shows that having visual

contact with mother cow, can relieve some stress. Fenceline weaning works, as well as the nose flaps. Using the nose flaps, be sure to follow the directions, they should not be left on more than five days, they can create sores, if left in too long. They aren’t 100 percent, sometimes calves can figure out how to get them off. We have used them, and it sure seems to help with the amount of bawling. Some of the research I heard about this summer suggests the cows stress out just as bad as the calves. For that, I guess fenceline weaning is the best.

Get moving

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dults should get at least 30 minutes of moderateintensity activity such as brisk walking on five or more days a week, according to recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Here are some ideas to get you moving: • Walk, run and play with children or grandchildren. • At work, take a walking break instead of a coffee break. • Take the stairs instead of the elevator. • Walk to lunch with a friend.

Family Life BY: NANCY NELSON MEADOWLARK EXTENSION DISTRICT

Set a good example. Be active and get your family to join in. Play with the kids or pets. Go for a walk and enjoy the fall foliage. Have an activity party. Plan the next birthday party around physical activity. Consider bowling or

a skating. Try backyard Olympics or relay races. Give gifts that encourage physical activity, such as active games or sport equipment. When outdoor temperatures drop, layer clothing and exercise outside. Choose undergarments that draw perspiration away from the body, and outer layers that are wind- and water-proof. Exercise during the day when temperatures are moderate. Exercise with a friend for safety and socializing. Always carry identification with you.


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October 12, 2016  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  sabethaherald.com

local&area BROWN COUNTY GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY

COURT UPDATES

McKenney and Berglund sentenced

Buffalo Bill Cody program is set Submitted by Greg Newlin An icon of America’s old west, Buffalo Bill Cody spent a good deal of his life in the northeast part of the Kansas Territory. Join us for an interesting freeto-the-public evening as we learn more about this hero from Doniphan Countian Steve Gringery at the 7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 20, meeting of the Brown County Genealogical Society, at 116 South Seventh in Hiawatha across the street west from the Brown County Courthouse.

AMERICAN RED CROSS

Blood drive to be held in Seneca The American Red Cross urges eligible donors to give blood to support cancer patients and other patients during Breast Cancer Awareness Month this October. Area residents will have the opportunity to donate from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 19, at Nemaha Central High School at 214 N. 11th Street in Seneca. Cancer patients may need blood products during chemotherapy, surgery or treatment for complications. To make an appointment to give blood, download the Red Cross Blood Donor App, visit redcrossblood.org or call 1-800RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767). Donors are encouraged to make appointments and complete the RapidPass online health history questionnaire at redcrossblood. org/rapidpass to save time when donating.

HEATHER STEWART

This group tours the Wenger Manufacturing facility in downtown Sabetha during the Kansas Manufacturing Day statewide kick-off event on Friday morning, October 7. Wenger was one of four locations statewide chosen to host a kick-off event for Manufacturing Day. Tim Kellenberger | Herald

Manufacturing Day at Wenger TOWN AND COUNTRY VETERINARY CLINIC P.C.

Auburn Veterinary Clinic receives grant Submitted by Kristin Bohling Town and Country Veterinary Clinic P.C. of Auburn, Neb., recently announced that it has been selected as a recipient of the Veterinary Services Grant. Town and Country Veterinary Clinic P.C. is now able to travel to the Sabetha area and anywhere within an 80-mile radius of the clinic. This grant was newly implemented in 2016 with the Farm Bill through USDA and National institute of Food and Agriculture. The Veterinary Services Grant Program (VSGP) was created to help relieve rural veterinary shortage situations where updated equipment would not otherwise be affordable to rural clinics. Grants through this program were made available on a competitive basis to qualified entities to support development, implementation and sustainability of veterinary services through education, training, recruitment, placement and retention of veterinarians,

veterinary technicians, and students of veterinary medicine and veterinary technology. The grant also serves to establish or expand rural veterinary practices. Two grants were fully funded in 2016, with Town and Country Veterinary Clinic P.C. being the recipient of one. The grant provided $124,760 for use on livestock equipment that would help the clinic remain sustainable and be able to expand livestock services to serve a wider area of Southeast Nebraska and Northeast Kansas. The funds are being used to purchase a mobile veterinary facility, portable hydraulic chute with tilt table capabilities, portable digital X-ray system for large and small animals, a new transducer (probe) for ultrasound of small ruminant (sheep and goat) pregnancy detection and horse and cattle abdominal ultrasound diagnostics, a new ultrasound machine for pregnancy detection in cattle, and laparoscopic equipment for insemination of

small ruminants (sheep and goats) and dogs. This new equipment will allow us to expand our services and our service area. Grant recipients were chosen from a very competitive list of clinics nationwide. Each clinic had to write a grant explaining the financial need for the equipment and how each piece would be utilized to ensure livestock health solutions remained available in this area. Input from others in the community was highly valued when deciding which pieces of equipment were most needed to help the clinic sustain and expand its services. With acceptance of the grant, Dr. Kristin Bohling is required to complete a minimum number of hours per week working with livestock and producers for the next three years. Quarterly reports will be completed to assess how the equipment is helping the clinic remain financially viable to be able to provide services for years to come.

James McKenney, 50, of Sabetha was sentenced to 13 months in the Kansas Department of Corrections (KDOC), suspended to 12 months supervised probation. Earlier in the year, McKenney pled no contest to count three, criminal threat, count six, possession of drug paraphernalia, and count seven, interference with a law enforcement officer. Counts one, two, four and five were dismissed. McKenney was also ordered to pay $1,853.03 in fines, fees and costs. McKenney was charged with aggravated assault, two counts of criminal threat, possession of methamphetamines, possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia and interference with law enforcement after a five-

hour standoff – which occurred on March 14 – involving multiple police agencies, including the Sabetha Police Department, Kansas Highway Patrol, Nemaha County Sheriff ’s Office, Brown County Sheriff ’s Office and Hiawatha Police Department. Randy Berglund Randy Duane Berglund, 32, of Lawrence was found guilty of aggravated battery and was sentenced to 52 months in the KDOC and was ordered to pay $338 in fines and fees. Berglund was arrested by the Nemaha County Sheriff ’s Office on Wednesday, Jan. 13, on a Nemaha County warrant for aggravated battery after he was charged in connection with a physical altercation – which occurred in December 2015 – involving a baseball bat.

DELAWARE WRAPS

WRAPS seeks applications for cost share funding Submitted by Kerry Wedel Coordinator The Delaware River WRAPS (Watershed Restoration and Protection Strategy) provides cost share funds for installing best management practices on agricultural lands in designated priority areas of the Delaware River watershed. The WRAPS cost share program helps landowners meet conservation goals while reducing sediment, nutrient and bacterial pollution of streams and lakes. Best management practices eligible for cost-share funding include: • Cropland practices that reduce sediment and nutrient pollution from crop fields. Examples include planting cover crops, grassed waterways, riparian buffers, sediment basins, establishing permanent vegetation and terraces. • Livestock practices that reduce nutrient and bacterial pollution from livestock operations. Examples include vegetative buffers, relocation of feeding sites, fencing, off-stream watering systems and rotational grazing. • Gully erosion control practices that reduce sediment pollution from eroding gullies in riparian

areas. Examples include sediment basins or other grade stabilization structures. • Streambank stabilization practices that reduce sediment loading from eroding streambanks. Examples include cedar tree revetments and riparian forest buffers. Interested landowners should apply now to take advantage of this program. Applications are reviewed and funding decisions made every six to eight weeks by a Stakeholder Leadership Team comprised of area landowners, producers and natural resource professionals. The next team meeting is Nov. 1. The Delaware WRAPS does not fund projects on sod-busted fields. Contact Kerry Wedel, Delaware River WRAPS Coordinator, at 785-284-3422 or kwedel@ delawarewraps.com, or visit the Delaware River WRAPS website at www.delawarewraps.com to get more information on cost share rates, program guidelines and to obtain an application form. Information and application forms are also available at conservation district offices in Atchison, Brown, Jackson, Jefferson and Nemaha counties.

FIRE PREVENTION WEEK

HATS OFF TO LIFE

Check smoke alarms this week

Group gathers for Falls City Life Chain

Submitted by Kevin Doel During this year’s Fire Prevention Week, Oct. 9-15, the Office of the State Fire Marshal urges all Kansas residents to know how old their smoke alarms are, and to replace them every 10 years Does your home have a smoke alarm? According to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), the answer is likely yes. NFPA research shows that most American homes have at least one. But do you know how old your smoke alarms are? If you’re like most people, you’re probably not so sure. “A working smoke alarm can save your life, but if it has expired and is no longer effective, that smoke alarm will give you a false sense of safety,” says Doug Jorgensen, State Fire Marshal for the State of Kansas. “That’s why we’re making a concerted effort to educate Kansans about the overall importance of smoke alarms, and that they do have a life limit.” NFPA 72, National Fire Alarm Code(r), requires smoke alarms

be replaced at least every 10 years, but because the public is generally unaware of this requirement, many homes have smoke alarms past their expiration date, putting people at increased risk. To find out how old your smoke alarm is and its expiration date, simply look on the back of the alarm where the date of manufacture is marked. The smoke alarm should be replaced 10 years from that date (not the date of purchase). Smoke alarms should be tested monthly, and batteries should be replaced once a year or when they begin to chirp, signaling that they’re running low. On Saturday, Oct. 15, the Office of the State Fire Marshal will join with SafeKids Kansas to encourage families throughout the state to participate in Home Fire Drill Day. On this day, every family should test their smoke alarms and practice their escape plan. Information on home fire safety, including how to diagram and practice an escape plan, is available at

FireMarshal.ks.gov/firesafety<http:// firemarshal.ks.gov/firesafety. For more information on smoke alarms and this year’s Fire Prevention Week campaign, “Don’t Wait: Check the Date! Replace Smoke Alarms Every 10 Years”, visit FireMarshal.ks.gov/fpw<http://www. firepreventionweek.org.

Seneca Twin

THEATRE STARTING FRIDAY

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Submitted by Joan Stoller A silent prayerful stand against abortion was held Sunday afternoon, Oct. 2, along Harlan Street in Falls City, Neb., as people in the community participated in the Life Chain. About 90 people enjoyed the beautiful autumn afternoon from 2:30 to 3:30 p.m. in silent prayer holding 18 inch by 22 inch signs that read “Adoption: The Loving Option”, “Abortion Hurts Women,” “Jesus Forgives And Heals” and “Lord, Forgive Us and Our Nation.” The chain stretched on both sides of Harlan Street from 14th Street to 25th Street. The Life Chain is a nationwide pro-life event held annually on the first Sunday in October. This year

nearly 1,800 chains were expected, making the Life Chain one of the most widespread pro-life events in the country. The Life Chain concept uses the cooperation of local churches to bring their parishioners to participate as an extension of the Sunday service. It emphasizes silence and prayer reparation for the 1.2 million abortions performed each year in the United States Prior to the event, participants gathered at First United Methodist Church to pick up signs and for a short prayer service. Jim Siefred and Pastor John Hogue of First United Methodist Church welcomed everyone to this year’s Life Chain. A short video titled, “The Miracle of Life” was shown. A responsive prayer was lead

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by Pastor Tim Boatright of Good News Assembly of God and he introduced the members of Falls City Friends for Life. Father Oldham closed in prayer. Phil Froeschl informed everyone of the Life Chain guidelines upon dismissal. Members of Falls City Friends for Life who planned this year’s Life Chain, besides Pastor Boatright and Froeschl, are Dorothy Kirkendall, Trudy Burenheide, Joyce Hundley, Deb Holys, Karen Berry, Nic Sikora and Steve and Joan Stoller. More information concerning the Life Chain can be found on the internet at www.lifechain.net and Falls City Friends for Life can be found at www.facebook.com/FCFriendsLife.

OCT. 12th OCT. 19th OCT. 26th

NOV. 2nd NOV. 9th

COST IS $30.00. WE WLL BILL YOUR INSURANCE

Local Ch. 2: Sunday - 4 pm Repeated: Wednesdays - 12 pm Dish Network - Ch. 239 Sunday - 6 am Direct TV - Ch. 307 Sunday - 6 am

October Topics

Oct. 2: The Church Jesus Built Oct. 9: Just a Christian Oct. 16: The Church of Christ Oct. 23: Membership in the Church Oct. 30: Why I am a Member

Church of Christ Third and Oregon • Sabetha


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sabethaherald.com  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  October 12, 2016

GOVERNING BODY

GOVERNING BODY

Nemaha County Commission The Board of Nemaha County Commissioners met in regular session on Monday, Oct. 3, in the Commissioner’s Room of the Nemaha County Courthouse. Commissioners present were Chairman Gary Scoby, Tim Burdiek and Dennis Henry. Also present were Road and Bridge/Solid Waste Supervisor Dennis Ronnebaum, Office Manager Kathy Haverkamp and County Clerk Mary Kay Schultejans recording the minutes. Sheriff Rich Vernon and Secretary Amy Lierz, Ronnebaum, Haverkamp, Noxious Weed/ Emergency Preparedness Director Todd Swart, Deputy Treasurer Janell Niehues, Attorney Secretary DeeAnn Fangman, Senior Services/Public Transit Director Diane Yunghans, Appraiser Betty Roeder, Register of Deeds Roxann Holthaus, Schultejans, Payroll Clerks Sandy Koelzer and Mandy Sudbeck came before the board for a quarterly Department Head meeting. Discussion was held concerning the county’s health insurance plan for 2017. District Court Clerk Amy Boeckman requested permission to remove the baseboard heating

in the District Court Office and the drinking fountain just outside the District Court Office. Eisenbarth Plumbing submitted a quote for this work in the amount of $1,382. Commissioners advised Boeckman to get a breakdown of this quote from Eisenbarth Plumbing. Jerry Stallbaumer with AHRS Construction, Inc. came before the board to let commissioners know that they have begun work on the additional parking on the west side of the Courthouse and that they have come across several wet spots while digging. Commissioners advised Stallbaumer to work with Ronnebaum to fill these spots with rock. Deb Henry, Ross Mosteller, Marissa Randel and Caleb Durland were present on behalf of the Nemaha County 4-H program to update commissioners concerning this program and to request that the commissioners proclaim this week as National 4-H Week in Nemaha County. Commissioners approved this request and signed the proclamation as presented. County Attorney Brad Lippert discussed with the commission a proposed amendment to the Nemaha County Neighborhood

Brown County Commission Revitalization Plan. Roeder joined this discussion as well. The proposed amendment to the plan died for lack of a motion to approve it. Commissioners approved the purchase and installation of a new garage door for the storage room at the Nemaha County Community Building in the amount of $777.97 from Stallbaumer Lumber and Hardware. Department Reports Ronnebaum advised the board that they are repairing a few more places along county blacktop roads with blade patch this week. The crew is hauling rock and hauling dirt for the backfill of Bridge H-9. Vernon advised the board that they booked in five individuals into the jail this past week and are currently holding five inmates in the jail. Vernon also presented the commissioners with an estimate for remodeling the old jail to be used for evidence storage. Commissioners advised Vernon to move forward with this remodeling plan. Vernon asked for an executive session with commissioners. Commissioners decided to hold a 10-minute executive session to discuss non-elected personnel.

Present for the executive session was the Board of Commissioners, Vernon and Schultejans. No action was taken by the board following the executive session. Yunghans came before the board to update commissioners regarding the increase in income that her department is seeing due to the expansion of the Transportation services provided in Nemaha County. Yunghans also advised commissioners know that on the van they were just given needs repair work done to the hood. Yunghans said that Dave’s Body Shop submitted a quote for this work in the amount of $1,400 and that the county will be responsible for paying 30 percent of this amount. Also at the meeting: The board reviewed and approved the vouchers and warrants which were submitted by the different departments that were paid at the end of September. The board reviewed and approved the minutes from the Sept. 26 meeting. The commissioners met Monday, Oct. 10. These minutes were not available at The Herald’s press time.

NEMAHA COUNTY DISTRICT COURT CRIMINAL CASES FINISHED (DISMISSAL INCLUDED) Casey Eastman of Oneida, pled no contest to Count 1, domestic battery, sentenced to six months in Nemaha County Jail, suspended to 12 months unsupervised probation. Ordered to pay fines and fees. Casey Eastman of Oneida, probation violations determined, probation extended 12 months. Randy Duane Berglund of Lawrence, found guilty of aggravated battery, sentenced to 52 months in Kansas Department of Corrections (KDOC). Ordered to pay $338 fines and fees. Anthony Leftwich of Dawson, Neb., pled no contest to count one aggravated battery, and count two criminal threat, sentenced to 55 months in KDOC. Ordered to

pay fines, fees and restitution of $334,048.50. James McKenney of Sabetha, plead no contest to count three, criminal threat, count six possession of drug paraphernalia, and count seven, interference with a law enforcement officer. Counts one, two, four and five are dismissed. Sentenced to 13 months in the Kansas Department of Corrections, suspended for 12 months supervised probation. Ordered to pay $1,853.03 fines, fees and costs. Steven Thorne of Kelly, probation violations determined, probation extended 11 months. SMALL CLAIMS FINISHED Sabetha Community Hospital vs. Katrina Belflower of Sabetha, judgment for plaintiff in the amount of $627.44 plus cost and

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interest. Merit Bank vs. Marcus E. Henninger of Sabetha, judgment for plaintiff in the amount of $1,624.18 plus cost and interest. Randy Slier of Frankfort vs. Mike Bailey of Centralia, judgment for plaintiff in the amount of $2,000 plus costs and interest. MARRIAGE LICENSES ISSUED Justin Perry, 37, of Seneca, and Cheyenne Rhoads, 25, of Seneca.. TRAFFIC CASES Matthew Schumann of Netawaka, speeding 65/55, $153 fines and fees. Austin Stallbaumer of Centralia, failure to yield to right of way at stop sign, $183 fines and fees. Larry Wilson of Olathe, speeding 74/65, $153 fines and fees.

TRAFFIC DIVERSIONS Jeana Ronnebaum of Axtell, speeding 75/60, $233 fines, fees and costs. Ross Talley of Soldier, failure to report an accident, $308 fines, fees and costs. Joseph Kieffer of Marysville, speeding 60/40, $313 fines, fees and costs. James Stewart of Bluffton, S.C., speeding 83/65, $301 fines, fees and costs. Christine Fast of Massena, Iowa, speeding 82/65, $295 fines, fees and costs. Robert Stansell of Independence, speeding 74/65, $203 fines, fees and costs. Daniel Lavoie of Powhattan, speeding 80/65, $183 fines, fees and costs.

The Board of Brown County Commissioners met in regular session on Monday, Oct. 3. Commissioners present were Chairman Warren Ploeger, Steve Roberts and Keith Olsen. Also present were County Clerk Melissa Gormley and Deputy County Clerk Dawn Boyles. County Attorney Kevin Hill was present for a portion of the meeting. Commissioners approved the Sept. 30 minutes. Sheriff Merchant reported that there are 16 inmates – 11 males and five females – in the County Jail. Merchant also updated the commission on the construction of the new storage shed located at the Sheriff ’s Department. Jeremy Forkenbrock with Horton EMS requested the approval of $81,885 for the purchase of a 2017 Osage Type I modular ambulance remount with a 2017 Ford F-350, 4x4, diesel chassis by Osage Ambulances.

The commissioners spoke with Hill about the sale of a building that is currently owned by Brown County that was deeded from the Historical Society. Hill read the state statutes regarding sales made by the county. Roberts will speak with the Historical Society and bring back information to the Oct. 10 meeting. Gormley discussed with the commissioners the current Brown County policy on jury duty. The current policy is vague, and Gormley asked for clarification. Hill suggests we pay regular pay for time missed. Sam Kirkpatrick and Doreen Hull with Cobbs Allen Representatives visited with commissioners regarding the employee benefits pool Midwest Public Risk has to offer. The commissioners met again on Monday, Oct. 10. These minutes were not available at The Herald’s press time.

GOVERNING BODY

Morrill City Council Submitted by Linda Hill City Clerk The Morrill City Council met in regular session Monday, Sept. 19, with members Mary Meyer, Miles Ploeger, Dan Halstead, Todd Gruber and Robert Wahwasuck present. Mayor Roger Price presided. Superintendent Lee Wymer also was present. Minutes and vouchers were approved. Mark Backer asked if the city would consider giving the businesses a break in the electric rate. Council said they would look into it. Discussed was the trash service. It was decided to contact the area trash companies to see if they would submit a bid. It was decided to contact the individual who enforces another town’s ordinances to see if they would be interested in enforcing the city’s codes. The 90 days after the hearing for

a structure has ended. The owner did not present a plan concerning the structure. It was decided to contact the city attorney to get advice on the best way to handle the situation of the structure. It was decided to send the owner a notice to appear at the next meeting. Wymer said the substation transformers had been picked up. A check had been received for the remainder of the credit from the previous transformers that had been sold. Concerning the water, Wymer stated he has been flushing the water lines and has overflowed the tower. Wymer also said he needs tires for the line truck. He was instructed to get three estimates to present at the next meeting. After reviewing the delinquent accounts, it was decided to shut off seven services if payments are not made.

