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THE SABETHA

WEEKLY RECIPE

Sabetha Community Hospital’s 2015 Baby Book

Head Cheese FUN&GAMES 8B

Strong Hearts, Outstretched Arms Family, friends and strangers alike wasted no time opening their hearts and reaching out to a Wetmore family forever changed by a Thursday morning, Jan. 7, accident. At approximately 8:25 that foggy morning, a two-vehicle crash at the junction of U.S. Highway 36 and W Road, about four miles south of Sabetha in Nemaha County, claimed the life of Rebecca Crismas, a 37-year-old mother of seven, while also injuring three of the family’s children. Weighted with hurt but armed with the knowledge that Rebecca’s husband, Aaron Crismas, was now the sole caregiver for the family’s seven children whose ages range from 1 to 15 years old, family and community members got to work. “We just want to thank the community for all the love and support they have shown us,” said the Crismas family in a statement to The Herald. “All the kindness has been very overwhelming. We thank God that he has blessed us with such a caring community.” Almost immediately, A. Crismas’ sister Autumn Plummer and brother-in-law James Plummer set up a GoFundMe fundraiser, with the stated purpose of raising money so the family could “start the healing process and not have the added stress of financial worries.” In only four days, more than 275 people had contributed nearly $19,000 to this fundraiser alone. View the GoFundMe page at https://www.gofundme.com/

d6h26myw. Sabetha business Aberle Ford has provided a vehicle for the Crismas family to use for free for the time being, with the option to buy later. Collections could help the family pay off the vehicle. Monetary and any other donations also are being collected at a number of area locations — Wetmore Academic Center, 321 6th Street in Wetmore; NEK Multi County Health Departments in Sabetha, Holton, Hiawatha, Seneca and Atchison; Community National Bank, 15 E Main Street in Sabetha; Netawaka Fitness Center; and a number of other local and area businesses and churches. Checks should be made payable to Aaron Crismas. Connie Ramirez, a family friend who has been helping to organize help for the family, said she has been amazed by the outpouring of love to the Crismas family. “May God bless everyone of you who have helped Aaron Crismas,” Ramirez said. “Our community extends way past our city limits. Our community is every town in a 100- mile radius, plus all those nationally that are helping in all different places. There are hundreds of people who have prayed and are helping, people from all backgrounds, from all walks of life.” Wetmore Academic Center PrinHEARTS.8A

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Spellbound

‘Methodology’ spells champion for Nathan Voos KRISTA WASINGER It was an intense battle back and forth between two fifth-grade boys at the Sabetha PTO Spelling Bee, held at 2 p.m. Friday, Jan. 8, at Sabetha Middle School. The battle for first place between Nathan Voos and Bryson Lay lasted for 10 words before Voos took the crown, correctly spelling “methodology.” At the beginning of Round 9, seven spellers remained and all were guaranteed a spot to compete in the County Spelling Bee. Eighth-grade student Molly Edelman went out on the word “escarpment,” followed by seventhgrade student Spencer Strahm missing “guardian,” which earned them seventh and sixth places, re-

spectively. In Round 10, seventh-grade students Ellen Glynn and Kenzie Meyer missed “cumulus” and “quagmire,” respectively. Meyer claimed the fourth spot, with Glynn securing the fifth spot. Also in Round 10, Voos missed “décor” and Jonathan Renyer missed “ottoman.” At the start of Round 11, the last two spellers out (Voos and Renyer) came back up to the podium. Renyer missed “alpaca,” and Voos correctly spelled “maximum,” earning Renyer third place. This left Voos and Lay to battle SPELLBOUND.8A

Nathan Voos, son of Brian and Jenny Voos, earns first place at the PTO Spelling Bee Friday, January 8. He is a fifth-grade student at Sabetha Elementary School. Krista Wasinger | Herald

Some of the missed words

PRAIRIE HILLS USD NO. 113

School Board meets AMBER DETERS The Prairie Hills USD No. 113 Board of Education met in regular session at 7 p.m. Monday, Jan. 11, at Wetmore Academic Center. Board members present were Ed Reznicek, Kathy Lippert, Kent Saylor, Jim Scoby, Leslie Scoby, Kent Kuckelman and Jeff DeMint. The board adopted the agenda as amended. Board members conducted the monthly check-in, with each being asked to reflect on a positive

JAN 2016

WEDNESDAY

SECTION C

CRISMAS FAMILY

AMBER DETERS

SINCE 1876

OH, BABY!

experience, and Superintendent Todd Evans also recognized board members for their years of service. Lippert, board member for one year, and Kuckelman, board member for three years, noted that they enjoyed the building tours. Saylor and L. Scoby, both board members for one year, said they have enjoyed working with board members and getting to know each other. J. Scoby, board member for one year, said he has learned it is a little

These spellers earned the Top 7 spots at the PTO Spelling Bee Friday, January 8. Pictured are FRONT ROW (L-R) Bryson Lay (second); Jonathan Renyer (third); and Nathan Voos (first); BACK ROW (L-R) Spencer Strahm (sixth); Molly Edelman (seventh); Ellen Glynn (fifth) and Kenzie Meyer (fourth). They all advance to the County Spelling Bee held in Seneca on Saturday, January 23. Krista Wasinger | Herald

attic regular canopy caramel glimmer field tirade valiant mutiny beret query coffee cymbals kangaroo diploma announcer everglades

hodgepodge fondant alpaca soprano mirthful eerily vigorously scrooge mundane guardian quagmire melodramatic winsome query hefty bawl prowess

BOARD.3A

SABETHA PLANNING COMMISSION

Lights out … again KRISTA WASINGER It was lights out – again – for Westar Energy customers in Sabetha, Oneida, Axtell and Bern Tuesday morning, Jan. 12. A power outage plagued the area beginning around 7:30 a.m. and lasting for nearly three hours for some customers. City of Sabetha employees powered up the city’s generators, restoring power to Sabetha customers in about 45 minutes, said City Administrator Doug Allen. The city operated on the generation until full power was restored through Westar. According to Westar representative Gina Penzig, a piece of equipment – a recloser – failed causing the outage. “Recently, we installed three reclosers in the area as part of our investment to improve reliability,” Penzig said. “One of the reclosers failed on Dec. 15. We suspected a manufacturing defect, so we returned the piece to the manufacturer.” The reclosers feed a substation north of Seneca. Now, with the second failed recloser, Penzig said Westar is sending both Tuesday’s failed recloser and the third recloser to the manufacturer for examination. Westar representatives have been investigating the area’s power reliability since November 2014. One plan to improve the reliability is to build a new substation by midyear 2017.

FOLLOW US:

Future Land Use is topic of Plan discussion KRISTA WASINGER The Sabetha Planning Commission met Thursday, Jan. 7. Present were Chairman Ed Steinlage, Vern Orton, Jeff Walter, Scott Krebs, John Rebant, Bill Roggenkamp and Scott Wedel. Julie Krebs and Adam Reel were absent. City Administrator Doug Allen and Assistant City Administrator Bill Shroyer also were present. Guests present were Daniel Tramp, City Commissioner Julie Burenheide, Mike Bosworth, Marlene Bosworth, Lora Key and Melissa Detweiler. Dave Yearout and Russ Ewy of Yearout Associates were on hand to continue discussions regarding the city’s Comprehensive Plan. Yearout Associates have been as-

WWW.SABETHAHERALD.COM Email sabethaherald@sabethaherald.com

sisting the Planning Commission with revising the city’s Comprehensive Plan, which has not been revised since 2002. At the December meeting, the Planning Commission discussed the Land Use portion of the Plan. Last Thursday’s topic was Future Land Use. Yearout and Ewy presented a proposed “Future Land Use” map, depicting a generalized pattern of future land use. Land use designations depicted on the map included urban reserve, low-density residential, moderate-density residential, manufactured housing, institutional, office, commercial/entertainment, transportation/utilities, government services, agricultural and park/recreation/open space. Wedel asked for clarity on the

Volume 140 | Issue 2 3 Sections - 24 Pages

definition of urban reserve. “Urban reserve is land that is rural undeveloped,” Yearout said. “What it means is that if the land changes out its current use, it may be part of the city at some point in the future.” Chairman Steinlage emphasized that the map is a “vision for the future” and does not change anything for anyone at this time. Yearout said the role of the Future Land Use map is to “say that if this community grew over the next several years, this is what might happen.” “Since we are looking at future land use, the development of Sabetha for housing should be south, west and north and not to the east,” PLANNING.6A

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2A

community record

January 13, 2016  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  sabethaherald.com

SPECIAL SUPPLEMENTS Sabetha Community Hospital’s 2015 Baby Book

INSERTS

Meadowlark Extension District Garrett Country Mart Hometown Memories

Farming involves taking risks but choosing the right insurance agency should not be one of them. “Your Farm Risk Partner.” Pat Sheik

deadlines&information The Sabetha Herald is the official Newspaper for the cities of Sabetha, Morrill and Fairview and the Prairie Hills USD No. 113 School District. The Herald is published each Wednesday. Circulation for 2015 averaged 2,000 copies per week. The Herald is a member of the following: � Kansas Press Association � National Newspaper Association � Sabetha Chamber of Commerce

SUNDAY

MONDAY 10

7:30 p.m., Too Young to Die Narcotics Anonymous, held at Midtown Building, First and Main Streets

DEADLINES

TUESDAY 11

WEDNESDAY 12

8:30-10 a.m., Coffeehouse at Morrill Community Building

9 a.m., Exercise Class at Cobblestone Court. Free to the public.

9:30 a.m., Coffee Hour at Cobblestone Court

9 a.m., Sabetha Christian Women meeting, at Buzz Cafe

6 p.m., Sabetha City Commission Meeting, at Sabetha City Hall

� News: 10 a.m. Monday for Wednesday newspaper. � Advertising: 10 a.m. Monday for Wednesday newspaper. � Special Holiday Deadlines for News and Advertising are 5 p.m. Thursday for next Wednesday's newspaper unless otherwise noted. If the holiday falls on a Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday or Thursday, holiday deadlines apply. Holidays include the following: New Year's Day, President's Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Veterans Day, Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day.

THURSDAY

10-10:30 a.m., Rural Mobile Food Pantry Distribution, Sabetha Community Food Pantry at NorthRidge parking lot

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5 to 6 p.m., Good Grief meeting, at Hospice Conference Room, located on second floor of east Sabetha Community Hospital 6:30 p.m., VFW Post 7285 Auxiliary meeting, Sabetha VFW Hall

7 p.m., Prairie Hills USD No. 113 Board of Education Meeting, at Wetmore Academic Center

7:30 p.m., VFW Post 7285 meeting, Sabetha VFW Hall

FRIDAY 14

8:30-10 a.m., Coffeehouse at Morrill Community Building

SATURDAY 15

16

9 a.m., Exercise Class at Cobblestone Court. Free to the public

6 to 8 p.m., Women in Agriculture Workshop, at Nemaha County Community Building in Seneca, RSVP to Conservation District at 785336-2186 ext. 110 by Jan. 11

7:30 p.m., Women’s Bible Study at United Brethren in Christ, 301 S. 12th Street in Sabetha

NUTRITION CENTER NUTRITION CENTER NUTRITION CENTER NUTRITION CENTER NUTRITION CENTER

PHOTOS � When submitting news photos, please submit by email or in person. Be sure to provide adequate information naming all persons in the photo and describing in detail what is going on in the picture. � Engagement, Wedding and Anniversary Photos are $25. The photos run two columns wide. � Anniversary Photos are $25 for (1) two-column photo, or (2) one-column photos. The charge is $35 to run (1) twocolumn photo AND (1) one-column photo. � Obituary Photos are $20. The photos run one column wide. � Birthday and Birth Photos are $10. The photos run one column wide.

Menu: Turkey Pot Pie with Mixed Vegetables, Biscuit, Broccoli, Mandarin Oranges, Cookies

17

7:30 p.m., Too Young to Die Narcotics Anonymous, held at Midtown Building, First and Main Streets

18

8:30-10 a.m., Coffeehouse at Morrill Community Building

Menu: Swiss Steak, Roll, Baked Potatoes, Cooked Cabbage, Fruit Cobbler

19

9 a.m., Exercise Class at Cobblestone Court. Free to the public.

9:30 a.m., Coffee Hour at Cobblestone Court Noon to 1 p.m., Sabetha Hospital Guild meeting (284-1535)

Menu: Beef Stew, Cinnamon Roll, Zesty Broccoli Salad, Island Fruit Salad

20

Menu: Chicken Breast with Cream of Mush., ww Roll, Mashed Potatoes, Green Beans, Straw. Mold Salad

21

22

Bern Red Cross Blood Drive, at Bern Community Center

8:30-10 a.m., Coffeehouse at Morrill Community Building

5 to 6 p.m., Good Grief meeting, at Hospice Conference Room, located on second floor of east Sabetha Community Hospital

9 a.m., Exercise Class at Cobblestone Court. Free to the public

7:30 p.m., Women’s Bible Study at United Brethren in Christ, 301 S. 12th Street in Sabetha

6:30 p.m., NAMI meeting at Hiawatha Community Hospital. Call 785-7423989 for more information

Menu: Creole Spaghetti, ww Bread, Lettuce Salad, Plums, Marshmallow Krispie Square

23

7:30 p.m., NEK-CAP, Inc. Board of Directors meeting, at NEK-CAP, Inc. Administrative Office, 1260 220th Street in Hiawatha

7:30 p.m., Quilt Lovers Guild meeting at Seneca Library

EVENT COVERAGE � If event coverage is desired, please notify The Sabetha Herald at least one month before the event is scheduled to take place.

NUTRITION CENTER NUTRITION CENTER NUTRITION CENTER NUTRITION CENTER NUTRITION CENTER

HOW TO SUBMIT NEWS &ADVERTISING (1) Stop in our office at 1024 Main Street, Sabetha. (2) Mail the information (typed of printed legibly) to P.O. Box 208, Sabetha, KS 66534. (3) Email the news to news@sabethaherald.com; Email the advertisement to advertising@sabethaherald.com. (4) Fax the information (typed or printed legibly) to 785-284-2320.

Closed. No Meals. No Bus.

24

7:30 p.m., Too Young to Die Narcotics Anonymous, held at Midtown Building, First and Main Streets

25

8:30-10 a.m., Coffeehouse at Morrill Community Building

Menu: Salisbury Steak, ww Bread, Mashed Potatoes, Green Beans, Strawberry Shortcake

26

9 a.m., Exercise Class at Cobblestone Court. Free to the public.

9:30 a.m., Coffee Hour at Cobblestone Court

eHerald: $27.95/year In-State Print: $41.00/year In-State Print+eHerald: $53.00/year Out-of-State Print: $48.00/year Out-of-State Print+eHerald: $60.00/year (tax included in all prices)

27

5 to 6 p.m., Good Grief meeting, at Hospice Conference Room, located on second floor of east Sabetha Community Hospital

6 p.m., STEP Foundation annual meeting, at American Legion Post 21, 812 Main Street in Seneca

6 p.m., Sabetha City Commission Meeting, at Sabetha City Hall

SUBSCRIPTION RATES

Menu: Ham and Potato Soup, Menu: Lasagna, Garlic Kolache, Cabbage Parfait, Bun, Corn, Lettuce Salad, Fruit Cup Mandarin Oranges with Jello

28

8:30-10 a.m., Coffeehouse at Morrill Community Building

Menu: Roast Pork, Muffin, Mashed Potatoes, Italian Vegetables, Ambrosia Salad

29

9 a.m., Exercise Class at Cobblestone Court. Free to the public

30

7 p.m., Sabetha High School Variety Show, at Sabetha Middle School

7 p.m., Cancer support group meeting at Morrison Speech Clinic in Hiawatha

7:30 p.m., Women’s Bible Study at United Brethren in Christ, 301 S. 12th Street in Sabetha

POSTMASTER � Form 3573 should be sent to: The Sabetha Herald, P.O. Box 208, Sabetha, KS 66534.

SUBSCRIBE TODAY! Please cut along this line and return with payment.

NUTRITION CENTER NUTRITION CENTER NUTRITION CENTER NUTRITION CENTER NUTRITION CENTER Menu: Hamburger Stroganoff, ww Noodles, ww Bread, Peas and Carrots, Tropical Fruit, Cookies

31

2 p.m., Sabetha High School Variety Show, at Sabetha Middle School

7:30 p.m., Too Young to Die Narcotics Anonymous, held at Midtown Building, First and Main Streets

FEB 1

8:30-10 a.m., Coffeehouse at Morrill Community Building

Menu: BBQ Pork Chop, Biscuit, Potato Casserole, Cheese Broccoli, Baked Apples

FEB 2

9 a.m., Exercise Class at Cobblestone Court. Free to the public.

9:30 a.m., Coffee Hour at Cobblestone Court

Menu: Chicken Patty Sandwich with Bun, Tri Tators, 3-Bean Salad, Sunshine Salad

FEB 3

10 a.m. to 2:45 p.m., Free Income Tax Assistance provided by VITA, at Northeast Kansas Area Agency on Aging, 1803 Oregon St. in Sabetha 5 to 6 p.m., Good Grief meeting, at Hospice Conference Room, located on second floor of east Sabetha Community Hospital

7 p.m., CAPS meeting, basement of Community National Bank

NAME:

Menu: Turkey Roast, Roll, Mashed Potatoes, Winter Mix, Fruit Crisp

FEB 4

8:30-10 a.m., Coffeehouse at Morrill Community Building

Menu: Minestrone Soup, ww Roll, Spinach Salad, Chunk Pineapples, Brownie

FEB 5

FEB 6

9 a.m., Exercise Class at Cobblestone Court. Free to the public

7 p.m., Sabetha Planning and Zoning Commission Meeting, at Sabetha City Hall 7:30 p.m., American Legion Post 126 meeting in room between Sabetha Family Pharmacy and Community Building

ADDRESS: CITY/STATE: PHONE #:

NUTRITION CENTER NUTRITION CENTER NUTRITION CENTER NUTRITION CENTER NUTRITION CENTER

EMAIL:

Menu: BBQ Meatballs, ww Bread, Augratin Potatoes, California Mix Veg., Banana Pudding, Vanilla Wafers

LOCAL SUBSCRIPTIONS ❏Newspaper ONLY: $41.00 ❏Newspaper & eHerald: $53.00 ❏eHerald ONLY: $27.95

OUT-OF-STATE SUBSCRIPTIONS ❏Newspaper ONLY: $48.00 ❏Newspaper & eHerald: $60.00 ❏eHerald ONLY: $27.95

Please mark your selection and be sure your address is complete and correct.

FEB 7

7:30 p.m., Too Young to Die Narcotics Anonymous, held at Midtown Building, First and Main Streets

FEB 8

Menu: Chicken and Noodle Soup, Muffin, Zippy Onion Salad, Mandarin Oranges

FEB 9

8:30-10 a.m., Coffeehouse at Morrill Community Building

9 a.m., Exercise Class at Cobblestone Court. Free to the public.

9:30 a.m., Coffee Hour at Cobblestone Court

9 a.m., Sabetha Christian Women meeting, at Buzz Cafe

6 p.m., Sabetha City Commission Meeting, at Sabetha City Hall

FEB 10

10 a.m. to 2:45 p.m., Free Income Tax Assistance provided by VITA, at NEK Area Agency on Aging in Sabetha 10-10:30 a.m., Rural Mobile Food Pantry Distribution, Sabetha Community Food Pantry at NorthRidge parking lot

Menu: Ham Loaf, Biscuit, Sweet Potato, Cheese Cauliflower, Fruit Cobbler

FEB 11

8:30-10 a.m., Coffeehouse at Morrill Community Building

Menu: Creole Spaghetti, ww Bread, Lettuce Salad, Plums, Marshmallow Krispie Square

FEB 12

Sabetha High School King and Queen of Hearts Crowning

9 a.m., Exercise Class at Cobblestone Court. Free to the public

7 p.m., Brown County Fundraiser, “Peterson Farm Brothers,” at Horton High School.

6:30 p.m., VFW Post 7285 Auxiliary meeting, Sabetha VFW Hall 7:30 p.m., VFW Post 7285 meeting, Sabetha VFW Hall 7:30 p.m., Women’s Bible Study at United Brethren in Christ, 301 S. 12th Street in Sabetha

NUTRITION CENTER NUTRITION CENTER NUTRITION CENTER NUTRITION CENTER NUTRITION CENTER Menu: Taco Salad, Chips, Cinnamon Bun, Lettuce Salad, Tropical Fruit

Menu: Oven Fried Chicken, ww Roll, Mashed Potatoes, California Blend, Peach Upside Down Cake

Menu: Salmon Loaf, ww Roll, Menu: Chili Soup, Cornbread, Scalloped Potatoes, Green Perfection Salad, Fruit Cup Beans, Strawberry Shortcake

FEB 13

7 a.m., Morrill Men’s Community Breakfast sponsored by Morrill churches, Old Community Center in Morrill

8 a.m., Sabetha Lions Club Paper Pick-up. Place newspapers by the curb, tied or in paper bags. No plastic bags, please

5 to 6 p.m., Good Grief meeting, at Hospice Conference Room, located on second floor of east SCH

7 p.m., Prairie Hills USD No. 113 Board of Education Meeting, at District Office in Sabetha

MAIL TO: The Sabetha Herald P.O. Box 208 Sabetha, KS 66534

Menu: Roast Beef, Roll, Mashed Potatoes, Japanese Mixed Vegetables, Apricots, Angel Food Cake

Menu: Tuna and Noodles, Roll, Sliced Carrots, Strawberries and Bananas, Chocolate Pie


community record

This Week’s Obituaries OUT OF TOWN Rebecca Crismas Roy Jones

Obituaries printed in The Sabetha Herald are printed for free up to 250 words. For anything beyond that, the charge is $.50 per word. A photo can be added for $20. For more information, contact us at 785-284-3300 or news@sabethaherald.com.

