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krishnanlalmistry [dot] com a socially awkward tower -p24 u.f.o. -p74

scroll cities -p4

ront desk redesign -p60 front

kiribati living laboratory -p108 shanghai expo redevelopment -p86

five-head figures -p116

smu daniel house -p68

library for tororo -p46

verona palimpsest -p62

711 1 Elm -p92


forest fires -p104

vaporwave city -p118

hyperloop canyon -p40

error encoded anamorphism -p84 issue xiv -p58

1401 Elm -p36

a home is not a house -p6

encore wire -p80

tower petroleum -p54

other -p138

a hidden arcology -p96


scroll cities personal 1999 - present black ballpoint pen on banner paper

Drawing cities is something I’ve done since I was a child. Initially, the drawings started out on sheets of 8.5”x11” paper, but that size started to grow. I started taping sheets together. Once one sheet was filled up, I’d add another. Eventually, The scale grew to about 3’ wide by about 60’ long rolls of banner paper. As you move along the scrolls, you see how my drawing skills change over time - from scribbles to something more recognizable.

According to the people who have seen it, the drawings tell a story about what was going on in my life. For example, I had to memorize the Preamble to the Constitution of the United States in fifth grade. As you unroll it you would see phrases dispersed throughout the drawing. So far, I have two scrolls that are fully complete at a length of about 60 feet each, and one more in progress. They are by no means my best drawings or design work, but the significant amount of time I have put into this holds much importance to me.

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a home is not a house with allison walvoord m.arch i began spring 2018 professor martin hättasch

The booming City of Austin is particularly beset by the ideal of free standing homes. The American icon is elevated to an absurd level under the current code by enforcing envelope volume limitations, encouraging sprawl, and isolation. In response to this, we present clear and identifiable objects, or “houses”, in the landscape that appear to be freestanding. However, upon occupation the units interconnect in unexpected ways, reinforcing a comprehensive and shared identity through density and integration. As a result, the community is legible at two scales - as a collection of individual objects, and as a

single object that consists of many constituent parts. Tilting up the ground plane toward the rear of the site both enhances the perception of freestanding objects arranged on the site, as well as enabling each unit to connect below grade and out of sight. Alterations to the ground delineate outdoor private spaces, their boundaries indicated by a change in elevation. The spaces between buildings are charged with a life of its own, one that pertains to a visual and physical connectedness with the community through propinquity and situational closeness. The resultant “village” presents a new collective identity distinct from the typical suburban fantasy, creating a decisive dialogue about house-ness in the city.

architect magazine studio prize 2018 published ISSUE: 012 txa studio award winner 2019 aia dallas student design award 2019 ut austin design excellence winner

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site

slope

tier

8

smaller steps

bury


extrude

randomize

densify

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connect

village


c1 a2 b1

a1

e1 b2

d1

c2

f2

e3

d2

g1

e2

h2

f1

f3

h1 h3

g2

a1 a2 b1 b2 c1 c2 d1

970ft2 1570ft2 1170ft2 1450ft2 950ft2 1300ft2 550ft2

1 bed, 1 bath, 250ft2 garage, ada 3 bed, 3 bath, 338ft2 garage 1 bed, 1 bath, 205ft2 garage 2 bed, 2 bath, 205ft2 garage 1 bed, 1 bath, 300ft2 garage 2 bed, 2 bath 1 bed, 1 bath

d2 e1 e2 e3 f1 f2 f3

1260ft2 990ft2 1140ft2 960ft2 1150ft2 850ft2 1900ft2

2 bed, 1 bath 1 bed + loft, 1 bath 2 bed, 2 bath, 300ft2 garage 1 bed, 1 bath, 475ft2 garage 1 bed + loft, 1 bath 1 bed, 1 bath 3 bed, 2 bath

g1 g2 h1 h2 h3

2300ft2 1010ft2 1350ft2 1050ft2 1690ft2

4 bed + loft, 3 bath 2 bed, 2 bath 2 bed, 2 bath 2 bed + loft, 1 bath 2 bed + loft, 2 bath

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analytique of site artifacts

testing scale and placement of house volumes

volumetric study model

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a

prefabricated wood rain screen mounted edge-wise with steel bracket attachments

b

sheathing with continuous vapor barrier and gutter at base

c

2x6 insulated sandwich

d

3/4in. baltic birch plywood interior finish

g

floor joists

h

framing, sheathing, and birch plywood ceiling

k

poured-in-place concrete plinth

m

poured-in-place concrete plinth with opening for glazing

n

5in. rigid insulation

p

pink glazing

s

brick and glass brick face

e

d

c

b

a

f

g

h

m

n k

s

p

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steel bracing cable 3x12 LVL Beams @ 4’-0" O.C. floor blocking

LVL transfer beams for window openings

3x10 LVL Frames @ 4’-0" O.C. dimensional lumber window framing within envelope

first level - cast-in-place concrete floor

cast-in-place ground floor wrapped in brick veneer with 4" rigid insulation

ground level cast-in-place concrete floor

concrete retaining walls with brick veneer

occupiable roof above underground portions cast-in-place basement retaining wall with 4" rigid insulation core

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level 2 plan below grade public spaces private spaces

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19


b

a

c d

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panelized wood rain screen assembly mounted edgewise with 1/2" spacing vapor barrier steel bracket for rain screen 2x6 insulated sandwich at roof 2x4 insulated sandwich at wall continuous lvl beam for moment connection

a 3/4"oak flooring 3/4"sheathing 3x12 lvl joists with sand fill baltic birch plywood ceiling

2x8 floor joists above entry threshold 4" rigid insulation 2x nailers with rigid insulation waterproofing membrane & matte black steel coping sheathing with matte black brake metal

c d

steel angle for brick ledge 4" rigid insulation brick veneer overhang

concrete pavers 1" tube steel rail pedestals @ 12" o.c. waterproofing membrane 4" rigid insulation 6" concrete slab

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b


metal flashing & drip edge reveal, sloped to drain skylight insulated cavity between solid wood blocking prefabricated wood rain screen panels 1 1/2" air gap 3/4" sheathing 5 1/2" rigid insulation steel bracket attachments 2x6 horizontally oriented wood studs w/ metal cross bracing 4" gutter within rain screen 4x10: solid timber beam

2x6 wood blocking with rigid insulation 2x4 insulated sandwich matte black metal coping and waterproofing membrane within reveal continuous brick ledge above threshold

3/4" oak flooring 3/4" sheathing 12" concrete slab dropped ceiling for hvac and plumbing

6" continuous brick ledge, 6-8" min above grade waterproofing membrane 5" rigid insulation below grade 6" concrete wall, cast-in place

cast-in-place concrete stair 8" slab foundation 6" rigid insulation and moisture barrier

concrete footing

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a socially awkward tower m.arch i began fall 2016 sci_arc professor margaret griffin The tower is typically characterized as a capitalist jewel for massive corporations - a thing symbolizing immense power. The structure itself being tall, rectangular, and blanketed in glass. Rather than buy into the international status quo, this project investigates how to design a building with a distinct personality to reflect that of an individual rather than the ever imposing “them.” A skyscraper  that becomes a character among others to create a full cast of tall friends.  The project explores how the silhouette and facade of a building can imply something

more, whether it’s relating to personality, its surroundings, or the life that occurs inside. The tower presents a different silhouette from every side. Some are more conservative than others, but each side still hints at oddities. To personify this, I was thinking of what kind of person hides themselves from one group of people, but is completely open in another. Perhaps it is a socially awkward person? It reveals it’s quirkiness to some while thinly veiling it to others. The result is a tower or character - which ever you prefer to call it - that surprises you at every corner.