Published in The Sabetha Herald on Wednesday, October 12, 2016

LEGAL NOTICE ORDINANCE 1514 AN ORDINANCE AMENDING IN PART PORTIONS OF THE CURRENT CODE OF THE CITY OF SABETHA, KANSAS, REGULATING AND PROHIBITING LOUD AND EXCESSIVE NOISES WITHIN THE JURISDICATION OF THE CITY OF SABETHA, KANSAS. Be it ordained by the Governing Body of the City of Sabetha, Kansas: Section 1. That Chapter XI, Article II. of the Code of the City of Sabetha is hereby amended by the addition of Section 11-206 to Section 11-211, including a repeal of any other provisions of said City Code which are inconsistent with the provisions herein. Section 2. That Sections 11-206 to Sections 11-211 of the Code of the City of Sabetha shall read as follows: 11-206 - Loud, disturbing noises—Prohibited. It shall be unlawful for any person to make, continue or cause to be made or continued any excessive, unnecessary or unusually loud noise or any noise which unreasonably either annoys, disturbs, injures or endangers the comfort, repose, health, peace or safety of others within the limits of the city. 11-207 - Same—Unnecessary noise standard. The following acts, among others, are declared to be loud, disturbing and unnecessary noises in violation of section 11-205, but said enumeration shall not be deemed to be exclusive, to-wit: (1) Radios, phonographs, etc. The playing, using, operating or permitting to be played, used or operated any radio receiving set, musical instrument, phonograph or other machine or device for the producing or reproducing of sound in such manner as to disturb the peace, quiet and comfort of the neighboring inhabitants or at anytime with louder volume than is necessary for convenient hearing by the person or persons who are in the room, vehicle, or on the property upon which such machine or device is operated and who are voluntary listeners thereto. The operation of any such set, instrument, phonograph, machine or device between the hours of 11:00 p.m. and 7:00 a.m. in such a manner as to be plainly audible at a distance of 50 feet from the building, structure, vehicle or property upon which it is located shall be prima facie evidence of a violation of section 11-205. (2) Loudspeakers, amplifiers for advertising. The playing, using, operating or permitting to be played, used or operated any radio receiving set, musical instrument, phonograph, loudspeaker, sound amplifier or other machine or device for the producing or reproducing of sound which is cast upon the public streets for the purpose of commercial advertising or attracting the attention of the public to any building or structure. (3) Animals, birds, etc. The keeping of any animal or bird which, by causing frequent or long-continued noise, shall disturb the comfort or repose of any persons in the vicinity. 11-208 - Same—Factors to be considered. The factors which shall be considered in determining whether a violation of Section 11-205 exists shall include, but shall not be limited to, the following: (1) The volume of the noise. (2) The intensity of the noise. (3) Whether the nature of the noise is usual or unusual. (4) Whether the origin of the noise is natural or unnatural. (5) The volume and intensity of the background noise, if any. (6) The proximity of the noise to residential sleeping facilities. (7) The nature and zoning of the area within which the noise emanates, as well as where the noise can be heard. (8) The density of inhabitation of the area within which the noise emanates. (9) The time of the day or night the noise occurs. (10) The duration of the noise. (11) Whether the noise is recurrent, intermittent or consistent. (12) Whether the noise is produced by a commercial or noncommercial activity. 11-209 - Same—Exemptions. The following uses and activities shall be exempt from the provisions of Section 11-205: (1) Noises emanating from a park or similar open space owned and maintained by a governmental entity. (2) Noise resulting from activities permitted by law and for which

NEMAHA COUNTY SHERIFF

a license or permit or other authorization has been granted by a governmental entity. 11-210 - Same—Application for special permit. (a) A person may apply for a permit for an exemption from the provisions of Section 11-205 for a specific date and time by completing an application on the form provided by the city. The application shall be accompanied by a nonrefundable $25.00 application fee and shall be submitted at least seven days in advance of the date of the exemption requested on the application. (b) A permit shall only allow an exemption from the provisions of Section 11-205 on Fridays and Saturdays, between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 10:45 p.m., and on Sundays, between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 8:00 p.m. Provided that, a permit may be issued for the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 10:45 p.m. on the day immediately preceding Memorial Day; July 3; the day immediately preceding Labor Day; and December 31, regardless of the day of the week. Further, a permit may be issued for July 4, Memorial Day, Labor Day and January 1, between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 10:45 p.m., unless such holiday falls on a weekday, and then the permit shall only be issued between 8:00 a.m. and 8:00 p.m. (c) Any permit issued by the city administrator, or his designee, may include conditions that the city administrator, or his designee, deems necessary to minimize the adverse effects of the noise upon the community or the surrounding neighborhood. Such conditions may include an occupancy limit for the event or location. All conditions shall be listed on the permit, and the permit holder shall conspicuously display the permit during the permitted activity, so it is readily visible from the exterior of the premises. Further, the permit holder shall conspicuously display a sign, provided by the city, outside the premises, stating that a noise permit has been issued and indicating the date and hours for which it was issued. The sign shall be posted 24 hours prior to the permit start time, and shall be promptly removed following the expiration of the permit. (d) The city administrator, or his designee, or an officer of the City of Sabetha Police Department, may revoke a permit, during the permitted activity, in the following circumstances: (1) If the conditions of the permit are violated; or (2) If criminal activity occurs during the permitted activity, for which a citation is issued or an arrest made, that is reasonably likely to cause injury or threat to persons or property or to create an unreasonable disturbance. Such revocation renders the permit null and void, and the permit holder shall comply with the requirements of Section 11-205. (e) If a permit holder has a permit revoked, as provided in subsection (d), the permit holder, or the organization upon whose behalf the permit was issued, may not be issued another permit for a period of two years following the date of revocation. 11-211 - Same— Penalties for Violations. (a) Any law enforcement officer may issue a citation for a violation of this act; and, upon a first offense, impose a fine of $25.00. If the violator pays the fine prior to the next court date, no court costs shall be assessed. (b) As an alternative, any law enforcement officer may issue a notice to appear for a violation of this act; even if a first-time offense. If the violator fails to appear for court, then a warrant for that person’s arrest may be issued. (c ) A second offense of this act shall carry a minimum fine of $50.00, plus court costs, and a third or subsequent offense of this act shall carry a maximum fine of $500.00 and, in addition to or instead of such fine, confinement in the Nemaha County jail for a definite term not to exceed 30 days. Section 3. That this ordinance shall take effect and be in force from and after its publication once in the official city newpaper. Passed and Approved by the Governing Body this 10th day of October, 2016. Doug Clark ATTEST: Steve Compo 41-1t

ARRESTS Dustin M. Barrett, 28, of Oneida was arrested on Oct. 3 on a Nemaha County bench warrant for probation violation. Contact was made with Barrett in Oneida, where he attempted to elude law enforcement by hiding in the attic of a home. Nemaha County’s police service dog was deployed and Barrett was taken into custody. Barrett remains in custody. Bond on the bench warrant is $25,000. Additional charges are driving while suspended, no liability insurance, no registration and felony

interference with law enforcement officer. Bond has been set at $50,000 on the new charges. Dagan K. Solberg was booked into the Nemaha County Jail on Oct. 3, awaiting transfer to Kansas Department of Corrections custody. ACCIDENTS At 7:02 a.m. Monday, Oct. 3, Matthew D. Walker, 46, of Morrill was traveling westbound on U.S. Highway 36 when he struck a deer. He was driving a 2007 Ford van. Damage was estimated at more than $1,000.

SABETHA POLICE DEPARTMENT ACCIDENTS On Sept. 29, the Sabetha Police Department (SPD) responded to a two-vehicle accident at the intersection of Eighth and Main streets. Raelyn Carlberg was turning onto Main Street, operating a 2009 Ford when she collided with Irene Yoesel who was westbound on Main Street, driving a 2006 Buick. Damage was minor and there were no injuries reported at the scene of the accident. CASES On Sept. 19, the SPD arrested

William Carlson, 32, of Sabetha for domestic battery. On Sept. 19, the SPD arrested Stephen Shuetz, 56, of Sabetha for domestic battery. On Sept. 21, the SPD took a report of identity theft. The case remains under investigation. On Oct. 4, the SPD took a report criminal damage to property. On Oct. 8, the SPD was called to investigate a report of hunting without permission. The case remains under investigation.

BROWN COUNTY SHERIFF On Oct. 3, there were 16 inmates – 11 males and five females – in the Brown County Jail. On Oct. 2, Adonis Hill, 24, of Omaha, Neb., was arrested on charges of possession of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia On Oct. 2, Levi Hitchcock, 21, of Verdon was arrested on a Brown County felony worthless check warrant. 6TH ANNUAL

RACE FOR THE RESCUES 5K

SATURDAY OCT.15TH

8:00 AM CORNER OF WASHINGTON & JEFFERSON STREETS (SITE OF SABETHA PET PARK)

On Sept. 30, Scott Guy, 46, of Robinson was arrested on charges of possession of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia. As of Monday, Oct. 10, the Brown County Jail has 20 inmates – 16 males and four females. On Oct. 7, the Brown County K-9 was requested by Kickapoo Police and alerted on a vehicle on the reservation. Ashle Walker, 25, of Gladstone, Mo. was arrested by Kickapoo Police on charges of possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia, possession with intent to distribute, disorderly, bribery and interference with law enforcement officer. On Oct. 9, a Brown County deputy was involved in a short vehicle pursuit which started in Brown county and ended in Doniphan County. Lane Olson, 17, of Highland was charged with expired tags, reckless driving, speeding, flee and attempt to elude and child endangerment.Doniphan County Sheriff ’s deputies, Highland Police Department, Sac and Fox and Iowa Tribal PD assisted. On Oct. 10, Chris Brassfield, 33, of Robinson was arrested on a charge of violating a protection order.


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local&area

October 12, 2016  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  sabethaherald.com

Sabetha students are finalists in entrepreneurship challenge BEREADY.1A Charming Senior Madison Williams created Charming, a bee-keeping and honey-related product business providing both bee-keeping services as well as soaps, lotions and other honey-related products. Honey-related products are a very fast growing sector of the homemade goods market. Williams was responsible for creating the products, packaging, and marketing her products. She appeared at craft fairs and art shows in locations around the state. For those efforts, Williams was named the third place winner and received a $1,000 scholarship to Washburn University. Charming started in the spring of 2015, after three and a half years of beekeeping and the realization that she needed to do something with the wax and honey that came from her beehives. “After I discovered that soap making was a great outlet for both honey and wax, I realized that my new hobbies complimented each other perfectly,” Williams said. According to Williams, she had been experimenting with soap making for fun when she decided to go into the soap making business. “Soap making was not only enjoyable, but also fairly easy to do,” she said. “It gave me a great way to be creative and relax.” Marketing for Charming has been by word of mouth and social media. Williams’ products can also be found at the Sabetha Greenhouse. “I appreciate Dayra Menold who has allowed me to show my products in her store [Sabetha Greenhouse],” Williams said. “This has offered me another outlet to let people know about my business.”

VIABILITY.1A

Sabetha High School sophomore Lexie Phillips presents her business to one of the judges at the trade show at Washburn University’s “Be Ready!” Entrepreneurship contest. Submitted | Nate Bauman

Sabetha High School senior Madison Williams presents her business to one of the judges at the trade show at Washburn University’s “Be Ready!” Entrepreneurship contest. Submitted | Nate Bauman

Menold said she is happy to carry Williams product in her store and thinks she has a good product. “Madison has produced an amazing product, with adorable details,” she said. “I plan to use her soaps at the Hospital Guild Tea as party favors on my Sabetha Greenhouse table.” Menold isn’t the only one who thinks highly of the Charming product line. Williams said that so far she is receiving positive feedback and is currently trying to expand her products for the Christmas season, since she has already been receiving requests for gift packages and stocking stuffers. “Thus far I have had very positive feedback from my customers,” she said. “All of my products have been a big hit! I am nearing $400 in revenue and look forward to continuing business in the area.” Williams credits much of her success in this process to mentor Butch Schiffbauer of Nebraska, boss and mentor Menold, Nate Bauman for helping her to discover her interest in the world of business, and to her whole family for helping her succeed even when

it got difficult. Williams plans to continue her business but said that it might slow down once she begins college next fall. People can find Williams on Facebook at “What’s the Buzz” or can contact her at madisonreine@ live.com for questions concerning Charming. She is the daughter of Jeff and Lea Williams. Pitch Whiffs Sophomore Lexie Phillips created Pitch Whiffs, which is a business in which Lexie provides individual or group softball lessons to girls looking to learn or improve their pitching and other softball skills. Phillips was attempting to capitalize on the momentum caused by Sabetha High School adding softball as a spring sport for 2017. For her efforts, Phillips was named a finalist in the contest and received a $500 scholarship to Washburn University. Phillips said in addition to the excitement of softball being added to the SHS athletic program, she chose a business based around softball so she can share her pas-

sion with others. “I’ve been playing softball since I was little,” she said. “It’s one of my only interests anymore, so I took that and made it into a business. Softball is something that I love, and I want to share that love with other people.” Phillips’ business has been up and running since the last softball season started and she said that it has been slow so far but she hopes her business will get kids more active during the summer. “It wasn’t as successful as I hoped,” she said. “But maybe once the season starts up again I will get more business.” Phillips plans to advertise her business during softball season, as well as expand to nearby towns to drum up more business. “The Be Ready! Challenge was a great opportunity for us and I’m very glad I got to be a part of it,” she said. People can contact Phillips at 19lexphi@usd113.org or 785-2851553 for questions and inquiries concerning Pitch Whiffs She is the daughter of Eric and Carrie Phillips.

GOVERNING BODY

Prairie Hills USD No. 113 Board of Education AMBER DETERS The Prairie Hills USD No. 113 Board of Education met at 6 p.m. Monday, Oct. 10, at Axtell Public School. Board members present included Ed Reznicek, Kathy Lippert, Kent Saylor, Jim Scoby, Leslie Scoby, Kent Kuckelman and Jeff DeMint. The board adopted the agenda as amended. Opening Business Candidates for Kansas Senate District 1 came to speak to the board, per the board’s invitation. Challenger Jerry Henry (DAtchison) is a current member of the Kansas House of Representatives. He started by introducing himself to the board. Henry said that education is the most important item on the state’s list. He said that a “suitable” education as set by the founding fathers is a education appropriate for the times in which we live. A big issue to discuss now is rural schools, as Henry believes that rural schools will be under attack in the future. He said he worries about school consolidation, as well as the possibility of shifting from state obligation to local obligation for items such as food service and school athletics and activities. Henry discussed transparency in the state legislature. He noted that many things that had happened in the legislature happened behind closed doors or in the middle of the night. He said the legislature needs to work harder to be more transparent. Henry closed by saying he would focus on rural communities and rural schools. “This fallacy that we are overspending and schools will do everything they can to spend more money is not correct,” Henry said. Incumbent Dennis Pyle (R-Hiawatha) thanked the board for the invitation to the meeting. Pyle said he has worked on a number of different committees over the years and has a working knowledge of what a lot of those committees do. Pyle noted that there are two main sides to education in Kansas, but those sides are not what you’ve been told. One side is the Democrat party and KNEA, and Pyle said he is on the other side — the one that wants to direct funds to the classroom. He said he believes the classroom and local level should start the school funding formula. Pyle said he believes that growth of the education establishment will result in forced consolidation of rural schools, and this growth does nothing to actually help schools. Dollars going to establishment would be better spent going toward the classroom, Pyle said. Pyle said he supports less administration and bureaucracy and more autonomy of rural schools. The problem is not rural schools, he said, but rather the bloated Topeka bureaucracy. “Our rural communities are under attack,” he said. Next, the board heard the Fiscal Year 2016 audit presented by Ken

USD No. 113 School Board approves viability standards

Kickhaefer of auditor Kickhaefer and Buessing. The board approved the audit. Consent Agenda The board approved the consent agenda, including the Sept. 12 regular meeting minutes, payment of October bills of $351,983.12, payment of September payroll of $634,249.53, acceptance of a $5,000 donation from Sabetha PTO for the Sabetha High School FFA Greenhouse Project, and a personal day request from Joyce Stallbaumer of Wetmore Academic Center, as well as contracts for Debra Grigsby, district accounts receivable, and James Shaughnessy, Axtell High School assistant boys’ basketball. The board received written administrative reports from principals Sheri Harmer, Matt Garber, Sara Toedman, Janelle Boden and Larry Geist. Harmer also spoke on behalf of the SHS Student Council. The Council will be hosting its annual Trick or Treat So Others Can Eat event on Oct. 31, in which council members will collect non-perishable food items for the food pantry. Director of Student Learning Jennifer Gatz presented to the board on the Kansas Education Systems Accredidation. She said USD No. 113 has already started the KESA process. Superintendent Todd Evans presented the board with information regarding the governor’s request for input from constituents for the new school finance formula. The deadline for input is Nov. 30 of this year. Input should be submitted StudentsFirst@ks.gov. See Evans’ column on Page 4A of this week’s Herald for more information. Evans also presented the board with a 2016-17 enrollment update. The district as a whole is down 40.4 Full-Time Equivalency (3.7 percent) from the 2015-16 school year. Changes at each campus from 2015-16 school year are as follows: Sabetha, down 19.5 FTE (2.6 percent); Wetmore, down 12.5 FTE (7.5 percent); Axtell, down 8.4 FTE (4.7 percent). Evans informed the board that Steve Shogren with George K. Baum and Associates plans to have information ready for the board in regard to a bond refinance proposal on Nov. 14. Also at the November meeting, the board will be approving a final list for the district site council. He reminded board members that each board member is responsible for finding one site council member from their district. Finally, Evans shared the Year-toDate Expenditure Comparison. The district has spent $25,767.22 more in the general fund so far this year than in the same timeframe last year. Capital Outlay and Special Education also have gone up, both by approximately $61,000. Greenhouse Project FFA Advisor Chris Bauerle sent written word that he is getting bids for the Greenhouse, which he will bring before the board at the November meeting. The dirt work is

done, but he does not plan to proceed until the bid is approved. Finance Committee The board considered a proposal for Standards of Solvency and Viability from the Finance Committee — comprised of Reznicek, Lippert and Saylor. See Figure A on Page 8A of this week’s Herald. The board approved the Standards of Solvency and Viability 6-1, with Reznicek opposed. See the full discussion beginning on Page 1A of this week’s Herald. Legislative Update Next, Lippert presented a legislative update. State revenues were below estimates again, Lippert said, for the fifth straight reporting period. DeMint said it sounds like the state needs to fire the estimator. District Roofs The board reviewed roofing reports from JB Turner and Sons Roofing and Sheetmetal out of Topeka. A condition report and recommended repairs were provided all district campuses. Costs for recommended repairs included the following: Sabetha Elementary School, $1,282; Sabetha Middle School, $484; Sabetha High School, $1,948; Wetmore Academic Center, $4,757; and Axtell Public School, $4,405. The total of all repairs is $12,876. The board agreed that Evans could hire JB Turner and Sons to make the suggested roofing repairs to all district buildings. Preschool Transportation Following up on the discussion from last month’s meeting regarding transportation for preschool students within city limits, the board considered a proposal to transport preschool students completing preschool in the middle of the day to their homes or daycares within city limits. Evans clarified that, at the previous meeting, what he was opposed to was the district setting a precedent of “Pay to Bus.” This would open

up the district to the possibility of families wanting to pay the district to transport their students within city limits, regardless of age or time of day. A board member requested it be brought before the board that the district pay to transport preschool students who complete preschool in the middle of the day. The cost to the district would be between $5,000 and $8,000. This would not include any pick-ups, or drop-off at the end of the day. Lippert said her concern last time was that the particular proposal created a precedent problem, whereas this proposal could meet the need without creating the problem. J. Scoby asked if this would require the purchase of any additional vehicles. Evans said it would not. The board authorized the administration to implement mid-day transportation of preschool students at all district buildings, beginning the week of Halloween. The transportation was approved 7-0. Board members agreed that midday transportation will be evaluated at the end of the school year, to decide whether it is feasible to continue. Vehicles The board gave permission to accept bids for Van No. 12. The board gave permission to purchase a car. SMS Heating and Air Conditioning The board considered a fee proposal of $10,410 from Pearson Kent McKinley Raaf Engineers LLC. The board authorized Evans to enter into a contract with Pearson Kent McKinley Raaf Engineers LLC for system design and construction oversight of HVAC replacement at SMS. Closing The board entered into executive session to discuss administrative contracts. No binding action was taken.

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DeMint said he would like to see the board move forward and approve the standards. “It says right there on number six that we can change these whenever we want and for whatever reason we want,” DeMint said. “I think we can just approve them and move forward.” Reznicek said he believes the board should wait to approve the standards until the November meeting, allowing time for public comment. L. Scoby said she thinks the document could be approved now, without waiting for public comment. “The public can still comment, and we can then make changes if

we see fit,” DeMint said. DeMint motioned that the document be approved as presented, and Lippert seconded it. Reznicek asked that the minutes reflect that the current school funding formula figures revenues based on weighted FTE. The board approved the Standards of Solvency and Viability 6-1, with Reznicek opposed. Reznicek said he opposed, because he believes the public should have been given the opportunity to comment prior to approval. Also, he said, he would have liked to see the 1.25 percent threshold raised to 1.5 percent. See the full minutes from the Prairie Hills USD No. 113 Board of Education meeting on Page 8A of this week’s Herald.