Rebecca L. Crismas

Rebecca Lynn Crismas, 37, of Wetmore died Thursday, Jan. 7, as the result of an auto accident. She was born Aug. 13, 1978, in Yuba City, Calif., the daughter of David and BobbyJean (McLennan) Smith. Rebecca graduated from Marysville High School in Marysville, Calif., in 1996. She attended Fleet Training School in San Diego, Calif, and served in the United States Navy from 1997 to 2002. She currently was a homemaker. She had lived in the Wetmore community for five years, and was a member of the Wetmore Bible Church. She previously lived in Holton and Norfolk, Va. Rebecca married Aaron Clarence Crismas on Aug. 11, 1999, in Norfolk, Va. He survives of the home. Other survivors include her children, Myrna, Alvana, Juliana, Malinda, Jonas, Joshua and Jebidiah, all of the home; her mother, BobbyJean McLennan-Smith of Topeka; step-mother, Margie Smith of California; father- and mother-in-law, Ted and Sylvia Wilson of Wetmore; a sister, Sarah Smith of Houston, Texas; and two brothers, Jonathan Smith of Fallon, Nev., and Chad Smith of Woodland, Calif. She was preceded in death by three infants and her father, David Smith. A Celebration of Rebecca’s Life will be held 11 a.m. Friday, Jan. 15, at the First Baptist Church in Holton. Family will greet friends from 5 to 7 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 14, at the Mercer Funeral Home in Holton. Private family inurnment will be at a later date. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be given to the Crismas Children’s Education Fund c/o Mercer Funeral Home, P.O. Box 270, Holton, KS 66436. To leave a message for the family, please visit www.mercerfuneralhomes.com. The Sabetha Herald 1/13/2016

Roy E. Jones

Roy E. Jones, 86, of Hiawatha died Saturday, Jan. 9, at Hiawatha Community Hospital. Roy was born in Sabetha Aug. 15, 1929, one of two sons born to Arleigh and Olwen Walters Jones, and was a lifelong resident of the Brown County area. He graduated from Hiawatha High School in 1947 and served 10 years with the 2nd BN, 130th FA, Kansas National Guard in Hiawatha, discharged at the rank of staff sergeant. He married Dorothy Gordon on June 11, 1950, at Mt. Zion United Methodist Church. She died Nov. 22, 1999. He married Mary Korthanke on Jan. 5, 2001, at Calvary Temple Church in Hiawatha. She survives of the home. Other survivors include a son Steven (Andrea) Jones of rural Hiawatha; two daughters: Jannifer (Michael) Mix of Osage Beach, Mo., and Barbara (Dennis) Rettele of Wetmore; step-daughter Pamela (Corey) Scott of Everest; seven grandchildren, Regina Bicknell, Ben Rettele, Casey McNulty, Shannon Blijlevens, Megan Thompson, Jereme Jones and Joshua Jones; two step-grandchildren Haley Scott and Patrick Scott; great grandchildren, Olivia, Delaney, Jillian and Collier Bicknell, Avery and Layton Rettele, Nathaniel and Jaidyn McNulty, and Estella Blijlevens; and an aunt, Margaret Jones of Hiawatha. Roy was preceded in death by his parents, and stillborn brother Arleigh Jones, Jr., in 1927; two granddaughters, Valissa Rettele and Jill Rettele. Services were held Tuesday, Jan. 12, at the Calvary Temple Assembly of God Church, with interment at Hiawatha Cemetery. Memorials are suggested to Gideon’s Memorial Bible Program or Calvary Temple Church, sent to Chapel Oaks Funeral Home in Hiawatha. The Sabetha Herald 1/13/2016

Leland R. Snyder

Leland R. Snyder, 84, of Sabetha died Wednesday, Jan. 6, at the Apostolic Christian Home in Sabetha. Leland, along with his twin brother Leo, was born to Roy and Lydia (Ledbetter) Snyder in Morrill on Nov. 14, 1931. When Leland was in high school, he and Leo made their home with Lee “Doc” and Lydia Wenger in the Morrill community. Doc and Lydia were like parents to the boys and like grandparents to Leland and Leo’s children. The twins graduated from Morrill High School in 1949. Leland joined the United States Marine Corps in September 1951. He served during the Korean War and was discharged in September 1953 with the rank of Sergeant. Leland married Nila Edelman on Dec. 10, 1953. Nila and Leland settled in the Rock Creek community for over 60 years, moving to Sabetha in September 2015. They enjoyed traveling and attending various activities their grandchildren participated in. He was an avid fan of K-State and of Duke. He was a meticulous farmer and stockman. He loved his children and grandchildren so much. He had a love for animals, especially his dog, Lola (his companion), with whom he was always extravagant with treats. His family considered him their own dog whisperer. He also was a member of the First United Methodist Church of Sabetha, and was a lifetime member of the American Legion and the VFW. He served on the Farmer’s Co-op board and the board of the Federal Land Bank. Leland is survived by his wife Nila of 62 years, daughter Melinda (Gregg) Wenger of Sabetha, and son Mark (Dee) Snyder of Houston, Texas; grandchildren Alex Wenger of New York, Lauren (Phil) DeBoalt of Thousand Oaks, Calif., Seth (Stevee) Snyder of Canyon Lake, Texas, and Eryn (Derek) Berger of San Marcos, Texas; and one great granddaughter, Eleanor Scout DeBoalt of Thousand Oaks, Calif. Funeral service was held Monday, Jan. 11, at the First United Methodist Church in Sabetha. Memorial contributions may be made to the Sabetha Community Hospital, Apostolic Christian Home or First United Methodist Church, sent in care of the funeral home, 823 Virginia, Sabetha, Kansas 66534. Online condolences may be left for the family at www.popkessmortuaries.com. The Sabetha Herald 1/13/2016

This Week’s Announcements BIRTHS Meara La Rock

DEATH NOTICE John Stone

Announcements printed in The Sabetha Herald are printed for free up to 250 words. For anything beyond that, the charge is $.50 per word. Photos can be added for an additional charge. For more information on photo charges, visit our website at http://sabethaherald.com/about/submit-anannouncement/ or contact us.

Births Meara Winifred La Rock

John and Lesley La Rock of Sheridan, Ill., are the proud parents of a daughter, Meara Winifred, born Thursday, Dec. 31, at Edwards Hospital in Naperville, Ill. She weighed 6 pounds, 13 ounces, and was 17-1/2 inches long. She has a sister, 3-year-old Aniston. Maternal grandparents are Les and Barb Heffner of Rushville, Ill. Great grandparents are Lucylle Cannon and the late Bud Cannon of Sabetha, and the late Bill and Janice Heffner of Macomb, Ill. Paternal grandparents are John and Fran La Rock of Lisle, Ill. The Sabetha Herald 1/13/2016

Death Notice John F. Stone

John F. Stone, 91, of Sabetha died Saturday, Jan. 9, 2016, at Sabetha Community Hospital. Funeral arrangements are pending at Popkess Mortuary in Sabetha. The Sabetha Herald 1/13/2016

How are we stacking up?

{

Questions? Concerns? Compliments? Don’t hesitate to contact us! by email to sabethaherald@sabethaherald.com | by phone to 786-284-3300 | in person at 1024 Main Street in Sabetha

MEMORIES

}

Compiled by Patty Locher from past issues of The Sabetha Herald

125 YEARS AGO

Friday, January 9, 1891 One of our correspondents from a neighboring town sent us a very interesting account of a lottery drawing which we necessarily and cheerfully fail to insert. The correspondent is probably not aware that the publication of such a news item would exclude The Herald from the mails and cause our arrest and trial under the charge of being lottery agents. The law is a good one, and The Herald expects to obey it to the letter. Cleren Cook and Will White went up to the Rock Island wreck Tuesday. They say it was the worst smash up they ever saw. The engines were fairly welded together and it took three engines to pull one of them away, breaking the rails in the operation. The body of Engineer Smith was carried through, Tuesday afternoon, to Horton. The trains were in a deep cut and just around a curve and the engines were fairly upon each other before the engineers saw the headlights. Then the only hope was to jump for life.

100 YEARS AGO

Thursday, January 13, 1916 Special dispatch to The Sabetha Herald: Salt Lake, Utah, Jan. 11 (Tuesday) – The state rested to-day in the case of Dr. Herbert Marshall, accused of murdering his wife in a hotel here. Miss Flora Belle Hedges of Garnette, Kas., intimate friend of Mrs. Bessie Haggard Marshall, was the principal witness to-day. She testified to having charge of Mrs. Marshall’s business. Frank Turner’s Hardware Ad: Ever since we have been in business, our aim has been to SERVE our patrons--to make their interests more important than our own--to protect them against loss, and shield their purses, by giving them value. A SPECIAL FOR THIS WEEK ONLY, we will give you ABSOLUTELY FREE a set of nickeled plated sad irons with every washing machine sold.

75 YEARS AGO

3A

Finance Committee gives report

Obituaries SABETHA Leland Snyder

sabethaherald.com  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  January 13, 2016

Wednesday, January 8, 1941 About half of the town of Sabetha was at the Rock Island station to witness as Sabetha’s Battery D entrained for transportation to Ft Joseph T. Robinson near Little Rock, Ark. As the Sabetha high school band played the national anthem just as the train was pulling from the station, many eyes were filled with tears, and not alone those of relatives and dear ones of the departing soldiers. There seemed something symbolic, patriotic and inspiring about the affair that moved all to deep emotion. Sixty-six men and two officers went to camp on this train. The other two officers and 23 men made the trip in the battery trucks and station wagons.

50 YEARS AGO

Tuesday, January 11, 1966 First Cavalry Div., Vietnam – Pfc. Roger W. Hartter, 21, son of Mr. and Mrs. Virgil W. Hartter, Sabetha, was assigned to the First Cavalry Division in Vietnam, Jan. 1. Hartter, a member Company B of the division’s 15th Medical Battalion, entered the Army last August and completed basic training at Fort Sam Houston, Texas. He was graduated from Sabetha Rural High School in 1962 and Draughons College of Commerce, Kansas City, Mo., in 1963. Before entering the Army, he was employed by Wenger Manufacturing. Roger Popkess was installed as Sabetha Kiwanis club president Thursday evening, Jan. 6, replacing Dick Hughes.

25 YEARS AGO

Wednesday, January 9, 1991 The only runners to show for the traditional midnight jog in Sabetha on New Year’s eve were Nancy Stoller, former Sabetha teacher now living in North Pole, Alaska, and Martha Montgomery, who lives on a farm west of Sabetha. Scott McCorkle recently pulled a 13-inch-long, two-pound carrot from his garden. He said he keeps the carrots in the ground with a cover of straw until he is ready to pull them for use.

10 YEARS AGO

Wednesday, January 11, 2006 On Friday, Jan. 6, Ollie Bauman of Sabetha turned 100 years old, joining Mae Schmitt in the unofficial Sabetha Centenarian Club. Army National Guard Pvt. Stephanie L. Sparks has graduated from basic combat training at Fort Jackson, Columbia, S.C. The 2005 Sabetha High School graduate is the daughter of Timothy Sparks of Sabetha and Debbie Brasher of Santa Ana, Calif. Lori Menold, R.N., BSH, of rural Sabetha, a 1997 Sabetha High School graduate and the daughter of John and Connie Lehman of Sabetha, has achieved Certified Diabetes Educator status, awarded by the National Certification Board of Diabetes Educators. Clint Merkel of Robinson is the winner of Votruba Archery’s deer contest. The deer he bagged had nine points on the right antler and seven on the left. The greatest spread was 21-7/8 inches, and the composite score was 188-6/8.

BOARD.1A different being on the board side of the table at meetings. DeMint, board member for four years, said he really appreciates how communities come together for their schools. Another thing that he enjoys is having the youth come and speak to the board about their groups. Reznicek, board member for 13 years and president for four, said one of the most positive experiences he has had on the board was the citizen committee for the bond issue, which involved people from throughout the district. The board approved the consent agenda, including minutes from the Dec. 14 meeting, payment of January bills for $315,274.16, payment of December payroll for $653,838.18, a decrease in the privately owned vehicle mileage reimbursement rate to 54 cents per mile, the resignations of Denise Huning and Brenda Wertenberger as Sabetha Elementary School teachers, and a contract with Cheri Grimm as Sabetha High School bookkeeper. The board received written building reports from principals Sheri Harmer, Matt Garber, Jennifer Gatz, Janelle Boden and Duane Ford. Principals also presented to the board on the experiences teachers had when they visited local businesses for their December inservice. Assistant Superintendent Volora Hanzlicek reported to the board on accreditation. Old Business Superintendent Evans presented the board with the month-to-date expense comparison. To date, the district has spent $405,911.28 less in the general, supplemental general, 4-year-old at risk, K12 at risk, food service, professional development and vocational funds. The district has spent $59,209.58 more from the capital outlay fund, and $54,773.88 more from the special education fund. Evans explained that the transportation staff salaries have been coming from the capital outlay fund this year, a change from previous years. Next, Lippert gave fellow board members a legislative update. Lippert said the K-12 Interim Committee was created to prepare a report for the legislature, and the report was created. However, she said, the Committee did not submit the report to the legislature. Lippert provided the board with some points made in the preliminary report. Next, members of the Finance Committee — Reznicek, Lippert and Saylor — reported to the board on the committee’s progress. Reznicek said the committee has met, and has meetings scheduled for the future. The committee does not have any recommendations to bring to the board at this time. Next, Superintendent Evans said the board received a number of bids for the D-14 Tractor from Summerfield, with the two highest bids being $1,500. The board voted to reject the bids and consign the tractor to the Axtell Knights of Columbus Consignment Sale. New Business Superintendent Evans brought to the board a discussion about dual sports. He said he believes it is going to come up at Sabetha, especially with the addition of softball and baseball. Currently, Axtell and Wetmore

allow a student to play in dual sports, but Sabetha does not. It is currently allowed at Axtell and Wetmore, but not at Sabetha. J. Scoby asked for input from Axtell and Wetmore principals. Ford said they allow it at Axtell with cross country and another sport, and cross country practices are in the morning. As a former athletic director at a larger school, he said, it was tried and failed. DeMint asked if it would be a building decision in terms of allowing it across the board, or on a case-by-case basis. Evans said he would see it being both — a decision to allow it, as well as a case-by-case determination and agreement between coaches. Lippert said she likes the individuality of letting the building decide whether it works in general, and whether it works for an individual student. She said she believes it also is important to consider the additional pressures that a dual sport could place on the coaches. The board members agreed that they would like to leave decisions about dual sports to each building. Next, Superintendent Evans presented the Fiscal Year 2017 district calendar proposal, as planned by the calendar committee. The board approved the calendar. Next, Superintendent Evans provided the board with information about Highland Community College dual credit licensure issues. A dual credit course refers to a course — that earns both high school and college — taught to high school students at the high school during the school day. Beginning with the 2017-18 school year, Evans said, licensure requirements are going to become more difficult for teachers to acquire. Under the new requirements, a teacher would need at least 18 graduate credit hours in the discipline or subfield to teach the course as dual credit. Hanzlicek explained to the board that these requirements are coming from the federal government. Evans told the board that HCC has said that as long as a teacher is on a path toward earning the credits, that teacher can continue teaching the dual credit course. To give teachers incentive to take the graduate courses necessary to continue teaching, or in some cases begin teaching, dual credit courses, Evans said he plans to instruct the school to its income from the courses to reimburse teachers for their continuing education. The board agreed that this was an acceptable idea, and should be done at the discretion of the building principal. Next, the board received Kansas Association of School Boards Policy Updates for first read. These updates will be considered for approval at the February meeting. Next, Superintendent Evans provided information to the board about the 2015-16 legal maximum general fund budget. Evans said when he did the budget, he took the figure directly from last year, since the general fund was supposed to be identical. However, there was a discrepancy, so Evans informed the board that the district adopted a budget for $80 less. The next regular meeting will be held at 7 p.m. Monday, Feb. 8, at Sabetha.


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January 13, 2016  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  sabethaherald.com

opinion EDITORIAL Sharing Positivity In this day and age, social media is a huge part of our everyday lives. It is used for many different reasons such as keeping in contact with old friends and updating loved ones on events happening in our lives. Social media is also a tool that expresses who you are as a person to the rest of the world. The posts and pictures that you publish on your page gives people an insight as to the type of person you really are, and those posts influence your personal brand. What image are you putting out there for others see and, more consequently, judge? Some people choose to share every detail of their life, while others choose to share very little or nothing at all. In all reality, the choice is ours on how much information we plan to share with friends and loved ones. For those of us who do choose to share our lives on social media, we still have the choice on the type of content we wish to share. While scrolling through the my personal Facebook news feed, the majority of content my friends and family share is happy, such as getting engaged or married, getting pregnant or celebrating a new baby, graduating from college, etc. Of course, some people want to focus on the negative aspects in their life, like if they had a bad day and want to rant about it. The point, though, is that we all make the choice of what we wish to share. Most people choose to always post happy things, and not share about their bad day at work or who upset them that day. I find it sad, though, that many people use social media as an outlet for personal frustrations and frustrations concerning current events. Instead, I prefer the idea of staying positive — think about the good things and not the negative things. This seems like an obvious statement, but I think it is an interesting concept that many of us should try implementing in our own lives more often. When you surround yourself with things that make you happy and embrace the positivity in the world, you will begin to notice that you are a more happy and positive person. If you choose to be negative and only focus on the bad, then I’m sure you can guess what life will be like. Positivity will begin to spread to the people around you. And honestly, that is what the world needs — more people to be happy and positive. We spend so much time trying to fix the parts of our lives that aren’t going as planned that we forget to embrace the positive things. When people inhabit this positive outlook on life and decide to share it on social media, others tend to think that that person’s life is always happy and perfect. This is not true. Everyone has his or her own shortcomings and failures, but that person is choosing to portray the positive side of life instead of focusing on those failures. Who really wants to show off their failures to the rest of the world? We have close friends and family for that. Be happy for the people who choose to share positive things, and don’t judge them. We do not know what that person might have gone through in order to get to that happy moment. Try to walk a mile in his or her shoes and think about what he or she has done or accomplished in order to make those happy moments happen. The happiest people don’t necessarily have the best of everything. They just make the best of everything they have. Life is only beautiful if you believe it’s beautiful. They are not trying to fake happiness. There is something good that happens each day in our lives, and the world would be a lot better place if we each tried to find that and share it with the rest of the world. What good thing has happened recently in your life that you want to share with your friends and family? Share it! You never know, you might just make someone else’s day. Heather Stewart Reporter The Sabetha Herald

LETTERS POLICY WRITE: Letters to the Editor, The Sabetha Herald, P.O. Box 208, Sabetha, KS 66534. EMAIL: news@sabethaherald.com We welcome letters of general interest to the community and reserve the right to edit for clarification or length. Letters should be fewer than 400 words, and writers are limited to one letter every other week. Letters are due by 10 a.m. on Monday before publication and must be signed with the writer's name, address and phone number for verification purposes. Only the name and hometown will be included in the printed letter. We do not publish anonymous letters or letters printed elsewhere.

COLUMNS

Life size fiberglass cow was a big hit

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e partnered up with fellow agents, Karol Lohman of Leavenworth County and Ray Ladd of Atchison County to bring a KSU Calving school to McLouth. It was sort of an unprecedented event. I’m not sure how many Extension meetings are held in McLouth Kansas. At any rate, we took our chance with a Jan. 4, meeting, unfamiliar location and a joint venture. Gosh, it did not disappoint. Dr. Dave Rethorst brought in #1407, the life size fiberglass cow, conveniently dissected in the right place, to insert a life size rubber calf. No. 1407 was a Hereford cow, and of course, couldn’t help myself, I commented, “of course it’s a Hereford, that needs calving assistance.” Sorry Willie and Henry Hill, you weren’t there to defend your breed! Dr. Chris Reinhardt our Feedlot Specialist first talked about body

National Soup Month

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n a cold winter day nothing could taste better than a hot, steamy bowl of soup. January is designated as National Soup Month. Soup is an easy meal that can incorporate many healthy ingredients. Create your own version with this simple plan. Nutrition 1. Heat fat in a large soup pot: & Finance two tablespoons BY: CINDY oil, butter or WILLIAMS margarine MEADOWLARK The opinions expressed in editorial, columns or 2. Add two to EXTENSION letters tot he editor do not necessarily reflect those three cups veg- DISTRICT etable and cook of The Sabetha Herald or its staff. until crisp-tender. Choose one or more chopped fresh, canned, or frozen vegetables: How are we celery, green pepper, green beans, carrots, onion, peas, corn, zucchini, squash, mushrooms, cauliflower, broccoli, cabbage, etc. 3. Next add a protein: one pound Questions? uncooked beef, chicken, ham, sauConcerns? sage or one (16 oz.) can beans (pinto, kidney, black, white, chick peas, Compliments? hominy, etc.) Don’t hesitate to contact us! 4. Then add three to four cups Email: sabethaherald@sabethaherald.com starch: diced potatoes, egg noodles, Phone: 785-284-3300 macaroni, pasta, uncooked rice. In Person: 1024 Main Street, Sabetha 5. Add broth: two cans chicken,

DISCLAIMER

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condition on cows and heifers and how it’s a good indicator of their breed back potential. The condition of the cow the day the calf drops, sort of tells you when she will breed back, or in the case of young cows, if she will breed Fenceline back. W hen Dr. BY: JODY Rethorst start- HOLTHAUS ed his presen- MEADOWLARK EXTENSION tation, even the DISTRICT AGENT youngsters in the crowd sat up and took notice. He had some great practical experiences he related, from his private practice days in the Sandhill’s of Nebraska. Dr. Rethorst is known for doing the Beef Quality Assurance programs and so he injected that knowledge into the presentation. One of his comments, drew a lot of attention, when he asked, “would you rather be pulled from

beef, and/or vegetable broth; four cups water and chicken, beef, or vegetable bouillon; one can crushed or diced tomatoes and three cups water; four cups milk and chicken bouillon or any combination of above to make one quart. Make it healthier by selecting no-added salt versions. 6. Season with one to two teaspoons any dried herbs or minced garlic. (If using fresh herbs add during the last five minutes.) 7. Partially cover pot and simmer until meat is cooked and starch and vegetables are tender (20 to 30 minutes). 8. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Simmer another five minutes. Serve. Leftover soup makes a quick and easy meal. Divide large amounts into small, shallow containers and store in the refrigerator for three to four days or freeze and use within two to three months, leaving two inch head space for expansion. What a great way to warm up on a cold winter day.

your feet with a chain that twists, or a nylon strap?” That’s why he promotes the nylon OB straps with four rings. He provided the website information and the crowd, w it h s m a r t phones, started looking. Thanks to Bill Hilbert, we have located the source. Later Bill found out that the OB straps can be special ordered from Tractor Supply Company. Here is the website, if you’re interested in the OB straps, http:// www.thewinnersbrand.com/Catalog/ItemContent.aspx?ItemNumb er=7298&CatalogId=LS&Catalog DetailId=87&NSM=Y. I think the OB straps would make a nice Valentine present for the hubby! The other take home message, was to revive a baby calf. We all

know, turning them upside down or swinging them only forces fluid out of the rumen, pushes the diaphragm down on the lungs, making it harder to breathe. We’ve all used the straw in the nostril to get them to sneeze out any mucus. Dr. Rethorst pinches their nose, about the place that a bull ring would sit. If you pinch hard enough, you will get them to sneeze. Of course, this was much easier to demonstrate on the rubber calf. It was a lot easier this time, the last time we hosted calving schools, I was combing the countryside for dead baby calves, putting them in my deep freeze and thawing them out in time for the schools. Nowhere in my college education was I taught, how long you defrost a baby calf, to make them pliable for a calving school. Many thanks to Drs. Reinhardt and Rethorst, my coworkers and the 85 participants. It was an evening well spent.