published ISSUE XIII

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rhino and grasshopper form testing with silhouettes and boolean operations

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implied readings

excavated sculpture michelangelo’s slaves

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negative space


office lobby café office elevator lobby hotel elevator lobby hotel lobby public entry hotel rooms mechanical shaft atrium lounge large atrium

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

7

10

8

11

9

sample floor

5

1

3

4

6

2

ground floor

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observation + restaurant + roof garden 2f upper level offices 5f

hotel levels 29f lounge offices gym pool tea room

food hotel atrium

lower level offices 28f commercial levels + hotel lobby 4f

vertical structure

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she tries to fit in sometimes...

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...by hiding behind a facade...

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...but solace is with her friends in the city of angels.

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1401 elm merriman anderson architects adaptive reuse dallas, texas 2017

1401 Elm, formerly known as the First National Bank Office Tower, is an abandoned 1.5 million square feet building in Downtown Dallas. Built in 1965 and closed in 2010 due to low occupancy, it is now undergoing conversion into apartments, a hotel, retail space, and a food hall with the aid of historic tax credits. The building, which is across from the firm’s office has been worked on for most of this passed decade, and is scheduled to open some time in 2020.

My main role in this project was to help create documents for the apartments. I was also involved the creation of interiors documents, millwork details, section details, the review of M.E.P. drawings for consistency, the preliminary design of the podium roof deck, and creation of marketing documents for potential lessees. In 2018, the project was put on hold, but began again under new ownership with many new changes across the board. In the new design work, I mainly worked on the podium roof deck detailing specific parts such as the wood decking and coordinated drawings with interior design FF&E.

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hyperloop canyon with tuan nguyen young architect competitions began summer 2020 1.5 months

How can we design a cutting edge research facility that not only looks to the future of transportation, but also the future of sustainability in iconic design? Artificially cooling a large space as big as this new facility is simply not feasible in today’s society to ensure ourselves and our planet a certain future. In contrast to the grandiose lighting and artificiality of Las Vegas, Hyperloop Canyon proposes a monumental facility complimenting the desert landscape. By positioning the facility across the site’s slope, an excavation in which the soil is placed along its sides, creates a ravine-like space for the lab. This space, with the introduction of a reservoir to store water, cools the air as it flows over the reservoir and through the open air lab. The additional shade provided by the solar power generating roof and sculpted topography effectively creates a cooler microclimate at the facility.

Sculpted by time, water, and life, the geological forms called hoodoos, with their towering amorphous structures prevalent in the Mojave Desert, are reflected in the Canyon’s occupiable volumes. Constructed out of a mixture of concrete and earth local to the site, the thick walls of these volumes further shade the central ravine, and provide thermal mass to keep cool during the day and heating during the night. In addition, the tallness allows heat to rise out of the oculi at the top of each volume. Upon entering the campus, both visitors and workers are thrust upon an elevated view of the lab with minimal barriers. The workers may circulate around the site freely under the large canopy and mingle in the open spaces, plazas, or amphitheater. Visitors are confined to the elevated pathway over the lab, however, due to the openness of the space, visitors still get to be amongst the action.

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Chosen Site with Natural Slope

Lab Volume as Flat River Bed

Build up Canyon Walls Using Excavated Ground

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Occupy with Mountain -like Volumes


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a library for tororo m.arch i began fall 2015 professor michael garrison

It takes a village. This project is intended as a community builder for the town of Tororo, Uganda, and pro-bono community of Smile Africa, which nurses and educates orphans. Creating a town of people with valuable skills and knowledge is the ultimate goal. The library is sited on a “hinge” space between the public program of workshops, markets, a women’s center, and the more private program of housing and educating children. Therefore, the library becomes a space for interaction and

education of the children and Tororo citizens. A social condenser. In addition to the library space, a gallery is provided for the work of craftsmen to be displayed and sold as well as the drawings of children - a place to be proud of their work. The roof and window screens on the building are inspired by traditional patterns in Ugandan textiles proportionally. Functionally, the roof is also a means for the collection of rainwater for drinking and use in a composting system to grow fruit and vegetables for the community.

aia fort worth design merit

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48 48


49 49

proportion studies based on traditional ugandan textiles to determine geometry and water flow off of roof.


a

b

c

d

a

outdoor classroom library breezeway gallery / flexible space

water tanks

showers & sinks

grey water tank

gardens

compost

50

latrines septic tank

a b c d


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tower petroleum

Tower Petroleum Building in Downtown Dallas, built in 1931, was a formerly shuttered office building that MAA converted into a Cambria Hotel. The project was made feasible through historic tax credits, and was restored with a sensitivity to the original art deco design. My role in this project was to create CAD based floor plans for hotel room levels in schematic and design development. To bring the building up to current codes, I also laid out a new fire stair that minimally affected the building structure. In designing the hotel room floors, certain levels still had portions of the original hallway, while others didn’t. Being historic preservation, these halls needed to be kept. Normally we

would just copy the floor plan of each level up on each floor, but there were certain deviations in each that had to be accounted for. We were also tied to the needs of the client in providing a certain number of units. This resulted in hotel rooms that did not always align to the arrangement of windows on the exterior. Designing each room so they logically fit with the window bays was crucial. There was an attempt to minimize the number of rooms which have windows in the bathroom. In certain cases is was not possible given the required number of rooms, but through design reviews we came to a solution that the owner liked, and rehabilitated a piece of Dallas history.

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KR-03

KR-02

GYP. 8'-0"

KR-01

GYP. 8'-0"

GYP. 10'-0"

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issue xiv m.arch i spring 2018 with brennen birch, hannah williams, annie liu, hannah bacon, eric joyce, and eeshna gupta

ISSUE is a yearly publication of student work put together by a group of student volunteer editors at the University of Texas at Austin School of Architecture. The group is run separately from the school and fund raises to make each annual publication.  Students and faculty submit their work from the previous calendar year, and the editors cultivate a 3rd party of students to select what goes into the book. We, the editors, take this work and create a narrative of what we think best describes the school of architecture in its current state. The process involves testing color studies, book maps, page layouts, typeface selections, content coordination, and communication with printing companies. The book is continually worked on year round and is released in March or April of each year. ISSUE XIV discusses  the importance of images in architectural discourse, as most of the work

done in school is fictional. The book is organized by the feel of each students’ work and grouped around similar styles whether it be post-digital, realistic, or vaporwave. There was a general desire among the editors to produce additional content for fun and to really celebrate the culture ISSUE has developed in the school.  It  is the first edition to branch out into the production of other content with the book. For our installation in the series, we created tote bags with the cover of the book printed on it in pantone811.  To announce the book release party, risograph posters were made with the help of the risograph lab at the UT School of Arts, and posted around the school. A limited edition series of scale-figure stickers were also given out for free at the book release party. The stickers are a curated collection of students’ scale figures used in their drawings.