FIGURE A

Standards of Solvency and Viability

1. Financial viability is defined as the capacity to operate or be sustained. 2. Revenue per campus will be identified based upon the Kansas School Funding Formula. 3. District Wide Viability Standard: a. The goal of the district is to maintain annual operating budgets with receipts equaling expenditures. If the district as a whole is operating with a deficit, an action plan should be immediately developed to eliminate the deficit. b. Capital outlay funds for sustaining a building’s major expenses will be evaluated separately. 4. Individual Campus Viability Standards: a. The goal is for each campus to achieve a breakeven level of financial performance i. As long as the district as a whole is financially viable (receipts = expenditures), small campus deficits are acceptable, e.g. 0% to less than 1.25% of total balanced operating budget. ii. Also to be considered is (campus deficit/campus expenditures). iii. Campus deficits in excess of: (deficit/district expenditures) of 1.25%, or a deficit in excess of 7.5% (Campus Deficit/Campus Expenditures) will be considered “On Fiscal Support.” 5. Measurement Time Periods: a. Monthly the district as a whole will measure its expenditures and compare to projected expenditures. b. Annually the district will measure its prior year receipts and expenditures after completion of its CPA provided audit: i. Determine if the district as a whole has performed as expected - expenditures have not exceeded receipts and reserves are adequate. ii. Determine if each campus is operating at a breakeven level. Apply the formulas from section 4 of this document. If a campus is considered to be “on fiscal support” the board of education will examine the situation and will develop an action plan. 6. At any time the Board reserves the right to consider previously unknown circumstances, changed circumstances or any other factors affecting the District’s fiscal and financial performance which may require immediate changes to any established procedures to preserve the fiscal solvency of the District.

Commission discusses concerns CITY.1A not wearing proper reflective gear and not walking on the correct side of the road. Burenheide suggested the SPD hand out free reflective vests as part of a campaign for walking safely. Wahwasuck said he would look into the cost of doing this. Another concern from Wittmer was the empty storefronts on Main Street that are being used for storage. “There are several up and down on Main Street,” Wittmer said. “Several people are concerned. We have got to put some rules in about having retail buildings. Our Planning Commission has worked very hard and they want that retail. If we have the buildings, we need to address that.” Wittmer suggested the commission look at what the city’s codes are regarding retail buildings sitting empty. Allen said he didn’t think there was anything in the codes to enforce that, but that he would look into it.

Burenheide said the city can’t force people to sell their buildings. “No, but we might be able to give incentives to sell,” Clark said. “If it is zoned ‘retail commercial,’ then that is our avenue to define as narrow as we have to,” Aberle said. “So, I think this is more about zoning than codes.” Also at the meeting: Commissioners approved the minutes from the Sept. 26 meeting. Ordinance No. 1514 also was approved, updating the city’s code on noise violations. This ordinance gives the SPD the ability to fine offenders. Fall burn dates were set from Oct. 11 to Nov. 28. Per a recommendation from the Planning Commission, the city commissioners approved a conditional use permit for the new Apostolic Christian Church and a cemetery to be located west of Highway 75 at the intersection of 208th Road and Highway 75. The next commission meeting will be held at 6 p.m. Monday, Oct. 24.


1B

October 12, 2016  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  sabethaherald.com

sports SHS TENNIS

STANDINGS

Two Lady Jays advance to State Tournament matches, 7-6 (7-2), 6-4. They ended up falling to Kansas City Christian’s Termini/Eldred and Marysville’s Gilbert/Melero. Senior singles player Angel Hadachek also went 1-2 for the day, beating Beloit’s Elsen 6-4, 4-6, 7-6 (10-5), but falling to Kansas City Christian‘s Jantsch and Perry Lecompton’s Worthington. Senior singles player Mady McGill also went 1-2 for the day beating Shawnee Maranatha Christian Academy player Dighton 6-0, 6-7 (5-7), 7-6 (10-8). McGill fell to Marysville players Hill and Downard. The 3-2-1A State Tournament will be held Friday and Saturday, Oct. 14 and 15, in Wichita. Play will begin at 11:30 a.m.

Rank

After a long day and some close tough matches, the Sabetha High School Lady Jays Tennis team will be sending seniors Laura Edelman and Savanna Metzger to the State Tournament in Wichita this weekend. The Bluejays took six players – five seniors and one sophomore –to the 3-2-1A Regional Tournament in Marysville on Friday, Oct. 7, at which the top six singles players and the top six doubles teams would secure a place in the State Tournament Doubles team Edelman and Metzger went 2-2 for the day. Their first match-up was against Wabaunsee’s Savage/Meseke, and they won 6-0 and 6-2. Their second match-up was against Marys-

ville’s Williams/Roberts, in which they fell in two games, 1-6 and 4-6. Edelman and Metzger then took on Immaculata’s Gilbert/Melero in a fight for a spot at state. After two games, Edelman and Metzger won their spot at state as well as the game with scores of 6-2 and 6-0. Their final matchup in a fight for fifth place and their toughest match was against Marysville’s Holthaus/Bruna. They won the first game 6-4, but fell in the final two matches, 2-6 and 1-6. The second Bluejay doubles team comprised of senior Jessica Stallbaumer and sophomore Kirsten Wenger went 1-2 for the day. The duo’s first matchup was against Shawnee-Maranatha Christian Academy’s Welch/ Schoenfeld, in which they won their first game of the day in tight

Big 7 League League

Overall

W

L

W

L

0

6

0

School

1

Sabetha

5

2

Nemaha Central

5

0

6

0

3

Holton

3

2

3

3

4

Riverside

3

2

3

3

5

Hiawatha

2

3

3

3

6

Perry Lecompton

2

3

2

4

7

Royal Valley

2

4

2

4

8

Jefferson West

1

4

1

5

9

ACCHS

0

5

0

6

Twin Valley League Rank

HEATHER STEWART

FOOTBALL

League

Overall

W

L

W

L

School

11-MAN FOOTBALL 1

Troy

3

0

6

0

2

Washington

2

0

5

1

3

Valley Heights

1

1

5

1

4

Centralia

1

2

1

5

5

Doniphan West

0

4

1

5

8-MAN FOOTBALL

Senior Laura Edelman serves up the ball to her opponents during 3-2-1A Regionals on Friday, October 7. Heather Stewart | Herald

Senior Jessica Stallbaumer returns this ball to her opponents during 3-2-1A Regionals on Friday, October 7. Heather Stewart | Herald

Hanover

3

0

5

0

Clifton-Clyde

2

0

5

1

3

Frankfort

2

1

3

3

4

Linn

2

2

3

3

5

Axtell

1

1

3

3

6

Onaga

1

1

1

5

7

Blue Valley

0

2

1

5

8

Wetmore

0

4

0

6

Northeast Kansas League League

Overall

W

L

W

Rank

Sabetha Bluejays doubles team Laura Edelman (left) and Savanna Metzger (right) hold their medals after placing sixth at 3-2-1A Regionals on Friday, October 7, in Marysville. Edelman and Metzger will compete in the State Tournament on Friday and Saturday, October 14 and 15. Heather Stewart | Herald

1 2

School

1

Jefferson County

5

0

6

0

2

Jackson Heights

4

0

4

2

3

Oskaloosa

4

2

4

2

4

MH-MA

2

2

4

2

5

McLouth

2

2

3

3

6

Pleasant Ridge

1

4

1

5

7

Horton

1

4

1

5

8

Immaculata

0

5

1

5

9

Valley Falls

0

0

1

5

L

VOLLEYBALL

Senior Mady McGill prepares to return this ball to her opponent during 3-2-1A Regionals on Friday, October 7. Heather Stewart | Herald

S e nior A n gel Hadach e k Senior Savanna Metzger serves prepares to return the ball to up the ball during 3-2-1A her opponent during 3-2-1A Regionals on Friday, October 7. Regionals on Friday, October 7. Heather Stewart | Herald Heather Stewart | Herald

Sophomore Kirsten Wenger sprints to the ball in prepartion to return it to her opponents during 3-2-1A Regionals on Friday, October 7. Heather Stewart | Herald

SHS CROSS COUNTRY

Bluejay harriers gear up for Big 7 meet

INDIVIDUAL RESULTS

SHS Girls’ Cross Country SHS XC Invitational, 10.6.2016 INDIVIDUAL RESULTS

RUNNER Megan Meyer Madisen Cochran Marissa Cox Karrington Payne

PLACE 13 54 60 85

TIME 22:23.00 25:42.00 26:30:00 30:11.00

TEAM RESULTS

TEAM Baldwin Hiawatha Atchison Kaw Valley Wamego Jeff West Jackson Heights Holton Jeff North

SCORE 40 75 78 87 105 149

TOTAL TIME 1:49:48 1:52:03 1:53:44 1:54:22 1:55:23.90 2:02:00

AVG TIME 21:57.60 22:24.60 22:44.80 22:52.40 23:04.78 24:24.00

161

2:03:17

24:39.40

231 252

2:20:38 2:30:05.00

28:07.60 30:01.00

15 67 78 91 104

19:13.00 21:24.00 22:05.00 23:15.00 25:09.00

TEAM RESULTS

PLACE Wamego Baldwin Atchison Jackson Heights Hiawatha Marysville Kaw Valley St. Marys Academy

Wetmore Royal Valley Sabetha Jeff West Jeff North Pike Valley Holton

25 75 124

TOTAL TIME 1:30:16.63 1:34:26.75 1:38:14.00

127

1:38:20.00

19:40.00

182 220 228 234 237 239 254 316 322 337 401

1:41:03.00 1:42:59.51 1:42:42.85 1:43:19.97 1:43:23.00 1:43:19.00 1:44:39.00 1:46:45.85 1:47:39.77 1:49:18.66 1:53:46.00

20:12.60 20:35.91 20:32.57 20:40.00 20:40.60 20:39.80 20:55.80 21:21.17 21:31.96 21:51.74 22:45.20

SCORE

L 11

Holton

11

3

18

Nemaha Central

10

2

23

6

3

Hiawatha

8

4

14

10

4

Perry Lecompton

8

4

17

12

5

Jefferson West

7

5

16

13

6

Royal Valley

5

6

8

17

7

Sabetha

4

8

8

19

8

ACCHS

3

9

7

16

9

Riverside

0

15

2

28

Twin Valley League

22 minutes, 23 seconds. She was League meet at 4 p.m. Thursday, followed by Madisen Cochran in Oct. 13, at the Sabetha Golf and 54th place, Marissa Cox in 60th Country Club. and Karrington Payne in 85th. The girls did not place as a team Boys’ Cross Country due to not having enough runners SHS SHS XC Invitational, 10.6.2016 for a team score. RUNNER PLACE TIME The Bluejays will host the Big 7 Keegan Cox 9 18:42.00 Henry Glynn Garrett Scott Micah Romines Jesse Burger Marcus Funk

Overall W

L

1

Rank

The Sabetha Bluejay harriers hosted their first cross country meet on Thursday, Oct. 6, at the Sabetha Golf Course. Boys For the boys’ race, there were 107 runners. Senior Keegan Cox placed ninth with a time of 18 minutes, 42 seconds. He was followed by Henry Glynn in 15th, Garrett Scott in 67th, Micah Romines in 78th, Jesse Burger in 91st and Marcus Funk in 104th. Overall, the boys placed 11th out of 14 teams with 254 points and an average time of 20 minutes 55 seconds. Girls For the girls’ race, there were 101 runners. Sophomore Megan Meyer led the Lady Jays, finishing in 13th place with a time of

League W

School

2

League

Overall

W

L

W

L

School

1

Centralia

11

0

29

0

2

Hanover

10

1

25

6

3

Washington Cnty

8

3

20

9

4

Linn

8

3

19

11

5

Valley Heights

7

4

13

15

6

Axtell

7

5

17

12

7

Frankfort

6

5

17

12

8

Clifton-Clyde

4

6

9

14

9

Onaga

4

6

10

16

AVG TIME 18:03.33 18:53.35 19:38.80

10

Blue Valley

4

7

14

14

11

Troy

2

10

7

21

12

Wetmore

1

10

4

25

13

Doniphan West

0

12

0

28

Northeast Kansas League Rank

HEATHER STEWART

Rank

Big 7 League

Senior Keegan Cox leads the Sabetha boys’ team during the cross country meet on Thursday, October 4, in Sabetha. Heather Stewart | Herald

League

Overall

School W

L

W

L

1

Valley Falls

11

1

25

7

2

Jefferson County

10

2

24

4

3

Immaculata

10

2

21

9

4

Horton

6

6

12

17

5

Pleasant Ridge

6

6

9

14

6

Oskaloosa

5

7

10

22

7

MH-MA

4

8

19

13

8

Jackson Heights

2

10

9

21

9

McLouth

0

12

4

25

SCORES VOLLEYBALL Date

Sophomore Megan Meyer leads the Sabetha girls’ team during the cross country meet on Thursday, October 4, in Junior Garrett Scott sets his sights on this Jeff West runner during Junior Karrington Payne keeps up her endurance during the cross Sabetha. the cross country meet on Thursday, October 4, in Sabetha. country meet on Thursday, October 4, in Sabetha. Heather Stewart | Herald Heather Stewart | Herald Heather Stewart | Herald

Teams

Score

10/4

Wetmore vs. Hanover

9-25, 17-25

10/4

Wetmore vs. Washington County

10-25, 10-25

10/8

SHS JV vs. Royal Valley

25-13, 25-23

10/8

SHS Freshman vs. Centralia

12-25, 27-25, 25-14

Scores can be submitted to us at news@sabethaherald.com. Please include sport type, date of game/ match, team names, and final scores. Scores should be submitted no more than three days following the contest.


2B

sports&recreation

October 12, 2016  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  sabethaherald.com

Get Out

& ROOT LAURA & SAVANNA

for your Hometown Team! State Qualifiers – Doubles – Laura Edelman & Savanna Metzger

3A State Tennis

11:30 a.m. Friday, October 14th 9 a.m. Saturday, October 15th @ Wichita

BLUEJAY WEEK AT A GLANCE 10/13 Big 7 Cross Country @ Sabetha

4:00 p.m.

10/13 Freshman Football vs N.C.

4:30 p.m.

10/14 3A State Tennis @ Wichita

11:30 a.m.

10/14 Football vs. Nemaha Central

7:00 p.m.

10/15 3A State Tennis @ Wichita

9:00 a.m.

10/15 Volleyball Invitational @ Sabetha 9:00 a.m. 10/17 JV Football @ Nemaha Central

4:30 p.m.

10/18 Volleyball vs. ACCHS

5:00 p.m.

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sports&recreation

sabethaherald.com  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  October 12, 2016

SHS FOOTBALL

The Sabetha Herald’s

Athlete of the Week

Bluejays dominate Tigers in runaway victory PETE SCHUETZ | CONTRIBUTOR “We had a different type of adversity to overcome [this week], and this team handled it well,” said Sabetha High School Head Football Coach Garrett Michael. The Bluejays welcomed the struggling 0-5 ACCHS Tigers to town Friday, Oct. 7, to wrap up the regular schedule. ACCHS is a young team who is suffering from a low level of participation. In recent years, they have suited up less than 20 players. Therefore, this contest was all Sabetha in a runaway victory with participation from everyone on the team as the Jays crushed the Tigers 79-0. Sabetha’s offense exploded for 35 points in the first quarter, and it was led by Blake Plattner who had the first touchdown of the game when he burst to the end zone on a 50-yard scamper at 11:45 in the first. Trae Snyder added three scores in the first frame, the first on a pick-six interception just two minutes into the game, and then scored on a 51-yard run and a 1-yard punch. Zach Edelman added a touchdown late in the first quarter with a 36-yard lightning strike with 1:22 left in the frame. At the end of the first, Sabetha led 35-0. Joseph Gruber jump-started the scoring in the second period when he had a 45-yard punt return for a touchdown in the opening seconds of the quarter. Gruber added a 25-

yard scoring strike on a run with 8:36 left in the half. Wyatt Beyer added a touchdown on a 66-yard run with 6:30 to go in the half, and Joel Hackney got loose on a 50-yard run play that landed him in the end zone. At the end of the first half, the Bluejays took a commanding 63-0 lead into the locker room. With a running clock to start the second half, the game was accelerated and abbreviated. But when ACCHS’s quarterback Levi Navinsky threw an interception on the opening drive of the third quarter, the Jays took over in Tiger Territory. Running back Tristan Edelman found the end zone from 9 yards out at the 6:49 mark of the third quarter. Receiver David Dyke hauled in the Brandon Brownlee pass for the two-point conversion to run the tally to 71-0 for the Bluejays. Sabetha had another takeaway on an interception from Effingham’s quarterback, and Hackney picked up his second score of the night with about five minutes left in the third frame. Colby Tinklin punctuated the touchdown with a two-point conversion run, and Sabetha led 79-0. Place kicker Braeden Cox was a perfect 8-8 for extra points and Sabetha took the win, 79-0, and improved to 6-0. “This was tough game from the

SHS Football

vs. ACCHS, 10.7.16

Senior Jacob Bayes carries the ball down the field during the Sabetha match-up versus ACCHS on Friday, October 7. Heather Stewart | Herald

TKL

SKS

2 0 3 0 1 0 2 0 2 1 0 1 5 0 2 3 2 4 3 0 1 1 1 2 2 2 6 3 7 1 2 2 1

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

J. Bayes T. Edelman A. Frazee B. Frey Spellmeier J. Hackney S.Harrell N. Garber B. Brownlee W. Beyer Trae Snyder B. Plattner J. Gruber R. Stapleton C. Halls G. Garber R.Herrmann Z. Edelman I. Sunderland D. Dyke C.n Renyer G. Remmers C. Geist C. Buser C. Oehm Lowdermilk P.Strahm J. Compo E.Strahm B. Rokey T. Kramer K. Grimm E. Renyer

FUM # REC INT RCY REC YDS

1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SHS 8 3/5 0/2 25 357 14.3 10 2 2 4 5 0-0 1-15 367

Team Totals FIRST DOWNS THIRD DOWN CONV. FOURTH DOWN CONV.

standpoint of we could not help but feel for ACCHS players and coaches,” Michael said. “I was very proud of our team. Everyone stepped up and executed on all levels.” Sabetha begins the district playoffs this week when they welcome the 6-0 Nemaha Central Thunder to town in a clash of the unbeatens. Nemaha Central is coming off of a 48-7 victory over Perry Lecomp-

3B

# RUSHES RUSHING YARDS RUSHING AVG. YARDS PASSING YARDS # COMPLETIONS # PASSES # INTERCEPTIONS PUNTING YARDS FUMBLES/LOST PENALTIES/LOST YARDS TOTAL OFFENSE

# RU

RU YDS

0 6 0 1 2 4 0 1 0 1 2 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 20 0 22 0 60 0 2 0 66 52 50 25 3 0 0 0 36 0 21 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Garret Evans

Football Wetmore High School

ACCHS 3 2/13 0/1 31 9 0.3 2 1 15 0 2 1-0 2-20 11

ton in week six. This game has Big 7 League and district champion implications, as well as Nemaha County bragging rights.

Senior Garret Evans has consistently been a leader throughout the Cardinals football season. During the Friday, Oct. 7, game versus Axtell he tallied 10 tackles, one sack, one blocked kick, one fumble recovery, four catches for 26 yards, 22 rushes for 59 yards, and a two-point conversion.

Athlete of the Week selection will be awarded with an “Athlete of the Week” t-shirt at the end of the fall sports season. Please contact The Sabetha Herald to provide sizing information.

Freshman Colby Tinklin runs the ball down the field, avoiding this Sophomore Braeden Cox sprints down the field during the Sabetha Jeff West defender during the Sabetha match-up versus ACCHS on Friday, October 7. match-up versus ACCHS on Friday, October 7. Heather Stewart | Herald Heather Stewart | Herald

WHS FOOTBALL

Cardinals fall 16-30 against Axtell in tough match-up HEATHER STEWART

Sophomore Joel Hackney holds on to the ball while these Perry Lecompton defensive players attempt to take him down during the junior varsity contest on Monday, October 3. Heather Stewart | Herald

Sophomore Tristan Edelman drives the ball down the field during the junior varsity contest versus Perry Lecompton on Monday, October 3. Heather Stewart | Herald

JV Jays battle Kaws

The Wetmore High School Cardinals traveled to Axtell on Friday, Oct. 7, looking for a win after a tough loss against Hanover. The Cardinals put up a fight against the Eagles, and Head Coach Rick Schnacker said the team never gave up. “We played hard and never gave up and played until the end,” Schnacker said. The Cardinals were the first to post points in the game with a touchdown and two point conversion. At the end of the first quarter, the Cardinals were in lead 8-0. During the second quarter, Axtell stepped up their game and drove in two touchdowns along with two, two-point conversions. At the conclusion of the first half, the Eagles had the lead, 16-8. Both teams remained scoreless during the third quarter, and during the fourth, Wetmore was able to drive in one more touchdown and a two-point conversion, but Axtell managed two touchdowns. The final score was 30-16, Axtell. “There were too many big plays, missed tackles and missed opportunities that hurt us,” Schnacker said. “I am proud of our efforts. We need to move forward and get ready for Blue Valley. I am proud of the boys.” Throughout the game, senior

Garret Evans tallied 10 tackles, one quarterback sack, one blocked kick, one fumble recovery, four catches for 26 yards, 22 rushes for 59 yards, and a two-point conversion. Sophomore Joel Hutfles totaled eight tackles, 16 rushes for 46 yards and one touchdown. Senior Trent Rowland also managed eight tackles, two quarterback sacks, one fumble recovery and one touchdown. Wetmore will host the 1-5 Blue Valley-Randolph Rams on Friday, Oct. 14. WHS Football vs. Axtell, 10.7.16 TKL

8 T. Rowland 10 G. Evans 8 J. Hutfles 4 A. Potter 14 K. Vance E. Osterhaus 8 4 K. Bloom 5 B. Myers J. Hladkey1 Bailey 2 D. Johnson 1 C. Morfitt

SKS

INT

2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0

1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 4 0 0 1 1 0 0

0 26 0 0 33 16 0 0

# RU

RU YDS

0 22 16 1 0 0 0 0

0 59 46 2 0 0 0 0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

Team Totals FIRST DOWNS THIRD DOWN CONV. FOURTH DOWN CONV. # RUSHES RUSHING YARDS RUSHING AVG. YARDS PASSING YARDS # COMPLETIONS # PASSES # INTERCEPTIONS PUNTING YARDS FUMBLES/LOST PENALTIES/LOST YARDS TOTAL OFFENSE

FUM # REC RCY REC YDS

WHS 9 0 0 39 107 0 75 6 18 1 64 3-1 6-41 181

AHS 7 0 0 27 33 0 218 18 31 1 49 4-2 11-80 251

Is it your right to hunt?