Talking to someone with dementia

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f you are caring for a loved one with dementia, you are no stranger to being a giver. You give your time, energy, patience, support and much more to someone who’s now in need. Here are seven tips for talking to some- Family Life one with dementia from Kristin BY: NANCY NELSON Angula, a native MEADOWLARK Texan, who is EXTENSION experienced in DISTRICT the senior care industry having worked for several facilities as a wellness and life enrichment director and Alzheimer’s and dementia care coordinator. 1. Approach from the front so as not to startle. 2. Converse at eye level. 3. Never argue or disagree; instead, join their reality keeping topics positive. 4. Keep it simple; stick to short specific statements. 5. Reminisce – in general, older memories are easier to recall than recent ones.

6. If an upset occurs, acknowledge their feelings and redirect with a change of scenery or new topic. 7. Don’t be offended if you are not remembered in the moment; it’s not you, it’s the dementia. Expanding on number three, joining their reality is important. Your loved one may lack short term memory but can recall a memory from 30 years past, possibly even believing they are actually in it. If Mom smells cookies and believes her mother is in the kitchen baking, encourage those around you to go with it. You might say, “Yes, they smell so good! What kind of cookies are they?” Do not argue with her; instead, join her reality. Remember as a caregiver to be kind to yourself, think of things in a positive light and be thankful that your loved one has someone like you looking after their needs.


opinion

sabethaherald.com  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  January 13, 2016

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COLUMNS

Build your financial foundation with life insurance

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know I need it, but I don’t want to think about it now, and I’ll deal with it later, it’s not a priority. These are two of the most common responses when the topic of life insurance comes up. Life insurance remains a product that many financial professionals agree should be the foundation on which people should build their financial goals. Why? Thrivent Financial suggests you start with your loved ones. The primary benefit of life insurance is to provide for them, helping them meet daily expenses so they can continue the activities of daily life should the unexpected happen. Proceeds from life insurance can be used by families to pay

ongoing expenses, like credit card and mortgage bills. The proceeds can also help cover daily necessities like groceries, gas, and other expenditures and can also pay for college Thrivent tuition and allow families to Financial keep commit- Column ments to one BY: STEVE another. Without ade- STOLLER quate life insurance coverage, many families could be placed under great financial distress to meet the ongoing financial obligations of their new situation. Having financial resources available after a loss can give families the time they need to grieve

and figure out what the future looks like. Life insurance may also protect one’s spouse against sharp reductions in future pension and Social Security payments by replacing assets cut short by premature death. Careful prepa rat ion and reviewing of all your accounts with a financial professional can help you know about all your pension coverage and whether you are prepared for the future. And it’s not just at home where life insurance can help. Life in-

surance can help business owners and others with significant assets to pass those assets to their loved ones in a tax-efficient manner. It also serves as an efficient tool enabling people to support nonprofit organizations through charitable gifts. Life insurance may not be a popular topic, but the security it offers brings a level of comfort that many people can’t do without. In addition, many people will find that life insurance coverage can be a key component of a retirement program as they plan for their long-term financial goals. None of us can control whether we will have tomorrow, but protecting the people in our lives is something we can take control of today.

Economics of weed control, vegetable varieties

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e just received word that the 2016 KSU Chemical Weed Control Guide will soon be available. If you are in need of a copy to begin your 2016 weed control offensive, contact a District Office or e-mail me at dhallaue@ksu. edu and we’ll be sure to hold one for you. Can’t wait? Find it online at: http://www.bookstore.ksre.ksu. edu/pubs/chemweedguide.pdf . Few would argue the importance that good weed control plays in our crop production enterprise. We know that weeds use light and moisture resources the crop needs. How important is application timing? University of Nebraska Professor of Integrated Weed Management Stevan Knezevic took a look at timing, with interesting results! His work (three years at two

eastern Nebraska sites) suggest that you have from nine (in 30 inch rows) to 19 (in narrow rows) days after soybean emergence before losing yield to weed competition. Once you reach that threshold, ex- Crops & pect about a t wo percent Soils yield loss for BY: DAVID every leaf-stage HALLAUER delay past the MEADOWLARK critical stage of EXTENSION weed control. DISTRICT Once the crop canopy closes, new weed germinations and competition diminish, says Knezevic. The information in the Chemical Weed Control Guide will be invaluable to helping you evaluate herbicide programs. Not only does it give product ratings from KSU evaluations, but it also provides

critical label information about active ingredients, use rates, etc. to help you not only control weeds, but reduce resistance issues as well. Contact us to get your copy soon! Recommended vegetable varieties It doe sn’t much matter if the weather is warmer than normal with no snow – it’s still winter! For avid gardeners, it can be a tough time of year! Take heart! Not all is lost, since now is the time to start checking out vegetable varieties you want to try out for the coming season (in fact, it won’t be long before we ought to consider starting plants indoors!). Trying out something new once

Now is a good time to design your landscape

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he dark, cold days of winter are a good time to dream and plan for the upcoming growing season. Have you always wanted to landscape your home but didn’t know where to start? We offer a number of publications available to help you accomplish your dream. This collection includes everything from general landscaping publications such as “Residential Landscape Design,” to specific works such as “Energy Efficient Landscaping,” “Landscaping the Farmstead,” “Naturalistic Landscaping” and “Low-Maintenance Landscaping.” You can download printed publications free of charge from http://www.hfrr.ksu.edu/DesktopDefault.aspx?tabid=600 or request printed copies from your local Brown County Extension office located in the Brown County Courthouse. Tame Credit Card Spending Shopping with a credit card can speed resolution if a product or service doesn’t live up to advertised claims, but using credit successfully typically requires self-discipline, said Carol Young, Kansas State University Research

in a while isn’t all bad, but if you want to increase your chances of a good harvest, start with proven varieties. Our KSU recommendations can be found in a publication called Recommended Vegetable Varieties found your District Extension Office or online at: http://www. bookstore.ksre.ksu.edu//pubs/L41. pdf. These plants tend to be the more “proven” ones across the state, increasing your chances of success. To help even more, obtain seeds from a reputable source including garden centers and seed catalogs. If choosing seeds from a business that does not specialize in plants, pay special attention to the packf you’re not close to retireage date, checking to be sure it ment age, it’s easy to ignore was packaged for the current year. what Social Security is doThough most seed remains viable for about three years, germination ing. However, some significant announcements made late last decreases as seed ages. year make now a very good time to pay attention. What follows is a summary of notable changes to Social Security at the start of 2016 and ways to ensure you’re making the right retirement planning and We would like to thank Dr. Wills and his staff claiming (http://www.consumand Stormont Vail staff for the excellent care erfinance.gov/retirement/beforeyou-claim/) decisions based on Patty received during her stay. We also would what’s ahead: like to thank all of our family and friends for 2016 Social Security payments the prayers, visits, wonderful food and flowers. won’t increase. In late October, Social Security (https://www.ssa. gov/myaccount/) announced that Robert & Patty Baumgartner there wasn’t enough inflation in 2015 to create a cost-of-living adjustment (COLA) to monthly benefits this year. Understandably, this announcement shook up recipients who look to Social Security for a significant part of their monthly income. It’s only the third time payments were frozen in the past 40 years since automatic COLA adjustments began, but here’s the rub – all three occasions occurred after 2010. In short, most seniors will have to live with an average monthly payment of $1,341 with married beneficiaries receiving a total of $2,212. Married and divorced individuals may have to rethink the way they claim benefits. Also last October, Washington settled a federal budget battle in part by closing some notable loopholes in Social Security law that allowed certain married couples to substantially increase their benefits over time and certain divorced individuals to claim benefits from former spouses under certain circumstances. These new restrictions on socalled file-and-suspend and restricted-claim strategies go into effect this coming May. In short, if you’re close to age 62 (the earliest age you can start claiming Social Security benefits) getting qualified advice has never been more important. Other COLA-related issues. When there’s no cost-of-living

On the Extension Line BY: MATT YOUNG BROWN COUNTY EXTENSION

and Extension family financial management specialist. “If paying with a credit card, shoppers may spend more than if paying with cash or a debit card,” said Young, who suggested asking yourself five questions before using your credit card: 1. Will this purchase help me meet one of my goals? 2. What do I have to give up to get it? 3. Would I buy this if I had to pay cash? 4. Would I come back tomorrow to buy this? 5. If I charge this, can I pay off this month’s bill? For more information, check with local or district K-State Research and Extension offices or visit Extension’s website, www. ksre.ksu.edu/financialmanagement/ and click on Kansas Saves.

Take a close look at social security in 2016

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Thank You

adjustment, there’s no change in the maximum amount of earnings subject to the Social Security tax, which will stay at $118,500 in 2016. This means earnings above that level aren’t subject to the Social Security portion of the payroll tax or used to calculate retirement payouts. At the same time, the Social Security earnings limit for people who work and claim Social Security payments will stay at $15,720 in 2016 for people ages 65 and younger. Social Security beneficiaries who earn more than this amount will have $1 in benefits temporarily withheld for every $2 in earnings above the limit. Some benefits are going down – a little. The highest possible Social Security payment for a 66-yearold worker who signs up for Social Security this year will be $2,639 per month, down $24 from $2,663 in 2015. The reason? Social Security noted that despite no cost-ofliving adjustment there was an increase in the national average wage index, one of the statistical guideposts the agency uses to calculate benefits. Service changes. If you haven’t created a My Social Security account, do so for two reasons: First, there have been reports of ID theft related to thieves attempting fraudulent signups for such accounts. Second, the agency is making more detailed account data available online such as estimates of monthly payments at various claiming ages. Also, Social Security expanded office hours in some of its field locations in 2015, so if you need face-to-face assistance, check hours of operation at your closest local office (https://secure.ssa. gov/ICON/main.jsp). Bottom line: Social Security froze benefit amounts for the coming year, and that has an impact on both current and future recipients. You can’t fully understand your retirement without understanding how Social Security works, so now’s the time to learn. By Nathaniel Sillin

the Nemaha County Courthouse and all non-essential County Departments

will be closed on

Monday, January 18th in observance of Martin Luther King, Jr., holiday

Tax, Income Planning & Estate Planning for 2015 & beyond Will I be able to receive tax relief? Do I want it short-term or long-term? When will income tax rates increase? Call Schumann Financials

Schumann 1012 Main Street • Sabetha, KS Financials (785) 284-2107 or 1-800-281-2107


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January 13, 2016  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  sabethaherald.com

local&area KANSAS HIGHWAY PATROL

Mother killed, three children injured in Thursday morning crash AMBER DETERS

The Ag Partners Young Co-op Leaders group met for the first session in February of 2014. Every year, a new group of young leaders meet to learn more about their local cooperatives and opportunities within them. In 2015, our second class made trips to the State Capital and to St. Paul, Minnesota. Pictured are (L-R) Craig Gilbert, Brent Wikle, Chance Steele, Adam Pyle, Ethan Noll, Michael Lanter, Josh Falk, Lincoln Hillyer, Ben Swinger and Brady Hageman. Not pictured are Nick Montgomery, Derek Pfrang and Dusty Jones. Submitted | Ethan Noll

Ag Partners visit state capital GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY

BCGS announces program about Jasper Edde Submitted by Greg Newlin At 7 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 21, at the Brown County Genealogical Society’s Research Center in Hiawatha, local resident Anne Cash will present a program about her ancestor Jasper Edde. At the age of 14, he left his family’s Tennessee plantation for Brown County where he secretly escaped slaves by day in his stone

Wedel said. “How far out do you go and what is the appropriate thing to put east of Antelope Road?” The reach can be as far as the community wants, Yearout said. “From a regulatory standpoint, you are limited to no more than three miles beyond city limits,” he said. “For planning purposes, you can stretch out as far as you want. Urban reserve also does not mean it is limited to residential.” Chairman Steinlage said he feels the perception will be that the Planning Commission is creating zones. “Our vision is based on what we know today. This is the future use we see within in a certain timeframe,” Yearout said. “The importance of having the Future Land Use map in the plan is when you have a zoning case.” Mike Bosworth asked if having the Future Land Use map in the plan means that the bar is set

ah Crismas, 1, were transported to Children’s Mercy Hospital. Joshua Crismas, 3, was transported to Sabetha Community Hospital. All vehicle occupants were using safety restraints, according to KHP. Accident response and cleanup caused closures on both U.S. Highway 36 and W Road until 3:15 p.m. U.S. Highway 36 — from the Kansas Highway 63 junction to the Brown County line. W Road was closed approximately 1 mile north and south of the junction.

BROWN COUNTY 4-H FUNDRAISER

Peterson Farm Brothers to perform in February The Brown County 4-H is proudly presenting the Peterson Farm Brothers Program as a fundraiser for the local 4-H program. It will be held Saturday, Feb. 13, at the Horton High School auditorium. Doors open at 6 p.m. and the program begins at 7 p.m. Advance tickets go on sale on Jan. 11. Cost

is $20 for adults and youth (up to 12 years) is $10. At the door will be $5 more. Seating capacity is 445. Tickets may be purchased at Horton National Bank and Pony Express Community Bank in Horton, Union State Bank in Everest and Horton or the Brown County Extension office 785-742-7871. Cash

or check only. Tickets sales will go towards the 4-H program to help pay for 4-H awards at the end of the 4-H year, judges for county 4-H day and other miscellaneous 4-H items. For more information please contact the Brown County Extension office at 785-742-7871 or Keith Olsen at 785-741-0208.

KANSAS FARM BUREAU

barn. Come be a part of this thought provoking informative free-to-thepublic evening given by a former Brown County teacher whose knowledge of this local historical figure we can all benefit from. The BCGS Research Center is located across the street west from In response to reports of two rethe Brown County Court House. cent cattle mutilations, in addition to current reward offers, Kansas Farm Bureau, along with McPherson and Harvey County Farm Bureaus are offering a $3,000 reward for information that leads to the arrest and conviction of individuals responsible for the deaths. higher. “I think it just gives clarity of the direction of the wants of the community,” Wedel said. “I can see people with the perception that ‘you are telling me what I can and can’t do with my property,’” Steinlage said. “This helps us be more clear with them – clear in what we can and cannot do.” The Kansas Highway Patrol is City Commissioner Burenheide short in manpower statewide. In said that it is important to make it addressing this shortage, the agenclear that this is just a vision and it is cy is exploring ways of attracting not set in stone. Planning Commis- more applicants for its trooper and sion members discussed changes other vacant positions. for Yearout and Ewy to make to the As an agency with a background Future Land Use map. of history and tradition, the agency At the February meeting, the has a tattoo policy. Planning Commission meeting As we move into 21st century will review all of the Plan areas dis- policing, the Patrol is interested cussed. In March, a public hearing in what the public’s thoughts are will be held regarding changes to on tattoos in law. the Comprehensive Plan. Currently the Patrol’s tattoo The next Planning Commission policy automatically disqualifies is scheduled for 7 p.m. Thursday, law enforcement officer candidates Feb. 4, at City Hall. from the application process for

Future Land Use map is a vision PLANNING.1A

A mother of seven is dead and three children injured following a two-vehicle accident at 8:25 a.m. Thursday, Jan. 7, at the corner of U.S. Highway 36 and W Road in Nemaha County. A Kansas Highway Patrol report released Thursday afternoon, Jan. 7, states that Rebecca Lynne Crismas, 37, of Wetmore, was driving a 2004 Chevrolet van south on W Road at U.S. Highway 36. Crismas failed to yield at

the stop sign at W Road, and was struck broadside by a 2016 Freightliner Cascadia driven westbound by Wayne E. Mowery, 63, of LaCygne, Kan. Crismas was pronounced dead at the scene at 11:30 a.m. Mowery was transported to Stormont Vail Regional Health Center in Topeka with non lifethreatening injuries. Also in the Chevrolet van were three children who also sustained injuries. Juliana Crismas, 11, and Jededi-

KFB offers reward for information related to cow mutilation deaths A cow was found dead and mutilated in a McPherson County pasture on Jan. 1. A family vet conducted an autopsy and discovered there were no bullet holes, and nothing was visibly wrong with the animal. Another report confirmed a bull was killed and mutilated in Harvey

KANSAS HIGHWAY PATROL

Christmas winners announced HERALD REPORT The Sabetha Chamber of Commerce has released the names of Christmas drawing winners. Winner of the “Coins for a Cause” Window Opening contest was Downtown Coffee. Downtown Coffee had $65 in its Christmas house. A total of $178.77 was collected for the Sabetha Food Pantry. The six winners of the $25 Chamber Gift Bonds were Roger Young, Sheila Rokey, Kelli Hartter, Harriet Strahm, Sue Schuette and Rene’ Asher. Other winners were as follows: Dennis Hartter, $25 gift certificate to C & K Service; Glenna Strahm, $25 gift certificate to Village Sampler; Lori Gruber, gift certificate to Char Mae; Linda Baumgartner, $25 Gift Certificate to Garrett Country Mart; Krista Wasinger, $10 Store Credit to Sabetha Family Pharmacy; Kimberly Craig, camo insulated gloves from Edelmans Home Center; JD Dempewolf, $25 gift card to Sabetha HealthMart; Vicki Goodman, $25 gift card to Sabetha Hardware Hank; Tiffany Menold, gift basket to Downtown Coffee; Jackie Swango, snowman from Grimm True Value; Carla Metzer, 9x13 baking pan from Hearthside Country Store; and Joyce Alspach, $50 Gift Certificate from Bern-Sabetha Veterinary Clinic.

County on Dec. 18. This incident in southeast Harvey County likely MORRILL CITY occurred the night of Dec. 17. COUNCIL The only conclusion was that both animal deaths were not natural. Both livestock deaths remain Council met in regular session under investigation. Anyone with Monday, Dec. 21, 2015 with meminformation should contact local bers Todd Gruber, Mary Meyer, law enforcement. Dan Halstead, Miles Ploeger and Robert Wahwasuck present. Mayor Roger Price presided. Superintendent Lee Wymer was absent. Minutes and vouchers were approved. After discussion of a delinquent utility bill, it was decided to allow the individual to pay the delinquent amount by Dec. 23. in the public to fill out. It was decided to contact the The survey is short, but will League of Kansas Municipalities provide the Patrol with valuable to see if any other cities have an information. ordinance concerning cash only The survey —available at http:// for utility payments for individuals goo.gl/forms/vyf3JAkwDL — is who repeatedly write checks that open now through Friday, Jan. 29. are returned for insufficient funds. We value your input and look It was decided to allow the city forward to hearing the responses. employees to have Christmas Eve The Kansas Highway Patrol takes off. great pride in the quality of the After reviewing the delinquent candidates, which we attract for accounts, it was decided to shut off the agency and our continued four services if payments are not commitment is to providing Ser- received. It was decided to disconvice-Courtesy-Protection to the tinue trash service to an individucitizens of the State of Kansas. al, as the individual is delinquent on paying the utility bill.

KHP asks for public input on tattoo policy having: · Any offensive tattoo, scarification or brand, regardless of location on the body. · Any tattoo, scarification or brand that would be visible when wearing an agency provided uniform or required work attire. Any such marking(s) appearing on the head, face, neck, hands, or arms (below the bottom of the bicep — as a general rule, any marking(s) visible when wearing a short-sleeved v-neck shirt. There is a brief survey on Google Forms that the Patrol is asking community members and those

SABETHA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE


local&area

sabethaherald.com  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  January 13, 2016

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NEMAHA COUNTY COMMISSION

County will receive new excavator and motor grader The Board of Nemaha County Commissioners met in regular session Monday, Jan. 4, in the Commissioner’s Room of the Nemaha County Courthouse. Commissioners present were Chairman Gary Scoby, Tim Burdiek and Dennis Henry. Department Reports Road and Bridge/Solid Waste Supervisor Dennis Ronnebaum advised the board that after reviewing the bids received for a new excavator and a new motor grader for the Road and Bridge Department, he would be satisfied with either purchasing a John Deere or a Caterpillar machine. Following discussion, commissioners approved the purchase of the 2015 John Deere 210G excava-

tor from Murphy Tractor at a cost of $138,000 with trade in of the county’s 2003 Caterpillar 320CL excavator. Following further discussion, commissioners approved the purchase of the 2016 Caterpillar 12M3 motor grader from Foley Industries at a cost of $167,458 with trade in of the county’s 2006 Caterpillar 12H motor grader. These purchases will be paid for out of the 2015 Special Machinery Fund. Ronnebaum received bids for the 2016 bridge inspections to be completed in Nemaha County. BG Consultants bid $96 per bridge, Central Kansas Engineering Consultants bid $68 per bridge, Schwab Eaton bid $77.62 per bridge, Cook, Flatt and Strobel bid

$75 per bridge, and Elite Engineering Services bid $61.50 per bridge. Ronnebaum let commissioners know that he checked on some references of Elite Engineering Services. He stated that he was satisfied with the reports received. Commissioners approved the bid from Elite Engineering Services for 2016 bridge inspections at a cost of $61.50 per bridge. Scoby signed the contract with Elite Engineering Services as presented. Sheriff Rich Vernon advised the board that he hired Lane Bachamp as a full-time corrections officer and Jeremy Haug as a relief corrections officer in the Sheriff ’s Department. Bachamp began work for the

BROWN COUNTY COMMISSION

Resident asks to vacate portion of Thrasher Road The Board of Brown County Commissioners met in regular session Monday, Jan. 4. Commissioners present were Chairman Warren Ploeger, Steve Roberts and Keith Olsen. Bruce Van Epps asked the Commissioners to consider vacating 1/2 mile of Thrasher Road located in Section 26 Township 3 Range 18, east of the Upper Wolf Church. County Attorney Kevin

Hill will look into the matter and visit with the Commissioners next Monday. Minutes from the Dec. 31, 2015 meeting were approved. Tax change order No. 2015-50 was approved and signed. The commissioners met Monday, Jan. 11. These minutes were not available at The Herald’s press time

SABETHA POLICE DEPARTMENT ORDINANCE INFRACTIONS Sandie Markley, no proof of liability insurance. Austin Wasinger, dog at large. ACCIDENTS On Dec. 18, 2015, the Sabetha Police Department (SPD) took a report of a hit and run accident. It was unsure where and when the accident took place. On Dec. 26, 2015, the SPD responded to a minor two-vehicle accident in the 1100 block of Ohio. The driver of one vehicle was backing out of a driveway and struck another parked vehicle on the street. Damage was very minor. On Jan. 1, the SPD took a report of a hit and run accident in the 300 block of South 11th. A suspect vehicle had struck a parked vehicle on the street and fled the scene of the accident without making notice to the owner or police. On Jan. 1, the SPD took a report of a hit and run accident in the 300 block of South 8th. A suspect vehicle had struck a parked vehicle on the street and fled the scene of the accident without making notice to the owner or police. On Jan. 2, the SPD responded to a one-vehicle accident in the 900 block of Ohio. Cory Gordon was westbound on 9th when he lost control of his 2011 Kawasaki and crashed. Ice was believed to have played a role in the accident. Only minor injuries were reported. CASES On Dec. 19, 2015, the SPD arrested 31-year-old Derek Beerbower of Sabetha on a Riley County warrant for probation violation. Beerbower

was transported and booked into the Nemaha County Jail. On Dec. 22, 2015, the SPD took a report of a vehicle burglary in the 1000 block of Main Street. That investigation remains ongoing. On Dec. 23, 2015, the SPD took a report of a theft in the 600 block of Jefferson. On Dec. 28, 2015, the SPD took a report of a vehicle burglary in the 700 block of South Old Highway 75. That investigation remains ongoing. On Dec. 30, 2015, the SPD arrested 20-year-old Dagan Solberg on a Nemaha County probation violation warrant. Solberg was transported and booked into the Nemaha County Jail. On Jan. 1, the SPD arrested 25-year-old Aaron Cover of Independence, Mo., for the charges or possession of marijuana and paraphernalia. A traffic stop was made on Cover’s vehicle and a search of the vehicle uncovered the illegal drugs. Cover was transported and booked into the Nemaha County Jail. On Jan. 7, the SPD took a report of a theft in the 400 block of South 14th Street. The investigation remains ongoing. On Jan. 8, the SPD arrested 53-year-old Michael Bankes of Sabetha for the charge of aggravated assault. The SPD responded to a disturbance in the 1300 block of Main Street involving several individuals and a knife. An investigation was made and shortly thereafter Bankes was taken into custody without incident. Bankes was transported and booked into the Nemaha County Jail for the charge.

deer, left the roadway and struck a tree. Enneking was transported to Nemaha Valley Hospital by private vehicle. He was driving a 2015 Dodge Ram pickup. At 11:02 p.m. Dec. 31, 2015, Raven C. Barrs, 15, of Table Rock, Neb., was traveling westbound on US 36 Highway just west of V Road when she was attempting to pass a vehicle driven by James P. Yunghans, 60, of Seneca. As Barrs maneuvered back into the westbound lane, the rear of her car struck the front of Yunghans’ vehicle, causing her to leave the right side of the roadway and overturn. Barrs and her passenger Michael Berkley, 17, of Seneca were transported to the Sabetha Community Hospital by Sabetha EMS. Barrs was driving a1998 Ford Ranger, and Yunghans was driving a 2015 GMC pickup. Damage is estimated at more than $1,000. At 7:30 p.m. Jan. 6, Isaac D. Meyer, 19, of Bern was traveling northbound on Kansas Highway 63 approximately 0.2 mile north of First Road when he struck a deer. He was driving a 2004 Jeep Liberty. Damage is estimated at more than $1,000. At 5:30 a.m. Jan. 10, Joshua A. Mills, 28, of Topeka was traveling eastbound on Kansas Highway 9 approximately 1/2 mile from the Jackson/Nemaha County Line when he left the roadway and struck a tree on the south side of the highway. He was driving a 1997 Chevrolet pickup. Damage is estimated at more than $1,000. REPORTED CRIMES / INCIDENT RESPONSES At 12:10 a.m. Jan. 1, Buck E.