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front desk redesign merriman anderson architects office renovation dallas, texas 2018

For this project, I helped the lead designer at Merriman Anderson Architects visualize new ideas for the office entry lobby. The lobby has a prominent street face that opens to the front of Akard Station - a street level commuter rail stop in the heart of Downtown Dallas. The general design prompt was to create a desk and display that draws attention to our office for the people who walk by. My proposals involved large screens that can show off the firm’s work in high resolution and illuminated desks that can display pixelated effects if desired. The space has a “cold” feeling

to it with its concrete floors and exposed steel structure and decking. To give the space some warmth, the proposals include a prominent use of wood and lowered ceilings to make the desk area more welcoming. Each idea focused on the use of repeating features, light portals, and the separation of the front space from the elevator lobby visually so that the entry area becomes a cozy space to linger for visitors. The idea we liked the most was the combination of stone and metal desk in the render to the right as it took cues from materials used throughout the office, but also because it somewhat looked like an elegant engine fascia.

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palimpsest in verona b.s. architecture began fall 2013 professor steve quevedo

Located at the Parco Cesare Lombroso in Verona, Italy, are a series of buried ruins. What was once a medieval shipping dock and terminus to a Roman fortification wall, is now forgotten. City evolution, and encroachment upon the Fiume Adige has left this area of historical significance behind. Through the use of the drawing constructed, or collage, a building and master plan for the

site was discovered. The building would then be refined through the conflicting palimpsest of collage and ruin. The result is a series of planes suspended over the site intending to uncover, preserve, and showcase the ruins, river, and Roman wall. The program involves three galleries - river, ruins, and wall, office spaces, curator office and studio, entry and lobby, Diderot machine, auditorium, and obelisk tower.

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site

sequence of spaces

historical layers

roman grid

figure ground

reversal

public vs private

spatial enclosure

hardscape

softscape

vehicular traffic

ruins

geometry

walls + foundation

axis

hierarchy

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collage on top of site

interpretation of collage into site

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8 4

1

6 3

2

5

7

suspended walkway ruins / gallery of the ruins gallery of the Roman wall garden gallery of the river + hydroelectric sculpture lobby reception auditorium

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1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8


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smu daniel house merriman anderson architects transient housing dallas, texas 2019

Southern Methodist University commissioned Merriman Anderson Architects to design a new 120,000 square foot housing structure for upperclassmen. Due to the fact that the apartments will be vacated during summers, the project is considered transient housing. The project used the design-build method for a shorter project duration to get the building constructed in time for the fall 2020 school year. My involvement in this project started from the beginning. I was involved in the initial space planning, design of facade proportions, and brick detailing. During design development and construction documents, I was support in Revit. I helped compile the full drawing set including details, enlarged plans, interiors documents,

and so on. One significant issue to solve in the design of the building pertained to the sloping site, and how to design a footing and appropriate waterproofing to prevent water penetration. The solution in this case was to design a layered footing with masonry blocks and a concrete “tub.” The university intermittently asked about design revisions, and I was responsible for making documents to help them visualize the potential changes. Documents were reviewed by the university architect, president, and construction team. This was particularly important as the university has an established aesthetic choice, and the revisions were important in coinciding with their standards

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OPENINGS (STUD TO STUD)

2

2.5

3

4

35' - 10 1/4" 3' - 11 1/2"

6' - 1"

25' - 9 3/4"

2' - 6 1/2"

3' - 0"

4.8

1 A4.00

3' - 0"

6' - 1"

6' - 4 1/2"

96' - 5 1/4"

3' - 5 1/2"

3' - 0" 2' - 6 1/2"

2' - 6 1/2"

$

E101 E101A

SUITE

F1

4' - 0 3/4" 3' - 0 1/2"

2' - 6 3/4"

MAIN ELEC

101A

$

102



7' - 11 3/4"

2' - 7 1/4"

2' - 7 1/4"

$

102B

2' - 5" 3' - 0" 2' - 6 3/4"

8' - 0 1/4"

RESIDENT "B" B1 RESIDENT "A"

2' - 5" 3' - 0"

3' - 0 1/2" 3' - 6 1/4"

$

7 A4.10

6"

OPENINGS (STUD TO STUD)

$

$

OVERALL (EXTERIOR FINISH)

6"

19' - 6 1/2"

10' - 11"

6 6.1

5

162' - 4 1/2"

29' - 1"

6' - 1"

6" 4' - 11 1/4"

OVERALL (STUD TO STUD)

1

3' - 0" 2' - 5"

7' - 9 1/2"

1/4" 2' - 4 1/2"

3' - 0 1/2" 7' - 7 1/2".

$

$

2' - 5" 3' - 0" 2' - 6"

106B

SUITE SUITE



4' - 0 1/4"

3' - 0 1/2"

6' - 0"

RESIDENT "A" 107A

WH

EV2

3' - 0 1/2" 3' - 6 1/4"

OPENINGS (STUD TO STUD)

2' - 7 1/4"

$

$

D1

RESIDENT "B"

SUITE

RESIDENT "A"

112B

112

112A

D2

$

$

UP D2 ST1A B1

ELEC E103

F1

ELEV EQ

B1

E103A

F1

E102

F1

EQ

ELEV 2

EV1

8' - 0 1/4"

2' - 5" 3' - 0" 2' - 7 1/4"

2' - 4"

ST1

ACCESSIBLE

ALIGN

ELEV 1

6' - 1"

3' - 0" 2' - 5"

7' - 8 1/2"

F1

1 A6.00

F1

$

3' - 0"

OPEN ABOVE

ENTRY COMMONS

STORAGE

2 A4.00

S101 100B C1 E

5()

VESTIBULE V101

FIRE RISER

RESIDENT "A"

F101

111A

$

SUITE 111

F101A

RESIDENT "B"

RESIDENT "A"

111B

113A

1 A1.02

RESIDENT "B"

SUITE

113B

113

$

$

3' - 0" OPENINGS (STUD TO STUD)

3' - 9 3/4" 3"

GRIDLINES (EXTERIOR FINISH)

6' - 1"

7' - 9"

7' - 9"

2' - 4 3/4"

2' - 6" 3' - 3 3/4" 3"

6' - 1" 7' - 3 1/4"

5' - 1 1/2"

17' - 5 1/2" 10' - 6"

6' - 0" 13' - 6 1/2"

19' - 4 3/4" 2' - 1"

12' - 3 1/2"

3' - 0 1/2"

1

3' - 0" 2' - 5" 7' - 11"

2.5

3

4

4.8

5

6 6.1

OVERALL FLOOR PLAN - 1ST FLOOR 1/8" = 1'-0"

70

7' - 11"

2' - 6" 3' - 0" 2' - 6"

3' - 0 1/2"

8' - 0"

2' - 6" 3' - 0" 2' - 5"

3' - 0 1/2"