H

ave you as a hunter ever vote for this proposition would thought that maybe constitutionally preserve the right someday you would be of the public to hunt, fish and trap forced to give up the activity that wildlife that has been traditionyou inherited from your forefa- ally taken by hunters, trappers thers? Are you aware of all of the and anglers. anti-hunting organizations out “This public right is subject to there currently at work attempt- state laws, rules and regulations ing to totally eliminate all forms regarding the management of of hunting in order to save the wildlife and does not change or poor, defensediminish comless animals in mon law or the world? statutory rights If you think relating to tresfor one minute pass, eminent that I am exdomain or priaggerating the vate property. issue with that A vote against statement then this proposition I would implore would provide you to sit down no constituBY: TIM KELLENBERGER at your computtional right of er and begin to do a little search- the public to hunt, fish and trap ing for yourself. Before I go any wildlife. It would maintain exfurther, I want to inform you of isting laws, rules and regulations what is coming up on the Novem- governing hunting, fishing and ber ballot that you will be voting trapping.” on. This ballot that will be before Wow! If you survived reading you in a couple of weeks contains through that, then pay attention a constitutional amendment. for a normal explanation! In order to get this correct, I There are currently 19 states will be quoting directly from the in our country that have such an website, ballotpedia.org, where I existing constitutional right for got my information. their residents. Is this really im“The Kansas Right to Hunt and portant and worth spending the Fish Amendment, also known as thousands of dollars to put before Constitutional Amendment 1, is the voters? on the Nov. 8 ballot in Kansas as Yes! If we don’t have this cona legislatively referred to constitu- stitutionally guaranteed right, ortional amendment. Amendment 1 ganizations such as the Humane would provide the constitutional Society and the Audubon Society right to hunt, fish and trap to be will make an attempt to end the subjected to regulations promot- sport we love and cherish. Do not ing wildlife conservation and believe what these organizations management. tell you! Their goal is to shut down “Furthermore, public hunting hunting in every state in the counand fishing would be the pre- try. I know this sounds like I am ferred method of wildlife man- standing on some soap box on a agement under the amendment. corner, but it is a very real threat The amendment would be added and is very probable. to the Kansas Bill of Rights. In the This vote for this amendment Kansas Senate, the amendment re- will keep organizations like those ceived unanimous support. In the who are against our hunting and Kansas House of Representatives, fishing and trapping out of our all but seven Democrats voted to state and out of our business. I place the measure on the ballot. don’t have enough space to elabo“Following is an explanation of rate any further on this but I will the initiative. This amendment is in the future tell you how these to preserve constitutionally the organizations pull off their dirty right of the public to hunt, fish deeds and quietly erode our rights. and trap wildlife subject to reaBut for now, we need to vote sonable laws and regulations. The yes in support of this amendment right of the public to hunt, fish and before us on November’s ballot. I trap shall not modify any provi- will talk more about this in the sion of laws or statutes relating to next couple of weeks in an editotrespass, eminent domain or any rial, because I feel it is that imother private property rights. A portant.

WILD TIMES

NEMAHA COUNTY REPUBLICAN PARTY

CANDIDATE DINNER THURSDAY, OCT. 13 6:30 pm

Bern Community Building Bern, KS

SPEAKERS INCLUDE: Senator Jerry Moran, Congresswoman Lynn Jenkins and Secretary of State Kris Kobach for Donald Trump, as well as Nemaha County Candidates. Contact Ray Shinn 785-294-1514 or ray@shinnappraisals.com or Dort Goodman 785-284-3636.

PAID FOR BY THE NEMAHA COUNTY REPUBLICAN PARTY: RAY SHINN, CHAIRMAN


sports&recreation

WHS CROSS COUNTRY

SHS VOLLEYBALL

Achten places seventh at Sabetha

Sabetha shows improvement at Marysville Invitational

Heather Stewart | Herald

SHS Volleyball

SHS Volleyball GD HIT

K

AST

2 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2

3 Spielman Emily Meyer 0 14 Huber 13 Kuenzi 7 Russell 2 M. Krebs 1 Holthaus 0 H. Krebs 2 Ellie Meyer 0 Smith 0 Ulrich 0 Polson 0 0 42 TOTALS

2 0 8 4 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 18

10 5 0 0 0 8 0 7 2 3 1 15 0 4 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 15 42

SHS Volleyball

AST

GD SRV

SRV ACE

DIG

SRV RCV

S BLK

AST BLK

19 0 1 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 23

8 0 8 8 2 6 10 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 42

0 80 0 0 0 2 89 10 1 80 2 0 40 5 0 75 2 1 100 1 0 5 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 81 26

0 0 11 0 9 4 8 14 0 0 0 0 0 1 47

1 0 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SRV %

K

TOTALS

1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

vs. Concordia Marysville Invitational, 10.8.16

4 1 0 0 17 8 8 3 16 8 5 2 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 51 23

GD HIT

Junior Myrna Crismas keeps up the Junior McKayla Henry leads the Wetmore Junior Beau Henninger keeps up the pace and stays in front of this Horton girls’ team during the cross country meet on pace during the cross country meet on runner during the cross country meet on Thursday, October 4, in Sabetha. Thursday, October 4, in Sabetha. Thursday, October 4, in Sabetha. Heather Stewart | Herald Heather Stewart | Herald Heather Stewart | Herald

2 100 5 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 89 5 3 0 2 88 1 2 0 1 60 3 4 4 3 100 3 3 0 0 80 1 12 0 0 8 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 89 26 29 5

SHS Volleyball

vs. Riley County Marysville Invitational, 10.8.16

Spielman Emily Meyer Huber Kuenzi Russell M. Krebs Holthaus H. Krebs Ellie Meyer Smith Ulrich Polson

S BLK

S BLK

AST BLK

DIG

SRV RCV

vs. Valley Heights Marysville Invitational, 10.8.16

1 86 0 0 0 0 0 0 83 6 5 1 100 1 0 0 50 1 4 0 50 2 2 1 100 5 9 0 5 13 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 82 21 35

SRV %

1 10 6 0 0 0 5 0 5 3 0 3 2 0 2 3 1 1 0 0 6 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 14 12 23

SRV ACE

1 0 15 9 10 7 1 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 46

AST

K

TOTALS

GD HIT Spielman Emily Meyer Huber Kuenzi Russell M. Krebs Holthaus H. Krebs Ellie Meyer Smith Ulrich Polson

GD SRV

vs. Nemaha Central Marysville Invitational, 10.8.16

AST BLK

TIME 26:17.00 29:24.00

Spielman Emily Meyer Huber Kuenzi Russell M. Krebs Holthaus H. Krebs Ellie Meyer Smith Ulrich Polson

TOTALS

3 0 5 8 9 2 1 1 6 0 0 0 0 0 35

1 0 3 4 1 1 1 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 15

9 7 0 0 0 6 0 4 1 5 0 1 0 4 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 11 27

S BLK

PLACE 59 79

AST BLK

RUNNER McKayla Henry Myrna Crismas

DIG

INDIVIDUAL RESULTS

SRV RCV

at Sabetha, 10.6.16

SRV %

WHS Girls’ Cross Country

1 88 0 0 0 0 0 0 86 7 15 0 100 0 0 1 83 1 7 0 50 0 2 0 100 0 5 0 5 11 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 2 87 14 48

0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2

SRV %

TIME 18:24.00 19:52.00 20:17.00 21:48.00 23:02.00

GD SRV

PLACE 7 29 42 75 89

SRV ACE

RUNNER Aaron Achten Jonathan Hladky-Bailey Beau Henninger Chanler Morfitt Curtis Bloom

GD SRV

INDIVIDUAL RESULTS

SRV ACE

at Sabetha, 10.6.16

The Sabetha High School Lady Jays traveled to Marysville for an invitational tournament on Saturday, Oct. 8. Though the team went 1-3 on the day, Head Coach Julie Kuckelman said the Lady Jays’ level of play was much improved from last weekend. “Overall, our level of play and desire was much better than first week at Silver Lake,” Kuckelman said. “It was fun to see the girls enjoying being on the court, which led to some amazing defensive and offensive plays. We just need to focus on improving daily so that we are ready for post season play.” In match one, Sabetha fell to Nemaha Central in two sets — 19-25 and 16-25. “We started off both sets playing well and ahead,” Kuckelman said. “However, in both sets we struggled with our serve receive halfway in and let them go on a little run and never able to catch back up.” In the second match, Sabetha topped Valley Heights in two sets — 25-17 and 25-21. “This was a great win for us which we needed,” Kuckelman said. “The girls played well as a team, and our defense led to a Senior Aaron Achten leads the Wetmore boys’ team during the cross country meet on Thursday, strong offensive attack. We also October 4, in Sabetha. served them very tough, so they

had a hard time executing on their side.” In the third match of the day, Sabetha fell to Riley County in three tight sets — 19-25, 25-22 and 25-15. “This was a tough match for us to get going right away coming off of a three hour wait,” Kuckelman said. “We struggled at first, but the girls made the necessary adjustments and finished the set stronger, and we were able to carry this momentum over to a Set 2 victory. Set 3 was looking great for us, but then serve receive problems let Riley County come away with set three and the match.” In the fourth and final match, Sabetha fell to Concordia in two sets — 16-25 and 17-25. “You have to give Concordia a lot of credit, because they are just a solid team,” Kuckelman said. “They have a string of hitters who can terminate the ball. The girls battled with them, but their offensive power led to a win.” The Lady Jays struggled on both side of the service line, hitting just 84.8 percent (134/158) of their serves, and tallying 33 serve receive errors on the day. On the day, Sabetha tallied 70 kills on 174/209 hitting. The Jays also tallied 87 digs and 159 serve receives, as well as 17 solo blocks and eight block assists.

AST

WHS Boys’ Cross Country

AMBER DETERS

K

The Wetmore Cardinals traveled to Sabetha Thursday, Oct. 6, to compete in the Sabetha Cross Country Invitational. Boys There were a total of 107 runners in the boys’ race, and senior Aaron Achten placed seventh with a time of 18 minutes, 24 seconds. Coming in after Achten were Jonathan Hladky-Bailey in 29th, Beau Henniger in 42nd, Chanler Morfitt in 75th and Curtis Bloom in 89th. The boys’ team placed ninth overall with 237 points and an average time of 20 minutes, 32 seconds. Girls There were two Lady Cardinals running in the girls’ race. Out of 104 runners, McKayla Henry placed 59th and Myrna Crismas placed 79th. There were not enough runners on the Wetmore team to get a team score. The Cardinals prepare for the Twin Valley League meet, which will take place on Thursday, Oct. 13, at Onaga.

GD HIT

HEATHER STEWART

SRV RCV

October 12, 2016  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  sabethaherald.com

DIG

4B

on’s

Axtell Pride Associati

2ND ANNUAL

Residential or Commercial

UNRUH SEAMLESS GUTTERING -and-

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We offer a free, no-obligation assessment and estimate.

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Fall Craft Show Saturday, October 22 9 AM - 2 PM

fts, vendor items, Wide variety of handmade cra n stand sio ces bake sale, con BUILDING | AXTELL, KS AXTELL AMERICAN LEGION

Medicare D Open Enrollment have you confused? Give us a call and let us help. Sabetha Community Hospital has reserved every Wednesday during open enrollment to help you look at your options. Appointments are required. Call 785-284-1527 to make your appointment. APPOINTMENTS WILL BE AVAILABLE 9 AM TO 3 PM Oct. 19 • Oct. 26 • Nov. 2 • Nov. 9 • Nov. 16 • Nov. 23 • Nov. 30 • Dec. 7

AUCTION REMINDER Roger Chadwell Household Auction

SATURDAY, OCT. 15TH, 10 AM Fairview Community Building Furniture, Small Farm Implements, Household

RENYER AUCTION SERVICE

Herman Renyer 785-467-5065 | Adam Renyer 785-317-5959

FARM AUCTION REMINDER SELLER: FRANK ALTHOUSE ESTATE

SATURDAY, OCT. 15 Starting at 10:30 am

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Directions: From Seneca, 10 miles east on Hwy 36 to U Road, 1.5 miles South on U Road to 140th Road, half mile east on 140th Road. From Sabetha, 4 miles south on Old Hwy 75, 4 miles west on Hwy 36 to U Road, 1.5 miles south on U Road to 140th Road, Half mile east on 140th Road

Wilhelm Auction Service

Dale Wilhelm 785-336-3627 or 785-294-8569 Danny Deters 785-336-1622


pigskin pick ‘em

sabethaherald.com  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  October 12, 2016

The Sabetha Herald Pigskin Pick ‘Em Contest

Pigskin 15 th ANNUAL

Entry Form for Wednesday, Oct. 12

Directions: After looking at the football games listed in each of the sponsor ads on this page, pick the winner of each game and write it next to the corresponding advertiser on this form. For the Tie-Breaker Game, write in your guess for the TOTAL POINTS SCORED in that game. DO NOT write in the name of the winner.

Pick ‘Em

The (2) entrants with the most correct picks each week will receive a $10 Sabetha Chamber of Commerce gift certificate, which can be used at any Chamber business! DEADLINE: Entries must be dropped off at The Sabetha Herald office by 3 p.m. on Fridays prior to high school games.

FOOTBALL CONTEST

2016

PANEL WEEK 7

STANDINGS:

CHARLIE WILSON

VICKI EDELMAN

37-17

36-18

PAT SHEIK

KATHERINE CLAASSEN

BRENDON GARRETT

JACKIE CREEK

Hiawatha @ Riverside

Riverside

Hiawatha

Riverside

Riverside

Riverside

Hiawatha

Axtell @ Wakefield

Wakefield

Wakefield

Wakefield

Axtell

Axtell

Axtell

N.C. @ Sabetha

Sabetha

Sabetha

Sabetha

Sabetha

Sabetha

Sabetha

Stanford @ Notre Dame

Stanford

N. D.

Stanford

N. D.

Stanford

Stanford

W. V. @ Texas Tech

Texas Tech

Texas Tech

W. Virginia

W. Virginia

W. Virginia

W. Virginia

USC @ Arizona

USC

USC

USC

USC

USC

Arizona

Kansas City @ Oakland

Oakland

Oakland

Kansas City

Oakland

Oakland

Oakland

Dallas @ Green Bay

Green Bay

Green Bay

Green Bay

Dallas

Green Bay

Green Bay

Cincinnati @ New England

New England

New England

New England

New England

New England

New England

60

52

39

42

48

21

34-20

TIE-BREAKER GAME:

Kansas City @ Oakland TOTAL POINTS

37-17

36-18

34-20

PICK ‘EM GAMES ARE LISTED BELOW!

Garrett S. Old Hwy 75 • Sabetha, KS

YOUR HOMETOWN GROCERY STORE! Immaculata @ ACCHS

Can’t make it to the game? Get live coverage at mscsports.net

Click Listen Live > Sabetha Channel

935 Main St. Sabetha, KS

Roy, Pat, Carrie & Cynthia

(785) 284-2816 Insurance for your Auto-Home-Life-Business-Farm

935 Main • Sabetha, KS (785) 284-2187

Hiawatha @ Riverside

Sabetha

Family Pharmacy 1773 Frontage Road

Coldest Beer in Northeast Kansas Stanford @ Notre Dame

64016 705 Road Dawson, Neb. (402) 855-2355 (800) 511-0928

Trucking Ag Retailer Propane Alabama @ Tennessee

New Mexico @ Air Force

C&K Service BF Goodrich Bridgestone Hercules Michelin Firestone Merit Uniroyal Titan

See us for all your Auto Repairs!

Axtell @ Wakefield

Cincinnatti @ New England

WAY TO GO BLUEJAYS!

ABERLE FORD Service Special

FALL MAINTENANCE CHECKOVER $19.50 Will check antifreeze, belts, hoses, filters and test battery

902 Highway K246 Sabetha, KS 66534 1.800.530.5624

1025 Main • Sabetha, Kansas

triple-c-inc.com

www.aberleford.com (785) 284-3122

Nemaha Central @ Sabetha

Blue Valley @ Wetmore

21 Main Street Sabetha, KS (785) 284-3435 www.saylorinsurance.com www.mjbtrc.com Sabetha, KS 785.284.3433

West Virginia @ Texas Tech

(parts not included)

USC @ Arizona

BE HEALTHY. LIVE HEALTHY. STAY HEALTHY. North Carolina @ Miami

Pioneer Seed Chemicals Grain Ag Lime Fertilizer

MORRILL

Elevator

121 S. 8th Sabetha, Kansas

Dallas @ Green Bay

v JillHuss

LOCAL STARS

- Tires - 4-Wheel Alignment - Custom Exhaust -

Kansas City @ Oakland

Name City Email Phone #

Here’s to our

Your Full Service Station

785.284.2955

ONE ENTRY PER PERSON

PICK UP YOUR CHAMBER GIFT CERTIFICATES!

SERVICE

785-300-6545

Drop off entry forms at The Sabetha Herald office.

u Gunnar Huss

AGEE’S

15 East Main Street • Sabetha, Kansas (785) 284-3416

Tie-Breaker: Total Points Scored Kansas City @ Oakland

WINNERS ARE:

Office (785) 284-3432 (800) 284-3432 Fax (785) 284-3795

1118 Main Street Sabetha, KS 66534

Stateline Ag Service Sabetha Family Pharmacy Community National Bank Garrett Country Mart Lukert Chiropractic Flat Track Liquor SBS Insurance Agency Triple C, Inc. Rensenhouse Electric Aberle Ford Rainbow Communications Morrill & Janes Bank C&K Service Agee’s Service Morrill Elevator Subway United Bank & Trust Saylor Insurance Service

THIS WEEKS PICK ‘EM CONTEST

Cindy & Kenny Alderfer Old Hwy 75 - Sabetha, KS (785) 284-2987 or (800) 547-2833

Jeff West @ Holton

5B

Morrill, Kansas (888) 299-8625 or (785) 459-2297

Los Angeles @ Detroit

Indianapolis @ Houston

914 S. Old Highway 75 Sabetha, Kansas 785-284-0333 Cleveland @ Tennessee


6B

October 12, 2016  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  sabethaherald.com

school&youth WHS STUDENT COUNCIL

STORMONT VAIL FOUNDATION

Wetmore Student Council gets their groove on at the Regional Conference

Area students receive nursing scholarships

Submitted by Dakota McQueen WHS Student Correspondent On Monday, Sept. 19, seven of the Wetmore High School Student Council (STUCO) members and the sponsor Connie Hutfles piled into a van at 7 a.m. sharp to head to the regional conference held at Emporia High School. The members agree STUCO conferences are a great way to share ideas and take some risks meeting new people. Every year it is always a surprise as to what the students will be doing, and this year was definitely a change of pace. The guest speaker this year was Brandon Lee White, who talked about using dance as a way to improve leadership. Author, speaker and professional ballroom dance instructor, White has spoken to thousands of youth and adults in nearly all 50 states about “owning it” in life and leadership. Born unable to speak, White stated, “I was made fun of, taken out of school... and leadership changed it all.” White has been seen on TLC, Discovery Health, Fit TV and TEDx. He is a member of the National Speaker’s Association and has attended Rockhurst University where he earned his master’s in business as well as a double major in business and psychology. White didn’t only speak to the

Submitted by Linda Ruiz The Stormont Vail Foundation was pleased to fund nursing scholarships totaling $69,900 for 83 students at the Baker University School of Nursing, Stormont Vail Campus, for the fall 2016 semester. Of those 83 students, two

KANSAS JUNIOR LIVESTOCK SHOW

Local youth, livestock rewarded at Kansas Junior Livestock Show Wetmore High School Student Council members Rachel Bloom, Dakota McQueen, Alena Pfrang, Joel Hutfles, McKayla Henry, Mariah Ramirez and Jill Henry attended the Regional Student Council Conference on Monday, September 19. Submitted | Linda Boyd

students about leadership, he also taught dance lessons to every student there. At first he numbers off all the girls and asked them to sit in lines around the gym. Then after all the girls were seated, he proceeded to number off the boys who would go to a spot where a girl was sitting. White taught ev-

eryone a very simple swing dance that had only a couple back steps and a swing. Everyone was very shy at first, but once everyone broke through their shells people had fun. “I eventually got very dizzy, but everyone smiled and laughed through the whole thing,” said

sophomore member Alena Pfrang. The day was considered worthwhile. STUCO member Mariah Rameriez said, “Brandon was really funny and inspiring. All in all, it was a wonderful day.”

ALLAN C. ROSS D.D.S. 502 S. Washington Sabetha, Kansas

785-284-3010 Dental Care For All Ages

local students were awarded with scholarships. Kelli Bauman of Sabetha was awarded with the Stormont Vail Health Auxiliary Nursing Scholarship. Jacey Rottinghaus of Seneca was awarded the Christ/Wolff Nursing Scholarship.