County Attorney Brad Lippert spoke to commissioners about the maintenance of roads in privately developed subdivisions and about changes to be made to the 2016 Nemaha County Reorganization and the 2016 Nemaha County Employee Handbook. The board reviewed the proposed 2016 Nemaha County Reorganization and the proposed 2016 Nemaha County Employee Handbook suggesting further changes to be made to these documents before they are approved. Commissioners approved and signed Resolution 2015-15 allowing Nemaha County financial statements for 2015 to be prepared on the basis of cash receipts and disbursements. The board re-

viewed vouchers submitted by the different departments that were paid at the end of December. Scoby signed add/abate orders as presented. Commissioners approved the December 2015 pay vouchers and warrants as presented. Commissioners approved the minutes from the Dec. 28, 2015 meeting. Commissioners held a 15-minute executive session to discuss employee matters. No binding action was taken. Commissioners approved the 2016 appropriation request from Northeast Kansas Enterprise Facilitation in the amount of $3,000. The commissioners met Monday, Jan. 11. These minutes were not available at The Herald’s press time.

NEMAHA COUNTY DISTRICT COURT CRIMINAL CASES FINISHED (DISMISSAL INCLUDED) Karri S. VanAlst, found guilty for criminal use of a financial card, sentenced to six months Nemaha County Jail, suspended, supervised probation for 12 months, to pay $278.01, costs and restitution, attorney fees to be determined. Guthrie J. Pollard, found guilty of two counts of theft, sentenced to six months county jail to be served, concurrently, suspended, supervised probation for 11 months – to pay $1,236.35 costs and restitution, attorney fees to be determined. LIMITED CASES FINISHED Seneca Family Practice vs. Darlene M. Cannon of Goff, default judgment to the plaintiff in the amount of $192, plus costs and interest. Sabetha Family Practice vs. Jerrell Nightingale of Horton, default judgment to the plaintiff in the amount of $257.31, plus costs and interest. Nemaha Valley Community Hospital vs. Tony A. McGehee of Seneca, default judgment to the plaintiff in the amount of $661.15, plus costs and interest. Seneca Family Practice vs. Brandi M. Buchwald of Salina, default judgment to the plaintiff in the amount of $166.71, plus costs and interest. Seneca Family Practice vs. Robert A. and Karen Stock of Marysville, default judgment to the plaintiff in the amount of $328.97, plus costs and interest. Seneca Family Practice vs. Jarrod J. Maus of Seneca, default judgment to the plaintiff in the amount of $448, plus costs and interest. Seneca Family Practice vs. Crystal Suderman of Corning, default judgment to the plaintiff in the amount of $418.48, plus costs and interest. Nemaha Valley Community Hospital vs. Susan Beecham of Goff, default judgment to the plaintiff in the amount of $1,412.88, plus costs and interest. Nemaha Valley Community Hospital vs. Rodney G. and Robin Sanner of Sabetha, default judgment to the plaintiff in the amount of $294.77 plus costs and interest. Nemaha Valley Community Hospital vs. Kelly S. Cochran of Sabetha, default judgment to the plaintiff in the amount of $306.62

NEMAHA COUNTY SHERIFF ARRESTS Kyle T.L. Dishong, 26, of Sabetha was arrested by the Nemaha County Sheriff ’s Office (NMSO) on Jan. 6, on a Nemaha County warrant for driving under the influence, refusal to submit to testing, and transporting an open container for an incident which occurred on Nov. 21, 2015. Dishong was released on $3,000 surety bond. Court is set for 9:30 a.m. Feb. 9. Michael A. Bankes, 53, of Sabetha was arrested by Sabetha Police Department (SPD) on Jan. 8, for the offenses of aggravated assault and criminal threat. Bankes remains in custody. Jose M. Garcia, 41, of Topeka was arrested on Jan. 9 by NMSO for the offense of driving while suspended. Garcia was released on Jan. 9, on $750 cash bond. Court is set for 9:30 a.m. Feb 9. Andrew Tryon was released on $5,000 OR bond for the Nemaha County Warrant on Jan. 7. He was transferred to the custody of Riley County PD on Jan. 8. Patrick E. Howard, 40, of Hiawatha was booked into the Nemaha County Jail on Jan. 8, to serve a 48-hour sentence for DUI. Howard was released on Jan. 10. Colin C. Wells, 23, of Centralia was arrested on Jan. 9, by NMSO for the offense of driving under the influence. Wells was released on Jan. 9, on $1,000 cash bond. Court is set for 9:30 a.m. Feb. 9. ACCIDENTS At 11:20 p.m. Dec. 26, 2015, Colby T. Enneking, 23, of Seneca was traveling westbound on 160th Road 0.7 miles east of L Road when he swerved to miss a

county on Dec. 31 at a rate of pay of $12.75 per hour. Haug began work for the county on Jan. 6 at a rate of pay of $12.75 per hour. They are currently holding five inmates in the jail and booked in five individuals this past week. Senior Services/Public Transit Director Diane Yunghans and Donna Hammes with the Seneca Housing Authority came before the board. Following discussion, Yunghans signed the 2016 lease agreement with the Seneca Housing Authority as presented for use of their property to serve as the Seneca Nutrition Center location. The county will be required to pay $225 per month for electricity as part of this lease agreement. Also at the meeting:

Kilbourn, 36, of Riley, was cited for transportation of an open container on a traffic stop near 40th and F Road. Court is set for Feb. 2. At 11:35 p.m. Jan. 4, NMSO responded to a domestic disturbance at 704 3rd St. in Centralia. No arrests were made at that time. Sometime between Sept. 1, 2015, and Jan. 2, 2016, an unknown person forced entry to a building at 1207 116th Road in Seneca and took a chainsaw and ratchet set. Loss is estimated at more than $200. On Jan. 9, Roger L. Ronnebaum, 55, of Axtell was cited for transporting an open container.

plus costs and interest. Seneca Family Practice vs. Clover L. Lyons of Bern, default judgment to the plaintiff in the amount of $819 plus costs and interest. Sabetha Community Hospital vs. Susan Beecham of Goff, default judgment to the plaintiff in the amount of $2,534.20 plus costs and interest. Sabetha Family Practice vs Kelly S. Cochran of Sabetha, default judgment to the plaintiff in the amount of $1,244.12 plus costs and interest. Sabetha Community Hospital vs. Kelly S. Cochran of Sabetha, default judgment to the plaintiff in the amount of $1,966.23 plus costs and interest. Nemaha Valley Community Hospital vs. Clarence Sr. and Sandra Tryon of Seneca, judgment to the plaintiff in the amount of $2,693.789, plus costs and interest. Sabetha Community Hospital vs. Jessica M. Smith of Sabetha, default judgment to the plaintiff in the amount of $354.02, plus costs and interest. First Published in The Sabetha Herald on Wednesday, January 13, 2016.

LEGAL NOTICE IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF NEMAHA COUNTY, KANSAS HSBC Bank USA, National Association, as Indenture Trustee of the Fieldstone Mortgage Investment Trust, Series 2005-2 Plaintiff, vs. June L. Rizzo, Michael L. Rizzo , et al., Defendants. Case No. 15cv25 K.S.A. 60 Mortgage Foreclosure (Title to Real Estate Involved) NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE Under and by virtue of an Order of Sale issued by the Clerk of the District Court in and for the said County of Nemaha, State of Kansas, in a certain cause in said Court Numbered 15cv25, wherein the parties above named were respectively plaintiff and defendant, and to me, the undersigned Sheriff of said County, directed, I will offer for sale at public auction and sell to the highest bidder for cash in hand at 10:00 AM, on 02/04/2016, at the front door of Nemaha County Courthouse, the following described real estate located in the County of Nemaha, State of Kansas, to wit: LOT 18 AND 19, BLOCK 2, BELMONT COURT, A SUBDIVISION OF HESSELTINE`S ADDITION TO THE CITY OF SABETHA, NEMAHA COUNTY, KANSAS. SHERIFF OF NEMAHA COUNTY, KANSAS Respectfully Submitted,

By: Shawn Scharenborg, KS # 24542

Michael Rupard, KS # 26954 Dustin Stiles, KS # 25152 Kozeny & McCubbin, L.C. (St. Louis Office) 12400 Olive Blvd., Suite 555 St. Louis, MO 63141 Phone: (314) 991-0255 Fax: (314) 567-8006 Email: mrupard@km-law.com Attorney for Plaintiff 2-3t

Published in The Sabetha Herald on Wednesday, January 13, 2016.

LEGAL NOTICE PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE NEMAHA COUNTY FIRE DIST #4 The County of NEMAHA will hold a public hearing on Monday, January 25, 2016 at 10:00 am at the Nemaha County Commission Room, Nemaha County Courthouse at 600 Nemaha Street, Seneca, KS 66538, to discuss the County’s submission of a KAN STEP application for the Kansas Community Development Block Grant program. The maximum KAN STEP grant that may be requested is $300,000. No Involuntary displacement of persons will be proposed. For the KAN STEP application the County proposes to build a Fire Station to be located in Bern, KS . Matching funds of no less than 35% of the award will be provided by the Grantee in the form of Volunteer Labor, Donated Equipment and Privately Donated Land. Reasonable accommodations will be made available to persons with disabilities. Requests should be submitted to the Nemaha County Clerk’s Office by 12:00 pm Friday, January 22, 2016. 2-1t

Sabetha Family Practice vs. Sherri and Brian Bredemeier of Bern, default Judgment to the Plaintiff in the amount of $265.62, plus costs and interest. Sabetha Family Practice vs. Matt and Roxanne Shasteen of Sabetha, default judgment to the plaintiff in the amount of $399.50, plus costs and interest. Sabetha Family Practice vs. Susan Beecham of Goff, default judgment to the plaintiff in the amount of $135.04, plus costs and interest. Bank of America, N.A. vs. Kristi Franklin of Corning, judgment to the plaintiff in the amount of $11,384.08, plus costs. MARRIAGE LICENSES ISSUED Patricia E. Stallbaumer, 24, of Overland Park and Frederick Dunsing, 24, of Overland Park. TRAFFIC Carson Seematter of Frankfort,

speeding 65/55, $153 fines and costs. Robert Buessing of Seneca, speeding, 64/55, $153 fines and costs. Dustin Fairley of Fairbury, Neb., speeding, 74/65, $153 fines and costs. Greg Fisher of Sabetha, speeding 70/60, $153 fines and costs. Gary Satter of Topeka, speeding 64/55, $153 fines and costs. Marcus Henninger of Sabetha, failure to report an accident, $158 fines and costs. TRAFFIC DIVERSIONS James Carr of Fairbury, Neb., speeding 76/65, $209 fines, fees and costs. Gregory V. Schmitz of Axtell, DUI, $1,058 fines, fees and costs.

Published in The Sabetha Herald on Wednesday, Jan. 13, 2016

LEGAL NOTICE ORDINANCE NO. 1502 AN ORDINANCE LEVYING A RETAILER’S SALES TAX IN THE AMOUNT OF ONE-HALF OF ONE PERCENT (0.5%) WITHIN THE CITY OF SABETHA, KANSAS, IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE PROVISIONS OF K.S.A. 12-187 ET SEQ., AND K.S.A. 12-189, ALL AS AMENDED. WHEREAS, the governing body of the City of Sabetha, Kansas, (the “City”) adopted and approved, at its duly called meeting held November 5, 2015, its Resolution No. 2015-28 which authorized a special question election to be held in the City on January 5, 2016, (the “Election”) for the purpose of submitting to the qualified electors of the City the question of considering the issuance of sales tax general obligation bonds of the City in the maximum principal amount of $3,300,000 (the “Bonds”) to finance the costs of certain improvements to the City’s public buildings, to be paid from a City’s retailers’ sales tax in the amount of one-half of one percent (0.5%) (the “Sales Tax”); and WHEREAS, notice of the Election was published by the County Election Officer of Nemaha County, Kansas, as required by law; and WHEREAS, a majority of the qualified voters of the City voting on the question submitted at the Election, did approve the City’s issuance of the Bonds and the imposition of the Sales Tax to pay the costs of the project to be financed with the proceeds of the Bonds including the payment of the principal of and interest thereon. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED BY THE GOVERNING BODY OF THE CITY SABETHA, KANSAS: Section 1. That a majority of the electors voting thereon having approved at a special question election held on the 5th day January, 2015, the levying of 0.5% retailers’ sales tax in the City, as authorized by K.S.A. 12-187, et seq., as amended, there is hereby levied a city retailers’ sales tax in the amount of one-half of one percent (0.5%) to take effect on the first day of April, 2016, in accordance with the provisions of K.S.A. 12-189 and K.S.A.12-191, all as amended. Section 2. That the proceeds of said sales tax shall be used to pay the costs of constructing, furnishing, equipping, improving, maintaining and financing public buildings, to include park and recreational facilities, together with sites therefor, and also including the payment of principal of redemption premium, if any, and interest on the City’s general obligation bonds issued to finance the cost of constructing, furnishing, and equipping such improvements. Section 3. That the sales tax levied in this ordinance shall continue until general obligation bonds issued in the sum of $3,300,000 are paid in full; provided, however, such tax shall expire not more than twenty (20) years from the date such tax is first collected. Section 4. That except as otherwise provided by law, such tax shall be identical in its application and exemptions therefrom to the Kansas Retailers’ Sales Tax Act and all laws and administrative rules and regulations of the Kansas Department of Revenue relating to the state’s retailers’ sales tax shall apply to such city retailers’ sales tax insofar as such laws and regulations may be made applicable. The services of the State Department of Revenue shall be utilized to administer, enforce and collect said tax. Section 5. That this ordinance shall be published once in the official city newspaper, and a copy duly certified shall be submitted to the State Director of Taxation by the City Clerk. PASSED by the Governing Body and approved by the Mayor this 11th day of January, 2016. CITY OF SABETHA, KANSAS ________________________________ Doug Clark, Mayor ATTEST: _____________________________________ Steve Compo, City Clerk 2-1t Published in The Sabetha Herald on Wednesday, Jan. 13, 2016

LEGAL NOTICE The Delaware Watershed Joint District No. 10 annual meeting is scheduled for Thursday, January 28, 2016, 7:00pm at Delaware Watershed Office, 125 West 4th Street on the South Side of the Square in Holton. The five-year construction schedule will be reviewed and approved. Three board positions are up for election. Those positions are in the North and South Cedar Creeks Sub Watershed, Grasshopper-Coal Creeks Sub Watershed, Elk Creek Sub Watershed and an at-large position. The public is invited. 2-1


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local&area

January 13, 2016  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  sabethaherald.com

Top seven head to County Spelling Bee on January 23 SPELLBOUND.1A for the win. According to Spelling Bee rules, when there are two spellers remaining, the elimination procedure changes. When one contestant misspells a word, the other contestant must spell the word correctly, plus the next word on the pronouncer’s list, before he can be declared champion. If one of the last two spellers misses and the other, after correctly spelling the word missed, misspells the new word submitted to him, the misspelled new word shall be referred to the first speller. If the first speller then succeeds in spelling that missed word correctly and then correctly spells the next word on the pronouncer’s list, he shall be the winner. Voos and Lay went back and forth through 10 words before Voos claimed the win. Voos and Lay, along with Renyer, Meyer, Glynn, Strahm and Edelman, will compete in the Nemaha County Spelling Bee on Saturday, Jan. 23, at the Nemaha County Courthouse in Seneca. The Bee will be held at 8:30 a.m.

COUNTY BEE INFORMATION

DATE: Saturday, January 23 TIME: 8:30 a.m. PLACE: Nemaha County Courthouse

Voos, son of Brian and Jenny Voos, said it felt great to win the Spelling Bee. “It was very exciting that the three fifth-grade boys took first, second and third,” he said. “We were all very excited for each other. We were cheering each other on.” “I enjoyed being up on the stage and the competition of spelling words,” said Lay, son of Troy and Sheri Lay. As the Bee concluded, the fifthgrade students who were watching the Bee, broke into a resounding, “Fifth grade rocks!” in celebration of their classmates’ victories. Fifth-grade teacher Sheryl Plattner said she does not practice the words in class, but does encourage students to always spell words correctly, especially in reading and writing, in addition to spelling class.

“All three of the boys who were finalists are avid readers and I think that is what helped all of them due to being exposed to a variety of words in print,” Plattner said. “As a teacher, I couldn’t be prouder of them. I am amazed at their composure and diligence while competing with older students.” Pronouncer was Leslie Scoby. Judges were Bill Simpson, Von Lauer and Marvin Kohlmeier. Mandy Funk coordinated the event. Classroom winners qualifying for this year’s PTO Spelling Bee were: Eighth grade: Ainsley Smith, Jesse Shafer, Kody Beyer, Braden Argabright, Molly Edelman and Maeve Brubeck. Alternates were RheaEtta Laipple and Hunter Terrel.

What’s the Buzz? Top Spellers talk about the bee

Seventh grade: Ashlyn Menold, Ethan Mitchell, Kenzie Meyer, Samantha Gutknecht, Spencer Strahm and Ellen Glynn. Alternates were Megan Kostiuk and Drew Schmelzle. Sixth grade: Lindsey Meers, John Streett, Cameron Harrell, Keyante Kearse, Kylie Shelly and Emma Schilling. Alternates were Gavin White and Desjha Shasteen. Fifth grade: Mary Lukert, Karrington Robinson, Penn Bachelor, Nathan Voos, Jonathan Renyer and Bryson Lay. Alternates were Kirsten Hartter, Halle Scoby and Carly Hartter. Top classroom spellers for kindergarten through fourth grade were: Fourth grade: Kavlin Evans, Mya Grimes and Taylor Menold. Third grade: Reve Nonnast, Quinn Kellenberger and Laura Metzger. Second grade: Cole Menold, Chloe Detweiler and Kiera Keim. First grade: Macey Drahota, Isaac Schmid and Cody Mitchell. Kindergarten: Colton Delome, Kyson Wertenberger, Anvay Bhatteja and Tyson Carlson.

Did you practice? Yes, I practiced a little with the website. How will you practice for the County Bee? Same thing. Return to the website, look at the words, turn around and spell them. Were you nervous/what did you do to calm your nerves? Kind of nervous. Very excited. I calmed my nerves by thinking confident thoughts. We prayed about it once or twice at home. Do you like spelling/what is your favorite subject? I like spelling. My favorite subject is science. Which word did you feel was most difficult to spell? query NATHAN VOOS Did you practice? No. How will you practice for the County Bee? I plan to use the “practice” list and Sheri will give me the words and I will spell them. Were you nervous/what did you do to calm your nerves? Before we started, I jumped up and down and tried to loosen up. Do you like spelling/what is your favorite subject? Kind of average. Reading is my favorite. Which word did you feel was most difficult to spell? Methodology, because I hadn’t heard of the word.

BRYSON LAY

Did you practice? No. How will you practice for the County Bee? I will use www.spellingbee.com to get words for the county spelling bee. Were you nervous/what did you do to calm your nerves? Yes. Do you like spelling/what is your favorite subject? Yes and I love to read. In school, my favorite subject is science. Which word did you feel was most difficult to spell? Nathan had to spell methodology.