7' - 11"

2' - 5" 3' - 0" 6' - 1"

8' - 0"

2' - 7" 3' - 0 1/2" 3' - 6"

71' - 6" 

2

2' - 5" 3' - 0" 2' - 6" 6' - 1"

5 3/4"

40' - 10 3/4"

1

3/$1 1257+

6' - 1"

3' - 0"

28' - 6"

OVERALL (STUD TO STUD)

758( 1257+

2' - 4 1/4"

C.1

$

UP

2' - 4 3/4"

C

6"

$

$

110' - 8"

10' - 4"

6"

OVERALL (STUD TO STUD)

$

$

OPENINGS (STUD TO STUD)

$

$ UP

11' - 9"

$

$

3' - 3 1/2" 3' - 0 1/2" 5' - 5"

109B 6 A4.10

1' - 10 1/2" 1' - 10 1/2"

100A RESIDENT "B"

B

3' - 5 1/2"

SUITE

$

35' - 10 1/4"

3' - 0"

F1

11' - 9 1/2"

C2

FIREPLACE AS SPECIFIED

S101A

109A

21' - 0 1/2"

F1

2' - 5 1/4"

RESIDENT "A" ACCESSIBLE

$

A.3

C1

C1

100

$

A A.1

6' - 2 1/2"

C1

STAIR 1

110A

110

V102

107B C2

RESIDENT "A"

SUITE

110B

VESTIBULE

1 A6.20

RESIDENT "B"

$

RESIDENT "B"

6' - 0"

T101

7' - 9 1/4"

D1

$

E102A

F1

3' - 0 1/2" 2' - 4"

$

$

100C

IT

107

3' - 0"

2' - 3 3/4"

19' - 1 1/2"

M102A

T101A

SUITE

$

7' - 7 3/4"

100D

M102

108

3' - 4"

2' - 0 1/2"

LAUNDRY

108A

7' - 7 3/4"

2' - 4" 3' - 0"

CLEAR

$

3' - 0 1/2"

3' - 0"

$

106A

7' - 9 1/4"

2' - 5" 3' - 0" 2' - 4"

3' - 0 1/2"

RESIDENT "A"

6' - 1"

3' - 0" 2' - 5"

ST1B

3' - 0 1/2" 3' - 11"

C1

2' - 5 1/4"

C2

$

3' - 0 1/2"

C1

F1

8' - 0 1/4"

2' - 3 3/4"

6' - 0 1/2"

105B

6' - 1" 3' - 0" 2' - 5"

RESIDENT "B"

$

2' - 7 1/4"

13' - 0"

$ 1 A2.10

7' - 10 1/2"

106

$

EQ

105

3' - 11 1/2"

RESIDENT "B"

6' - 1"

105A

29' - 1"

C1

8' - 0"

C2

2' - 6" 3' - 0" 2' - 6"

104A C1

65' - 5 1/4"

RESIDENT "A"

F1

RESIDENT "A"

2' - 6 1/2"

C1

3' - 0 1/2"

C2

7' - 11"

C1

7' - 11"

2' - 6" 3' - 0" 2' - 5"

103B

3' - 0 1/2"

RESIDENT "B"

107' - 4 7/8"

7' - 7 3/4".

2' - 4" 3' - 0" 2' - 3 3/4" $

104

$

3' - 4"

2' - 3" 3' - 0"

SUITE

7' - 9 1/4"

2' - 5" 3' - 0" 2' - 4"

103

6' - 1"

SUITE

$

3' - 0 1/2"

$

104B

107' - 5"

2' - 6" 3' - 0" 2' - 5"

3' - 0 1/2" 8' - 0"

2' - 6" 3' - 0" 2' - 6"

3' - 0 1/2" 7' - 11" 6' - 1" 7' - 11"

RESIDENT "B"

2' - 6" 3' - 0" 2' - 5"

3' - 0 1/2"

131' - 4 3/4"

8' - 0"

F1

2' - 6" 3' - 0" 2' - 6"

3' - 0 1/2"

8 A4.10

D1

B1

103A

2' - 5" 3' - 0" 2' - 6"

7' - 11"

UP

RESIDENT "A"

$

6' - 1" 7' - 11"

M101

D2

2' - 6" 3' - 0" 2' - 5"

3' - 0 1/2" 8' - 0"

ST2 ST2B

MECH

2' - 6" 3' - 0" 2' - 6"

3' - 0 1/2" 7' - 11"

STAIR 2

ST2A

C1 B1

$

6' - 1" 7' - 11"

C2

M101A

2' - 6" 3' - 0" 2' - 5"

5' - 9" 1' - 6 3/4"

3' - 0 1/2" 8' - 0"

D1

F1 C1

2' - 6" 3' - 0" 2' - 6"

18' - 6 1/2"

3' - 0 1/2" 7' - 11"

$

D2

101B

$

6' - 1" 7' - 7 3/4"

4 1/2" 11' - 7 1/2"

C.1

RESIDENT "A" 102A

109

3' - 9 3/4"

C

3' - 0 1/2"

9' - 11"

B

F1 5 A6.00

RESIDENT "B"

2' - 5" 3' - 0" 2' - 6"

A.3

6' - 0" CLEAR

$

2' - 4 3/4" 2' - 2 3/4" 3' - 0" 2' - 5"

A A.1

101

2' - 5" 3' - 0" 2' - 6"

184' - 7 1/4"

179' - 2"



SUITE

$

2' - 5" 3' - 0" 2' - 6"

7' - 11"

6' - 1"

2' - 3 3/4"


2 A4.00

4' - 10 1/2"

A - T.O. PARAPET 137' - 5"

STUDY COMMONS

SUITE

SUITE

SUITE

308

306

304

302

10' - 2 1/2"

A - LEVEL ROOF 132' - 6 1/2"

STORAGE

ELEV 2

OFFICE

SUITE

SUITE

STAIR 2

SUITE

EV2

208

206

204

ST2

202

37' - 5"

10' - 8"

A - LEVEL 3 122' - 4"

SOCIAL COMMONS

ENTRY COMMONS

LAUNDRY

SUITE

SUITE

SUITE

108

106

104

102

11' - 8"

A - LEVEL 2 111' - 8"

A - LEVEL 1 100' - 0"

1

BUILDING SECTION 1/8" = 1'-0"

5 A4.20

8 A4.20

8 A4.20

SIM

4 A4.10

6 A4.10 METAL COPING

METAL COPING

METAL COPING GFRC CORNICE

4' - 10 1/2"

GFRC CORNICE GFRC CORNICE

10' - 2 1/2"

NOMINAL 8" CMU WITH MASONRY BRICK VENEER, MASONRY TIES AS REQUIRED

ACCESSIBLE SUITE

SUITE

309

301

BRICK VENEER COLUMN, MASONRY TIES AS REQUIRED

STUCCO, REF. ELEVATIONS

STAIR 2 ST2

37' - 5"

STUCCO

GUARDRAIL BEYOND, REF. A6.00

10' - 8"

BRICK VENEER, PROVIDE MASONRY WALL TIES AS REQUIRED

SUITE

SUITE

209

201

STUCCO TRIM, REF. ELEVATIONS

BRICK, PROVIDE MASONRY WALL TIES AS REQUIRED 4 A4.20

2 A4.20

7 A4.20 ROWLOCK BRICK, MASONRY TIES AS REQUIRED

CAST STONE ARCH, REF. ELEVATIONS

11' - 8"

BRICK VENEER COLUMN

DOUBLE WYTH NOMINAL 8" CMU, REF. STRUCTURAL FOR REINFORCEMENT REQUIREMENTS

SUITE

SUITE

101

109 1 A4.20

3 A4.20

MASONRY UNIT WITH LIMESTONE FINISH, REF. STRUCTURAL FOR REINFORCEMENT REQUIREMENTS

CAST STONE

DOUBLE WYTH MASONRY UNITS AT COLUMNS, TYP., REF. STRUCTURAL FOR REINFORCEMENT REQUIREMENTS

6 A4.20

3' - 0" TYP.