Over 20 years

Brown County local youth earning awards were Tayler Bacon of Powhattan, who won fifth, class 19, ShorthornPlus Breeding Heifer; sixth, class 12, Crossbred Market Steer; sixth, class 43, Commercial Breeding Heifer. Aden Geisendorf of Hiawatha won sixth in class 1 with Angus Breeding Heifer. John Grathwohl of Hiawatha won second, class 16, Shorthorn Breeding Heifer; and third, class 29, Simmental Pct Breeding Heifer. Jacob Rieger of Powhattan won 11th, class 9, Commercial Ewe Lamb; 12th, class 6, Chianina Market Steer; fourth, class 23, Charolais Breeding Heifer; and seventh, class 4, Commercial Ewe Lamb.

POSTER CONTEST

Axtell student is contest winner

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INTRODUCING

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Submitted by Scarlett Hagins Youth from across the state earned cash premiums and scholarships while competing in the 84th Kansas Junior Livestock Show. During the state’s largest youth livestock show, held Friday, Sept. 30, through Sunday, Oct. 2, in Hutchinson, 702 4-H and FFA members from 88 counties exhibited a record 1,515 head of livestock. Nemaha County local youth earning awards were Karrie Van Winkle of Corning. She won second, class 15, Blackface Market Lamb; third, class 14, Blackface Market Lamb, third, class 2, Hampshire Breeding Ewe; and fifth, class 12, Commercial Ewe Lamb.

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Submitted by Kim Stich Winners of two Put the Brakes on Fatalities Day statewide contests have been announced as part of the national safety campaign Put the Brakes on Fatalities Day. For the poster contest - Brooklyn Green-Lawson of Riverton, Kayleigh Flores of Moscow and Sierra de Koning of Axtell are the statewide winners. Each student was first selected as a regional winner and will receive a bicycle and a helmet donated by Safe Kids Kansas at presentations at their schools. A total of 824 Kansas kids ages five to 13 participated.

Green-Lawson, Flores and de Koning were then chosen as the statewide winner in their age category. They will also receive a $50 gift card from the Petroleum Marketers and Convenience Store Association of Kansas, movie passes from AAA Kansas and family packages. Put the Brakes on Fatalities Day is a nationwide effort to increase roadway safety and reduce all traffic fatalities. For more information and a list of all the winners across Kansas, go to www.ksdot.org and click on the Put the Brakes on Fatalities Day information.

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OR one non-perishable food item

Screams Ahead

October 29th, 2016

Terms apply. See frontierfarmcredit.com/terms for details.

ONE NIGHT ONLY! 6 PM - 10 PM 12 and Under must be with an adult 18+

Horrific Hayrack Tour of Haunted Grounds of Albany Food and Drink Stand On Site

Old Albany

Horrorfest & Hayrack Tour 1 mile north of Sabetha on X4 Road

cht

e r b m a L d a h T

ER P P U S T I F E BEN nation Free will do BBQ meal. llow. Auction to fo

Event sponsored by Albany Historical Society and Sabetha Chamber of Commerce

Oct. 82p2m

PLACES OPEN FOR

VOTER REGISTRATION

4:30m-unity Center

Bern Com

BANKS: OPEN BUSINESS HOURS BERN | CENTRALIA | CORNING | GOFF | WETMORE

CITY CLERK OFFICES

For more information or donations, please contact Tim at 785-548-5014 or Andy at 785-799-4022.

Sabetha – 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Seneca – 7:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

COUNTY CLERK’S OFFICE - SENECA COURTHOUSE Downtown Tecumseh, Nebraska

Schumann Financials, CLU, MBA Different types of life insurance, annuities and new combinations with long term care.

Schumann 1012 Main Street • Sabetha, KS Financials (785) 284-2107 or 1-800-281-2107

Mon. thru Fri. - 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

ADDITIONAL REGISTRATION SITES

New & Used Vehicles

Nemaha County Community Health Services, Sabetha; Nemaha County Training Center, Sabetha & Seneca; Kansas Driver’s License Office, Seneca

Voter Registration Closes On Tuesday, October 18th at the close of regular business hours and remains closed until Wednesday, November 9th. Certified GM ServiCe departMent

402-335-3348 1-800-322-0156 www.brinkmansgm.com

2015 Chevrolet Colorado Crew Cab

Mary Kay Schultejans Nemaha Co Clerk/Election Officer


school&youth

sabethaherald.com  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  October 12, 2016

4-H CLUB

SCHOOL ORGANIZATION

Morrill Tip Top celebrates 4-H Week

Sabetha PTO

Submitted by Emmie Grimm Reporter “4-H Grown!” was the theme to National 4-H Week, which was Oct. 2-8. 4-H grows leaders, workers, volunteers and helpers. According to the National 4-H organization, 4-H is America’s largest youth organization. Kids complete hands on projects in areas like health, science, agriculture and citizenship, in a positive environment where they receive guidance from adult mentors and are encouraged to take proactive leadership roles. The four “H’s” in 4-H stand for Head, Heart, Hands and Health. 4-H members pledge their head

Submitted by Kara Tramp PTO Secretary Sabetha PTO met at 7 p.m. Monday, Oct. 3, at the Sabetha Elementary School library. Present were President Lori Menold, Vice President Amber Deters, Secretary Kara Tramp, Treasurer Wanda Menold, Mary Herrmann, Anita Meyer, Holly Meyer and SES Principal Sara Toedman. Minutes from the September meeting were approved. W. Menold presented the Treasurer’s Report. The $5,000 donation from PTO to the Sabetha High School FFA for the greenhouse project was sent to FFA Advisor Chris Bauerle. OLD BUSINESS Secretary Tramp read thank you cards from Sabetha High School for the early September early release treats that were provided by parents. COMMITTEE REPORTS Landscape: The SES landscaping project will begin on Wednesday evening weather permitting. Jay Herrmann and Jared Metgzer plan to take out the bushes and haul off using a dump truck donated by Darin and Karen Edelman with Rent-A-Tool. (Editor’s Note: Planting has been moved to Oct. 14 and 15.) Planting will begin as soon as the kids leave the school grounds on Friday at approximately 4 p.m. Kara Beyer and Greg Strahm from Grimm’s Gardens will have everything ready to go. Saturday work will begin at 8 a.m. and finish when complete. The dead bush at SHS will be cut off this weekend and replaced with a boulder. Principal Sheri Harmer said replacing with a boulder is fine. A. Meyer presented a picture of some boulders found in a field and asked if those would be suitable for replacement of the bush at SHS and used where needed

to clearing thinking, their heart to greater loyalty, their hands to larger service and their health to better living for their club, community, country and world. 4-H offers a variety of projects. These projects are Beef, Citizenship, Clothing and Textiles, Communications, Dairy Cattle, Dairy Goats, Dog care and Training, Energy Management (Electric/ Electronics, Small Engines, Power of the Wind), Entomology, Environmental Science, Family Studies (Child Development, Family, Consumer Skills), Fiber Arts (Crochet, Knitting, Needle Arts, Quilting, Rug Making, Spinning, Weaving, Ethnic Arts, Macramé), Foods

and Nutrition, Geology, Health and Wellness (Bicycle, Health, Outdoor Adventures, Recreation), Home Environment, Horse, Leadership, Meat Goats, Performing Arts, Pets, Photography, Plant Science (Field Crops, Forestry, Horticulture), Poultry, Rabbits, Reading, Self-Determined, Sheep, Shooting Sports, SpaceTech (Rocketry/ Aerospace, Astronomy, Robotics, Geospatial, Computers), Swine, Visual Arts, Wildlife and Woodworking. 4-H offers something for everyone. The Morrill Tip-Top 4-H club Monday, Oct. 24, at the Morrill meets the fourth Monday of every Community Building. Become month. 4-H grown. The next meeting is at 7 p.m.

4-H CLUB

Fairview Willing Workers August The regular monthly meeting of the Fairview Willing Workers 4-H Club was held at 5 p.m. on Aug. 28, at Matt and Amy Lowdermilk’s home. The pledges were led by Emily Meyer. Roll call of “What grade will you be in?” was answered by 14 members and two leaders. The secretary read the last month’s minutes, and they were approved as read. The treasurer’s report was also accepted. We discussed when record books and officer books are due. Also, we discussed that we are wanted to serve at the Fairview Alumni Dinner at 1 p.m. on Sept. 3. Walker Lowdermilk gave a project talk over his beef project. The meeting was then adjourned. The meeting was a mem-

bership drive so members could bring a friend interested in joining 4-H. We also had a potluck, swimming and s’mores. September The regular monthly meeting of the Fairview Willing Workers 4-H Club was held at 6 p.m. on Sept. 11 at the Fairview Community Building. The pledges were led by Walker Lowdermilk. Roll Call of “What is your favorite class in school?” was answered by 16 members and two leaders. The secretary read the minutes of the last meeting, and they were approved as read. The treasurer’s report was also accepted. We discussed National 4-H Week and what we will do. National 4-H Week is Oct. 2-8. We decided to decorate the bank in Fairview and wear our

4-H shirts to school on Wednesday, Oct. 5. We also discussed next year’s officers and that installation of the new officers will be at the next meeting. Kodi Miller, Hunter Lowdermilk and Megan Brockhoff all gave a project talk.

Kody talked about swine, Hunter talked about fashion revue and buymanship, and Megan talked about a decorated mug she made. The meeting was adjourned and refreshments were provided by the Miller and Lowdermilk families.

at SES. It was agreed by all to use these boulders instead of paying for them. The memorial bed was discussed and tabled until early spring. Taco Feed: The PTO Taco Feed will be Friday, Dec. 2. Best Choice Labels: The group talked about how to encourage collection of Best Choice labels. It was discussed that an incentive type event with the three schools would help collection. Further discussion will be held at a later date. Box Tops: Three high school volunteers have agreed to help with cutting and organizing Box Tops, and $179 has been raised since August. Early Release Treats: The next early release will be Friday, Nov. 11. Crossing Guard: The group discussed recognizing the crossing guard. Giving Trees: A letter will be issued to the teachers next week regarding the trees, so teachers have ample time to develop their wish list. Principal Toedman said the week of Nov. 14 would be a good week for the trees to be hung in the SES hallway. A letter to remind and encourage parents to use their teacher’s wish list will be sent home with students. K. Tramp shared that feedback from an anonymous survey given to teachers last year was very high and the teachers were extremely grateful at all the practical gifts they were given. There was discussion about recognizing the paras/ISS staff sometime this school year. More will be discussed at a later date. NEW BUSINESS Our next meeting will be held at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 1, at the SES Library. The meeting adjourned at 8:11 p.m.

SPOOKTACULAR

SAVINGS

CARS 2014 2014 2013 2013 2012 2012 2012 2010 2006

FUSION SE w/1.5 cycl, aod, full pwr, Leather, Sunroof, Lots of extra, 29k miles FOCUS SE w/2.0 eng, aod, keyless entry, full pwr, 56k miles, Nice fun car!! TAURUS SEL w/3.5 eng, aod, Leather, full pwr, 73k miles, Full size one owner FUSION SE w/1.6 eng, Ecoboost, aod, full pwr, Sunroof, 26k miles, good mpgs!! FUSION SE w/2.5 eng, aod, full pwr, 76k miles, VERY CLEAN FOCUS SEL w/2.0 eng, aod, full pwr, 100,000 miles, Local trade TAURUS SEL w/V6 aod, Leather, Moonroof, 18k miles, LOW MILES, REDUCED MERCURY GRAND MARQ w/4.6 eng, aod, LS trim, full pwr, 64k, JUST LIKE NEW MAZDA 6 w/V6 eng, aod, S trim, full pwr, 154k miles, Great school car

2WD TRUCK 2010 2005

F150 CREWCAB w/5.4 eng, aod, Lariat, full pwr, Line X, 78k miles, VERY CLEAN F150 w/4.2 eng, aod, XL trim, 159k miles, dependable work truck

4WD TRUCKS 2015 2014 2014 2014 2014 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2012 2012 2012

F150 CREWCAB w/2.7 eco, aod, Lariat, full pwr, Chrome pkg, 15k, JUST LIKE NEW F150 CREWCAB w/3.5 ecoboost, aod, Lariat, full pwr, lots extras, 60k miles, Nice F150 CREWCAB w/5.0 eng, aod, Lariat, full pwr, 31k miles, VERY NICE F150 CREWCAB w/3.5 eco, aod, XLT trim, full pwr, LOT OF EXTRAS, 35k miles F150 CREWCAB w/5.0 eng, aod, Lariat, full pwr, Chrome pkg, 58k miles, CLEAN F350 CREWCAB w/6.7 diesel, aod, Lariat, full pwr, 100k miles, Very very clean F150 CREWCAB PLATINUM w/3.5 eco, aod, Longbed, full pwr, 49k miles F150 CREWCAB w/5.0 eng, aod, XLT, full pwr, 56k miles, Very clean one owner F150 CREWCAB w/5.0 eng, aod, Lariat, full pwr, 98k miles, tow pkg, Nice clean truck F150 CREWCAB w/3.5 Eco, aod, Lariat, Moonroof, Nav, full pwr, 72k miles F150 CREWCAB PLATINUM w/5.0 eng, aod, 63k miles, VERY clean, NICE GMC SIERRA CREWCAB Z-71 w/V8 eng, aod, SLE trim, New tires, full pwr, 45k miles F150 CREWCAB w/5.0 eng, aod, Lariat, full pwr, Bedcover, 60k, Great local trade F350 CREWCAB w/6.2 eng. aod, Lariat, full pwr, 97k miles, Nice local HD truck

2011 2010 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2004 2003 2003

F150 CREWCAB w/5.0 eng, aod, Lariat, Lots of extras, higher miles but very Nice!! F150 CREWCAB w/5.4 eng, aod, Lariat, Bedcover, Lots of extras, ONLY 33K MILES F150 CREWCAB PLATINUM w/5.4 eng, aod, LOADED, 90k miles, Nice F250 SUPERCAB w/6.8 aod, XLT trim, 213k miles, Utility bed, good work truck LINCOLN MARK LT w/5.4 eng, aod, Leather, full pwr, Moonroof, 104k, VERY NICE F250 SUPERCAB w/6.0 diesel, aod, Lariat, Longbed, full pwr, 113,000 miles, REDUCED GMC 1500 CREWCAB w/5.3 eng, aod, full pwr, SLE trim, 167k miles, Local trade DODGE DAKOTA w/V8 eng, aod, SLT trim, heated seats, 110k miles, Clean smaller truck F350 SUPERCAB w/6.0 diesel, aod, Lariat, full pwr, 154k miles, VERY NICE HD F150 SUPERCAB w/5.4 eng, aod, full pwr, XLT trim, 145k miles, NEW TIRES F250 BRADFORD BED w/6.0 diesel, aod, XLT, full pwr, 161k miles, RUN GREAT!!!!! DODGE 3500 QUADCAB w/5.9 diesel, aod, SLT trim, full pwr, higher miles but local trade

SUV’S & CROSSOVERS 2015 2015 2014 2014 2013 2013 2013 2012 2011 2011 2010 2010 2008 2006

EXPLORER XLT w/3.5 eng, aod, Leather, full pwr, 33k miles, 7 passenger vehicle!! EDGE SEL w/3.5 cycl, aod, full pwr, Leather, 22k miles, Very popular Crossover EDGE LIMITED AWD w/3.5 eng, aod, full pwr, 50k miles, Great local trade ESCAPE TITATIUM w/2.0 eng, aod, Leather, full pwr, 29k miles, GREAT smaller SUV EDGE LIMITED w/3.5 eng, aod, full pwr, Nav, backup camera, 71k miles, Great crossover EXPLORER XLT FWD w/2.0 Ecoboost, aod, full pwr, Leather, 58k miles, One owner EDGE SEL AWD w/3.5 eng, aod, full pwr, trl tow, pwr liftgate, 53k miles, NICE EXPEDITION KING RANCH w/5.4 eng, aod, Loaded, Quad seats, 83k miles, local trade EXPLORER LIMITED w/3.5 eng, aod, full pwr, quad seats, pwr liftgate, 120k miles, local trade EXPLORER LIMITED AWD w/3.5 eng, aod, Moonroof, LOADED, 91k miles EXPEDITION KING RANCH w/5.4 eng, aod, LOADED, Nav, Sunroof, 71k miles MERCURY MOUNTAINEER w/4.0 eng, aod, Leather, full pwr, 100k miles, Nice SUV EXPLORER EDDIE BAUER w/4.0 eng, aod, Sunroof, full pwr, higher road miles JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE w/V8 eng, aod, LIMITED, Moonroof, 112k miles

OCTOBER SERVICE SPECIAL 10% off wiper blades with Service Job

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BLUE OVAL CERTIFIED DEALER


8B

October 12, 2016  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  sabethaherald.com

classifieds EMPLOYMENT

C.J. FOODS, INC.

C.J. Foods continues to grow and is seeking friendly people to work in the customer care department that are confident, fully engaged, team players. We need dedicated individuals to bring a positive and enthusiastic outlook to work each day to care for our valued customers.

CUSTOMER SERVICE SPECIALIST

If you are an individual that has a high degree of energy, the curiosity to learn and grow, likes digging and crunching numbers in complex Excel documents, the drive to find and fix problems, is a quick learner, thrives in a collaborative and changing environment, loves problem solving, and has a friendly personality, then we want you to apply! THE RIGHT CANDIDATE MUST HAVE: • a minimum of a high school diploma, with one or more years in secondary education in business or related field preferred. • Two years of customer service and/or accounting/finance is required, preferably in an office setting. • Applicant must be proficient in Microsoft Office software, especially Excel, with ability to pay careful attention to detail. • Personal characteristics: pleasant, good-natured, cooperative attitude, honest and ethical, reliable, responsible, and dependable. Very competitive wages and bonus potential. Apply on-line at www.cjfoodsinc.com C.J. Foods Inc. is a drug free employer and EOE

BROWN COUNTY SPECIAL EDUCATION is accepting applications for

Classroom paras for 2016-17 school year High school diploma required. Health insurance available. Please contact Carol Strecker at 785-742-7108. Applications are available at the Brown County Special Education office located at 301 South 1st Street in Hiawatha. Applications are also available at www.bcksei.org.

CNA POSITION, 3PM -11PM Excellent opportunity to join our friendly, compassionate staff. We offer competitive wages, excellent benefits, and shift differential for evening and night shifts. Apostolic Christian Home | 511 Paramount, Sabetha, KS 66534 Call Chris Grote, DON at (785) 284-3471, stop in to pick up an application, or apply on our website at achome@apostolicsabetha.com All inquiries will be kept confidential.

Will be working evening shift 2 - 10 pm. CMA required. We offer excellent wages, shift differential, scholarship program for staff in college, and a wide range of other benefits for 20 hrs a week. EOE

LAKESIDE TERRACE

1100 Harrison | Sabetha, KS 66534 Contact Debbie Tangeman, Residential Director at (785) 284-0005, email debbie@lakesideterrace.org, or stop by for an application.

C.J. FOODS, INC. MANUFACTURING ACCOUNTING SPECIALIST

The Manufacturing Accounting Specialist will have primary responsibility for inventory and operational costing and reporting.

NOW HIRING:

FULL TIME EVENING CMA

• This position will provide support to accounting which will include but not be limited to accounts payable, accounts receivable, and order entry. • This position will perform cost accounting duties such as checking work orders for accuracy, reviewing open work order listings to ensure closing timely, sending daily operating reports to operations group, new item setups, working in ERP system keeping inventory listing current. • College degree in business or accounting preferred, minimum Associate’s degree required. May substitute accounting experience for education. • Two years prior accounting or business-related experience required. Visit our website at www.cjfoodsinc.com for on-line application. Must include a resume with application. Incomplete applications may result in disqualification.

CJ Foods is an EOE & drug free employer.

HIAWATHA COMMUNITY HOSPITAL

INSIDE SALES/SERVICE/MARKETING USC, LLC, a rapidly growing agriculture manufacturing company, is currently seeking an Inside Sales/Service/ Marketing position. The function of this position is to provide support to the Sales, Service, Marketing and Product Development departments. High school diploma required, college degree preferred. Salary will be based upon experience and includes a comprehensive benefits package. A complete job description is available by contacting jennifercarr@uscllc.com. Resume is required and should be sent to 2320 124th Rd, Sabetha, KS 66534 by October 19, 2016.

S upported L iving S taff open at

n emaha C ounty training C enter HOURS:

Week 1 Sunday

HCH is accepting applications for the following positions:

Wednesday Thursday Week 2 Monday Tuesday Friday Saturday

Host/Hostess – Nutrition & Food Services

Part Time Evening Shift: Responsible for handling patient room service orders and delivering and retrieving patient trays. This is the key contact person between the food and nutrition services department and the patients and is responsible for entering orders into a software system. Strong customer service skills, ability to multi-task, and attention to detail are a must.

Expeditor – Nutrition & Food Services

Part Time Evening Shift: Serves as the lead service person to verify tray accuracy and prompt delivery of patient trays. Assembles all tray items to make a complete meal. Works as a team leader by regulating flow of trays and speed of preparation to create a smooth work flow. Strong customer service skills, ability to multi-task, and attention to detail are a must.

RN – OB Department

Weekend R esidential s taff open at

n emaha C ounty tRaining C enteR , s eneCa This staff person will sleep in the staff bedroom of the residence. The staff in this position will respond to consumer needs that may arise during their designated sleeping hours. HOURS:

This is a weekend on/weekend off rotation. Working Hours Friday 4:00 p.m. – 11:00 p.m. Saturday 7:00 a.m. – 11:00 p.m. Sunday 7:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Designated Sleep Time Friday 11:00 p.m. – 12:00 a.m. Saturday 12:00 a.m. – 7:00 a.m. and 11:00 p.m. – 12:00 a.m. Sunday 12:00 a.m. – 7:00 a.m.