JONATHAN RENYER

Did you practice? No. How will you practice for the County Bee? I will probably use spellingbee.com and review the words.. Were you nervous/what did you do to calm your nerves? No, I wasn’t excited about it, but I wasn’t nervous either! Do you like spelling/what is your favorite subject? No, spelling isn’t my favorite, but I love to read and write. Which word did you feel was most difficult to spell? Quagmire stumped me! KENZIE MEYER Did you practice? I did not practice, but I wish I would have. How will you practice for the County Bee? I am going to practice a little bit, but mostly just try my hardest. Were you nervous/what did you do to calm your nerves? I was not very nervous, but I talked and joked with my friends to calm my nerves. Do you like spelling/what is your favorite subject? I like spelling. It is one of my favorite subjects. Which word in did you feel was most difficult to spell? I thought that “festooned” was a tricky words and it was Jonathan Renyer’s word. ELLEN GLYNN Did you practice? No. How will you practice for the County Bee? I will use the website recommended. Were you nervous/what did you do to calm your nerves? Yes, I popped my knuckles and did small hand movements. Do you like spelling/what is your favorite subject? Yes.My favorite subject is pre-algebra. Which word did you feel was most difficult to spell? I felt like almost all of the words were fairly easy, though umbrage was very difficult to me.

SPENCER STRAHM

Did you practice? No. How will you practice for the County Bee? I might look over a word list, but I am pretty confident in my knowledge of spelling rules. Were you nervous/what did you do to calm your nerves? I wasn’t nervous. Do you like spelling/what is your favorite subject? Yes. It comes easily for me. I have never missed a spelling word on a test. My favorite subject would be anything but math. Which word did you feel was most difficult to spell? The word that I was disqualified with - escarpment. I had never heard it before and had a hard time understanding it.

Sabetha PTO Spelling Bee classroom winners in kindergarten through fifth grade are FRONT ROW (L-R) kindergarteners Anvay Bhatteja, Tyson Carlson, Colton Delome and Kyson Wertenberger; ROW TWO (L-R) first grade students Cody Mitchell, Isaac Schmid and Macey Drahota, second grade students Kiera Keim, Cole Menold and Chloe Detweiler; ROW THREE (L-R) third grade students Laura Metzger, Quinn Kellenberger and Reve Nonnast, fourth grade students Mya Grimes, Taylor Menold and Kalvin Evans; BACK ROW (L-R) fifth grade students Mary Lukert, Karrington Robinson, Penn Bachelor, Nathan Voos, Jonathan Renyer and Bryson Lay. The students were honored at a school assembly Thursday, January 7. The fifth grade students participated in the Spelling Bee held at Sabetha Middle School on Friday, January 8. Krista Wasinger | Herald

MOLLY EDELMAN

Benefit coming up

SABETHA CITY COMMISSION

KRISTA WASINGER The Sabetha City Commission met at 6 p.m. Monday, Jan. 11. Present were Mayor Doug Clark, Commissioners Kenny Miller, Nick Aberle and Julie Burenheide, City Administrator Doug Allen, Assistant City Administrator Bill Shroyer and City Clerk Steve Compo. Commissioner Maridel Wittmer was absent. Police Chief Robert Wahwasuck presented his police report. Following his report, he followed up with commissioners on a four-way stop study at the intersections of 14th and Oregon Streets, and Jefferson and Ninth Streets. A suggestion to install two additional stop signs at each of those intersections was first introduced to the commission at the June 8, 2015 meeting. Sabetha High School students Jacob Payne and Mollie Robinson proposed the idea to the commission as part of an assignment for their government teacher Maggie Suther. In July 2015, Wahwasuck evaluated the intersections and did not feel the additional stop signs were necessary. Commissioners asked

him to reevaluate the intersections in six months and at Monday’s meeting, he again concluded that the stop signs were not necessary at this time. City Administrator Allen asked if making the intersections four-way stops would encourage more rolling through the stop signs. Wahwasuck said he felt that it would. Also at the meeting: Commissioners approved Charter Ordinance No. 19 and Ordinance No. 1502. By passing Charter Ordinance No. 19, the commission is following the same procedures it has always followed in regard to filling vacancies. This is just a formality. Ordinance No. 1502 approves the retail sales tax for the outdoor aquatics center approved in the Jan. 5 election. Mayor Clark approved the appointments of Stan Remmers and Ruth Wisemiller to the Housing Board. Remmers will fill Nick Montgomery’s unexpired term and Wisemiller replaces John Carlson. Commissioners also approved the minutes from the Dec. 28 meeting. The next regular commission meeting is scheduled for 6 p.m. Monday, Jan. 25.

MEMBERSHIP DRIVE

Plant a Seed

Watch It Grow We have been planting seeds. With funds from the STEP Foundation’s General Endowment fund, we have been able to help fund both new and ongoing projects for community members and organizations in Nemaha County. We have been able to fund scholarships for our community’s young people.

We know we can do more.

And we need your help. Together, WE can empower our community. Donate to an existing endowment or fund, or even set up your own. Channel donations through STEP to the local group of your choice. The options are limitless for investing in the community you call home. A COMMUNITY FOUNDATION

for Nemaha County

S T E P

Donation Amount:

PROGRESS

ENSURE

Name: Address: MAIL TO: STEP Foundation PO Box 165, Seneca, KS 66538

HEARTS.1A

WE

TO

(Suggested Membership Donation: $30 Single, $50 Family, $60 Business)

you+me

STRIVING

Four-way stops still unnecessary

Find out more about what you can do. call Leslie Scoby at 785-285-1765

Nemaha County STEP Foundation

Even the smallest seed can help a whole community grow.

cipal Janelle Boden said she has been touched by the compassion and generosity being shown to the Crismas family. She said area schools and students are coming together for the family as well. A donation jar was out at the Nemaha Central Middle School basketball game versus Wetmore on Monday, Jan. 11, and Axtell High School was holding a cake raffle at its Tuesday, Jan. 12, basketball game. “The outpouring of support from the entire area is something I will never forget. We are truly one big community,” Boden said. “There truly are good people out there, and we are so blessed to be surrounded by them!” Recently, a Soup Supper Benefit has been organized by community members. The Benefit will be held beginning at 4:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 15, at St. James Church Hall in Wetmore. Free will donations will be taken for the meal, which will include soups, sandwiches, homemade desserts and refreshments. Also a recent development, Pizza Hut in Sabetha will donate 20 percent of its profits from sales on Monday, Feb. 1. For updates on the family, including medical conditions of the two children still at Children’s Mercy, A. Plummer has set up the Crismas Family Carepage on facebook, www.facebook.com/Crismasfamily.

STEP FOUNDATION

ANNUAL MEETING Wednesday January 27th 6:00 pm @ American Legion Post 21 Seneca, Kansas


1B

January 13, 2016  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  sabethaherald.com

sports SHS BOYS’ BASKETBALL

STANDINGS

Jay boys survive late Cyclone run, win in OT

BOYS’ B-BALL Rank

Big 7 League

PETE SCHUETZ | CONTRIBUTOR

Sabetha 41, Royal Valley 31 Jonah Montgomery Brock Frey Trae Snyder Alec Kirwan Caleb Strahm Calder Keehn Eric Renyer SABETHA TOTALS 41 | 11-22 | 4-10 | RIVERSIDE TOTALS 31 | 10-20 | 2-16 |

TP

4 15 0 16 3 1 2

2FG

2-3 3-5 0-0 4-5 1-2 0-4 1-3

3FG

FT

R

A S

0-2 2-6 0-0 2-2 0-0 0-0 0-0

0-2 3-5 0-0 2-2 1-5 1-4 0-0

2 1 1 2

1 2 0 2 0 0 1

1 2 0 0 7 0 5 4 4 0

T

F

1 4 0 0 2 0 0

1 3 0 1 2 5 3

0

7

2

Royal Valley

5

1

6

1

3

Nemaha Central

5

1

5

2

4

Riverside

4

3

4

3

5

Jefferson West

3

4

3

4

6

Holton

2

4

2

5

7

Hiawatha

2

4

2

4

8

Perry Lecompton

1

5

1

6

9

ACCHS

0

6

0

7

Rank

without the clock running,” Burger said. The game would go to overtime with the score tied at 40. Riverside’s Shue gave his team the lead once again in the opening seconds of the OT with a bucket, but Frey answered on the other end with a trey to edge out the Cyclones 43-42. “When things looked bad in OT, we came up with a big three [Frey] and big stops on the defensive end,” Burger said. Shue had a chance to take the lead once again with a pair of free throws but missed both. Sabetha added a little insurance with 36 seconds left when Riverside’s full

court press was distracted on the inbounds to leave Keegan Cox alone under the basket at the other end, allowing him to lay the ball up and in. A Cyclone desperation shot at the buzzer missed its mark and the Bluejays retained their undefeated status with the 45-42 victory. Sabetha 45, Riverside 42 Jonah Montgomery Keegan Cox Brock Frey Dustin Gruber Alec Kirwan Caleb Strahm Marcus Jackman Calder Keehn Eric Renyer SABETHA TOTALS 45 | 12-31 | 3-10 | TOTALS 42 | 13-33 | 2-15 |

TP

5 2 6 0 11 4 0 15 2

2FG

1-4 1-2 1-5 0-1 2-5 2-4 0-0 4-8 1-2

3FG

FT

R

A S

T

F

0-2 0-0 1-3 0-0 1-4 0-0 0-0 1-1 0-0

3-4 0-0 1-4 0-0 4-6 0-0 0-2 4-5 0-2

2 1 2 1 5 5 5 8 2

2 0 2 0 1 1 0 2 2

1 0 5 0 1 3 1 3 1

3 0 4 1 1 5 1 5 2

3 0 6 0 0 1 0 0 2

W

L

1

Centralia

5

1

6

1

Doniphan West

4

0

6

0

3

Washington Cnty

4

0

8

0

4

Hanover

4

1

5

2

5

Axtell

4

2

5

5

6

Troy

3

1

5

1

7

Frankfort

2

2

2

6

8

Valley Heights

1

3

2

5

9

Clifton-Clyde

1

3

1

6

10

Blue Valley

1

4

2

5

11

Wetmore

1

5

1

7

12

Onaga

0

2

1

5

13

Linn

0

6

0

6

Northeast Kansas League League

Overall

School W

L

W

L

1

Jackson Heights

6

0

6

0

2

Horton

5

1

5

1

3

Jefferson County

5

1

5

2

4

Valley Falls

4

2

4

3

5

MH-MA

3

3

3

3

6

Oskaloosa

2

4

2

5

7

Immaculata

1

4

1

5

8

Pleasant Ridge

1

5

1

6

9

McLouth

0

7

0

7

GIRLS’ B-BALL Big 7 League

10-21 | 30 | 0 | 1 | 4 | 18

League

Overall

School W

L

W

L

1

Nemaha Central

6

0

7

0

2

Sabetha

6

0

7

0

3

Holton

4

2

4

3

4

Hiawatha

4

2

4

2

5

Jefferson West

4

3

4

3

6

Perry Lecompton

2

4

2

5

7

Royal Valley

2

4

3

4

8

ACCHS

0

6

1

6

9

Riverside

0

7

0

7

Rank

Twin Valley League

LET’S TALK RESOLUTIONS For your health and pocketbook.

League

Overall

School W

L

W

1

Centralia

6

0

6

1

2

Axtell

5

1

8

2

3

Hanover

4

1

5

2

4

Valley Heights

3

1

4

3

5

Washington Cnty

3

1

7

1

L

6

Troy

2

2

3

3

7

Frankfort

2

2

3

5

8

Linn

2

4

2

4 3

9

Doniphan West

1

3

2

10

Clifton-Clyde

1

3

2

5

11

Blue Valley

1

4

2

5

12

Onaga

0

2

0

6

13

Wetmore

0

6

1

6

Northeast Kansas League League

Overall

W

L

W

L 0

School

1

Valley Falls

6

0

7

2

MH-MA

5

1

5

1

3

Pleasant Ridge

5

1

5

2

4

Horton

4

2

4

2

5

Jackson Heights

3

3

3

3

6

Jefferson County

2

4

3

4

7

Immaculata

1

4

1

5

8

Oskaloosa

1

5

2

5

9

McLouth

0

7

0

7

SCORES GIRLS’ BASKETBALL

5-12 | 19 | 0 | 0 | 5 | 16

for the Aaron Crismas Family

Overall

L

2

7-18 | 22 | 7 | 6 | 7 | 15

BENEFIT SOUP SUPPER

League W

School

12-23 | 31 | 10 | 12 | 15 | 22

PETE SCHUETZ | CONTRIBUTOR betha’s zone keeping them out of the lane. “We played much stronger down the stretch, more than we did Tuesday versus Riverside, and I also thought that we were much more aggressive on the offensive end,” Burger said. The Jays were 6-10 shooting in the final period with Kirwan pouring in seven additional points in the quarter, including a breakaway dunk in the last two minutes of play. Frey was 4-5 from the charity stripe and converted one jump shot for six points in the quarter. Free throw shooting for Sabetha was 7-18 and the Panthers made 5-12 in the contest. The game changer was scoring from the field, and Sabetha outscored Royal Valley 17-6 in the fourth quarter. The Bluejays stand alone at the top of the Big Seven with the 42-31 win over the Panthers. “It was a fun game,” Burger said. “I was impressed with Royal Valley, so I was happy with a good win.” The Bluejays have road games over the next two weeks. They will travel to the 5-2 Nemaha Central Thunder on Tuesday, Jan. 12, while finishing at the 1-6 Perry Lecompton Kaws on Friday, Jan. 15.

6

Rank

Calder Keehn goes up strong against this Riverside defender during basketball action on Tuesday, January 5. Tim Kellenberger | Herald

Undefeated Bluejays beat Royal Valley Panthers The unbeaten 6-0 Royal Valley Panthers came to Sabetha Friday, Jan. 8, in an attempt to stay atop the Big Seven League standings and beat the undefeated 6-0 Sabetha Bluejays. Sabetha trailed at half but used a late run in the fourth quarter to pick up the win over the Panthers by a score of 42-31. Defenses limited the open shot and second chance opportunities to keep the scoring at a minimum. “I was real happy with our defense,” said Head Coach Scott Burger. “We shut down a good scoring team and held them to just 31 points for the game.” Brock Frey managed to shoot over the top of Royal Valley’s zone defense and drop a pair of treys in the opening frame. The Panthers started with a 6-0 lead, but the Jays took the lead of 10-6 after the first eight minutes of play. Royal Valley took the lead with under six minutes to play in the half as the Bluejays struggled on the offensive end of the court. Sabetha shot 2-6 from the field and 2-5 from the free throw line in the second quarter. The Bluejays trailed 16-17, at half. In the third quarter, Sabetha converted 4-9 of their shots, but Alec Kirwan was near perfect shooting 3-4 with a pair of doubles and a trey to raise his personal tally to nine points in the first three quarters. Sabetha outscored the Panthers 9-8 in the third frame and the score was tied 25-25 with one quarter to play. The Panthers were held to six points in the final frame with Sa-

L 0

Sabetha

Twin Valley League

Keegan Cox drives toward the basket during the SabethaRiverside basketball contest on Tuesday, January 5. Tim Kellenberger | Herald

given any free throw opportunities through the frame. Alec Kirwan had a triple and a deuce to lead his team with 5 points, and the Bluejays would lead 23-14 headed into the final stanza. “We had an 18 point lead with six minutes left in the game, and a 14 point lead with 3:43 left,” Burger said. It was then that the Cyclones went on a 21-7 tear, with the score knotting t h re e - p oi nt shot by Bryer Miller, his only points of the night — a dagger from behind the arc with six seconds to play in the contest. “Riverside hurt us on the offensive rebounds down the stretch, and we fouled to o many Alec Kirwan prepares to make the pass inside to Eric Renyer during basketball times to allow action with Riverside on Tuesday, January 5. Tim Kellenberger | Herald them to score

W

Rank

Cyclones edged out their opponent at the end of the first quarter, 8-7, led by post player Grant Shue with 4 points. Sabetha was 3-12 shooting in the first quarter with the Riverside zone defense keeping them out of the lane. The Cyclones were blanked in the second frame against Sabetha’s zone, and they could not get the drop that they desperately needed. The Jays managed only two field goals in the quarter, one each from Brock Frey and Eric Renyer, with the rest of their points coming from the free throw line. At the intermission, Sabetha had stretched a meager lead, 14-8. Sabetha’s defense kept the Cyclones on their heels, and they were allowed only 6 points in the third quarter. But the Jays didn’t fare much better, shooting just 4-12 from the field and were not

Overall

L

1

Rank

The Sabetha High School Bluejays headed back to the hardwoods Tuesday, Jan. 5, when they welcomed the 3-2 Riverside Cyclones to town for Big Seven action. Sabetha survived a scare in Hiawatha just before the winter break, and the Cyclones were riding the momentum of a 52-50 victory over Holton before the hiatus. It was a low scoring affair with some Bluejays getting into foul trouble early, and a late run by Riverside that forced overtime. “It was a game of runs,” said Head Coach Scott Burger. “But our players held on at the end.” The Jays outlasted their guests in this one and pulled off the 45-42 overtime win. Both teams were cold on offense the entire night with neither of them putting up double-digit scoring until the final period. The

League W

School

On balances $.01 to $20,000

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Date

Teams

Score

1/8

Wetmore vs. Linn

39-45

1/8

Axtell vs. Frankfort

65-47

BOYS’ BASKETBALL

Friday, January 15

Date 1/8

Wetmore vs. Linn

40-38

St. James Church Hall | Wetmore, KS

1/7

SMS A vs. ACCJH

47-14

1/7

SMS B vs. ACCJH (2 qtrs)

1/4

SMS A vs. Perry

29-36

1/4

SMS B vs. Perry

20-36

Beginning at 4:30 p.m.

Serving: Chicken Noodle Soup, Chili and Vegetable Beef Soup, Ham/Turkey Sandwiches, Homemade Dessert, Tea/Coffee Free Will Donation to help with any and all expenses. Monetary Donations also can be brought to Wetmore Academic Center.

785.284.3433 | MJBTRC.com 1 Annual Percentage Yields (APY) are accurate as of 12/11/15. 2.01% APY applies to balances of $0.01 to $20,000 and 0.11% APY applies to balances over $20,000 if qualifications are met each monthly statement cycle. 0.01% APY applies to balances of $0.01-$20,000 and 0.11% APY to balances over $20,000 if qualification are not met. Rates and terms may change after account is open. To earn rewards: Sign up for eStatements, use direct deposit and post 15 signature debit transactions within your monthly statement cycle. Limit one account per household in the bank’s market area. Minimum $25 to open. Fees may reduce earnings. ATM surcharge fees of up to $20 per monthly statement cycle will be refunded if reward requirements are met. Member FDIC.

Teams

Score

8-4

Scores can be submitted to us at news@sabethaherald.com. Please include sport type, date of game/ match, team names, and final scores. Scores should be submitted no more than three days following the contest.


2B

sports&recreation

January 13, 2016  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  sabethaherald.com

SHS GIRLS’ BASKETBALL

Sabetha girls cruise past Cyclones

leading 61-19. going. And then sharing the ball The running clock in the fourth on offense with 23 assists and just in the third quarter. Six different kept scoring low for both teams. six turnovers was amazing!” Bluejays inked points in the score- Jena Winkler had a bucket and a Sabetha 65, book in the period, with Schuette pair of free throws to be the only Riverside 23 0 0-1 0-0 0-0 0 0 1 0 0 Krebs being a perfect 4-4 from the free Sabetha player to score in the Hillary 16 4-6 1-2 5-6 5 3 2 1 0 Taryn Schuette throw line as well as sinking a quarter, and the Cyclones were Skylar McAfee 0 0-0 0-0 0-0 1 0 0 2 0 11 4-4 1-3 0-1 6 5 5 1 1 McAfee deuce to give her 6 more points. allowed just 4 points as a team in Alexis 8 2-2 1-2 1-2 2 1 2 0 Lexi Wenger McAfee turned a pair of steals the period. 0 0-3 0-3 0-0 0 1 0 0 2 Lauren Huber 3 1-1 0-0 1-2 2 0 2 0 1 Mariah Huneke into 4 points to give her 11 for the The Lady Jays remained perfect Ellie Meyer PETE SCHUETZ | CONTRIBUTOR 0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 1 0 0 2 game, and Broxterman had two on the season with the 65-23 win Kalli Broxterman 10 5-8 0-2 0-0 3 5 1 0 0 6 2-5 0-0 2-2 2 2 4 1 4 Jena Winkler quick scores for 4 points off of a over their Big Seven competition. Emily The undefeated 6-0 Lady Jays and the bucket-and-one by Emily 11 5-12 0-0 1-2 9 2 0 0 1 Meyer couple of Riverside turnovers. The “I was proud of our focus, in- SABETHA TOTALS welcomed the 3-3 Royal Valley Meyer tied the game 26-26 with | 23-38 | 3-12 | 10-15 | 29 | 21 | 16 | 7 | 11 “mercy rule” would be in effect in tensity and defensive execution,” 65 Panthers to town Friday, Jan. 8 six minutes to play in the third. RIVERSIDE TOTALS the last quarter with the Lady Jays McAfee said. “That really got us 23 | 6-23 | 1-7 | 8-13 | 18 | 5 | 2 | 22 | 13 for their first meeting of the year. Royal Valley took the lead once This game was a battle to the finish again but Meyer knotted the score with the Lady Jays stretching a lead again at 28 with a power jump shot in the third quarter and putting midway through the quarter. Sait away in the fourth to take the betha took their first lead of the win 51-38. night with 2:30 left in the third and The Panthers took the lead early ended of the quarter, 35-31. with a score of 12-2 through the The Panthers were held to seven first five minutes of the contest as points in the final eight minutes they picked apart the Lady Jay’s with Sabetha’s man defense. “Our man defense. Sabetha was 4-12 man defense was pretty good, from the field in the first quarter as especially in the second half,” they struggled getting their shots McAfee said. to drop against Royal Valley’s zone. Sabetha outscored their guests “I was really proud of the poise 16-7 in the fourth quarter. The we played with for the entire game, Lady Jays defended their home but especially in the first quarter,” court and won, 51-38. said Head Coach Alex McAfee. Seven different Lady Jays postAlexis McAfee scored a couple ed points in the contest with four of quick buckets late but, at the end scoring near or more than 10 of the first period Sabetha trailed points apiece. 8-17. “Our offensive balance was aweTaryn Schuette led in scoring for some as we did a really good job the Lady Jays in the second quarter working inside-out,” McAfee said. when she pumped in five points. Sabetha remains unbeaten at 7-0 The Bluejays struggled from the and will face road games Tuesday, field, but out scored their oppo- Jan. 12 versus Nemaha Central and nent 13-7. Friday, Jan. 15, versus the Perry Five Lady Jays posted points in Lecompton Kaws. the quarter, but at half, the Panthers held the 24-21 lead. Sabetha 51, “I thought the girls just kept bat- Royal Valley 38 8 1-4 2-6 0-0 3 2 1 0 2 Schuette tling tough together and got the Taryn 11 3-6 0-4 5-7 5 11 3 3 3 Alexis McAfee 2 1-1 0-1 0-0 1 0 2 1 1 Royal Valley lead down to a single Lexi Wenger 9 3-7 0-0 3-6 8 0 0 3 2 Mariah Huneke possession by halftime,” McAfee Kalli 1-1 0-1 3-4 1 0 0 1 Broxterman 5 4 2-2 0-0 0-2 3 0 3 1 3 said. Jena Winkler 12 5-5 0-0 2-4 5 0 0 3 3 Emily Meyer Both teams fought in the open- SABETHA TOTALS Kalli Broxterman takes this fast break inside for the lay-in during the Sabetha-Riverside basketball | 16-26 | 2-12 | 13-23 | 26 | 14 | 9 | 11 | 15 ing minutes of the second half, 51 contest on Tuesday, January 5. ROYAL VALLEY TOTALS Tim Kellenberger | Herald but a basket by Mariah Huneke 38 | 7-16 | 6-16 | 6-11 | 15 | 10 | 3 | 18 | 18