8

WALL SECTION 1/2" = 1'-0"

7

WALL SECTION 1/2" = 1'-0"

6

WALL SECTION 1/2" = 1'-0"

71

5

ENLARGED EXTERIOR ELEVATION 1/2" = 1'-0"

2' - 11 1/4" TYP.

TYP.

2 COURSES MIN.

MASONRY UNITS WITH LIMESTONE FINISH, REFER TO STRUCTURAL FOR REINFORCEMENT AS REQUIRED


T.O. PARAPET METAL COPING BLOCKING AS REQUIRED TPO ROOF SYSTEM, REF. A5.10 CRICKET, BLOCKING AS REQUIRED, REF. ROOF PLAN

FLASHING AS REQUIRED F.R. TREATED 2X WOOD BLOCKING GLASS FIBER REINFORCED CONCRETE BRICK ON 6" METAL STUD FRAMING EXTERIOR SHEATHING CONTINUOUS RIGID INSULATION COMPOSITE DECK, REF. STRUCTURAL

FRAMING AS NEEDED CONT. JOINT SEALANT WITH BACKER ROD

WALL TIES AS REQUIRED BATT INSULATION

RIGID INSULATION WEATHER BARRIER MASONRY TIES AS REQUIRED STEEL ANGLE, REF. STRUCTURAL B.O. ROOF ROWLOCK BRICK, REF. ELEVATIONS MORTAR NET PREFAB ROOF TRUSS AND CONNECTION BY CFM ENGINEER, REF. STRUCTURAL

METAL FLASHING WITH DRIP EDGE STUCCO TRIM, BLOCKING AS REQ'D

METAL ROOF DECK STUCCO

GYP. BOARD CEILING, REF. RCP

5

PARAPET DETAIL 1 1/2" = 1'-0"

2

SECTION DETAIL 1 1/2" = 1'-0"

BATT INSULATION BRICK WITH MASONRY TIES AS REQUIRED

STUCCO, REF. ELEVATIONS

WINDOW AS SCHEDULED

COMPOSITE DECK, REF. STRUCTURAL CAST STONE METAL FLASHING

MASONRY UNIT WITH LIMESTONE FINISH, FULL GROUTED, REINFORCEMENT PER STRUCTURAL DRAWINGS 6" METAL STUDS, 16" O.C. MAX, GAUGE AS REQUIRED, REF. STRUCTURAL 1 1/2" AIR GAP

WEATHER BARRIER

EXTERIOR SHEATHING 1 1/2" AIR GAP

6" METAL STUDS, 16" O.C. MAX, GAUGE AS REQUIRED, REF. STRUCTURAL

EXTERIOR SHEATHING

WEATHER BARRIER RIGID INSULATION

BATT. INSULATION 5/8" GYP. BOARD LEVEL 1 100' - 0"

SECTION DETAIL

RIGID INSULATION

1 1/2" = 1'-0" 5/8" GYP. BOARD 6" METAL STUDS, 16" O.C. MAX, GAUGE AS REQUIRED, REF. STRUCTURAL

VAPOR RETARDER, REF. STRUCTURAL

3/4" SHEATHING

MASONRY TIES AS REQUIRED

VARIES, REF. CIVIL

BRICK VEENER WITH MASONRY TIES AS REQUIRED

FLEX FLASHING

ALIGN

CAST STONE MASONRY CAP

FLEX FLASHING

MORTAR NET

MORTAR NET

METAL FLASHING WITH DRIP EDGE

METAL FLASHING WITH DRIP EDGE

FINAL GRADE

MASONRY UNIT WITH LIMESTONE FINISH, REFER TO STRUCTURAL FOR REINFORCEMENT AS REQUIRED

FINAL GRADE

SOLID GROUT WEATHER BARRIER LEVEL 1

TYP.

2 COURSES

VARIES

MASONRY UNIT WITH LIMESTONE FINISH, REFER TO STRUCTURAL FOR REINFORCEMENT AS REQUIRED

REF. CIVIL

SOLID GROUT

100' - 0"

CONCRETE CURB, REF. STRUCTURAL

8"

4

FOOTING, REF. STRUCTURAL

3

FOUNDATION DETAIL

1

1 1/2" = 1'-0"

72

FOUNDATION DETAIL 1 1/2" = 1'-0"


4 A1.02 A - T.O. PARAPET 137' - 5"

A - LEVEL ROOF 132' - 6 1/2"

A - LEVEL 3 122' - 4"

A - LEVEL 2 111' - 8"

2 A1.02

HANDRAIL A - LEVEL 1 100' - 0"

42" HIGH MASONRY WALL, TYP.

Site - Ramp Section 1/4" = 1'-0"

3

4

4 A1.02

C

4.8

5

2 A1.02

C.1

3"

100A

EQ

4' - 0"

A1 3 A1.03

A1

11 3/4"

13' - 7 3/4"

A1

UP

13' - 1 1/4"

EQ

4' - 0"

A2

6' - 3 3/4"

A1

5' - 0 1/4"

3

3 A1.02

5' - 0"

6' - 9 1/2"

0' - 0" FF = 100'

UP 11' - 6"

30' - 10"

7' - 9 3/4"

2' - 3" 2' - 0"

-6' - 0"

3 TREADS @ 1' = 3' - 0"

5' - 0" 9' - 8" 4' - 9"

UP UP

3' - 0"

2' - 0"

UP

2' - 9"

4' - 9"

5 TREADS @ 1' = 5' - 0"

4' - 4 1/2"

RAMP, REF. CIVIL

9' - 8" 4' - 9"

5' - 0"

40' - 4"

1

30' - 0" 40' - 0"

Site - South Entry Stairs and Ramp 1/4" = 1'-0"

73

5' - 0"


u.f.o. m.arch i spring 2017 professor igor siddiqui with dylan king

The U.F.O.s [Unidentified Footstool Orifices] were created as part of a prototyping class. The course entailed the creation of parametrically derived pieces of furniture. In this iteration of the course, a trio of stools were designed with serial difference - different yet still seen as a family of objects from the layman perspective.  This project tackled the idea of designing something with excessive digital orientation and translating it into the real world - digital for the sake of being digital! The grasshopper definition is able to yield many different types of forms. However, a criterion of the prototype stool is that they read as a series. While examining our options we came up with several rules to define our series. One, the variable pipes cutting the stools should mostly carve exterior rather than interior conditions because when they are on the interior the effect becomes negligible to the observer.

