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Portfolio KRISTEN YOUNG


Kristen Young Selected works (2011-2014) 1425 Laamia Street Honolulu, HI 96821 808.282.1796 kyoung6@hawaii.edu


Contents

PROJECT DIVERGENCE

01

WAIKIKI 2050

02

THOMAS SQUARE

03

KAWILOA DESIGN/BUILD

04

LINKING THE MASTERS

05

D I G I TA L F A B R I C AT I O N

06

HUMAN SCALE

07

CLONE

08

HAND DRAWING

09

PHOTOGRPHY

10

MIX MEDIA

11


01

PROJECT DIVERGENCE Fall 2014

Project divergence in Seocheon, looks at order versus disorder, fragmentation versus unity and utilizes a methodology between these relationships to create space. Divergence means tending to be different or developing in a different direction. Like most architectural projects, the space was influenced by the history of the area. However, it diverges by challenging traditional spaces, programing and relationship to context.


SEOCHEON, SOUTH KOREA

1:500

The Seocheon area has an older history compared to other parts of Seoul and recently it has been undergoing a revitalization. The buildings in the area are being restored, rebuilt and reoccupied. My proposal seeks to create architecture through superimposition. It argues that spaces can be made through the layering of the city.


1:200


Intersection Layers

Information Layers

changdeok wall ro

gyeongbok palace

gyeongbok palace

changdeok wall roofline

third line of n/s gr

third line of n/s grid

negative space of

changdeok palace

negative space of palaces

gyeongbok pavilio

changdeok palace

north/ south grid

gyeongbok pavilions palace axis

north/ south grid

palace axis

Two historical sites in the area of Seocheon are Gyeongbok palace and Cheongdeok palace. The site plan of these two palaces were overlaid onto the site and its surroundings. Along with these two site plans a North/South grid was also superimposed. Various elements were then overlaid where intersections occurred.

gyeongbok roof lines

gyeongbok roof li


BUILDING COMPONENTS

concrete roof

Intersection layers helped develop where building components occurred. For example the rooftops of Cheongdeok palace became concrete slabs and where the North/South grid intersected these slabs, I-beams emerged to support glass roofs. The combination of these intersections created spaces and the spaces together became my design.

steel posts/trusses

i-beams

glass roof

roof structure

concrete walls

wood frame

ramp/ stairs

concrete slab


Traditional design tries to seamlessly incorporate program and architecture. But as seen by example, it is not necessary to do so. Old buildings in Seocheon are re-purposed and have become cafes, shops, studios and galleries. The initial program intent of these historical buildings have been altered to fit modern uses. The spaces allow for adaptation and multi-function. Users can build upon the space to fit their own needs. One area turned into a cafĂŠ, while the other a garden space used to sell flowers. The building components designed on the site are the skeletal structure. It asks to be changed and transformed, much like Seocheon has evolved over time.


02

WAIKIKI 2050 Spring 2014


SEA LEVEL RISE This semesters project investigates the past and present of Waikiki, and proposes alternative futures for the urban district, and links scales from urban to building design. With an articulated 2050 scenario, sea level rise, increased density, and other social, economic, technological, and environmental factors have changed the area .

2014

Site

2050


2050 SETTING In Waikiki 2050, communities have become self sustaining. The majority of food is now grown on site and people are more involved in the food process. The active lifestyle and culture of Hawaii remains the same. With the same climate year round, everyone wants to be outside. The BnB building allows the local community and visitors from around the world to interact.

TMK # HT MAXHT

TMK # HT MAXHT TMK # HT MAXHT

TMK # HT MAXHT

TMK # HT MAXHT

Rail Electricity Goods Delivery Waste Disposal Sewage Transportation


THE USERS

To u r i s t

Local Family

Hoping to experience the

Tired of the long

“true Hawaii�, the tourist

commute into town,

travels to Oahu not for

the local family moves

luxury, but in search of a

into Waikiki. Ready to

local experience.

experience a new style of living.

BNB EXPERIENCE Designed to integrate the local lifestyle into a visitors experience, the BnB Building is a space that creates interaction between the two parties. Families who live in the building host visitors to give them a local taste of Hawaii.


THE UNIT Designed to integrate the local lifestyle into a visitors experience, the BnB Building is a space that creates interaction between the two parties. Families who live in the building, host visitors to give them a local taste of Hawaii.

vertical wood louvers

interior walls

upper level

stairway

entry level


TYPICAL FLOOR PLAN 1st

TYPICAL FLOOR PLAN

2nd

A

B

Section A

Section B


03

THOMAS SQUARE Fall 2013


CONCEPT The concept for the park derived from the native Hawaiian plant, Kalo. It is used in various ways by the native Hawaiian people and has been an important resource in the Hawaiian culture. The plant is broken down into three parts, the root (kalo), the stem (ha) and the leaves (lau). Similarly the park is broken down into three parts the center represents the root or the heart, which holds the park together. The path ways become the stems connecting the root to the various parts of the park. Lastly, the leaves are represented by the three main areas of the park.