PETE SCHUETZ | CONTRIBUTOR The Sabetha High School Lady Jays kick-started the remainder of the season with a game against the Riverside Lady Cyclones Tuesday, Jan. 5. The Cyclones have been a longsuffering team with a combined record from last season to the current one of 0-27. The Lady Jays took control of this one early and never looked back, taking the 65-23 victory at home. “Our kids were aggressive and under control to start the game, which helped us get out to a 26-3 in the first quarter,” said Head Coach Alex McAfee. Taryn Schuette led the Jays in scoring, putting of 7 points in the first eight minutes of play and finishing the night with a season high 16 points. Alexis McAfee and Lexi Wenger had 5 points apiece in the first frame, with Kalli Broxterman and Emily Meyer chipping in 4 points apiece in that time period. Sabetha’s zone defense and press forced turnovers, which were converted to points. Sabetha was limited to 14 points in the second quarter, hitting only six of 20 shots for just 30 percent from the field. The Cyclones’ Mackinze Gray boosted her team by adding 6 points in the second frame as Riverside posted 11 points trying to keep pace with their hosts. For the Lady Jays, Meyer added 4 more points to tally 8 points in the first half, while Schuette added a trifecta to run her tab to 10 points in the first two quarters. Sabetha led 40-14 at the intermission. Riverside tried to close the holes in their zone to start the second half, but the Jays found some daylight in-between defenders and tacked on an additional 21 points

Sabetha Lady Jays tally win, remain undefeated heading into match-ups with Thunder, Kaws

TP

2FG

3FG

FT

R

A S

T

F

1

TP

2FG

3FG

FT

R

A

S

T

1

SABETHA HIGH SCHOOL WRESTLING

Jay grapplers take seventh at Rossville Invitational TIM KELLENBERGER

Jena Winkler goes up over this Riverside defender during basketball action on Tuesday, Lauren Huber looks to pass during basketball action with Riverside January 5. on Tuesday, January 5. Tim Kellenberger | Herald Tim Kellenberger | Herald

Sabetha High School cheerleaders lead second- and third-grade girls in cheers during halftime of the boys’ basketball game Friday, January 8. Duane Tramp | Contributor

Sabetha Elementary School kindergarten girls yell loud during their cheer at the Varsity Boys’ Basketball game Friday, January 8. The Sabetha High School cheerleaders hosted a cheer clinic for 73 girls in grades kindergarten through fifth grade Wednesday and Thursday, January 6 and 7. The girls performed cheers and did a dance Sabetha High School cheerleaders routine to “I want you back” by the Jackson 5. The song lead fourth- and fifth-grade girls in was performed by the SHS pep band. cheers Friday, January 8 Krista Wasinger | Herald Duane Tramp | Contributor

Cheerleaders in Training

The Sabetha High School Bluejay wrestling squad traveled to Rossville to compete in the Rossville Invitational Saturday, Jan. 9. There were 16 teams entered in this year’s tournament and at the conclusion of the day, the Jays captured seventh place with 96 points. The host team Rossville Bulldogs took the team title with 215 points followed by Clay Center with 176 and Santa Fe Trail with 156. The Jays placed seven wrestlers in the tournament, with junior 113-pound Vernon Nellis and junior 126-pound Seth Harrell leading the way with second place finishes. Freshman 170-pound Cauy Rokey finished in fourth place. He finished the day with a 3-2 record with his loss in the consolation finals to Schoemann of Wellington by a 7-4 decision. Rokey had pinned Schoemann earlier in the day but could not duplicate that

feat in the final match. “Cauy has shown great commitment to the team and his training this year,” said Assistant Coach Kyle Allen. “This weekend was a testament to the hard work he has put in.” Grabbing fifth place finishes were sophomore 132-pound Brandon Brownlee, senior 145-pound Nate Niehues, and junior 195-pound Payton Strahm. Freshman 152-pound Kamden Brownlee took sixth place. “This weekend was a great opportunity to experience the type of competition we will have at regionals and state,” Allen said. “The team showed improvement against tough competition, and that is a step in the right direction.” The Jays travel to Maryville, Mo., on Thursday, Jan. 14, to wrestle the Maryville Spoofhounds and the Falls City Tigers beginning at 5:30 p.m. The team will compete in Marysville on Saturday, Jan. 16, in the Marysville Invitational.

Rossville Invitational, 1/9/2016 INDIVIDUAL RESULTS WEIGHT CLASS

NAME

113

Nellis

120

Wisdom

126

S.Harrell

132

B. Brownlee

138

Halls

145

Niehues

152

K .Brownlee

160

Becker

170

C.Rokey

182

G.Meyer

195

P.Strahm

285

E.Strahm

OPPONENT TEAM

O'Leary Pringle

RC PL Culbertson Ross Greenfield SFT Dorr PR Brown SM Rundus RC Gfeller Ross Hurla Ross Guess PL Rep Lowell Co Clay Knitter Filinger RC Rennenberg PL Riv Carr Int Wynn Clay Geier RC Miller Ross Humberg MH Luellen Ross Birkinsha ACCHS Schoenfield SM Koger SFT Failer SM Glover Well Trainer DW Schoemann Well Tiers Clay Lyle SFT Schoemann Well Cruickshan SM Groom Well Norris Well Blevins DW Ware Clay ACCHS Forbes Miller DW Hanshaw ACCHS Gomez Hay

WIN/ SCORE LOSE

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Fall Fall Fall Fall Fall Fall 6-2 Fall Fall Fall

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Fall

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3-2 5-3 Fall

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Fall

L W L W L W L L L L W W L W L L L L W L W W L L

Fall 11-2 6-5 Fall Fall Fall 14-4 Fall Fall Fall Fall Fall Fall Fall 7-4 Fall 5-4 Fall Fall Fall Fall Fall 5-1 Injury

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sports&recreation

sabethaherald.com  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  January 13, 2016

THE HUNT

The Sabetha Herald’s

Those predator calls really do work Ockert, the tracker, and I loaded up in the Land Cruiser early the next morning as the sun peeked over the eastern horizon. The temperature was in the middle 40s with hardly any wind blowing. We didn’t eat breakfast before we left, because Ockert was in a hurry to get to the riverbed. When he secured the predator call from another professional hunter in camp the night before, the guy told him he hadn’t seen any klipspringers around the ranch for a long time. He didn’t think there were any in the area any longer. Ockert told him thanks, but we had nothing to lose going out and looking around anyway. We had several days to kill on the hunt, so we might as well be out doing something. We headed toward the river and within half an hour we were climbing out of the Cruiser and preparing to do a little hiking. It was at this point that I finally asked Ockert why in the world he wanted a predator call. He quickly explained to me that a klipspringer is a very curious animal, and you need to take advantage of this if you want a good chance to take one. The habitat that the klipsringer lives in — rock outcroppings called koppies — offers the best concealment for its survival. As I would soon find out, these little antelopes blend in so well with the rocks that they live in and around that they are almost impossible to spot, unless you catch them moving. By blowing on the predator call, we could sit still in a promising location and let the klipspringer make the first move, a move that just might enable us to work our way in for a shot. We marched our way up the riverbed, which was strewn with boulders the size of small cars.

Along the edge of the riverbed Ockert stopped and began to glass rocks. were these rock outcroppings that the area. He had not been looking Ockert had this big grin on his would rise up into the air around very long before he just dropped face when we could finally stand 25 to 30 feet high. There was to the ground and motioned for up and not be seen. He pulled the sparse vegetation in the area but us to do the same. We dropped call out of his pocket and winked just enough that like bags of wet at me. He made some comment it offered some feathers waiting about there being no klipspringers concealment for for further in- in the area. I told you… Ockert is the wildlife. structions. good! We made plans to work our We began to Ockert whis- way forward and see if we could climb up, down pered that the close the distance on the pair of and around the two klipspring- klipspringers. rocks. It was ers were only We took off at a snail’s pace, tough going about 150 yards and within a few minutes Ockmost of the time. from us and ert peeked over the top of a large We worked our were looking boulder and quickly ducked back BY: TIM KELLENBERGER way down the right at us. He down. He made his way over to me river for almost a mile before motioned for us to follow him, and and whispered in my ear that the Ockert decided to park and give he worked his way to the left trying male was standing facing us on a the call a couple of squeals. We to reach a large patch of boulders. large boulder less than 75 yards plopped down on some rocks, and We crawled for about 50 yards and away! Now it was time for some Ockert let out a couple of hair-rais- were then able to hide behind the strategy. ing squeals on the call. I thought I was home calling in coyotes! We sat there for about two or 150 acres M/L Marshall County, KS three minutes when Ockert whispered that he just spotted a klipSaturday, Jan. 23, 2016 • Starting at 10:30 am springer. I about fell off of the rock. Frankfort American Legion Building I honestly thought he was kidding 8th Street and N. Locust Street (Hwy 99) Intersection at first, but I could tell by his look that he was dead serious. He in- LAND LOCATION: Go 1 mile north of Frankfort, KS, to Hwy 9. Take Hwy 9 4-1/2 miles east to structed the tracker and me to sit 26th Road. Property lays on northeast side of the intersection of Hwy 9 & 26th Road. From the intersection of Hwy 36 & 26th Road (Hwy 87), go 7-1/2 miles south. Property starts at the 1/2 still and not move. He said the klipspringer was mile line on east side of Hwy 87. about 300 yards out and standing LEGAL DESCRIPTION: SW 1/4 Section 5, Township 4, Range 10, Noble Township, Marshall on top of a big boulder staring our County, Kansas way. Two seconds later, he whis- GENERAL DESCRIPTION: Property has approximately 140 acres of tillable land, balance waterways pered that there were now two of and creek. Approximately 80 acres is very productive bottomland, and 60 acres very productive them standing side by side. It was well maintained upland. Base acres 91.52 corn, 37.96 soybeans, 11.02 wheat. a male and a female! I still had REAL ESTATE FIRM COMMENTS: Very Nice Farm! Lays well, farms very easy with good soil, has not spotted them, but Ockert had always produced high yielding crops. Easy access. them in his sights with his binocu- TERMS: 10% down auction day with balance due on Feb. 23. Possession to be upon closing. Buyer lars. They stood there for about and seller will equally split title insurance expense. Seller will be responsible for taxes to closing a minute and then, according to date. Buyer and seller will equally split closing costs of Nemaha County Abstract Title Co. Statements Ockert, they bounded off the rock day of sale take precedence over printed material. Seneca Realty represents seller’s interest. and disappeared down in the rock Seller: Joseph & Rita Strathman Trust Co-Trustees: Jerry Strathman 785-336-3832 & Joe Strathman 785-736-2945 strewn riverbed. We were up instantly and on the move toward them. We took AUCTION CONDUCTED BY SENECA REALTY off on a trot and probably covered Dale Wilhelm - Auctioneer/Sales Person Mike Kuckelman - Broker 785-336-3627 or 785-336-3501 785-294-1038 about a quarter of a mile before

Athlete of the Week

WILD TIMES

ABSOLUTE REAL ESTATE LAND AUCTION

Alec Kirwan Basketball Sabetha High School

Senior Alec Kirwan lit up the court during the Sabetha-Royal Valley game Friday, January 8. He tallied 16 points on nearperfect shooting, two rebounds and two steals. Alec punctuated the night with a thunderous dunk.

Athlete of the Week selection will be awarded with an “Athlete of the Week” t-shirt at the end of the fall sports season. Please contact The Sabetha Herald to provide sizing information.

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January 13, 2016  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  sabethaherald.com

school&youth PRAIRIE HILLS USD NO. 113

Sabetha Elementary, Middle Schools earn ‘HealthierUS Challenge’ awards

HONOR ROLLS

The following students were named to the honor roll for the first semester (high schools) and second quarter (middle schools) of the 2015-16 academic year.

SABETHA HIGH SCHOOL 4.0 Honor Roll

Seniors: Josey Allen, Nicole Grey, Nolan Brey, Kalli Broxterman, Matt Burdick, Starla Cochenour, Brock Frey, Tyler Hackney, Mariah Huneke, Devon Johnson, Elaina Lohman, Jordan Longabaugh, Anthony Martin, Alexis McAfee, Lauren Menold, Lindsay Meyer, Nick Meyer, Levi Mills, Hayley Mitchell, Jacob Payne, Courtney Plattner, Mollie Robinson, Caleb Strahm, Lexi Wenger and Jena Winkler. Juniors: Ashton Buser, MiKayla Deters, Hannah Edelman, Laura Edelman, Lauren Herbster, Michaela Krebs, Savanna Metzger, Christian Meyer, Ellie Meyer, Alex Montgomery, Eric Renyer and Karlie Spielman. Sophomores: Preston Bruning, Larke Edelman, Howard Hinton, Sonja Menold, Leah Metzger, Samantha Shafer, Laurel Smith, Brett Stallbaumer and Justin Wenger. Freshmen: Anna Cochenour, Braeden Cox, Tristan Edelman, Mason Engelken, Henry Glynn, Hillary Krebs, Hunter Lowdermilk, Skylar McAfee, Norea Menold, Logan Metzger, Megan Meyer, Kortney Plattner, Cheyan Rokey, Mason Spellmeier, Kate Strahm, Shayna Strahm and Kirsten Wenger.

Honor Roll (3.5-3.9999)

Sabetha Elementary School Food Service is honored at a school assembly Thursday, January 7, for earning the HealthierUS Silver School award, earning the food service program $1,000. Pictured are HOLDING BANNER (L-R) students GracieAnn Glaspie, Jacob Garber, Reid Plattner and Kate Beyer; BACK ROW (L-R) cook Deb Shefferd, cook Vonnie Harvey, head cook Lori Gruber, substitute Sandy Matney and Prairie Hills USD No. 113 Food Service Director Brook Brubeck. Krista Wasinger | Herald

Submitted by Brook Brubeck Prairie Hills USD No. 113 Food Service Supervisor Sabetha Elementary and Sabetha Middle School are making national news by working to support and improve the health of our children and our community. As part of their effort, healthy items are featured on their menus and physical education and activity are emphasized. Their efforts are part of the HealthierUS School Challenge (HUSSC). Sabetha Elementary School qualified for the Silver Level award and Sabetha Middle School qualified for the Bronze Level award. Angela Dittmer, consultant for the Kansas Department of Health and Environment’s Department of Child Nutrition and Wellness, presented awards to the two schools on Thursday, Jan. 7. The application process was led by Brook Brubeck, district food services director. A team of school professionals reviewed and aided in the application process. At SES, former principal Matt Garber, physical education teacher Julie Kuckelman and former district nurse Emily Streit provided vital information. At SMS, former principal Tom Palmer, P.E. teachers Alex McAfee and Megan Glick, technology teacher Linda White, and school nurse Michelle Edelman cooperated in the application process. Special recognition is also due to the school food service team for

SABETHA MIDDLE SCHOOL

Superintendent Honor Roll (4.0 GPA)

Sabetha Middle School Food Service is honored Thursday, January 7, for receiving the HealthierUS Bronze School award. The award earns the food service program $500. Pictured are (L-R) cook Carol Baumgartner, head cook Nancy Broxterman, students Bree Voos, Hunter Terrel, Jake Longabaugh, Carson Ukele, Olivia Meyer, Jeanelle Wenger and Rachel Kramer, cook Hannah Clements and Prairie Hills USD No. 113 Food Service Director Brook Brubeck. Krista Wasinger | Herald

its part in preparing and serving healthy daily meals, particularly SES head cook Lori Gruber, SMS head cook, Nancy Broxterman, and SHS/Production Kitchen Manager, Kay Edelman. The HealthierUS School Challenge is a voluntary national certification initiative for schools participating in the National School Lunch and Breakfast Programs. It supports First Lady Michelle Obama’s “Let’s Move” campaign by recognizing schools that are creating healthier school environments through their promotion of good nutrition and physical activity. Sponsored by the United States

Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Food and Nutrition Service (FNS), the initiative encourages all schools take a leadership role in helping students to make healthier eating and physical activity choices that will last a lifetime. Schools such as SES and SMS, that champion the HUSSC work hard to make changes to their school environment in order to (1) improve the quality of the foods served, (2) provide students with nutrition education, and (3) provide students with physical education and opportunities for physical activity. Ultimately, FNS would like to

see all schools receive an HUSSC award at any one of the four levels of superior performance: Bronze, Silver, Gold or Gold Award of Distinction. Schools awarded receive a monetary incentive (Bronze, $500; Silver, $1,000; Gold, $1,500; and Gold Award of Distinction, $2,000), an award plaque signed by a USDA official, a banner to display in their school, and their name listed on the Team Nutrition Web site. These two schools join past winners from our district, Wetmore Academic Center (Gold) and Axtell Public School (Gold).

SCHOOL ORGANIZATION NEWS

Sabetha PTO Submitted by Sabetha PTO Sabetha PTO met at 7 p.m. Monday, Jan. 4, at the Sabetha Elementary School library. Present were President Anita Meyer, Vice President Lori Menold, Secretary Krista Wasinger, Treasurer Wanda Menold, Jeanelle Plattner, Amber Deters, Mary Herrmann, Kara Beyer and Kara Tramp. Guest present was Christa Schuette. Minutes from the December meeting were approved and W. Menold presented the Treasurer’s Report. OLD BUSINESS Giving Trees: L. Menold reported that she had received positive feedback on the trees. It was discussed to send out a survey to the teachers for additional feedback. Color printer cartridges: Mem-

Seniors: Kaid Allen, Remington Beckner, Lillian Brownlee, Ethan Cochenour, Connor Epple, Corbin Hartter, Erin Herrmann, Courtney Holthaus, Calder Keehn, Zachary Meyer, Jonah Montgomery, Nathaniel Niehues, Brandon Poe, Taryn Schuette, Larisa White and Elisha Wilcock. Juniors: Zachary Edelman, Mackenzie Garber, Lauren Huber, Maggie Kruse, Grace Kuenzi, Madyson McGill, Josh Nuzum, Blake Plattner, Traevin Snyder, Jessica Stallbaumer, Payton Strahm, Emily Strathman, Kendall Walter and Madison Williams. Sophomores: Cullen Bergman, Kesair Brubeck, Riley Herrmann, Cassidy Holthaus, Gracie Saner, Abram Schuetz, Isaac Sunderland, Tanner Ukele and Austin Wiltz. Freshmen: Trista Argabright, Brooklyn Bauman, Brynna Broxterman, Jesse Burger, Logan Burger, Jadyn Graybill, Joseph Gruber, Aubriana Gugelman, Joel Hackney, Ashten Halls, Jarod Hartter, Addison Huning, Payton Lippert, Emily Poe, Cauy Rokey, Kyle Spielman, Ryan Stapleton, Elliott Strahm and Kinsey Terrel.

bers discussed purchasing color printer cartridges for SES teachers, as requested by principal Jennifer Gatz. This purchase was approved. SES Christmas party: Overall, the Christmas parties were successful. Members discussed appropriate games for parties. Secretary Wasinger will send an email to Head Room Parents regarding appropriate games and Head Room Parents should share with their respective classroom parents. CORRESPONDENCE Secretary Wasinger read a thank you note from the Sabetha High School staff for the December Early Release Treats. Also received was a Christmas card from Grimm’s Gardens. COMMITTEE REPORTS Sunshine: W. Menold will send

Fundraiser & Silent Auction

Sunday, Jan. 24th 11:30 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.

for medical/travel expenses for the family of Jason VanVerth, son of Bob and Marcia Huber. Jason is battling brain cancer.

a reminder to teachers to let her know if there is a student who should receive a Sunshine gift. Box Tops: It was reported that a check had been received for the Box Top submissions. Crossing Guard: Tramp reported that she had purchased a Chamber of Commerce gift certificate for the crossing guard’s Christmas gift. Spelling Bee: The PTO spelling bee will be held Jan. 8. President Meyer said Coordinator Mandy Funk said everything is ready to go. School Supplies: President Meyer said the supply lists have been updated and submitted to Sabetha Healthmart and Garrett Country Mart. Taco Feed: Meyer will send out Volunteer spot notices for the Taco

Feed. The event will be held during the basketball games on Tuesday, Feb. 9. Parent/Teacher Conferences Spring Meal: Tramp said she would organize the catering for the meals and contact the building principals. Carnival Games: The game list will be finalized soon. There will be 10 to 11 games, which is similar to last year. The inflatables have already been booked. W. Menold will order supplies for face painting. NEW BUSINESS Nominating Committee: A nominating committee will be formed at the February meeting. The next regular meeting will be held at 7 p.m. Monday, Feb. 8, at the SES Library.

Women I n AgrIculture “The Heart of the Farm” Thursday, January 14, 2016

Registration at 5:45 p.m., Event lasts 6 to 8 p.m.

Free supper provided Special Guests : Dr. Paige Pratt, Chef Alli and Debbie Lyons-Blythe

Silent Auction concludes at 1:45 p.m. Winners announced at 2 p.m.

Bluejay Honor Roll (3.5-3.9 GPA)

Eighth Grade: Maeve Brubeck, Marissa Cox, Molly Edelman, Gabe Garber, Erin Howard, Maggi Hughes, Charles Kuenzi, Rachel Kuenzi, Jake Longabaugh, Walker Lowdermilk, Kinsey Menold, Cody Meyer, Payton Michael, Braden Mitchell, Emily Murchison, Gracie Robinson, Micah Romines, Mariah Russell, Foser Saner, Kinley Schuette, Carson Ukele and Hannah Wertenberger. Seventh Grade: Summer Bechtelheimer, Charlie Bestwick, Kaden Dillon, Colby Hayden, Bailey Hoffman, Megan Kostiuk, Ethan Mitchell, Chad Russell and Nicole Stallbaumer. Sixth Grade: Hadley Argabright, Jake Beyer, Megan Brockhoff, Memphis Cochran, Jadyn Dorn, Kaden Edelman, Kendrick Edelman, Simon Engelken, Payton Hatfield, Pyper McGill, Lindsey Meers, Kellen Menold, Thadd Menold, Kinzey Meyer, Sophia Meyer, Olivia Saner, John Streett, Rachel Wertenberger and Tristan Wittwer.