Two, the pipes should create more broad, sweeping subtractions. This is to help make the stool fabrication possible when considering the production tool, a 3D CNC, which can easily break or vacuum up small pieces. Three, it should have curved faces to make it ambiguous which side should be sat on resulting in a variety of sitting experiences for your derrière. In order to make these stools, a 3-D CNC was used on 4’x 4’x3” blue EPS foam. Due to the limitation that a 3-D CNC cannot do “undercuts,” a situation in which there is a void below a solid form, the machine would cut right through the solid form to make it all void. To cut the form properly, the stools were segregated into pieces that would add up to the overall form. The overall outcome are these solid yet lightweight, mildly trypophobia inducing, and familiar yet unfamiliar objects to sit on and throw around.

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encore wire merriman anderson architects distribution plant mckinney, texas 2019-2020

Encore Wire is a copper wire manufacturing company. We were commissioned to design a new facility for the packaging and distribution of their product. My role on the project started from the beginning. I completed tilt-wall design studies, code and zoning checks, coordinated with consultants ,and was the main producer of drawing development. I worked with a project architect all the way through to the beginning of CA as the main Revit technician. In the CA process I reviewed submittal for aesthetic conformance, and forwarded any submittals to our consultant as needed. I also provided ASI’s when change orders were needed. For example, our fire pump room was discovered to be too small, so I provided additional drawings to delineate the changes.

I really enjoyed working on this project even though there wasn’t a lot of design. I got to learn a lot about efficient facility design, tilt-wall structures, and also work through interesting fire code, energy efficiency, and ADA nuances. For example, the building has a series of airconditioned islands in a factory floor space with only large fans and vents. During environmental analysis we treated the building as three different ones as we only needed to evaluate the air conditioned spaces. These islands also had two floors, and they didn’t want to put in elevators to access the second floor. In order for this to be acceptable, we had to design the islands with reciprocal programs on each floor. I also got to work directly with consultants in designing the structure and MEP systems. I really liked this as I felt as though I was getting a wholistic understanding of the design process and making a building function.

80


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3 A4.10

3 A6.00

TRANSFORMER, REF. MEP 1 A2.12

P1

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19

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30' - 0"

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60' - 0"

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30' - 0"

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18

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30' - 0"

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60' - 0"

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SHELVES, TYP.

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PACKAGING

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TYP.

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12' - 0"

TYP.

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103

30' - 0"

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BREAK ROOM

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TYP.

30' - 0"

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30' - 0"

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12' - 0"

TYP.

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12' - 0"

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8' - 0"

TYP.

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SHELVES, TYP.

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P5

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8' - 0"

I

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30' - 0"

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17

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60' - 0"

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16

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60' - 0"

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1 A2.11

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30' - 0"

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15

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30' - 0"

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30' - 0"

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60' - 0"

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14

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30' - 0"

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60' - 0"

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30' - 0"

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13

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1 A4.01

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31' - 7 5/16"

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60' - 0"

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28' - 4 11/16"

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EXPANSION JOINTS

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2 A4.11

MEZZANINE 113' - 10" EXTEND ROOF TPO OVER PARAPET AND PROVIDE END WALL CAPS SINGLE PLY MEMBRANE ROOF, TYP.

CONCRETE MASONRY UNITS

1 A4.11

GUTTER, PAINTED TO MATCH

EAVE 132' - 6"

8

1 A4.11

GUTTER, PAINTED TO MATCH

EAVE 132' - 6"

SECTION DETAIL

SINGLE PLY MEMBRANE ROOF, TYP.

SINGLE PLY MEMBRANE ROOF, TYP.

SINGLE PLY MEMBRANE ROOF, TYP.

6' - 0"

STEEL ANGLE, REF. STRUCTURAL, PAINT

CRICKET; 1/2" SLOPE, REF. ROOF PLANS

GUTTER, PAINTED TO MATCH

EAVE 132' - 6"

EAVE 132' - 6"

EAVE 132' - 6"

TWO ROWS OF EXTERIOR SEALANT AND ONE ROW OF INTERIOR SEALANT, ALL ON BACKER RODS, AT PANEL JOINTS

1 A4.11

1 1/2" = 1'-0"

PANEL JOINTS INDICATED BY DASHED LINES, REF. ELEVATIONS

SHEET METAL DOWNSPOUT; REFER TO ELEVATIONS FOR LOCATIONS

PRECAST CONCRETE PANEL, TYP.

PRECAST CONCRETE PANEL, TYP.

PRECAST CONCRETE PANEL, TYP.

PRE-CAST CONCRETE PANEL, TYP.

18' - 8"

9 A9.11 REVEAL

1 1/2" = 1'-0"

7 A9.11

REVEAL, TYP.

7 A4.11

SECTION DETAIL

WALL PACK EXTERIOR LIGHT

C1

42' - 6"

4' - 1 3/4"

10 A9.11

4' - 1 3/4"

A1

4' - 1 3/4"

7

18' - 8"

18' - 8"

FOUNDATION 100' - 0"

18' - 8"

8"

18' - 8"

8"

16" R 3/

MEZZANINE 113' - 10"

3' - 0"

MEZZANINE 113' - 10"

2' - 1 3/4"

MEZZANINE 113' - 10"

8 A9.11

36' - 6"

MEZZANINE 113' - 10"

36' - 6"

MEZZANINE 113' - 10"

2' - 1 3/4"

13 A4.11

8 A4.10

36' - 6"

2' - 1 3/4"

7 A4.11

MEZZANINE 113' - 10"

3' - 0" GUTTER PREMANUFACTURED STEEL CANOPY, REF. SPECS GUTTER

OVERHANG DOOR WITH LOCKS AN SEALS, REF. SPECS

METAL CANOPY/ ROOF

METAL CANOPY/ ROOF

GUTTER

1 A9.11

7 A9.11

13' - 10"

10' - 6"

BOLLARD BEYOND, TYP. @ EACH SIDE OF O.H. DOOR

13' - 10"

13' - 10"

13' - 10"

14' - 6"

13' - 10"

13' - 10"

13 A9.11

B

PIPE BOLLARD RAIL, TYP. GUARDRAIL, TYP. OVERHEAD DOOR CONCRETE RAMP, REF. STRUCT

LEVELER AT FINISH FLOOR

FOUNDATION 100' - 0"

ENTRY GUARD HOUSE FOUNDATION 96' - 6"

WATERSTOP

FOUNDATION 100' - 0"

FOUNDATION 100' - 0"

4' - 0"

SLAB AT LEVELER, REF. STRUCT.

4' - 0"

VAPOR BARRIER

FOUNDATION 100' - 0"

GROUND LEVEL 96' - 0"

GROUND LEVEL 96' - 0"

FOUNDATION 100' - 0"

TRANSITION SEALANT AT ABOVE GRADE TO BELOW GRADE.