Leaves (Lau)

Stem (Ha)

Root (Kalo)


PA R K C O M P O N E N T S

trees

trellis

planters

pathways

Each of the various components of the park contribute to the users experience. The pathways at the northern end of the park act as seating for various events. While the other pathways guide users to important event areas. Planters add additional seating and trellis’ and trees provide shade.

0’

25’ 50’

100’

200’


C O N TA I N E R D I A G R A M

corrugated plastic

corrugated steel

wood trellis

wood shelves

counters

glass window

corrugated steel

concrete slab


Hawaii ships more than 90 percent of its goods, therefore, the island has an abundance of shipping containers. The shipping container can be used as an inexpensive basic building block. It is easily transported, can withstand incredible stresses and can be used for both temporary and permanent structures. Not only would the container be highly cost efficient but would be easy to maintain. Though the general form and appearance of the container could be modified, my design tried to keep the container similar to its original form. This allows the general public to appreciate and be educated in the positive transformation of a sustainable design.

0’ 1’ 2’

4’

8’


04

KAWILOA DESIGN/BUILD Spring 2014


CONCEPTS For the challenge of designing a rain shelter, we thought it necessary first to consider the meaning of shelter. Shelter is commonly understood to be a place giving protection from danger, but in the Hawaiian language, the word for shelter, Wahi Lulu, can also be interpreted as Place of Calmness. With our design, we sought to create a place that not only acts to protects its users from the weather, but also to embrace the beauty of it. The roof structure is designed to shed rainwater onto the vegetated rock wall to remind the users that although we may need protection from the rain, we cannot forget that it is the source of life. Responsibilities: Design, Renderings, Boards

0

2

4

8

16

A


PAV I L I O N C O M P O N E N T S The construction process of the design incorporates simple wood framing techniques and standard slab-on-grade foundation. The vegetated rock wall follows typical gabian wall construction. Corrugated steel panels will be bolted onto the wood trusses as well as suspended by steel rods. The overall process is simple and could be managed by any contracting group.

gabion wall

corrugated steel

bamboo reeds wood structure

tension rods

seating

concrete slab

RAIN DIAGRAM Our pavilion makes use of expansive overhangs to shield from both sun and rain. The open plan allows for air to flow freely through the space, maintaining a comfortable environment. Seating is placed to orient the users towards the windmills for convenience of presentation viewing.


05

LINKING THE MASTERS Spring 2013


THE MATERIAL Black chip board and zip ties were used for the intervention.

THE DIAGONAL Zip ties were used to create a contrasting diagonal grid that intervened through the buildings.

In this project, designs were based off of three past architects. From researching their buildings and design processes, we “learned from the masters�. Our design included the merging of the three architects and creating our own intervention to link the different design styles together.


Rudolph Rudolph has the ability to play with proportion, repetition and composition. This model tries to pull some of these techniques. Built with computer parts and staples, the meticulous layering mimics Rudolph’s designs.

M i e s Va n D e r R o h e Mies’ intervention was influenced by Crown Hall, Illinois Institute of Technology. By incorporating the diagonals, Mies’ simplicity remained, while the theme of the new intervention tied the design to the rest of the composition.

Kahn Kahn’s buildings have a consistent monumental feel them. His work uses simple but heavy geometric forms. His model incorporated these design features.

My Own This model is the linking point of the intervention. By using parts from each of the three masters, a combination of all four designers are featured.


06

D I G I TA L FA B R I C AT I O N

This assignment takes the final Arch 101 hand model and recreates

Fall 2012

used to physically create each piece. Next, the assignment asked to

it using Rhinoceros. After digitally modeling it, the laser cutter was recreate the same model using a method to hold the model together without glue. Our group created a tab system that held each piece together. Lastly, using the 3D Catch program, a contour model was formed and laser cut.

Hand

Laser Cut


Self Connecting

3D Catch


07

HUMAN SCALE

The importance of scale and space relative to the size and location is what the Human Scale

Fall 2011

After selecting a scale, four drawings were developed. Three are manipulations of the first, each

project investigates. Through composition, the project explores how space can be experienced. a building section rotated at 90, 180, and 270 degrees from the original.


08

CLONE Fall 2011

Each individual is unique and by understanding our own form, we begin to understand other forms. The 1:1 scale recreation of the body, allows repetition and sections to describe its composition. Using the life sized clone as a “site�, strips of bass wood and zip ties respond by creating a organic composition in the focal point of the clone.


09

HAND DRAWING Sketching and Drafting


10

PHOTOGRAPHY Digital and Film

New York, 2014


Hawaii, 2012


11

MIX MEDIA Charcoal and Pastels


Architecture Portfolio (University of Hawaii 2011-2014)  

M.Arch 1 Portfolio Application 2014 (Accepted - USC, UCLA, Sci-Arch)

Architecture Portfolio (University of Hawaii 2011-2014)  

M.Arch 1 Portfolio Application 2014 (Accepted - USC, UCLA, Sci-Arch)

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