Scholastic Honor Roll (3.0-3.49 GPA)

Eighth Grade: Kody Beyer, Aidan Brubeck, Colby Buser, Andrew Frazee, Jordan Gatz, Kaleb Grimm, Amelia Martin, Amber Menold, Morgan Schuette, Jesse Shafer, Vivian Strahm, Isaiah Tavis and Olivia Warren. Seventh Grade: Ayiana Blacksmith, Cooper Bradbury, Erin Deters, Saydee Elms, Ashlyn Garber, Jordie Geist, Michael Gugelman, Brycen Hartley, Madeline Herrmann, Haylee Kramer, Caden Lierz, Katelyn Lierz, Riley Lierz, Keenan Lippert, Kylie Meredith, Laban Metzger, Noah Nonnast and Madelyn Wehner. Sixth Grade: John Barnes, Blake Bowser, Travis Dalinghaus, Griffen Huning, Jared Kruse, Kylie Shelly, Casey Williams, Jalen Worthley and Aaron Zubler.

WETMORE HIGH SCHOOL High Honor Roll (4.0 GPA)

Seniors: Gerae Haverkamp, Trevor Heitz and Elizabeth Hutfles. Sophomores: McKayla Henry. Freshmen: Alyssa Davis and Joel Hutfles.

Principal’s Honor Roll (3.5-3.99 GPA)

Seniors: Dalton Lee Boeckman, Tyrell Davis, Ellen Gorden, Brittany Hardenberger, Rylian Martin and Bryanna Morfitt. Juniors: Kyle Bloom, Mariah Jones, Dakota McQueen and Walker Uhl. Sophomores: Alena Pfrang. Freshmen: Curtis Bloom and Seth Shumaker.

Honorable Mention (3.0-3.49 GPA)

Seniors: Trey Craig, Danyel Duryea, Dakota McKinney, Destinie Morfitt and Camila Palacios. Juniors: Aaron Achten, Rachel Bloom, Desiree Fund, Alex Potter and Robyn Potter. Sophomores: Jade Brown, Myrna Crismas, Jill Henry, Ethan Osterhaus, Josephine Shumaker and Newt Smith. Freshmen: Noah Ball, Orion Martin, Mariah Ramirez and Lauryn Scott.

WETMORE MIDDLE SCHOOL High Honor Roll (4.0 GPA)

Seventh Grade: Alyssa Bloom Sixth Grade: Campbell Brown, Braden Henry and Kenzie Strathman.

Principal’s Honor Roll (3.5-3.99 GPA)

Eighth Grade: Shayla Ball Seventh Grade: Zachariah Cole, Alvana Crismas, Shayla Hughes, Jasmine Johnson, Kael McQueen, Reagan Osterhaus, Kaitlyn Ramirez, Abbigail Shumaker, Ross Shumaker and Austin Smith. Sixth Grade: Eric Bloom, Juliana Crismas, Taylor Fillmore, Colby Hanzlicek, Marshall Tanking and Rachel Vandiver.

Honorable Mention (3.0-3.49 GPA)

@ Sacred Heart Church 1031 S. 12th St., Sabetha

Eighth Grade: Ivy Bailey, Madisen Cochran, Deborah Edelman, Rachel Kramer, Nikole Kuenzi, Sofia Kuenzi, RheaEtta Laipple, Olivia Meyer, David Pierson, Ainsley Smith, Bree Voos, Jeanelle Wenger and Hannah Whittaker. Seventh Grade: Khalea Bergman, Kayla Devore, Kaleb Evans, Darrin Funk, Lauren Gatz, Ellen Glynn, Samantha Gutknecht, Hattie Lukert, Ashlyn Menold, Braden Menold, Kenzie Meyer, Nicholas Niehues, Leah Renyer, Abigail Russell, Drew Schmelzle, Melinna Schumann, Spencer Strahm, Camryn Wessel and Sharon Zubler. Sixth Grade: Gavan Bergman, Kendall Edelman, Emily Krebs, Sadie Krogmann, Chloe Menold, Madison Menold, Kennedy Mitchell, Emma Popkess, Emma Schilling and Matthew Whittaker.

Chef Alli

Dr. Paige Pratt

Debbie Lyons-Blythe

Event Location: Nemaha County Community Building 1500 Community Drive, Seneca, KS 66538

Eighth Grade: Michael Hemenway, Wesley Kautz, John Michael Lamberson, Kevin Shumaker and Lane Strathman. Seventh Grade: Christopher Kautz Sixth Grade: Stephanie Hughes, Roryahna Martin, Haley Murrow, Sydney Smith and Calissa Wallace.


school&youth

sabethaherald.com  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  January 13, 2016

UNIVERSITY GRADUATIONS

4-H CLUB NEWS

Kansas State University

Busy Jayhawkers

Nearly 1,450 students have completed degree requirements from Kansas State University for fall 2015. The graduates hail from 90 Kansas counties, 45 states and 29 countries. Degrees earned include more than 1,075 bachelor’s degrees, more than 300 master’s degrees, more than 60 doctorate and seven associate degrees. Some students earned multiple degrees. Local graduates include the following: Benjamin Bosworth,

Submitted by Kortney Plattner, reporter Citizenship in our community is one of the goals for the Busy Jayhawkers 4-H Club this year. There are two common definitions for citizenship. It means membership in a community or country, or the character and behavior of an individual as a member of society in terms of the duties, obligations and functions of a citizen. As a 4-H club, we not only want each member to be active in the club, but we also want the club as a whole to participate in community service activities. This can include recycling, picking up trash, collecting food for the Food Pantry, or Christmas caroling as we did at our December meeting. We met at Cobblestone Court on Dec. 21, and joined our youthful voices together to sing many familiar carols such as Silent Night, O Come All Ye Faithful, and We Three Kings. It is rewarding to not only hear the many voices join together in song but to also see many of the residents join in as well. After singing, we spent a few minutes

Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering; Olivia Robinson, Bachelor of Science in Food Science and Industry; Jessalyn Strahm, Bachelor of Science in Hotel and Restaurant Management; Andrea Tangeman, Bachelor of Science in Business Administration; Claire Wenger, Bachelor of Science in Family Studies and Human Services, all of Sabetha; and Kelsey Webs of Goff, Bachelor of Science.

UNIVERSITY HONORS

Missouri Valley College Jessica Keehn of Wetmore, majoring in psychology, was named to the Missouri Valley College’s Fall 2015 Dean’s List The requirements for the Dean’s

List are a 3.3 or higher grade point average; at least 12 graded hours for the semester and no “D,” “F,” or “Incomplete” grades for the semester.

UNIVERSITY SCHOLARSHIPS

visiting with the residents before going to the Community Building for our monthly meeting. Roll call was one of the highlights of this meeting as we were to answer by telling of a gift we were given that we did not want. There were many interesting and humorous responses from a lump of coal to socks and toothbrushes. The best response of the night was from Jared Rokey, who stated, “I have never received a gift I didn’t like.” We are not sure if he is easily satisfied or maybe he is so good that Santa just gets him great gifts. Club Leader Sue Rokey, encouraged us to begin thinking about what each of us were planning to do for County 4-H days which will be held Feb. 27, at St Peter and Paul School in Seneca. Club Leader Carrie Strahm gave a brief summary of what 4-H day is all about and encouraged new members to come and observe if they don’t feel they are ready to sign up yet. Demonstrations, project talks, readings, dances, skits, and piano solos are just a few of the options available.

Emporia State University Piper Rokey of Sabetha, received the Emporia State University Hornet, Presidential, Foundation, Transfer Scholarship for the 20152016 academic year at Emporia State University. Over $2.53 million in scholar-

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ship funds are helping nearly 1,700 students from Kansas, 19 other states and 24 foreign countries realize their educational dreams during the 2015-2016 academic year.

Busy Jayhawkers 4-H members carol to Cobblestone Court Residents. Carolers pictured are Morgan Toedman, Holden Edelman, Reid Plattner, Davis Rokey, Sarah Rokey, Cheyan Rokey, Laura Edelman, Kortney Plattner, Mallorie Schultejans, Molly Edelman, Tyson Detweiler, Trinity Detweiler, Ava Edelman, Chloe Detweiler, Jared Rokey, Alivia Lang, Luke Rokey, Blake Plattner, Payton Strahm and Elliott Strahm. Submitted

After singing “Happy Birthday” to Molly Edelman and adjourning the meeting, recreation was led by the Brian and Jeanelle Plattner family. The club was divided in half — the “Santas” versus the “Elves.” Team captains were the Strahm brothers, Payton (Santa) and Elliott (Elf). Members had to work together to open a Christmas gift box and pass the items from one end of the room to the other while

keeping their hands joined. The “Elves” won the contest fair and square! The meeting concluded with a gift exchange led by the Tim and Michaela Schultejans family. Everyone brought a $5 gift, and gifts were exchanged by rolling dice. For refreshments, all enjoyed a Christmas goodie buffet. The Galen and Jolene Wiltz family provided drinks.

UNIVERSITY SCHOLARSHIPS

Kansas State University Nearly 13,700 academic scholarships have been awarded to Kansas State University students for the 2015-16 school year. Local students receiving scholarships to Kansas State University include the following: Sabetha – Abby Meyer, Anna L. Steckelberg Memorial Scholarship in Dietetics and Nutrition and Medallion Scholarship; Emma Montgomery, Eugene T. McGraw Scholarship and IAPD Excellence Fund; Cody Wilhelm, Foundation for Engineering at Kansas State University Fund; Michael Baumgartner, Achievement Award, Gladys Lichty Memorial Scholarship and Norvin and Barbara Stunkel Scholarship in Livestock Production and Management; Taylor Baumgartner, Lynn and Hazel Russell Memorial Scholarship; Zachary Burger, Activity Scholarship; Trenton Cox, Foundation for Engineering at Kansas State University Fund and Lusardi Construction Company Scholarship; Kortney Edelman, Achievement Award; Malaena Edelman, Laura and Martin Turner Education Scholarship and Medallion Scholarship; Katelyn Guengerich, June Milliard Hall Memorial Scholarship; Meggie Hall, Foundation Plus Scholarship and Jean Lawson Bottger Scholarship in Dietetics; Billy Hatfield, Foundation Plus Scholarship, K-State Marching Band Scholarship and Rosamond P. Haeberle Music Education Scholarship; Samuel Hughes, Foundation Scholarship; Brandi McCoy, Irwin E. Patton Endowed Fund and Jon and Janice Isch Agriculture Scholarship; Allison McNary, Wilma Johnston and Jean Hollis Modern Language Scholarship; Lindsay McNary, COHO Digital Media Scholarship and Fred White Sports Broadcasting Scholarship; Ellie Montgomery, Leadership Scholarship, Leonard Leon Brown and Margaret Emma Brown Memorial Scholarship and Walter A. Buchheim Memorial Scholarship; Robert Nagely, Raymond and Geneva Dobbins Scholarship in Human Ecology; Megan Plattner, Foundation Plus Scholarship, Kendall Scholarship for Overseas Experience and Robert and Linda Salem Scholarship Fund; Sarah Plum, Leadership Scholarship; Olivia Robinson, Lawrence E. and Gertrude E. Kern Family Scholarship in Agriculture; Jordan Rokey, Charles D. Singelton Scholarship in Grain Science and Industry; Ashley Schmelzle, Achievement Award and Neva E. Babcock Scholarship; Kelli Stallbaumer, Department of Kinesiology Scholarship, Foundation Plus Scholarship and Hazel Molzen Craig Human Ecology Scholarship; Kyle Stallbaumer, Mildred Shannon Barnes and Vivian Finley Nolte Human Ecology Scholarship; Tate Steinlage, Sarah Watson Memorial Scholarship in Journalism; Jessalyn Strahm, Margaret Kirby Burtis and Her Parents Walter John and Winifred Jane Brown Burtis Memorial Scholarship; Joshua Strahm, Foundation Plus Scholarship and Willard S. and Ethel E. Hemker Engineering Scholarship; Malerie Strahm, Foundation Scholarship, Genny and Lowell Brandner Scholarship, Jon and Janice Isch Agriculture Scholarship and Law-

rence H. Erpelding Scholarship; Mariah Strahm, Achievement Award, Barry A. Beck Memorial Scholarship, Darcy DempseySchmidt Memorial Scholarship in Management, Douglas and Sharlene Gardner Scholarship and Executive Mentorship Program; Michaela Strahm, College of Education Alumni Scholarship; Ryan Strahm, Foundation Scholarship; Elsie Suhr, Timothy R. Donoghue Graduate Scholarship; Anna Sunderland, Clyde E. Minner Scholarship and Leadership Scholarship; and Camden Wenger, Fairchild Scholarship. Fairview – Carissa Tummons, Medallion Scholarship. Bern – Mitchell Baumgartner, Foundation Plus Scholarship; Jacob Leuthold, Leadership Scholarship; Claire Meyer, Dr. Dennis and Georgiana Dettmer Scholarship in Human Ecology; Darren Meyer, Foundation for Engineering at Kansas State University Fund, Jim and Pat Guthrie Civil Engineering Scholarship and Leadership Scholarship; Eric Meyer, Achievement Award and R.B. Laing Memorial Scholarship in Grain Science; Isaac Meyer, Jon and Janice Isch Agriculture Scholarship, Medallion Scholarship, Norvin and Barbara Stunkel Scholarship in Livestock Production and Management and Raymond and Geneva Dobbins Scholarship in Agriculture. Wetmore – Cristy Law, Leadership Scholarship and Max E. and Jean Hollinger Scholarship in Journalism and Mass Communications; and Ross Strathman, Feed Technology/Feedstuffs Scholarship. Goff – Mallory Heinen, David R. and Janice W. Von Riesen Scholarship in Journalism and Mass Communications and Ralph and Ruthana Lashbrook Scholarship; Jessica Hermesch, College of Arts and Sciences Student Research Travel Award, Foundation Plus Scholarship, Jaconette L. Tietze Memorial Scholarship and Mr. and Mrs. Dwight Raymond Lee Memorial Scholarship; Dana Kramer, R.C. and Eva Finley Center on Aging Scholarship; Katelyn Niehues, Achievement Award, Jay C. and Dorothy B. Marshall Human Ecology Scholarship, Mary Jordan Regnier Human Ecology Scholarship and Nelson Family Memorial Scholarship; and Kelsey Webs, Achievement Award. A complete list of Kansas State University students who have received scholarships is available at http://www.k-state.edu/media/ newsreleases/lists/scholar1516/index.html.

Michaela Schultejans leads the club gift exchange. Members pictured are (L-R) Sarah Rokey, Chloe Detweiler, Jyllian Stapleton, Kayla Meyer, Alivia Lang, Samantha Schultejans, Haylie Meyer Kendall Edelman, Elf Captain Elliott Strahm, Gabe Meyer, Jared and Molly Edelman. Rokey, and Luke Rokey enjoy the Christmas Gift Exchange. Submitted | Kendrick Edelman Submitted | Kendrick Edelman

4-H CLUB NEWS

4-H Ambassador

Submitted by Karrie Van Winkle Nemaha County Ambassador Everyone has heard about 4-H, but do you know what 4-H is? 4-H allows youth to be leaders and get involved in their community. 4-H members get to work on projects and learn new skills along the way. We have camps for youth of all ages that let kids make new friends and attend workshops. Workshops can range from learning a new craft, to learning about wildlife, to making homemade lotions, soups, and sprays. What is stopping you from joining 4-H? The common stereotype is living on a farm or showing livestock, but if you have ever been

to the fair it is much more than that. Kids can grow a garden in the back yard, bake a cake, and build rockets or robots. You get to help teach your kids how to do a project and learn new skills while doing it. When you enter it at the fair everyone is a winner. Who doesn’t enjoy getting ribbons? Another stereotype keeping parents from signing kids up is the record books. But the records help teach kids how to write, keep track of bills, and they will receive pins when completed. Kids and adults might complain at the beginning, but later in life youth will appreciate it and be able to balance a check book, do taxes,

etc. Another stereotype is 4-H is only at the fair or it is a one-year event. 4-H has activities for younger and older youth all year round. For younger kids, they can attend a local day camp and a state camp at Rock Springs in the summer. For older youth we have state camps all throughout the year at Rock Springs, Topeka, Junction City and Manhattan. Depending on the camp and what the purpose of the camp, you might learn how laws are made, work on leadership skills, do activities as a team, and most often let you have free time and a dance, let alone make new friends along

the way. We also have workshops around the state for improving projects and answering questions. I’m an 11-year 4-H member at Centralia Aces 4-H Club and a four-year Nemaha County Ambassador. My involvement has taught me to promote 4-H and use my leadership and citizenship skills. The seven 2016 ambassadors hope to get more youth at the fair with more activities. Watch for activities at the fair and a day camp this summer. If you have any questions or want to join 4-H, contact your local extension office or 4-H club.

COLLECTIBLE & HOUSEHOLD AUCTION Saturday, Jan. 16, 2016 Starting at 10:00 am Sabetha Event Center • 16 Main, Sabetha, Kansas Lunch by Pat & Sylvia • web site w/pictures: www.hartterauction.com

Seneca Twin

THEATRE

STARTING FRIDAY SISTERS

R

DADDY’S HOME

PG-13

Showtimes FRI&SAT

7 & 9 pm

SUN

2 & 7 pm

MON-THUR

7 pm

Movie Line 336-2512

http://senecatwintheatre.webs.com/

GARY & JANICE ABERLE


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January 13, 2016  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  sabethaherald.com

classifieds EMPLOYMENT

H uman R esouRces a ssistant open at

n emaHa c ounty tRaining c enteR , HOURS:

in

s eneca .

20 hours per week Monday – Friday 8:00 am – 12:00 pm

EvEning S upport S taff n Emaha C ounty tr aining C EntEr , g roup h omE , HOURS:

STARTING PAY: $10.00/hour Cafeteria Plan; KPERS; Vacation, Sick, and Personal Leave.

Contact Tracy Rusche at NCTC, 12 S. 11th Street, Seneca, KS 66538; or call (785) 3366116; or apply online at www.nemahactc.org. EOE

D evelopment D irector open at

n emaha c ounty training c enter , i nc . This position has responsibilities in both Seneca and Sabetha.

in

S EnECa

This is a week on/week off rotation: 1st Half of the Week Wednesday – Friday 3:00 p.m. – 12:00 a.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. – 10:00 p.m.

This schedule may change due to agency needs. BENEFITS:

C.J. Foods Inc.

open at

2nd Half of Week Sunday 10:00 a.m. – 10:00 p.m. Monday – Tuesday 3:00 p.m. – 12:00 a.m. STARTING PAY: $9.97/hour BENEFITS:

Cafeteria Plan; KPERS; Vacation, Sick, and Personal Leave.

Contact Caitlin House at NCTC, 12 S. 11th St., Seneca, KS 66538; or call (785)336-6116; or apply online at www.nemahactc.org. EOE

Pawnee City, NE Receptionist Wanted • This is an excellent career opportunity for an individual that has strong communication skills and excellent multi-tasking abilities. Front desk representation and multi-line telephone system are key components to this position. • Full Time, Competitive Pay! • High School diploma/GED required. 2 year associates preferred. • Working knowledge Microsoft applications including Excel. Please visit our website for more position details and to submit application. Walk-ins always welcome. Call 402-852-2341 for further questions. C.J. Foods Inc is a drug free employer and EOE

SABETHA GOLF CLUB is seeking an Experienced cook for the bar & restaurant

CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT OPERATOR

BENEFITS: Cafeteria Plan; KPERS; Vacation, Sick & Personal Leave.

Position open until filled, early application is encouraged. EOE.

AHRS Construction is looking for an ambitious mechanically inclined equipment operator. Main duties will include operating a CAT 953 track loader and a CAT 315 excavator plus driving a dump truck. A class “A” CDL license is required and a well rounded construction background will be beneficial. AHRS will train the “right” person. Benefits include; no overnight work, health insurance, 401k plan, profit sharing plan, cafeteria plan, paid holidays and paid vacation paid sick days. Pay will depend on skill level. Call 785-336-6118 or apply at the office in Bern Kansas

Contact Alice Lackey at NCTC, 12 S. 11th Street, Seneca, KS 66538, or call (785) 336-6116. EOE

Supported Living Staff poSition

FULL-TIME COOK

REQUIREMENTS: Bachelor ’s degree in Marketing, Public Relations, or Development and preferably 6 months experience in the field. Experience to include event planning, fund raising (shor t and long term), etc. Excellent communications skills, both written and verbal. HOURS: 8:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.; 1:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday; 40 hours per week. Days and hours may vary depending on events/activities. STARTING PAY: $14.50/hour

N ight S upport S taff

open at Nemaha CouNty traiNiNg CeNter, group home, iN SeNeCa. HOURS:

• Hours are variable, based upon the restaurant operating hours and the seasonal needs of the organization. • Experience with food inventory control, supervising staff members, and cooking a set menu (catering/banquet) for larger numbers are all preferred qualities. Some training will be provided on specific tasks. • Salary is negotiable based upon the applicant experience and availability. • Bartending and additional food service/hospitality experience is helpful. Qualified applicants may contact Cindy Alderfer, telephone, 785-285-1020, or Lynn Hartter, via e-mail, at sabethacountryclub@gmail.com.

open at

n emaha C ounty training C enter HOURS:

This is a week on/week off rotation:

Wednesday Thursday

1st Half of Week Thursday – Friday 12:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. Saturday 12:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. 10:00 p.m. – 12:00 a.m. 2nd Half of Week Sunday 12:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. 10:00 p.m. – 12:00 a.m. Mon. – Wed. 12:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m.

Week 1 Sunday

Week 2 Monday Tuesday Friday Saturday

Sabetha Manor is seeking to fill a full time cook position.

in

S abetha

8:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. 3:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. 3:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. 3:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.

This position rotates between these two weeks for schedules. Schedule may var y according to programming needs.

BENEFITS:

STARTING PAY: $9.97/hour

Contact Caitlin House at NCTC, 12 S. 11th Street, Seneca, KS 66538; or call (785) 3366223 or (785) 336-6116; or apply online at www. nemahactc.org. EOE KANZA Mental Health and Guidance Center has exciting opportunities available for outgoing and energetic individuals to become a member of our team. Working for KANZA will afford an individual the opportunity to be able to make a difference in the life of an individual with a mental illness. We are currently seeking individuals for the following position:

Full-Time Attendant Care Provider

Must be 21 years old and have a valid driver’s license, possess good computer, social communication and interpersonal skills. Will support and assist individuals with activities of daily living.

SEND RESUME TO:

Lisa Zakutansky | PO Box 319 | Hiawatha, KS 66434 or email: h_r@kanzamhgc.org

EOE

SEASONAL POSITIONS

BENEFITS:

Cafeteria Plan; KPERS; Vacation, Sick, and Personal Leave.