Hours may fluctuate due to consumer needs as determined by the super visor. STARTING PAY: $8.95/hour for working hours $7.25/hour for designated sleep time BENEFITS:

Cafeteria Plan; KPERS; Vacation, Sick, and Personal Leave.

Contact Kellie Jones at NCTC, 12 S. 11th St., Seneca, KS 66538; or call (785) 336-6116; or apply online at www.nemahactc.org. EOE

Sabetha Community Hospital is now accepting applications for a

Full-Time Business Office Clerk Job duties would include A/P, insurance billing, registering patients, scanning documents and customer service. An excellent base salary is offered and benefits include vacation, holiday, sick time, group health insurance, pension plan and numerous other benefits. If interested visit the hospital’s web site at www.sabethahospital.com or call Julie Holthaus, Human Resource Director at 785-284-1584.

Weekend Night Shift Position: Provide care for patients while predominantly working in the field of obstetrics providing care in labor, delivery, postpartum and nursery. Applicants must be strong communicators, team players, able to work under pressure, and have or be able to obtain a Kansas registered nursing license. Prior OB experience preferred. Full time weekend shifts consist of two weekends on and one weekend off rotation. On-call responsibilities required. $8 per hour night shift differential included!

RN – Medical Surgical

Full Time Weekend Night and Day Shift Position: Provide professional, direct nursing care to patients of all age groups admitted to the Med-Surg unit by following physician-prescribed regimen and hospital policies and procedures. Applicants must have or be able to obtain a Kansas registered nursing license. Full time weekend positions consist of two weekends on and one weekend off rotation. Night shift position includes an $8 per hour night shift differential!

Receptionist-Family Practice Clinic

PRN-Day Position. This position provides the welcoming of patients to the clinic and assists patients in making appointments and other requests from patients either in person or by phone. Promotes good will for clinic through good public relations.

position

This staf f is responsible for duties including monthly payroll, accounts payable, billings for ser vices, and other general office duties. HOURS:

40 hours per week Monday - Friday

STARTING PAY: $10.43/hour BENEFITS: Health Insurance; Cafeteria Plan; KPERS; Vacation, Sick, Personal, and Holiday Leave. Contact Mary Rose Sudbeck at NCTC, 12 S. 11th Street, Seneca, KS 66538; or call (785) 336-6116; or apply online at www.nemahactc.org. EOE

8:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. 3:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. 3:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. 3:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. 3:00 3:00 4:00 8:00 2:00

p.m. – 8:30 p.m. p.m. – 8:30 p.m. p.m. – 9:30 p.m. a.m. – 1:00 p.m. p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

This position rotates between these two weeks for schedules. Schedule may vary according to programming needs. STARTING PAY: $9.97/hour BENEFITS:

Cafeteria Plan; KPERS; Vacation, Sick, and Personal Leave.

Contact Beth Meader at NCTC, 329 N. 11th Street, Sabetha, KS 66534; or call (785) 300-1306; or apply online at www.nemahactc.org. EOE

Registered Nurse Full time, 30-40 hours per week. Daytime schedule, no Sundays!! Competitive wages and benefits. Sabetha Dialysis is looking for an RN that is enthusiastic, has a strong work ethic and is looking for a challenging and rewarding nursing position. Candidate will be trained in providing dialysis in the outpatient setting working 10-12hr days. This nurse will be a part of the dialysis team that includes the physician, patient care technician, dietitian, and social worker. The facility is located at 106 North 12th Street Sabetha, KS

Apply online at www.careers.davita.com More Info: Penny Bair at 918-760-1186 or penny.bair@davita.com

Nurse Aide-Medical Sugical

RN-Medical Surgical

Full Time Night Position. The Med-Surg Registered Nurse provides professional, direct nursing care to patients of all age groups admitted to the Med-Surg unit by following the physician-prescribed regimen and hospital policies and procedures, and by utilizing the nursing process.

HCH offers competitive pay and an excellent benefit package. For further details or to apply, please visit the Careers section of our website at www.hch-ks.org. Resumes and general questions may be submitted to HR@hch-ks.org or by calling Human Resources at 785-742-6579. HCH IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER

ASSEMBLER USC,LLC, a rapidly growing agricultural manufacturing company, is currently seeking a full time Assembler. Responsibilities will include assembly, pre-wiring of equipment, and print reading. Pay based upon experience and includes a comprehensive benefit package. We are willing to train the right individual. A complete job description and application is available by contacting jennifercarr@uscllc.com. Send resume to 2320 124th Rd, Sabetha, Ks 66534 or email jennifercarr@uscllc.com by October 19, 2016.

Controls Specialist Wenger Mfg. Inc, located in Sabetha, KS, is the

Experienced Welders Needed

global leader in the design and manufacture of commercial Extrusion Cooking and Drying Systems, which are used to process a wide variety of products including Companion Animal Food, Aquatic Feed, Animal Feed, Breakfast Cereals and Snacks.

Call Brad at 785-313-6333

Wenger is looking for a Controls Specialist and this position requires International and Domestic Travel. The technician should be knowledgeable with Allan Bradley PLC’s, ControlLogix, RSView32, FactoryTalk View SE and ME and electrical troubleshooting. Experience with Powerflex drives on Ethernet helpful, but not necessary.

Nemaha County Community Health Services is looking for a

Wenger offers competitive wages, paid leave, medical insurance, life insurance, short and long term disability and 401k.

REGISTERED NURSE

To apply contact fsteele@wenger.com or 785-284-2133 ext. 261.

open at

n emaha c ounty training c enter , i nc

S abetha

Full Time-Day Position. The Med-Surg Nurses’ Aide provides direct nonprofessional nursing care to patients of all age groups admitted to the Med-Surg Unit by following the direction of their assigned nurses in accordance with Hiawatha Community Hospital policy and procedures.

Trifecta Solutions in Sabetha

F inance a ssistant

in

Duties include administering immunizations, conducting children’s health assessments, newborn home visits, WIC program, communicable disease investigations, and public health education. Must enjoy working with children and families, be detail oriented, and highly motivated. Position is three days a week, 8 am – 5 pm. No weekends or major holidays. Competitive salary and good benefits available.

Call Jane Sunderland RN, Administrator at 785-284-2152 for more information or apply in person at 1004 Main Street in Sabetha.

Drivers: Sign-on Bonus! Vacation, 401k, Newer tractors, Paper logs. Great Pay/Benefits! CDL-A, OTR. Universetruck.com 866-958-7825

EOE

Convoy Systems is hiring Class A drivers to run from Kansas City to the west coast. Home Weekly! Great Benefits! www. convoysystems.com Call Tina ext. 301 or Lori ext. 303 1-800926-6869.


classifieds

sabethaherald.com  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  October 12, 2016

EMPLOYMENT

REAL ESTATE

Wanted

HELP WANTED

Part time Maintenance Position

Full time truck driver with at least 2 years experience, clean MVR, dependable, & self disciplined.

Flexible hours If interested, please apply at Rock Creek Hotel, 1423 S. Old Highway 75 in Sabetha or call 284-2300.

HELP WANTED

PRICE FURTHER REDUCED! 2754 N Road, Bern

www.heartland-realty.com

$260,000

FOR SALE

For Sale 1979 CJ5 Jeep V-8 304 engine and transmission, new tires, new soft top, new brakes, new seat covers and carpet, pin striping, excellent condition.

Growing small business looking for a

Field Install Tech

401K Retirement and 100% Health benefits provided after probation period.

Hiawatha, KS 66434

708 Roanoke, Seneca

CALL 785-285-1562

Need to be proficient with hand tools. Will train the right candidate . Competitive Wages - Based on experience.

Real Estate

Cheryl Lippold, Realtor 785-741-2381

MOTIVATED SELLER!

Weekends part time

Please Apply within All Star Convenience Store.

785-224-3773

Price reduced to $145,000

2 Full Time Positions

8 am - 2 pm or 2 pm to 8 pm 12 hours a week. All Shifts must be willing to cook, clean and operate registers.

Heritage

Jim Faunce, Realtor

Sheila Schwalm, Broker 785-741-1773 Office: 785-742-3618 720 Oregon Street

Please call Matt at 785-336-1372

2 pm to 10 pm and 6 am to 2 pm 40 hours a week.

For Sale 2006 Grand Prix 104,000 miles, new tires, one owner, loaded, excellent condition, serviced every 3,000 miles by local shop.

Drug Screening required. Call for more information: Haug Communications Inc 622 Neptune Dr. | Seneca KS 66538 785.336.3579

CALL 785-285-1562

FOR SALE

Piano Rolls 284-2270

1920s Four Square style with 3,500 square feet of living space. Five bedrooms, very charming, country living, new large metal building, many items new or remodeled.

$59,000 203 Hanson, Morrill

Like us on Facebook!

New Home, under construction

1781 Rachel Lane

(Located at the south end of Sabetha City Limits) Buy Now, and Pick Your Own Colors & Finishes

Call Todd at 785-548-5104 for details! GARAGE SALES

SABETHA REALTY 205 S. 8th St. | 785-284-3774 Dan Kellenberger, Broker

The Right Stuff

To review our listings, go to: www.sabetharealty.com

$5 Clothing Bag Sale

THR IFT S TOR E

on selected clothing

MISCELLANEOUS Stop OVERPAYING for your prescriptions! Save up to 93%! Call our licensed Canadian and International pharmacy service to compare prices and get $15.00 off your first prescription and

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Oct. 13th-Oct. 15th LOTS FOR SALE

307 S. 9th, Sabetha Monday – Friday 9:30-5:30 Saturday 9:30 – 1:00 785-284-0395

Large walkout lots located on Rachel Lane. South city limits of Sabetha.

“Like” us on Facebook “The Right Stuff Thrift Store” to keep up-to-date with sales and new items in the store.

Call Steve at 785-294-1208

Contact Us Today to Reserve Your Place in Business Services

Phone 785.284-3300 Fax 785.284.2320 advertising@sabethaherald.com PEST CONTROL

Erik Ganstrom (785) 336-1847 Kathy Ganstrom (785) 336-1848 Lori Burdiek (785) 294-1681 www.HeritageSuccess.com

For Sale!

Business Services AUTOMOTIVE

9B

ELECTRICAL

FOR LAND OWNERS Roll your New Home and Land Improvements into One Package. Discount National Pricing on Breeze II Doublewide and our 60th An-

niversary Singlewide. Trade-ins Welcome!! 866-858-6862

Advertise your business in our Business Services section for as low as $5.75 per week.

EQUIPMENT

MISCELLANEOUS

DENTIST LEGAL

1309 S. Old Highway 75 | Sabetha, KS

Dental Care That Never Quits! Services Provided:

ENTERTAINMENT

STORAGE Need extra storage space? 24 hour access various sizes

Call for prices and availability. 284-3205

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GUN SHOW OCT.15-16 SAT. 9-5 & SUN. 9-3 TOPEKA KANSAS EXPOCENTRE (19TH & TOPEKA BLVD) BUYSELL-TRADE INFO: (563) 9278176

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fun&games

10B October 12, 2016  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  sabethaherald.com

WEEKLY RECIPE

Smoked Oriental Sliced Beef INGREDIENTS

3-4 pound rump or chuck roast 1 cup soy sauce 1 cup diced onion 4 Tbsp. Brown sugar 2 cloves chopped garlic 2 tsp. Ginger 2 tsp. Sesame seeds 1 Tbsp. Ground mustard

INSTRUCTIONS

from the kitchen of Tim Kellenberger

Slice meat into 3/16 inch thick strips. Combine all ingredients into bowl and mix together using small whisk. Place meat into resealable Zip Lock bag and pour in the marinade. Shake well to cover meat and marinate for 24 hours turning bag several times to make sure all the meat is covered. Bring grill or smoker to a temperature of 300 degrees. Place strips of meat on grates and cook for no more than three to five minutes per side. Remove and serve.

Sudoku

Fun By The Numbers Here’s How It Works: Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the number will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle.

ALPHORN BARLEY BAVARIAN BEER BIERKRUG BRASS BAND BREWERIES CARNIVAL CAROUSEL CELEBRATION CHEERS CHICKEN FAMILY FESTHALLE FLOATS GERMANY GOATS HORSES KEG KELLNER LEBKUCHENHERZ MUSIC OKTOBERFEST O'ZAPFT IS PARADE PRETZEL PROST SAUERKRAUT SAUSAGE STEIN TENTS TRADITIONAL WIESN

H E C R O S S W O R D S A L D

CLUES ACROSS 1. Nonsense (slang) 5. Military leader (abbr.) 9. Removes 11. Streamed 13. Inner ear cavity 15. Where to go after high school 16. Olympics host 17. A day to remember fallen soldiers 19. Forearm bone 21. Bypass surgery pioneer F. Mason __ 22. Judo garments 23. Gentlemen 25. Large wrestler 26. Large integer 27. Makes a soft sound 29. Some claim to have six 31. Sunfish 33. Clan 34. A form of comedy 36. Defy 38. More (Spanish) 39. Sixteen ounces 41. Adventure story 43. Liquid distilled from wood or coal 44. Michigan ghost town 46. Fond of 48. Pearl Jam frontman 52. Clothes 53. Flinches 54. Giving the axe 56. Where planes are kept 57. Intervals 58. Plant's unit of reproduction 59. Equips

CLUES DOWN 1. Cooks by exposure to direct heat 2. Using few words 3. Wood 4. Steer 5. Soft drink 6. Consider 7. Clears from a river 8. Claim again 9. Beige 10. Witnesses 11. Spiked 12. Partidge actor Susan and Marmaduke director Tom 14. __ and Andy, TV show 15. Fraiche and de Menthe are two 18. Burden 20. Olfactory properties 24. Carbon particles 26. Set of four 28. A sweater pulled over the head 30. Relaxing places 32. Gets up 34. Canned fish 35. __ Blyton, children's author 37. A conceited and self-centered person 38. Fine-textured cotton fabric 40. Turner and Kennedy 42. Repents 43. Smartphones, tablets, etc. 45. A way to garner 47. Eat them for breakfast 49. Former Tigers third baseman Brandon 50. Oh, God! 51. Canadian flyers 55. One legged Chinese mythological demon


VOTER GUIDE Meet the Candidates

&

Polling Place Listings Voter Registration Constitutional Amendment Court Justice Retention

October 12, 2016 A Special Supplement to

The Sabetha Herald


voter guide

2C October 12, 2016  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  sabethaherald.com

ELECTION 2016 NEMAHA COUNTY VOTING LOCATIONS

ELECTION DAY

Tuesday, November 8, 2016 Polling places are open 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.

Bern Community Building

Gilman Township Nemaha Township Washington Township

Goff Community Center

Harrison-Goff Reilly Township

HCC Western Center Commons

Clear Creek Township Marion Township

VOTER ID

Must have photo identification to vote.

Nemaha County Community Building

Adams Township Richmond Township

Sabetha City Hall

Berwick Township Capioma Township Rock Creek Township Sabetha City – Ward 1 Sabetha City – Ward 2

ADVANCE VOTING

Nemaha County Clerk’s Office: 785-336-2170 Brown County Clerk’s Office: 785-742-2581

Sabetha City – Ward 3 Sabetha City – Ward 4 Wetmore American Legion

Granada Township Wetmore Township

BROWN COUNTY VOTING LOCATIONS Fairview Community Center

VOTER REGISTR ATION Registration Deadline: Tuesday, October 18th

Walnut Township Powhattan Township Hiawatha Fisher Center

Fisher Township Hiawatha City

Register Online: https://www.kdor.ks.gov/Apps/VoterReg/ Register in Person: Countywide Locations - Nemaha County Banks, City Clerk Offices, County Clerk Offices at County Courthouses Additional Locations - Nemaha County Community Health Services in Sabetha, Nemaha County Training Center in Sabetha and Seneca, Kansas Driver’s License Office in Seneca, SRS Office in Hiawatha

Morrill Township

Hiawatha Township Hamlin Padonia Reserve Horton Blue Building

Washington Township Mission Township Horton City

Robinson Senior Citizen Center

Irving Robinson


voter guide

sabethaherald.com  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  October 12, 2016

3C

AREA ELECTIONS

Local, state and national offices that will appear on 2016 ballots including the following: LOCAL LEVEL

BROWN COUNTY

NEMAHA COUNTY

Commissioner, District 2 Keith C. Olsen (R)

Commissioner, District 2 Tim Burdiek (R)

Commissioner, District 3 Dwight A. Kruse (R) Penny Gastineau (D)

Commissioner, District 3 Dennis R. Henry (D)

Sheriff John D. Merchant (R) Clerk Melissa L. Gormley (R) Treasurer Cheryl S. Lippold (R) Register of Deeds Nellie M. Brockhoff (R) Attorney Kevin M. Hill (R) Fairview City Mayor No Filing Fairview City Council Members Margaret Wikle (U) Hiawatha Commissioner of Streets and Parks Rebecca “Becky” Shamburg (D) Malachi Oswald (U) Hiawatha Commissioner of Utilities Toni J. Hull (D) Kedrin Pyle (R) Hiawatha Commissioner of Police Dustin Williams (D) Township Trustee and Treasurer for the following townships: Irving, Padonia, Hamlin, Morrill, Walnut, Hiawatha, Robinson, Washington, Mission and Powhattan Party Committee Men/Women for the following precincts: Irving, Padonia, Hamlin, Morrill, Walnut, Hiawatha, Robinson, Washington, Mission, Powhattan, Hiawatha 1st Ward, Hiawatha 2nd Ward, Hiawatha 3rd Ward, Hiawatha 4th Ward, Horton 1st Ward, Horton 2nd Ward and Horton 3rd Ward

Clerk Mary Kay Schultejans (R) Treasurer Janell M. Niehues (D) Register of Deeds Roxann Holthaus (R) Attorney Brad M. Lippert (R) Sheriff Richard D. Vernon (R) Township Trustee and Treasurer for the following townships: Adams, Berwick, Capioma, Center, Clear Creek, Gilman, Granada, Harrison, Home, Illinois, Marion, Mitchell, Nemaha, Neuchatel, Red Vermillion, Reilly, Richmond, Rock Creek, Washington and Wetmore Party Committee Men/Women for the following precincts: Adams, Berwick, Capioma, Center, Clear Creek, Gilman, Granada, Harrison-Goff, Harrison-Kelly, Home, Illinois, Marion, Mitchell, Nemaha, Neuchatel, Red Vermillion, Reilly, Richmond, Rock Creek, Washington, Wetmore, Centralia-Home, Centralia-Illinois, Sabetha First Ward, Sabetha Second Ward, Sabetha Third Ward, Sabetha Fourth Ward, Seneca First Ward, Seneca Second Ward and Seneca Third Ward

STATE LEVEL

Kansas Senate, District 1 Dennis Pyle (R) Jerry Henry (D) Kansas House of Representatives, District 62 Randy Garber (R) Kansas State Board of Education, District 6 Deena L. Horst (R) Aaron Estabrook (I) District Court Judge, 22nd Judicial District John Weingart (R)

NATIONAL LEVEL

President/Vice President Hillary Rodham Clinton/ Timothy Michael Kaine (D) Donald J. Trump/Michael R. Pence (R) Gary Johnson/Bill Weld (L) Jill Stein/Ajamu Baraka (I) U.S. House of Representatives, 1st Congressional District Roger Marshall (R) Kerry Burt (L) U.S. House of Representatives, 2nd Congressional District Lynn Jenkins (R) Britani Potter (D) James Houston Bales (L) U.S. Senate, Class 3 Jerry Moran (R) Patrick Wiesner (D) Robert D. Garrard (L)

Presidential Candidates’ Views Page 4C

Constitutional Amendment Ballot Question Page 12C Kansas Right to Hunt and Fish

Candidate Q&A

Pages 5C - 10C Questions and Answers with candidates facing opposition in the General Election

Justice Retention Page 11C


voter guide

4C October 12, 2016  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  sabethaherald.com

2016 PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATES’ VIEWS

HILLARY CLINTON (D)

DONALD TRUMP (R)

GARY JOHNSON (L)

JILL STEIN (I)

ECONOMY

Employers should be required to pay men and women the same salary for the same job. The government should raise the federal minimum wage.

The minimum wage should be a state issue. Employers should not be required to pay men and women the same salary for the same job, because there are too many other variables that determine salary.

All federal wage standards should be eliminated. Employers should not be required to pay men and women the same salary for the same job, because there are too many other variables that determine salary.

Employers should be required to pay men and women the same salary for the same job. The government should raise the federal minimum wage.

TERRORISM

The U.S. should defeat ISIS by intensifying the coalition air campaign against ISIS fighters, leader and infrastructure, and should step up support for local Arab and Kurdish forces on the ground. Guantanamo Bay should be shut down.

The U.S. should aggressively pursue joint and coalition military operations to crush and destroy ISIS, and coordinate international cooperation to cut off their funding. Foreign terrorism suspects should not be given constitutional rights.

The U.S. should stay out of Middle Eastern conflicts. Foreign terrorists should not be given constitutional rights. They should be tried in military tribunals but not subject to torture.

The U.S. should fight ISIS by cutting off the flow of weapons by initiating a weapons embargo to the Middle East. Foreign terrorism suspects should be given constitutional rights.

IMMIGRATION

The U.S. should not increase restrictions on its current border security policy, but needs to enforce the current policy.

The U.S. should increase restrictions on its current border security policy. Children of illegal immigrants should not be granted legal citizenship.