CONCRETE STAIRS

4' - 0"

FOUNDATION 100' - 0"

8 A9.11

BOLLARD, TYP.

VAPOR BARRIER

6 A9.11

4' - 0"

VAPOR BARRIER

GROUND LEVEL 96' - 0"

4' - 0"

7 A4.10

GROUND LEVEL 96' - 0"

GROUND LEVEL 96' - 0" PIER & PIER CAP PER STRUCTURAL

B.O. TILT PANEL 94' - 0"

B.O. TILT PANEL 94' - 0"

CONTINUOUS VOID BETWEEN PIERS PER STRUCTURAL

6

WALL SECTION 1/2" = 1'-0"

FIRE PUMP

5

WALL SECTION 1/2" = 1'-0"

MEZZANINE

4

WALL SECTION

3

1/2" = 1'-0"

82

B.O. TILT PANEL 94' - 0"

CONTINUOUS VOID BETWEEN PIERS PER STRUCTURAL

WALL SECTION 1/2" = 1'-0"

B.O. TILT PANEL 94' - 0"

CONTINUOUS VOID BETWEEN PIERS PER STRUCTURAL

2

WALL SECTION 1/2" = 1'-0"

1

WALL SECTION 1/2" = 1'-0"


9

8

RIDGE 140' - 0"

ROOF BEYOND 2 A4.10

3 A4.10 SKYLIGHTS BEYOND EAVE 132' - 6"

GUTTER & DOWNSPOUT

TILT WALL PANEL JOINT, TYP.

12' - 3"

SEALANT AND BACKER ROD

PAINT, SW 9180 AGED WHITE

15' - 0"

15' - 0"

15' - 0"

EQ

15' - 0"

WALL PACK; SEAL TOP AND SIDES WITH SEALANT

EQ

15' - 0"

4' - 2 1/4"

15' - 0"

PAINT, SW 7701 CAVERN CLAY ON FORM LINED CONCRETE

A1

MEZZANINE 113' - 10"

PAINT, SW 9180 AGED WHITE

MEZZANINE 113' - 10"

7 RISERS @ 6 7/8" = 4' - 0"

12' - 0"

TRUCK DOOR

2' - 4"

8' - 6" OPENING

8' - 4"

8' - 6" OPENING

PAINT, SW 9180 AGED WHITE FOUNDATION 100' - 0"

2' - 4"

2' - 4"

30' - 0"

1

9' - 4"

5 A4.11

4' - 0"

4' - 0"

RD, TYP.

10 A4.12

PAINT, SW 6256 SERIOUS GRAY ON FORM LINED CONCRETE

9' - 0" OPENING

20' - 0 3/4"

10' - 6" TO METAL CANOPY

METAL CANOPY

8' - 6" OPENING

2' - 6"

3' - 4"

2' - 6"

8' - 6" OPENING

FOUNDATION 100' - 0"

GROUND LEVEL 96' - 0"

2' - 4"

30' - 0"

METAL STAIR

ENLARGED DOCK DOOR ELEVATION - TYPICAL

1

1/4" = 1'-0"

NORTH BREAK ROOM - EAST ELEVATION 1/4" = 1'-0"

M

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2 A4.11

RIDGE 140' - 0"

3 A4.11

RIDGE 140' - 0"

CRICKET, REF. ROOF PLANS

SKYLIGHT, REF. ROOF PLANS

CRICKET, REF. ROOF PLANS

METAL GUTTER BEYOND EAVE 132' - 6"

8 A4.12

EAVE 132' - 6"

4 A4.12

4 A4.12 8” DOWNSPOUT BEYOND

7 A9.11

8' - 6"

7 A4.11

7 A6.00

8' - 6"

3 A4.12

WALL PACK

A1

WALL PACK

A1 # 222

13 A4.11

# 223 8 A9.11 GUARD HOUSE ENTRY MEZZANINE RIDGE - 10" 113'113' - 8 9/16"

13 A4.11

GUARD HOUSE ENTRY MEZZANINE RIDGE - 10" 113'113' - 8 9/16"

6 A4.12

5' - 4"

5' - 4"

6 A4.12 ENTRY GUARD HOUSE - EAVE 110' - 6"

ENTRY GUARD HOUSE - EAVE 110' - 6" 2 A4.12

2 A4.12

2

# 105

A1

A1

14 A9.11

8' - 0"

8' - 6"

8' - 6"

# 104

11 A9.11

5 A4.11

7 A4.11

1 A4.12

38' - 6"

5' - 6"

3 A4.12

# 115

5 A4.12 FOUNDATION 100' - 0"

FOUNDATION 100' - 0"

ENTRY GUARD HOUSE FOUNDATION GROUND LEVEL 96' - 6" 96' - 0"

9 A4.12ENTRY GUARD HOUSE FOUNDATION GROUND LEVEL 96' - 6" 96' - 0"

B.O. TILT PANEL 94' - 0"

B.O. TILT PANEL 94' - 0"

NORTHWEST BREAKROOM SECTION

1

1/4" = 1'-0"

NORTH BREAKROOM SECTION 1/4" = 1'-0"

1 A4.01

EAVE 132' - 6"

12

13

18' - 8"

CORRUGATED METAL

A1

A1

A1

A1

A1

# 221

A1

6 A4.10

MEZZANINE 113' - 10"

CMU, PAINTED

# 111

30' - 0"

2

98' - 8"

NORTH BREAK ROOM - SOUTH ELEVATION 1/4" = 1'-0"

83

STAIR HEAD KNOCK PROTECTION SHALL BE 24" MEASURED FROM FINISH FLOOR TO TOP OF RAIL; LOCATE AT A MINIMUM HEAD CLEARANCE OF 7' - 0" TO STAIR STRINGER ABOVE

4' - 0"

A1

7' - 0"

A1

CLEARANCE

# 116

13' - 10"

48" PIPE GUARD BOLLARDS 4" STANDARD PIPE; PAINTED

5 A4.11

12' - 4 1/2"

1' - 0" EXTENSION

FOUNDATION 100' - 0"


error-encoded anamorphism b.s. architecture spring 2015 professor steve quevedo with marco peirce and tuan nguyen

Error-encoded anamorphism involves the distortion of data both physical and digital. A digitally engendered anamorphosis is formed by first inputting a rasterized image into a Quick Response (QR) Code generator. In this generator, the computer calculates the necessary square matrix to encode a website. The more complex the web URL, the more distortion of the original image.

The physical anamorphism is formed through the distortion of the QR code by projecting its matrix onto a wall. This distorted projection is formed in a way that the intended optical reading of the QR matrix becomes evident only when viewed in a specific manner - in this case, a specific location in relation to the physical projection. Ultimately when scanning the image, the computer reads through these physical and digital distortions to bring you to your online terminus.

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scan me!

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shanghai expo redevelopment bs. arch summer 2014 professor brad bell and josh nason with david tidwell, alma espinoza, and candace ledingham

The 2010 Shanghai Expo was a vast area designed to get massive amounts of people from location to location. While effective then, the area has become a “ghost town,” as described by a local taxi driver. There is some ongoing construction, and several of the pavilions are being kept. Therefore, the design problem entails the understanding of what can and cannot be touched when master planning. The master plan also warrants the investigation of what is needed in the area to improve the lives of those who live in the area, and make the district more pedestrian friendly.