Contact Jenny Haislip at NCTC, 329 N. 11th Street, Sabetha, KS 66534; or call (785) 300-1306; or apply online at www.nemahactc.org. EOE

Case C oordinator open at

nemaha C ounty training Center, i nC., in sabetha. REQUIREMENTS: A minimum of six months’ experience in the field of developmental disabilities ser vices; and a Bachelor’s degree or additional experience in the field, which may be substituted for the degree at the rate of six months of experience for each semester; and obtain and maintain a license according to standards. HOURS: 32 hours per week. Flexible working hours to accommodate both Vocational and Residential programming. Hours may fluctuate due to consumer needs as determined by your super visor. STARTING PAY: $12.00/hour BENEFITS: Cafeteria Plan; KPERS; Vacation, Sick, Personal, and Holiday Leave.

Grimm’s Gardens is seeking full and part time seasonal employees for Hiawatha and Atchison Locations. Positions include Hiawatha Nursery Manager and Atchison Assistant Store Manager among others.

If interested please apply at 1441 Oregon Street, Sabetha, Kansas or online at www.americareusa.net.

3:00 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. 3:00 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. 4:00 p.m. - 9:30 p.m. 8:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. 2:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

STARTING PAY: $9.56/hour Cafeteria Plan; KPERS; Vacation, Sick, and Personal Leave.

The ideal candidate will have a willingness to learn proper cooking methods and how to serve our residents; be flexible, reliable, and personable.

Contact Alice Lackey at NCTC, 12 S. 11th Street, Seneca, KS 66538; or call (785) 336-6116; or apply online at www.nemahactc.org. EOE

Seeking Office Assistant for Hiawatha location. Computer skills required. Will assist with general office tasks. Email resume to apply@ grimmsgardens.com Plant/Ops/Safety/Emergency Preparedness Director, southeast Nebraska Critical Access Hospital. Requires bachelor’s, excellent organizational, customer service, planning skills. Experience: safety management, OSHA, environmental safety, Homeland Security preferred. Competitive compensation. Apply: www.jchc.us. Information: HR (402) 729-6850

Convoy Systems is hiring Class A drivers to run from Kansas City to the west coast. Home Weekly! Great Benefits! www. convoysystems.com Call Lori 1-800-926-6869 ext. 303.

Can You Dig It? Heavy Equipment Operator Career! We Offer Training and Certifications Running Bulldozers, Backhoes and Excavators. Lifetime Job Placement. VA Benefits Eligible! 1-866-362-6497 Pharmacy Director, southeast Nebraska Critical Access Hospital. Requires BS Pharmacy, excellent organizational, customer service and planning skills. Experience in healthcare pharmacy management preferred. Competitive salary, benefits. Apply at www.jchc. us. For information call HR at (402) 729-6850.

MISCELLANEOUS Our Hunters will Pay Top $$$ To hunt your land. Call for a Free Base Camp Leasing info packet & Quote. 1-866-3091507. www.BaseCampLeasing. com.

GUN SHOW JAN. 16-17 SAT. 9-5 & SUN. 9-3 TOPEKA KANSAS EXPOCENTRE (19TH & TOPEKA BLVD) BUY-SELL-TRADE INFO: (563) 927-8176.

FOR SALE AUCTIONS

HAY FOR SALE Large net-wrapped brome bales, baled dry. Bill Glace 785-547-7181

For Sale 20’ 40’ 45’ 48’ 53’ Storage containers centralcontainer.net or 785655-9430.

Send resume to

apply@grimmsgardens.com 785-459-2586

BROME HAY FOR SALE

PRN TO PART-TIME

$55/ton 9 miles south of Sabetha Keith Kramer @ 336-3973

Are you a Licensed Practical Nurse or a Registered Nurse who has always wanted to work with the elderly? Are you ready to make a difference in the lives of our elders? If your answer is yes, then give us a call or come see us at Sabetha Manor.

FOR SALE

We have a prn to part time, noc shift, position available. Our number is 785-284-3411, or you can also fill out an application online at Americareusa.net. We look forward to hearing from you.

3-year-old washing machine, $200 or best offer.

Call 785-799-5051 (Sabetha)

Registered Nurse Sabetha Community Hospital is now accepting applications for a Part-Time Night RN. Schedule would be two 12 hour shifts per week, with every 3rd weekend being required. Facility is 90% lift-free. Supportive medical staff consists of five Family Practice Physicians. An excellent base salary is offered with a competitive shift differential. Additional benefits include vacation, holiday, sick time, and pension. If interested in filling out an application, visit our website at www.sabethahospital.com or contact Julie Holthaus, Human Resource Director at 785-284-2121 ext 584.

CONSIGNMENTS WANTED Come join our friendly, compassionate staff. We offer excellent wages and a wide range of benefits.

R ottinghaus C onsignment a uCtion

Hiring:

Farm and Industrial Consignments

Nursing Home CNA for 3-11 & 11-7 shifts. Call Chris Grote, DON at (784) 284-3471 or stop by for an application.

Apostolic Christian Home

511 Paramount | Sabetha, KS 66534

WANTED

Wednesday, March 2nd at 10 A.M. Jct. Hwy 36 & 99 • Beattie, Ks

Deadline for advertising is: February 8th, 2016 Contact Terry at: (785) 353-2525 Cell: (785) 799-5141


classifieds

sabethaherald.com  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  January 13, 2016

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REAL ESTATE

MAXIMUM REALTY 505 N. 1st - Hiawatha, KS ROGER HARTTER Auctioneer & Salesperson 785-284-2590 or 284-2643

Give us a call for all of your real estate needs!!

Sheila Schwalm, Broker

785-741-1773 Office: 785-742-3618

Have a favorite recipe? CONTRACT PENDING 2560 X Road, Sabetha

SOLD 1313 US Hwy 75

Share it with us!

SOLD 710 S. Washington

Sabetha

Sabetha

TO SUBMIT RECIPE:

www.heartland-realty.com

SOLD 709 Thunderbird Lane

- Email your recipe to: recipes@sabethaherald.com.

Heritage

Real Estate

- Drop off a copy of your recipe to: 1024 Main Street. - Make sure to include: whose recipe it is, ingredients, instructions and any special tips.

317 1st, Sabetha

$125,000

SOLD 714 Virginia, Sabetha

SOLD

Brick ranch with fantastic location. 3+ bedrooms, 2.5 baths, large master, lots of natural light, main floor laundry, full basement, tons of storage.

SOLD Erik Ganstrom (785) 336-1847 Kathy Ganstrom (785) 336-1848 Lori Burdiek (785) 294-1681 www.HeritageSuccess.com

If you have a photo, we would love to use it!

We will feature it on the Fun Page for all readers to enjoy!

Call us today for a showing!

605 330th Road, Morrill 5+ acres

SABETHA REALTY 205 S. 8th St. | 785-284-3774 Dan Kellenberger, Broker

SOLD

To review our listings, go to: www.sabetharealty.com

1437 Main St., Sabetha 3 car insulated garage

Business Services Contact Us Today to Reserve Your Place in Business Services

Phone 785.284-3300 Fax 785.284.2320 advertising@sabethaherald.com DENTIST

CATTLE

ELECTRICAL

ENTERTAINMENT

EQUIPMENT

Advertise your business in our Business Services section for as low as $5.75 per week.

HEALTH

LEGAL

PEST CONTROL

AUTOMOTIVE

STORAGE

1309 S. Old Highway 75 | Sabetha, KS

Dental Care That Never Quits! Services Provided:

-Dental Implant Placement -Advanced Bone & Soft Tissue Grafting -Removal of Impacted 3rd Molars (Wisdom Teeth) -Advanced Cosmetic Reconstruction -Routine Dentistry -IV Sedation for Surgical and Advanced Reconstruction Cases

Dr. Terry Whitten (785) 284-3911 or (888) 589-8100 www.dentalimplantsnek.com

Need extra storage space?

MEDICAL BILLING SKILLS IN DEMAND! Become a Medical Office Assistant! NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training can get you job ready! HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! 1-888-424-9412

24 hour access various sizes

Call for prices and availability. 284-3205

Sabetha Mini Storage

advertising details&deadlines CONTACT US

POLICY

DISPLAY ADVERTISING

Contact The Sabetha Herald for additional advertising details!

� All material published or inserted in The Sabetha Herald is subject to final acceptance of the publisher. � The Sabetha Herald reserves the right to accept or reject any advertisements for any reason at any time and to, if necessary, print the word “advertisement” in any display advertisements. � The Sabetha Herald is not responsible for errors submitted for advertisements. � The Sabetha Herald is not responsible for more than one incorrect insertion. No adjustment can be made if error does not alter the value of the ad.

� The local display advertising rate is $5.25 per column inch. This rate is non-commissionable. � The annual commissionable display advertising rate is $6.25 per column inch.

SUBMISSIONS (1) Bring the information to our office, 1024 Main Street in Sabetha, between 8 a.m. and 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. (2) Mail to P.O. Box 208, Sabetha, KS 66534. (3) Email advertising@sabethaherald.com. (4) Fax to 785-284-2320. (5) Call us at 785-284-3300 or 866-502-3300.

PROOFS & TEARSHEETS � If requested, proofs of advertisements will be delivered prior to publication by fax or by e-mail, providing all copy is submitted by the deadline. � Electronic Tearsheets will be provided upon request through The Sabetha Herald DropBox folder.

PAYMENTS � The Sabetha Herald requires prepayment on all ads unless you or your business has an established account with us. Even with an established account, we require prepayment for all ads under $20. Payments are due by the end of the month. � Late payment penalty is $3 per $100 per month. � A $30 charge will be added to advertising bills paid with an insufficient funds check.

ADDITIONAL CHARGES & FEES � A design fee of $35 per hour will be charged for any advertisement requested and designed, but not placed. � A late fee of $2 per column inch will be charged for advertisements requested after deadline.

DEADLINES � 10 a.m. Monday for Wednesday newspaper � Special Holiday Deadlines are 5 p.m. Thursday for next Wednesday's newspaper, unless otherwise noted. If the holiday falls on a Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday or Thursday, holiday deadlines apply. Holidays include the following: New Year's Day, Presidents' Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Veterans Day, Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day. � Changes to ad copy must be submitted no later than Monday at 5 p.m. � Because space is limited, The Sabetha Herald staff must be notified of full color advertisements two weeks in advance. Placement is first come first serve. � If an advertiser would like an ad placed on a specific page of the paper, Herald staff requires notification one week in advance. Not all requests can be granted.

LEGAL & PUBLIC NOTICES � The local rate for legal and public notices is $5.50 per column inch per issue.

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING � The local classified advertising rate is $5.75 per column inch. This rate is non-commissionable. � The national commissionable classified display advertising rate is $6.75 per column inch. � The Herald does not run line classifieds.

INSERTS � The non-commissionable insert rate is 10 cents a piece for pre-prints, 12 tab pages or less. The non-commissionable insert rate is 11 cents a piece for pre-prints 12 to 24 tab pages. The insert rate for brown paper sacks/bags is 12 cents a piece.

SUPPLEMENTAL ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS � This year, we are offering businesses the opportunity to participate in a number of campaigns aimed at boosting your business. Select from themed campaigns such as Valentine's Day, Mother's Day and Father's Day, or contact our staff and request that we design a campaign specifically for you!

SUPPLEMENTAL SECTION SPONSORSHIP � We offer a number of opportunities for area businesses to sponsor our Special Supplements. We create a number of supplements each year, with topics varying from Veterans to Youth Sports and Soil Conservation.


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fun&games

January 13, 2016  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  sabethaherald.com

Head Cheese INGREDIENTS

from the kitchen of Mike Lierz

Meat from 2 hog heads 1 gallon water 42 oz. quick cooking oatmeal 2 cups corn meal 1 large onion Salt to taste

INSTRUCTIONS

WEEKLY RECIPE

Boil in large pot the jowls and face meat of two hogs for two hours, save the broth it will be used later. Separate the meat from the fat and put in large bowl. Save about 1-2 cups of fat. Now grind meat, fat, and 1 large onion (table top hand meat grinder). In a large pot, add meat mixture, 1 gallon of water, and broth saved from boiling the meat, bring to a slow boil. Now slowly add 42 oz. of quick cooking oatmeal, while stirring, then add 2 cups of corn meal while stirring, and salt to taste. Boil mixture for about 20-25 minutes or until thick. Place in 9x13 cake pans and put in fridge to cool. Slice into blocks and freeze, using freezer bags. When ready to cook, remove from freezer, slice into thin wafers and fry in skillet.

Sudoku

Fun By The Numbers Here’s How It Works: Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the number will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle.

ALIGNMENT ARCHITECT ARRANGEMENT ARTIST AUTHOR BEAUTY CLAY COLOR CRAYONS CREATIVE CULINARY DESIGNER DIGITAL DIRECTION DISPLAY DRAWING FASHION FILM GRAPHICS IMAGINE INSPIRATION LANDSCAPE MANIPULATION MASTERPIECE MEDIUM MODEL MOVEMENT PAINTS PERSPECTIVE PHOTOGRAPHY QUILTING SEWING TONE TRANSPARENCY VIEW WRITING

H E C R O S S W O R D S A L D

CLUES ACROSS 1. Color properties 5. Arabian greeting 10. Frozen spike 12. Levels 14. Tear down social stiffness 16. Rapper Hammer's initials 18. Midway between E and SE 19. Shooting marble 20. Edward __, British composer 22. Largest English dictionary (abbr.) 23. Cygnus' brightest star 25. Goidelic language of Ireland 26. Midway between N and NE 27. Auditory organ 28. Last month (abbr.) 30. Indicated horsepower (abbr.) 31. Mediation council 33. Aussie crocodile hunter 35. Sylvan deity 37. Clears or tidies 38. In a way, emerges 40. Whimper 41. G. Gershwin's brother 42. Begetter 44. Seated 45. Old world, new 48. Girls 50. “Song of triumph” 52. A covering for the head 53. Attack 55. Norwegian krone 56. Coach Parseghian 57. No good 58. Task that is simple 63. A way to move on 65. In a way, advanced 66. Loses weight 67. Shift sails

CLUES DOWN 1. Go quickly 2. Fiddler crabs 3. Cervid 4. Gundog 5. Gushed forth 6. Caliph 7. Shoe cord 8. Give extreme unction to 9. Of I 10. “A Doll's House” author 11. Documents certifying authority 13. Drunk 15. Principal ethnic group of China 17. Crinkled fabrics 18. Longest division of geological time 21. Pancake 23. Small pat 24. A garden plot 27. Strayed 29. Surgical instrument 32. No. French river 34. Modern 35. Now called Ho Chi Minh City 36. Set into a specific format 39. Exhaust 40. Individual 43. Moves rhythmically to music 44. D. Lamour “Road” picture costume 46. Having earlike appendages 47. Certified public accountant 49. Outermost part of a flower 51. Supplement with difficulty 54. Plains Indian tent (alt. sp.) 59. Electronic warfaresupport measures 60. Displaying a fairylike aspect 61. Taxi 62. They __ 64. Syrian pound


A Special Supplement to The Sabetha Herald January 13, 2016


2C January 13, 2016  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  sabethaherald.com

baby book

Erica Lynn SALTER

Grant Ronald RETTELE

Drew Annabelle FAHEY

January 1, 2015 4:27 PM 7 lbs 1 oz 19 in

January 8, 2015 7:08 AM 7 lbs 11 oz 20 in

January 13, 2015 4:17 AM 7 lbs 5 oz 20 in

Henley Grace STRAHM

Ellie Alice OTTO

Graclynn Lee TANGEMAN

January 13, 2015 6:36 AM 8 lbs 5 oz 20.5 in

January 16, 2015 2:23 AM 6 lb 2 oz 19.5 in

January 19, 2015 2:00 PM 8 lb 4 oz 21.5 in

Vanessa Rose Lee BAILEY

Carson John LIERZ

Deja Maye CROSBY

February 26, 2015 7:14 AM 6 lb 11 oz 19 in

March 10, 2015 6:49 PM 8 lbs 6 oz 20 in

Nellie Mae GRIMM

Grace Elizabeth STRAHM

Dakota Grace LUNDERGARD

March 19, 2015 5:49 AM 8 lb 0 oz 20 in

March 20, 2015 8:23 AM 3 lb 12 oz 17 in

March 22, 2015 1:09 AM 8 lb 3 oz 21.5 in

February 18, 2015 3:00 PM 7 lb 12 oz 20.5 in


baby book

sabethaherald.com  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  January 13, 2016

3C

Liam Andrew WINKLER

Addyson Jean EDELMAN

Lanae Ann METZGER

March 23, 2015 7:40 PM 6 lb 13 oz 19.5 in

March 27, 2015 5:15 PM 7 lb 13 oz 21 in

April 13, 2015 11:29 PM 5 lb 0 oz 19 in

Madelyn Marie GLICK

Solomon M GUTKNECHT

Ivy Rae KAEB

April 15, 2015 5:51 AM 7 lb 14 oz 21 in

April 16, 2015 1:52 PM 7 lb 13 oz 21 in

April 17, 2015 9:57 AM 8 lb 4 oz 21 oz

Morgan Laine REBANT

Kellen Matthew HEIMAN

Whitney Leigh SCHULTEJANS

May 11, 2015 7:18 AM 8 lb 12 oz 21 oz

May 18, 2015 7:20 AM 7 lb 8 oz 19.5 in

May 19, 2015 11:15 AM 8 lb 1 oz 19 in

Madelynn Rose SOLBERG

Vincent Santino ASHER

Benji Lee KELLENBERGER

May 27, 2015 3:54 AM 5 lb 11 oz 20.5 in

June 2, 2015 4:00 PM 8 lb 4 oz 19 in

June 4, 2015 2:13 AM 7 lb 11 oz 19.5 in


baby book

12 MONTHS: Erica Salter, Grant Rettele, Henley Strahm, Drew Fahey, Graclynn Tangeman; 11 MONTHS: Carson Lierz; 10 MONTHS: Grace Strahm.

4C January 13, 2016  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  sabethaherald.com

9 MONTHS: Solomon Gutknecht, Madelyn Glick; 8 MONTHS: Morgan Rebant; 7 MONTHS: Calin Meyer, Sloane Davis, Kyra Strahm, Oakley Brassfield, Athena Tisoy.

29 Babies born at Sabetha Community Hospital in 2015

Sabetha Community Hospital 14th and

Photos and Information in this special supplement we


baby book

sabethaherald.com  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  January 13, 2016

5C

6 MONTHS: Charlotte Schmid, Kruze Moeller, Dallas Strathman, Jacob Edie; 5 MONTHS: Klaira Dempewolf, Landon Hall, Lettie Kaeb; 4 MONTHS: Isaiah Deters, Tanner Thompson.

3 MONTHS: Dane Stapleton, Zaccai Frederick; 2 MONTHS: Finley Rose, Ettalyn Sheik, Raeleen Colley.

5 gather Wednesday, January 6, 2016, for a photo shoot.

Oregon

Sabetha, KS

(785) 284-2121

ere reprinted with expressed consent of the parent(s).


6C January 13, 2016  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  sabethaherald.com

baby book

Kyra Jean STRAHM

Calin Keith MEYER

Sloane Lillian DAVIS

June 6, 2015 6:21 PM 8 lb 4 oz 21 in

June 15, 2015 7:31 AM 9 lb 10 oz 21.5 in

June 17, 2015 9:34 AM 8 lb 1 oz 20.5 in

Oakley Alucard BRASSFIELD

Athena Camilla TISOY

Jacob Glen EDIE

June 17, 2015 3:57 PM 9 lb 6 oz 21 in

June 20, 2015 2:56 PM 7 lb 6 oz 20 in

July 1, 2015 8:26 AM 7 lb 4 oz 20 in

Serenity Monroe WARD

Charlotte Abigail Joy SCHMID

Dallas Timothy STRATHMAN

July 5, 2015 12:27 PM 8 lb 5 oz 20.5 in

July 20, 2015 10:15 AM 8 lb 10 oz 21 in

July 22, 2015 8:25 AM 8 lb 2 oz 21.5 in

Emma Jayde SHUPP

Kruze Gene MOELLER

Lettie Ann KAEB

July 27, 2015 8:24 AM 8 lb 4 oz 20.5 in

July 28, 2015 3:13 PM 9 lb 8 oz 22.25 in

August 11, 2015 3:27 AM 7 lb 1 oz 20 in


baby book

sabethaherald.com  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  January 13, 2016

Selena Marie GRIMM

August 16, 2015 10:29 AM 8 lb 12 oz 21 in

Landon Reinhard Clayton HALL

August 18, 2015 7:26 AM 6 lb 6 oz 20 in

7C

Cortland Dean BOLDRA

August 19, 2015 9:33 PM 8 lb 7 oz 21 in

Klaira Grace DEMPEWOLF

Tanner Foust THOMPSON

Isaiah John DETERS

August 27, 2015 7:20 AM 7 lb 13 oz 21.5 in

September 4, 2015 2:55 PM 8 lb 11 oz 20 in

September 5, 2015 10:04 AM 9 lb 6 oz 21.5 in

Kayden James LANDON

Leroy Eugene KASTER

Lenora Rose KORTHANKE

September 29, 2015 4:37 PM 7 lb 13 oz 20.5 in

October 11, 2015 3:59 AM 7 lb 4 oz 19 in

October 13, 2015 12:29 PM 6 lb 6 oz 19.25 in

Graycen Jean LOVELESS

Jayse Michael CLEAR

Oliver Kleo COLE

October 19, 2015 8:29 AM 7 lb 3 oz 19.5 in

October 20, 2015 6:44 PM 7 lb 13 oz 20 in

October 25, 2015 7:51 PM 7 lb 12 oz 20 in


8C January 13, 2016  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  sabethaherald.com

baby book

Zaccai Nathanael FREDERICK

Dane Ryan STAPLETON

Finley Ann ROSE

October 27, 2015 6:28 PM 8 lb 13 oz 21.5 in

October 29, 2015 4:18 PM 9 lb 8 oz 21.25 in

November 6, 2015 9:45 AM 7 lb 15 oz 19.5 in

Raeleen Autumn COLLEY

Ty Eugene KUCKELMAN

November 9, 2015 7:16 AM 8 lb 5 oz 19.5 in

November 10, 2015 7:50 AM 8 lb 9 oz 20 in

Isabelle Lorraine NORRUP

Ettalyn Marie SHEIK

November 19, 2015 9:38 AM 7 lb 7 oz 20 in

November 30, 2015 8:16 AM 7 lb 9 oz 21 in

Zaydin Richard WISDOM

Lydia Grace ROTTINGHAUS

Caleb Amos BOLINGER

December 4, 2015 1:24 PM 8 lb 14 oz 20.5 in

December 17, 2015 1:25 AM 6 lb 14 oz 20 in

December 22, 2015 5:16 PM 8 lb 0 oz 21.5 in

The Sabetha Herald 01 13 2016  
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