The U.S. should not increase restrictions on its current border security policy, and should make to easier for immigrants to access temporary work visas. Children of illegal immigrants should be granted legal citizenship if they were born here.

The U.S. should not increase restrictions on its current border security policy, and should make to easier for immigrants to access temporary work visas.

GUN POLICY

Additional restrictions should be placed on the current process of purchasing a gun. People on the “no-fly list” should be banned from purchasing guns and ammunition.

There should not be more restrictions on the current process of purchasing gun. People on the “no-fly list” should be banned from purchasing guns and ammunition.

There should only be more restrictions on the current process of purchasing a gun for criminals and the mentally ill. People on the “no-fly list” should not be banned from purchasing guns and ammunition.

There should be more restrictions on the current process of purchasing a gun.

LEARN

MORE

WATCH

RE AD

RE AD

Final Presidential Debate

Biographies

On the Issues

Wednesday, October 19th

Moderator: Chris Wallace, anchor, Fox News Sunday 90-minute debate, divided into six 15-minute segments Showing on all major networks and news networks

www.hillaryclinton.com www.donaldjtrump.com www.johnsonweld.com www.jill2016.com

www.isidewith.com www.votesmart.org


voter guide

sabethaherald.com  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  October 12, 2016

5C

UNITED STATES SENATE Jerry Moran (R-Incumbent)

Patrick Wiesner (D)

Tell us about yourself. After serving seven terms in the U.S. House of Representatives, Kansans elected me to the Senate in 2010. In Washington, I am a leading advocate for protecting and preserving the special way of life we live in Kansas. Despite the distance of more than 1,000 miles between Washington, D.C., and Kansas, I return home each weekend to meet with Kansans, listen to your concerns, and get my marching orders. Before being elected, I attended Fort Hays State University and later the University of Kansas, where I completed a degree in economics. After an early career as a small town banker, I received my J.D. from the University of Kansas School of Law. I practiced law in Kansas City and Hays, and served as the state special assistant attorney general and deputy county attorney of Rooks County. I live with my wife Robba in Kansas. What do you believe are the three most important issues you would face if elected, and what is your position on each? In my view, the greatest threat we have to being able to pursue the American Dream is the debt and deficit. I have opposed every stimulus package and every bailout offered by either party while fighting to reduce spending and enact a balanced budget amendment. Spending trillions of dollars that we do not have undermines economic growth today while putting a massive financial burden on our children and grandchildren. The security and safety of the American homeland is a paramount responsibility for those elected to serve in Washington. It’s clear that in the 15 years since 9/11, the threats this nation faces from Islamic extremism remain very real. We must remain vigilant against those who wish to take advantage of the free and open society in which we live while protecting the liberties we enjoy and cherish. There is no group of Americans JERRYMORAN.7C I hold in higher regard than our

Tell us about yourself. I am a life-long resident of Kansas. I was raised in Ellis. I am a tax attorney and CPA. Today, I own the firm Wiesner & Frackowiak, LC, which operates a tax and bankruptcy practice in Overland Park. I am a former Army Reserve attorney. In 2014, I retired as a Major with 21 years of military service. I have served on three one year-long deployments; twice to Iraq and once to Afghanistan. During my last deployment, I was appointed Chief of Contract and Fiscal Law, United States Forces-Afghanistan. My two children are college graduates. My son, Frank, graduated with a computer science degree from Wichita State University; he works in Saint Louis as a computer programmer in the aircraft industry. My daughter, Stephanie, graduated with a finance degree from Clemson University; she works in marketing and public relations for a large healthcare organization in the Kansas City area. What do you believe are the three most important issues you would face if elected, and what is your position on each? Reduce Health Insurance Premiums. My senator work will start with a rework of our health care policy. Small business owners and the self-employed are getting hit with annual health insurance premiums increases of 30 to 40 percent even though annual out-of-pocket costs have also increased. Many families have dropped coverage. This unchecked inflation in premiums and deductibles needs the immediate attention of the Senate. A Fair and Simple Tax Code. My lifetime of experience as a tax attorney and CPA makes me the right choice to draft new tax law. The standard will be a tax code that is easy to understand so that everyone knows what they owe; is enforceable so that everybody pays their fair share; and one that brings in enough revenue to fund our government and have a surplus. I look forward PATRICKWIESNER.7C to this work.

Robert D. Garrard (L)

Tell us about yourself. I’m an Electronics Technician for Garmin in Olathe. I troubleshoot and repair avionics such as navigation and communication equipment. From 1995 to 2014, I worked for JcAIR/Aeroflex in New Century and Lenexa, troubleshooting avionics test equipment. I graduated from DeVry Institute of Technology in Kansas City, Mo., with an Associate Degree in Electronics in 1993. I served on active duty in the Army from 1986 to 1991, repairing air defense radar in Mainz, Germany, and performing mechanical and electronics maintenance on air defense weapons at Fort Bragg, NC. I was deployed to Saudi Arabia, September 1990 to April 1991, for the 1991 war with Iraq. I’ve been active in the Libertarian Party of Kansas since 1996, and I was the Libertarian Party candidate for U.S. Congress, 2nd District, in 2010. My wife and I have lived in our home in southeast Douglas County since 1999. What do you believe are the three most important issues you would Tell us about yourself. Tell us about yourself. face if elected, and what is your I am a fourth-generation, self-emMy name is Jerry Henry. I was born position on each? ployed Kansas farmer. I attended Hiin 1956 in Seneca. I have been married My three highest priorities are awatha schools and Grace College of the to my wife, Linda (Becker) Henry for reducing government intervenBible. I have been married for 36 years to over 34 years. We have three children tion in the economy, reducing my high school sweetheart, Jennifer. We and seven grandchildren. I graduated American involvement in foreign have six daughters, four sons-in-law, one from Maur Hill High School and then wars, and cutting the budget to a grandchild and another on the way. We obtained a degree in Business Adminlevel that can be supported without operate a farm and small cow/calf operaistration from Benedictine College in incurring debt or overburdening tion. We built our home with hard work Atchison. After college, I became the Extaxpayers. and fiscal discipline, and managed to pay ecutive Director of Achievement ServicIf elected, what are two things you for three weddings within 10 monthses for Northeast Kansas, Inc., a private would like to accomplish within without having to borrow! I served in non-profit corporation that provides the first year of your term? the Kansas House of Representatives programs and services for developmenAs a member of a minority party, prior to being elected to the Kansas Sentally disabled citizens. I have remained my goals for the first year of my ate. I enjoy listening to the concerns of the Executive Director for over 38 years. term are to oppose any further exthe citizenry, and working to provide solutions to new and existing In 1986, I was elected to a four-year term to the Atchison City Commis- pansion government power or challenges. As a servant leader, it is an honor to stand for conserva- sion. In 1989, I was selected to be the Mayor for the City of Atchison. spendingof by Republicans or Demotive principles. I do not “go along In 1992, I was elected to the Kansas to get along” with the lobbyists and DENNISPYLE.9C House of Representatives. I have JERRYHENRY.10C ROBERTGARRARD.7C

KANSAS SENATE, DISTRICT 1

Dennis Pyle (R-Incumbent)

Jerry Henry (D)


6C October 12, 2016  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  sabethaherald.com

voter guide

U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, DISTRICT 2 Lynn Jenkins (R-Incumbent)

Britani Potter (D)

Tell us about yourself. I’m a 6th generation Kansan who grew up on a dairy farm just north of Holton. It’s here I learned the values of hard work, keeping my word and the importance of serving my community. I’m a graduate of Kansas State University and Weber State College with a degree in Accounting and a minor in economics. I’m the mom of two wonderful young adults, and I’m a Certified Public Accountant. I have nearly 20 years of experience helping individuals and small businesses manage their finances. I currently serve on the House Committee on Ways and Means, the chief tax writing committee in the House of Representatives, and it’s on this committee that I get to work every day for Eastern Kansans to reform our broken tax so we can grow our economy and create jobs. What do you believe are the three most important issues you would face if elected, and what is your position on each? 1. Hearing from Kansans and listening to their concerns is my top priority. I take their advice and counsel every week when I come home to Eastern Kansas and work to bring Kansas common sense values to Washington. 2. People who work hard and play by the rules deserve our respect and support. My focus will be on creating genuine opportunities that LYNNJENKINS.9C

Tell us about yourself. I’m a wife, mother of three, small business owner, and a school board member. I moved to Ottawa 15 years ago, and still live there to this day. First and foremost, I’m a person, not a politician. I view elected office as a position in which the representative owes a duty to the public. It is not a stepping stone to achieving other goals. I feel a calling to serve my community, and give a voice to the frustrated people who want a government that is interested in their needs, and not just corporate interests and big money donors. What do you believe are the three most important issues you would face if elected, and what is your position on each? First, there is the issue of the amount of money involved in politics and the corruption in Washington. I’m putting my money where my mouth is, so to speak, on this issue. Unlike my opponent, I am not taking money from special interest groups. I am running to serve the people, and my vote cannot be bought. The economy is also huge issue right now. The middle class is shrinking as our country’s wealth gets more concentrated at the top. We need to make sure that everyone, including large corporations, are paying their fair share in taxes. I want the government to invest in its people, and take on projects, such as bolstering our infrastructure, that BRITANIPOTTER.8C

U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, DISTRICT 1 Roger Marshall (R)

Kerry Burt (L)

Tell us about yourself. I am a father, a physician, a leader in my church, a veteran and the Republican candidate for Kansas’ 1st Congressional District. Two years ago, my wife and I had a discussion about leaving this country, and world, better than we found it. We decided the best way to do that would be to run to restore leadership in Congress for the common sense values and pragmatism that defines us as Kansans. I am not a politician, but with your prayers and support, I can advocate on behalf of our pro-life, pro-farm, proKansas values. What do you believe are the three most important issues you would face if elected, and what is your position on each? 1. Restore Kansas’ voice in congress in order to pass constructive legislation that supports the farmers, businesses, and residents of the Kansas First. 2. Stimulate the economy by eliminating burdensome and unnecessary regulations, simplifying the tax code so that all businesses are playing on a level field, and repairing our healthcare system in a way that lowers costs for the average citizen. 3. Protect crop insurance so that American farmers, the bankers who provide their loans, and local businesses where they shop will be ROGERMARSHALL.9C

Tell us about yourself. I live just outside of Hutchinson, and I work as an aircraft mechanic at the local airport. I have been married to my lovely wife for seven years and together we are raising an energetic six-year-old boy and a mischievous one-year-old girl. We are proud to homeschool our children and enjoy taking a personal role in their education. We are very much an outdoors family and we spend every minute we can fishing, hunting, gardening and raising all manner of creatures on our small farm. I am an avid sportsman and firearm enthusiast who would much rather spend his time in a field than in an office! What do you believe are the three most important issues you would face if elected, and what is your position on each? The most important issues facing the current congress are: 1. The federal government’s out-of-control spending. The United States in hemorraghing money at an absurd rate on everything from foreign aid for wealthy countries to subsidies for giant mega-corporations. That the current political machinery cannot put aside its absurd pettiness for such a critical function as balancing the budget is all but unfathomable. I will fight for a balanced budget that stops our tail spin into debt. 2. Our ever-expanding role in the KERRYBURT.8C

James Houston Bales (L)

Tell us about yourself. I am a native son of Kansas, born in Wichita. I received my Bachelor’s Degree from Wichita State in Secondary English Education. I am currently attending the University of Kansas School of Law. I come from a family of Kansas entrepreneurs and small businessmen, and I maintain their legacy to this day through my involvement in my family’s farming interests. I am married to Laura Hanenkamp, also of Wichita. My main motivation, both in attending law school and in seeking this office, is to help Kansans however I can. Whether I am fighting for the rights of Kansans in the courtroom or the Capitol, I will fight for Kansans. What do you believe are the three most important issues you would face if elected, and what is your position on each? The erosion of Constitutionally guaranteed rights. I believe that the Founding Fathers knew what they were doing when they wrote the Constitution, and that the rights guaranteed therein have been under assault for far too long. Runaway spending. The Federal Government is spending far too much money. We need to get Federal spending under control before future generations are overwhelmed with an unpayable debt. Foreign Policy and the Military. While our troops are the greatest in the world, we have been far too eager to use them for far too long. Congress needs to be slower to authorize force, and a more vocal check against presidential attempts to draw us into JAMESBALES.8C


voter guide

sabethaherald.com  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  October 12, 2016

BROWN COUNTY COMM., DISTRICT 3 Dwight Kruse (R) Tell us about yourself. I am a lifelong resident of Brown County. I have lived in the Morrill and Fairview area and currently reside in Fairview with my wife, Charlotte. Following graduating from Hiawatha High School, I attended Kansas State University, where I earned a bachelor’s of science degree in ag econ. After college, I engaged in crop and beef production, which I continue today. My wife and I have two grown children and two granddaughters. I have been and am still active in the community, serving on various boards through Church, Hiawatha High School FFA Alumni, and Walnut Township Cemetery Board. Previously, I

Penny Gastineau (D) No Photo Available

The Herald attempted to contact Penny Gastineau for responses to the Candidate Q&A, but received DWIGHTKRUSE.10C no response.

Patrick Wiesner End Lobbyist Control of the Senate. Lobbyists are hired to keep US Treasury money flowing to special interest groups, contractors and foreign governments. The lobbyists’ control over the timing, amount, and placement of campaign donations gives them unfettered influence over all US Senators. The threat of a well-funded primary opponent and negative ads deters all debate on federal spending reform. These lobbyists - unaccountable to voters - have taken the power of the purse away from Congress. I take it as my senate duty to defeat this power-grab of lobbyists. Only then will America have a Congress free to enact the people’s will on spending, taxes, and public debt. If elected, what are two things you would like to accomplish within the first year of your term? First, we will fix Social Security. The two Social Security trust funds’ $3.0 trillion investment in US government bonds will be earning more. As your Senator, I will draft the law that raises the interest earnings from about 3.3 percent to a fixed 9.3 percent. Interest deposits to the trust funds will increase by $180 billion each year. This will replenish Social Security with enough reserves to carry the trust funds well beyond the retirement of baby boomers. My plan does not increase payroll tax rates. We won’t need to raise the retirement age, reduce benefits, or incur more debt. The $180 billion of extra interest money will be moved to mandatory spending from some $310 billion of discretionary spending that Congress, every year, indefensibly wastes on expired programs that were never renewed. There are hundreds of these, See Congressional Budget Office report, dated January 15, 2016, “Unauthorized Appropriations and Expiring Authorizations.” Next, we will fix farm policy. The current income support structure limits its protections to what are called “shallow losses.” This policy is specifically designed to force farmers to buy federal crop insurance. Even though subsidized, the program fails because the premiums are unaffordable. My goal is for young farmers to buy land. Cultivated land prices are inflated because absentee investors can get government checks that are equivalent to high yield insured CDs. The current farm bill needs to be PATRICKWIESNER.5C

replaced with policy where the rewards come from raising and selling crops and livestock. What separates you from your opponents? As an Army Reserve fiscal law attorney with three tours of active duty in an Iraq and Afghanistan, I learned the federal budget process. I extensively studied federal appropriations law and became an expert on what the Constitution requires before the government can spend your tax dollars. I know about mandatory and discretionary spending and how each are funded. In private law practice, I’ve been a tax attorney my entire career. In addition, I have the extensive farm background that the senate now lacks. Kansas gets immediate problem solving capability out of me. I pledge never to let a lobbyist draft the law; never to depend on my staff to pick out questions to ask at a hearing; and will never vote on legislation I haven’t read. I don’t need any favors from Washington donors. I am free to vote my conscience. This will be real change. Why should voters elect you? In Washington, I intend to make changes. I’ll be a Senator who’ll stop the give-away of our tax dollars to the clients of well-connected lobbyists. I will immediately tell Senator Pat Roberts and the other big government incumbents that I won’t vote for conglomerated spending bills that neither they nor the rest of Congress have read. I pledge all spending proposals will be subject to the scrutiny of an evidence-based and transparent authorization process. No more secret spending projects buried in thousands of pages of appropriations law. An approved expenditure will involve only a government duty that represents a priority of the people. Yearly budgets will be passed on time and in surplus. Borrowing money will be tolerated only when needed to pay for declared wars and responses to disasters such as floods or the Zika virus. I have the experience, expertise, and enthusiasm to be the change the voters want. The tax code, Social Security, and immigration will be fixed. The Supreme Court will not have vacancies. The practice of giving access in exchange for campaign donations ends with me. I’ll have your back in Washington so you can focus on your family.

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Jerry Moran JERRYMORAN.5C

nation’s heroes. During my time in Congress – as a member of both the House and Senate Veterans’ Affairs Committees – I have made improving the quality of life for the nearly 250,000 veterans living in Kansas a top priority. Our nation’s veterans should be treated like patriots, deserving of care from a grateful nation – not made to feel like a burden. I will not rest until Kansas veterans have a Department of Veterans Affairs worthy of their service and sacrifice. If elected, what are two things you would like to accomplish within the first year of your term? While Senate Committees have worked hard this Congress to pass appropriations bills with strong bipartisan support, Senate Democrats continue to block the funding bills on the Senate Floor. By discarding this appropriations process, control of government spending is ceded to the executive branch, where risk of waste, fraud and abuse is abundant. I am hopeful that next year we’ll be able to pass a budget and actually prioritize federal government spending. Second, with the ever changing threats to our national security, our military cannot afford the reduced readiness that results from force reductions. I will continue advocating for our servicemembers and military installations in Kansas and their supportive communities. As a member of the Senate Appropriations Defense Subcommittee, I can directly impact the funding priorities of our nation’s military. I must also add a third goal. The current tax code is a disaster that hurts our economy. Next Congress, I will push to overhaul the convoluted code to make America a better place to raise a family, buy a home, start a business, and create jobs. I am the lead sponsor of the FairTax, legislation that would fundamentally simplify the tax code and abolish the IRS while creating a flatter, more fair system that benefits Americans of all incomes while supercharging the economy. What separates you from your opponents? Since first being elected to Congress, I have been a leading advocate for protecting and preserving the special way of life we live in Kansas. I consistently push back against the growth and overreach of government, fight for a strong military, work to roll back harmful regulations and bureaucratic red tape for Kansas agriculture producers, honor America’s heroes — our veterans — and find common-sense solutions. Additionally, despite the distance of more than 1,000 miles between Washington, D.C., and Kansas, I return home each weekend to meet with Kansans, listen to your concerns, and get my marching orders. I recently wrapped-up my third round of listening tour stops in each of Kansas’ 105 counties. Why should voters elect you? Kansans are concerned that our nation is going off-course: out-ofcontrol spending threatens our national security and our children’s future; high taxes and burdensome regulations make it hard to start and operate a small business; and we have an administration that seems more concerned with monitoring bathroom policies than confronting ISIS. Kansans are looking for principled, conservative leadership that will actually solve these problems. That’s who I am, what I’ve done, and what I will continue to do.

Robert D. Garrard crats and to support Gary Johnson in reducing government power and spending, should he be elected president. What separates you from your opponents? The biggest difference between me and my opponents is my belief that every individual adult American owns his or her life and property, and that individual Americans should be free to act in their own self interest, in pursuit of their own happiness, cooperating with others honestly and voluntarily, never forcibly sacrificing others to support them and never being forced by government to sacrifice themselves for others. Why should voters elect you? I ask voters to recognize that most Democrats and Republicans elected to the U.S. government have been doing approximately the same thing for more than 100 years and there will be no positive change unless those political parties and their leaders are removed from power. ROBERTGARRARD.5C


voter guide

8C October 12, 2016  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  sabethaherald.com

KANSAS STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION, DISTRICT 6 Deena L. Horst (R-Incumbent)

Aaron Estabrook (I)

View Candidate Information at: www.deenagordonhorst.com/

View Candidate Information at: www.aaronestabrook.com/

Kerry Burt KERRYBURT.6C

Middle East. It’s been more than a decade and the place is still a disaster. It may be time to acknowledge that we have no idea what we’re doing over there. I fervently hope that one day the Middle East will be a place of peace and prosperity, but it is becoming clear that that is an end that it will have to pursue on its own. No amount of bombing on our part will make it a better place. I will push for a sensible withdrawal from the plethora of conflicts we have engaged ourselves in. 3. The criminal justice system. The War on Drugs has taken a devastating toll on our communities. Violence and chaos in the streets has become in the norm in far too many of our cities. If I am elected, I will fight for reduced sentences for non-violent offenders and an end to the militarization of the police. If elected, what are two things you would like to accomplish within the first year of your term? Though it may seem in this time of political infighting a Herculean task, my goal for my first term is to work together with my fellow congressmen to develop a budget plan that cuts federal spending and balances the budget. Every single American family has to budget intelligently in their own lives and I find it absurd that this concept seems so unworkable at the federal level. At this point, I can think of no other mission more important to congress than the balancing of the Federal budget. My second goal is connected to the first: to develop a plan for our orderly withdrawal from conflicts in the Middle East. Our involvement in these conflicts has cost America far too much in blood and treasure for far too little

return. It is time to end our role as policeman for the region and let the other nations of the Middle East step forward in a leadership capacity. What separates you from your opponents? I believe that what differentiates me from my opponents, and from politicians in general, is that I truly believe that you don’t need anything from me. While others may go to Washington to ensure that this group gets that subsidy or these people get those benefits, I want to go to Washington for the express purpose of ensuring that you are left alone. The American people are capable of extraordinary feats when they are not busy being crushed by regulation and taxation. That is why I would like the opportunity to serve as your congressman — to keep the Federal government off of your back so that you can succeed. Why should voters elect you? Above all, you should vote for me because I believe in you. I’m nothing special — I’m an aircraft mechanic. I’m not running for congress because I believe myself to be some astounding statesman. But you just might be extraordinary. You might be the next Nicola Tesla, or George Washington Carver, or maybe this generation’s MLK. Or maybe you’re just the sort of person who has the will and the desire to succeed and wants the right to do just that. Either way, I want to fight for you. I want to make sure that whatever you want to be, that you can be that without the federal government standing in the way. I want to go to congress to make sure that the government steps back so that you can step forward.

Britani Potter will create jobs. Putting money into the pockets of the middle class earners, who will then spend it and reinvest it directly into the economy is the best way to turn things around for both people, and businesses. Health care is another important subject that comes up when I talk to people. Unfortunately, for too many people, the Affordable Care Act didn’t make health insurance affordable. We need transparency in the healthcare industry to encourage competition and lower costs. We also need to shorten the patent time on pharmaceuticals to eliminate these companies’ stranglehold on life-saving medications. This will also promote competition and lower our costs. If elected, what are two things you would like to accomplish within the first year of your term? I would definitely want to address healthcare. This is a necessity, not a privilege, and it needs to be truly affordable for all Americans. By taking steps to increase pricing transparency, reducing pharmaceutical patents, and reduce the cost of insurance for those who are already paying for it through their employer, we can ensure Americans are getting more bang for their healthcare buck. We also need to make sure adequate mental health coverage becomes a part of typical health insurance. Right now, it’s treated like a forgotten tagalong, and coverage is often weak or nonexistent. Everyone has a right to be treated for health problems, physical or psychological. Under the current system, coverage is simply too expensive for us to say that the American healthcare is working. I would also take steps to get lobbyist dollars out of our government. We have a revolving door where the majority of those in Congress who leave simply take an even higher paying job where they lobby their former coworkers for votes. Currently, there is an obscene amount of corporate money being spent on elections. Corporations are not people, and they certainly are not more important than everyday Kansans. Yet every day, they are buying special access to our representatives to ensure their voices are heard. Everyone’s voice should be BRITANIPOTTER.6C

heard, regardless of their wealth. We must limit special interests in Washington and return government to the people of the United States. What separates you from your opponents? My opponent is a career politician. She has held this position for eight years, and has no progress to show for it. She’s taken millions in PAC money and has served as reliable vote for Wall Street, big banks, pharmaceutical companies, and insurance companies. These groups do not have our well-being in mind. They have their profits in mind, and they don’t donate big money just to be nice. Congresswoman Jenkins has taken nearly $40,000 directly from the Koch brothers’ KOCHPAC since she first ran for federal office. She wants to take the ideas behind the failed experiment that they and Sam Brownback forced upon Kansas, and bring them to the Federal level on behalf of the incredibly wealthy. I will reject special interest influence and serve the best interests of the people I am elected to represent. I will fight for the middle class, not VIP donors. Why should voters elect you? Voters should elect me because I will truly listen to them. This was perfectly illustrated in August when I was touring the 25 counties in our district. My opponent and I were in Topeka on the same day. While I was meeting with any individual who chose to attend my meet and greet, and discuss their concerns, she was speaking to a credit union. Congresswoman Jenkins has lost touch with what everyday Americans want and need, and has completely disregarded them in favor of following around those who are willing to spend the most on her campaign. I am a middle class Kansan. I face the same challenges that most Americans face. I’m familiar with the problems that we all cope with in our daily lives, and I’m eager to change the system to make our lives better. Unlike my opponent, I will not become another cog in a broken machine. I will help usher in a new era of government in which the average voter’s voice is heard over the sound of the cash being offered to politicians like Congresswoman Jenkins.

James Houston Bales JAMESBALES.6C new conflicts. If elected, what are two things you would like to accomplish within the first year of your term? I would like to pass meaningful criminal justice reforms and education reforms that return control of the classroom to the State level. What separates you from your opponents? I respect liberty and the Constitution as my guiding principles. I have seen the liberty-eroding consequences of haphazard laws firsthand, and have legal training necessary to demand a higher quality of law in legislation. Why should voters elect you? Voters should elect me because I am a young, energetic, liberty-loving Kansan who wants to serve his fellow Kansans. I will reach across the aisle instead of perpetuating the eternal deadlock of Congress, and I will work to bring meaningful change not only to Kansas, but to America at large.


voter guide

sabethaherald.com  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  October 12, 2016

Dennis Pyle DENNISPYLE.5C

special interests in Topeka, and will not sell out the interests of my constituents. What do you believe are the three most important issues you would face if elected, and what is your position on each? State Budget: The Kansas legislature and those in positions on budget committees continually disregard the law on the 7.5 percent ending balance law, choosing to spend rather than exercise discipline. Building budgets on estimates and projections is the way “big spenders” keep up demand for tax increases. The Consensus Revenue-Estimating Group (CREG) which is comprised of a few individuals, make economic “predictions” which are used to build the state budget. This needs to be changed. My proposal, zero based budgeting or build budgets off of prior years actual revenue and inflation, capping the budget growth. School Finance: Administrative funding is more than adequate, but the fact is not enough of all budgeted dollars are reaching our classrooms. Unlike my democrat opponent, I don’t think the solution is simply spending more money. We need to take a results oriented approach so that we can prioritize the spending of taxpayer dollars in a way that helps Kansas students succeed. A first step would be redirecting administrative/bureaucratic dollars to be spent in classrooms and our rural schools. Second Amendment: Hillary Clinton and so many in the Democratic Party have said that Australia’s gun ban and subsequent collection would be a good example of how to handle an overstated gun problem in our country. Considering that this Presidential Election could also result in a change in the ideological balance of the Supreme Court, everyone who respects the 2nd Amendment should work very hard for Trump but be prepared to stand against a federal gun grab if Hillary wins. If elected, what are two things you would like to accomplish within the first year of your term? First, I think it’s extremely important that we all work together to make Kansas as job friendly as possible, incentivizing local businesses to expand, new businesses to form, and out of state industry to relocate here. Rural Kansas needs a strong voice for families and businesses; I have been and will continue to work to be that voice. It is one of my goals to continue working for private sector jobs and less government regulation and taxation. By maintaining the LLC tax exemption, exercising spending restraint, and regulatory reform we can significantly impact the Kansas economy’s ability

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Lynn Jenkins to produce quality jobs. The big spenders believe we can create jobs by growing government. History has proven them wrong and our families and businesses can’t afford that approach anymore. Second, I began the effort to stop government funded lobbying in the last few years. In this term I would like to continue that fight. It’s bad enough the way the legislature spends money as a result of lobbyist influence. The taxpayers deserve better than having their tax money fund those who advocate for spending more and raising their taxes. What separates you from your opponents? Who we support or do not support for president: I’m open and honest about my choice to support Donald Trump, he doesn’t like to answer the question. Our careers: mine is in the private sector, while his has been in government. Public accessibility: I attend public events routinely, most of the events he attends are thrown by his campaign. I have always supported concealed carry, he doesn’t. I have opposed tax increases, he voted for two of the largest tax increases in history. I supported the Holcomb power plant, he opposed it. I opposed special tuition breaks for illegal immigrants, he supported them. I am not endorsed by the AFL-CIO, he has a 100 percent lifetime rating. I support judicial reform, he consistently opposes it. I support restricting welfare recipients from using their benefits at liquor stores, strip clubs, movie theatres, arcades, and cruise lines, he opposes. I supported voter ID, he opposed. I support the 7.5 percent balance law, he votes to spend every penny. Why should voters elect you? Voters should vote for the person who best represents them and is successful in achieving results. Some legislators spend their time in politics with nothing to show for it but a paycheck. My record on life, the second amendment, tax and spend policy is clear, having sponsored and co-sponsored many successful pieces of legislation dealing with these issues and standing up against federal encroachment like Obamacare. I have worked for term limits and have gotten property tax relief legislation (the SAFE Senior Act) passed, helping seniors stay in their homes. As the leader in the legislature for taxpayer funded lobby reform, I’ve had success getting beneficial legislation passed in the senate while standing against the entrenched establishment. It has always been a struggle making sure our rural schools are funded especially when those who represent urban areas have over half the votes in the legislature. Having a rural republican in the senate is critical to obtaining equity for our rural schools.

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will improve the quality of life for all Eastern Kansans. I will relentlessly work to pass legislation that helps create an environment for goodpaying jobs, fosters a healthy economy, and helps folks keep more of their hard earned money. 3. At such a dangerous time as this, we must continue to do everything we can to keep Americans safe. I have stood up to the President’s disastrous plan to close Guantanamo Bay and won. The administration has announced that due to language I originally authored, they do not have authority to close gitmo and move terrorist to American soil. I represent Ft. Leavenworth and they have made it loud and clear they do not want terrorist housed on post. ISIS remains a threat and the President must put forward a credible plan to defeat ISIS. The House has acted on this. Unfortunately, this President continues his strategy of leading from behind. If elected, what are two things you would like to accomplish within the first year of your term? When Democrats were given unfettered power they took spending to new heights. Every day there was a new government solution to each and every problem. We are still dealing with a stagnant economy, an oppressive debt and an Administration embroiled in scandal. Since I was first elected I have worked to rein in out of control spending and ensure our children and grandchildren have the same opportunities we enjoy. I believe fixing our broken tax code and making it more fair is the single most important thing we can do, right now, to make our economy stronger and more secure. Tax reform isn’t glamorous. Tax reform doesn’t turn out hundreds for a political rally. Yet any family, individual or small business that has filed a tax return or forced to file for an extension in April knows our tax code is an outright mess. The house has put forward a concrete proposal to fix our broken tax code. You can view it at better.gop and I encourage you to take a look at it and let me know what you think. What separates you from your opponents? Unlike my opponent, I can tell you what my solutions to the challenges we face are. My opponent can’t even decide where she stands on the candidates for President, doesn’t know if terrorists should be at Leavenworth, and doesn’t know if we should pay more or less in taxes, I have no idea how she is going to fight against special interest and fight for the interest of Kansans. I’ve offered real solutions, my opponent has only criticized my positions and has offered zero ideas on how to solve them. I grew up nearby. You all know me and know that I will continue to fight for our shared values. Why should voters elect you? As a Jackson County farm girl at heart and a mom of two kids, I understand the challenge Kansas families are facing. I understand Kansas values, and I understand the value of an early morning and a hard days work. The reason I ran for office is because I was frustrated with both parties. For years, Washington politicians have passed laws that allow them to pick winners and losers. As a CPA I saw this every day throughout our tax code and I wanted to be a part of fixing it. We need to level the playing field and put hard working Americans ahead of special interests. I will work to ensure there are no more loopholes, handouts or bailouts.

Roger Marshall protected against years of low yields and prices resulting from uncontrollable circumstances and weather. If elected, what are two things you would like to accomplish within the first year of your term? As I mentioned, my top priority is getting on the House Ag Committee. Restoring Kansas’ voice is beyond important. I have talked with the Chairman of the committee, and House leadership, who are all supportive, and I look forward to being added to the committee in short order. I also plan to implement common sense healthcare reform. I have met with other physicians in Congress, and though I will vote to repeal Obamacare, these changes can ROGERMARSHALL.6C

even occur as changes to existing law. We must fix this healthcare system. Additionally, I should add that as a veteran, seeing to it that our government is taking care of our servicemen and women will be a major priority. What separates you from your opponents? I am the only candidate in the race who has earned the support of Kansans like Senators Dole and Moran Kansans who know how to fight for Kansans and what Kansans want. I’ll look to them as examples of service. I am the serious candidate in this race with a lifetime of leadership experience that can be a representative Kansans can be proud of.

Why should voters elect you? As I said to you in July, I’m a physician, not a politician. I am running for congress to give Kansans effective, conservative representation in Washington. While I am honored to be the Republican nominee for the First District, my pledge to you is simple: I will look at my party, and across the aisle for the best solutions for Kansans. I am a Kansan first. That is my priority over any party affiliation or pressure from the political elite and career politicians. As a proud Kansan, I would be honored to serve the people of my state, and put their needs before petty politics.


voter guide

10C October 12, 2016  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  sabethaherald.com

Jerry Henry JERRYHENRY.5C

been re-elected 12 times and I am currently serving in my 24th year. What do you believe are the three most important issues you would face if elected, and what is your position on each? Education for our children is a core function of our state government. The 2017 Kansas Legislature will develop and implement a new school funding formula for every school district in our state. We will have to set up the new funding formula so that every child in Kansas will have an education that prepares them for a global society. The 2017 Kansas Legislature will also have to develop a fair and stable tax program. We will have to close the LLC tax loophole. The current tax system has drastically reduced funding for many core functions for our state. Every month we fall short in our projected income for the state. Currently the Governor has called for an additional 5 percent across the board reductions. We have a number of businesses and individuals who pay no state income tax while other Kansas citizens are paying more in taxes. The State of Kansas budget will also be a major issue in the 2017 budget. Over 2 billion dollars has been diverted away from the maintenance of our highways, roads and bridges. We need to adopt a budget that fully funds our transportation budget. Our rural hospitals are struggling, nursing homes are behind in paying their bills, programs for the sick, the poor, the disabled and the elderly are facing reduced budgets. A completely new budget will have to be developed to address some of drastic cuts that have occurred in our state. If elected, what are two things you would like to accomplish within the first year of your term? First, we have to get our tax structure back in order. We need to re-balance our income tax structure so that everyone pays a fair and equal amount of taxes that maintains essential services for all our citizens. For example, currently our income tax structure allows for a doctor or a lawyer to pay no income tax to the State of Kansas, at the same time, the assistant or a secretary who works for these doctors and lawyers has to pay state income tax on all of their income. Many Kansas citizens, including doctors and lawyers, believe this to be unfair. Second, we have to get our state budget back on good footing. We consistently miss revenue pro-

Dwight Kruse jections every month. The governor just recently reduced funding to many state agencies by 4 percent, and now he is asking that all agencies prepare for another 5 percent budget reduction. Every year our budget seems to be out of balance. We need to properly fund our schools, maintain our roads and bridges and make sure that our vulnerable citizens are getting the help that they need in their daily lives. What separates you from your opponents? I will bring to the Kansas Senate a voice of reason. I will work to bring back some stability to our state budget and make our state tax policy both fair and balanced. It became clear after the Aug. 2nd primary that a vast majority of Kansas residents want a state government that is stable and caring. The current administration has been disruptive in providing adequate services to the citizens of Kansas, especially in our rural communities. I will fight to keep from consolidating our rural schools, I will fight to keep our rural hospitals open and I will fight to keep the needed services in our local communities. I have always been responsive to the needs of my constituents, I will answers letters and emails and I will return your phone calls. For me, being responsive to your constituents is an important part of being a public servant. Why should voters elect you? I would ask for everyone’s vote on Nov. 8th. I want to bring moderation back to our state government. I want to bring back our state to a time when you were assured that our schools would remain open, that services were available when you needed them, when public safety was adequately funded so that you could feel safe in your communities and your homes. Recently, I was honored to receive the endorsement of the Kansas Farm Bureau, I know from experience that the Kansas Farm Bureau only gives their endorsement after much consideration to the candidates. I have also received support from the Kansas Hospital Association, the Kansas Medical Society and the Kansas Bankers Association. I have spent over 16 years on the House Appropriations Committee, so I can assure the voter that I know how to read and assemble a state budget that works for all Kansas citizens. I have been the Mayor of a small city. I have voted 100 percent in favor on all pro-life legislation for the past 24 years as a state representative. Kansas is a great state to live, work, play and to raise a family, I want it to remain that way.

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served on the Fairview City Council and Walnut Township Fire Board. I also have volunteered for several organizations, such as 4-H, and have provided volunteer labor for various projects, such as the Fairview and Morrill community centers. What do you believe are the three most important issues you would face if elected, and what is your position on each? There are many issues that the county faces. Some of the more important issues are maintaining our county infrastructure, health care costs, and the decrease in funding at the federal and state level that help run local agencies and programs in Brown County. I will work to maintain the county infrastructure and to improve it when the revenue will allow it. As for health care costs, I will work on trying to keep costs down while still maintaining adequate coverage for the county employees. Until healthcare costs are under control nationwide, not much can be done on the local level. However, I will ensure our state officials know that passing costs down to local government to run programs is placing a undue burden on the taxpayers in rural areas of the state. If elected, what are two things you would like to accomplish within the first year of your term? As a county commissioner, I will be responsible to the people in the third district. I will have an open mind and will listen to the people and their concerns first, and then balance their needs with the needs of everyone else. I will work to make Brown County a place where people want to work and raise a family. What separates you from your opponents? As a candidate for commissioner, I have attended county commission meetings since mid-June and have gained a basic understanding of the time that is involved in being a commissioner. I have served as a City Councilman for the City of Fairview, served on the Walnut Cemetery Board and have been a member of the Fairview-Walnut Township Fire Board. These roles have given me an insight to the budget process and experience in being responsible in the use of taxpayer monies. I am aware of several concerns that the residents of the third district face, and I will work on these areas and improve where possible. Why should voters elect you? First and foremost, I will spent the time needed to do the job. I will take the time to serve on various boards or committees that a commissioner’s presence is needed or required. I understand the amount of time between weekly meetings to gather information, to meet with constituents and to listen to concerns. Second, I will always make myself available to the people. I want local government to be accountable to the needs of the people.


voter guide

sabethaherald.com  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  October 12, 2016 11C

RETENTION OF JUDGES

Should the following judges be retained in office? Supreme Court Justices If retained, justices will serve six years before another retention election. Appeals Court Judges If retained, judges will serve four years before another retention election.

Dan Biles Shawnee, Kansas Position 2, Kansas Supreme Court Since 2009

Karen Arnold-Burger

G. Gordon Atcheson

Carol A. Beier

Topeka, Kansas Position 9, Kansas Court of Appeals Since 2011

Overland Park, Kansas Position 8, Kansas Court of Appeals Since 2010

Topeka, Kansas Position 1, Kansas Supreme Court Since 2003

David E. Bruns

Kathryn A. Gardner

Steve Leben

Topeka, Kansas Topeka, Kansas Fairway, Kansas Position 6, Kansas Court of Appeals Position 14, Kansas Court of Appeals Position 2, Kansas Court of Appeals Since 2011 Since 2015 Since 2007

Marla Luckert

Lawton R. Nuss

G. Joseph Pierron Jr.

Caleb Stegall

Topeka, Kansas Position 5, Kansas Supreme Court Since 2003

Topeka, Kansas Position 3, Kansas Supreme Court Since 2002

Lawrence, Kansas Position 3, Kansas Court of Appeals Since 1990

Lawrence, Kansas Position 7, Kansas Supreme Court Since 2014

SEE BIOGRAPHIES, CASE LISTINGS, OPINIONS

www.kscourts.org


Right to Hunt and Fish Constitutional Amendment

The Kansas Right to Hunt and Fish Amendment, also known as Constitutional Amendment 1, is on the Nov. 8, 2016, ballot as a legislatively referred constitutional amendment.

Background How It Will Appear on the Ballot Shall the following be adopted? 21. Right of public to hunt, fish and trap wildlife. The people have the right to hunt, fish and trap, including by the use of traditional methods, subject to reasonable laws and regulations that promote wildlife conservation and management and that preserve the future of hunting and fishing. Public hunting and fishing shall be a preferred means of managing and controlling wildlife. This section shall not be construed to modify any provision of law relating to trespass, property rights or water resources.

Explanatory statement. This amendment is to preserve constitutionally the right of the public to hunt, fish and trap wildlife subject to reasonable laws and regulations. The right of the public to hunt, fish and trap shall not modify any provision of common law or statutes relating to trespass, eminent domain or any other private property rights. A vote for this proposition would constitutionally preserve the right of the public to hunt, fish and trap wildlife that has traditionally been taken by hunters, trappers and anglers. This public right is subject to state laws and rules and regulations regarding the management of wildlife and does not change or diminish common law or statutory rights relating to trespass, eminent domain or private property. A vote against this proposition would provide for no constitutional right of the public to hunt, fish and trap wildlife. It would maintain existing state laws and rules and regulations governing hunting, fishing and trapping wildlife. Amendment 1 would permit the constitutional right to hunt, fish, and trap to be subjected to regulations promoting wildlife conservation and management. Furthermore, public hunting and fishing would be the preferred method of wildlife management under the amendment.

If Approved The amendment adds a paragraph 21 to the Kansas Bill of Rights. The following text would be added: Right of public to hunt, fish and trap wildlife. The people have the right to hunt, fish and trap, including by the use of traditional methods, subject to reasonable laws and regulations that promote wildlife conservation and management and that preserve the future of hunting and fishing. Public hunting and fishing shall be a preferred means of managing and controlling wildlife. This section shall not be construed to modify any provision of law relating to trespass, property rights or water resources.

The proposed amendment was introduced into the 2015 Legislative Session as House Concurrent Resolution (HCR) 5008 by Representative Travis CoutureLovelady (R-Ellis) and Representative Adam Lusker (D-Frontenac), but no action was taken. It was carried over to the 2016 session where it passed both chambers by large margins. In the Kansas Senate, Amendment 1 received unanimous support. In the Kansas House of Representatives, all but seven Democrats voted to place the measure on the ballot. Nineteen states currently have similar constitutional provisions for the right to hunt and fish. Two others have constitutional provisions guaranteeing the right to fish, and two have statutes providing for the right to hunt and fish. Vermont established its right to hunt and fish in 1777, but most of the other states have created their rights since 2000.

The Sabetha Herald 10 12 2016  
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