One mixed-use building was designed in detail with an emphasis on housing. Rather than designing another tower, we took a more horizontal approach to accommodate for problems that might occur building along a river. The concept is a mid rise ribbon that activates the waterfront and creates links between the shanghai modern art museum, pavilions, and the rest of the site. Through the idea of a porous surface, it maintains views and access to the river for buildings further inland. The building is composed of trapezoidal modules, which allow for a variety of outcomes in terms of curvature. The resulting curvature of the interlocking trapezoids also allows a number panoramic views out to the water front.

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shanghai buildings of focus pavilions remaining under construction health + education retail + commercial

87


circulation program

circulation

river access

clusters in plan

modular versatility

zoned spaces

soft scapes

loft double volume

kitchen + living

bedroom + bath

circulation

view through a unit from the interior hallway

public spaces

88


89


double volume studio single level studio single level + 1 bed + living single level + 2 bed - living single level + 2 bed + living single level + 3 bed + living L-shape + 2 bed + living L-shape + 3 bed + living vertical circulation zones

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711 elm merriman anderson architects adaptive reuse hotel dallas, texas 2017

711 Elm is an adaptive reuse project in Downtown Dallas. Currently it is an operational parking garage. The firm was commissioned to convert it into a hotel along with a new addition on top. The building is in the West End historical district, which has a committee that reviews new construction. My part in this project was to create schematic floor plans that accommodate the staggered garage floors and the production of exterior renderings for the historic committee to approve.

From a mainly brick design, to a simple glass box, to the design you see here, the project has gone through many revisions in order to be approved by the historic committee’s design standards. This step is particularly important in getting tax credits for historic renovation. The rendering you see to the right was the approved version of the project as of January 2018, however, the project has undergone many more iterations due to the client wanting something different for budget and aesthetic reasons. Currently, the project is on hold.

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a hidden arcology m.arch i spring 2016 professor matt fajkus

Hidden deep within a suburban compound in Austin, Texas, Olympus Drive was like a black hole - unseen and untouched by the surrounding development. However, when close it pulls one in with its steep slope and diverse ecology that terminates in a flowing spring and temperate microclimate at its base. To morph this initial impression into architecture, a person would descend through a meandering path. As one progresses, they are pulled further by interesting natural formations either visual, audible, or tactile, then propelled on to the next one. The buildings on the site also gravitate around these points, and get less dense the further away from them one

gets. The variation in building density creates a relationship between voyeurism and intimacy for the people who occupy them. Programmatically, there is a problem in these sprawling neighborhoods in which one must drive a long way to get to any shop. As a result, homes will have extra pieces to them such as a convenience or craft store. This project provides a yoga studio, lodging, and a natural research center due to the site’s diverse ecology. These divergent public and private programs are tied together by the drum circle and kitchen in the center. While seemingly awkward, together they afford sustenance and a sense of community to the entire site.

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97


98


notes at site and initial ideas for design

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4

1a

2c 5

d

3

wildflowers karst limestone monolith small meadow trees growing out of karst limestone makeshift fire pit significant and widely spread cedar tree floating rock with sounds of creek without being visible view over cliff down to creek below

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

1

100

2


nature + wildlife research center remote study yoga studio visitor + researcher lodging entry + living space “front garden" dining kitchen drum circle fire pit open camp structures bedroom + bath children’s room recording studio library remote studies

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grand entry living room + kotatsu green room restroom indoor / outdoor space kitchen drum circle fire pit creek “front garden" dining bedroom bathroom closet

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forest fires m.arch i spring 2016 professor matt fajkus with kim choy and marett flores

From an anthropocentric view, forest fires are perceived as a natural disaster. Humans have fought these fires valiantly, but to what extent does our intervention actually help the environment? Our attempts at quelling forest fires allow the dense brush of dead plants to build up. This increases the risk as well as the intensity of subsequent fires. It is perhaps better then, to view forest fires as a natural system of checks and balances, not as distinct and disastrous events.

Once an understanding of forest fires was established, a deployable structure was designed to cope with the extremities. Rather than designing an indestructible shelter, a malleable one was created. Just like a forest, the structure is molded by the fire. This allows new forms to arise after each fire, never to be the same. Cyclical, yet linear at the same time. Likewise, a forest ecology after a fire starts anew, allowing new plants to arise from the formers’ ashes.

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kiribati living laboratory yacademy - architecture for humanity began october 2020 advisor raul pantaleo with xin yue yang, caroline bouchet, simeon chua, and juan salamanca

A society between sky and water. Kiribati, is an independent nation composed of 3 atoll islands in the heart of the Pacific Ocean. Due to climate change, changes in the ocean temperature and the resultant coral bleaching, coral reefs are dying off and not growing. This is a particularly pressing issue in the case of atolls, which need sustained coral reef growth to keep above the ocean surface. Therefore, atoll nations are facing imminent extinction. Kiribati recently bought land in Fiji to evacuate its population in case the trend continues. However, the people of Kiribati want to stay, this is there home, where they belong. So, can we built something for them and work with the water? We want to extend the habitable life of the Kiribati islands and protect the homeland of the Kiribati people by building up the islands’ resilience towards climate change through the gradual layering of ingredients from a culturally fitting “toolbox” or kit of infrastructural, environmental, and educational parts. These parts were separated into ground relying activities and non-ground relying activities. The ground relying activities were mainly tasks intensive on land and include animal and produce farming, tree farming, burial ceremonies, and play. To maintain these

activities, the toolset is used to protect these activities by preserving and building land mass. The non-ground relying activities are gathering, fishing, education, markets, and domesticity. To maintain this set of activities, they are moved out onto water whether it is with floating or stilt architecture and land reclamation. In addition to designing an environmentally engineered system, the design of a kindergarten for the people of Kiribati was specifically focused upon. When thinking about this school, we thought about what the role of the kindergarten should be in this collective process of transforming the island. The kindergarten will be three things. First, a lab to experiment with different methods and become a prototype to be followed. Second, a catalyst to initiate change and spread awareness. Finally, an educator to disseminate knowledge the next generation about sustainability and resilience, as well as the importance of preserving a cultural identity. The Kiribati Kindergarten is not on a fixed site, but an ever-developing, semi-mobile system that starts with acupunctural insertions of the ingredients from the toolbox. This flexible mode of teaching allows for not only the dissemination of traditional knowledge about the ocean, but also information and processes to protect themselves from climate change.

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109 tarawa atoll, kiribati


kiribati

2020

the specific site in question is on the southern part of the tarawa atoll in kiribati

2050

kiribati is expected to encounter severe loss of habitat due to rising ocean levels in the next 100 years

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structures terra forming environmental engineering resources

building elements

the “toolbox”

stilt architecture

modular

platforms / rafts

walkways

fish traps

mangrove islands

oyster reefs

high passage

land raising

inland swamp farms

land farming

reservoir walls

planter walls

permeable sea walls

floating farms

floating mangrove nurseries

seaweed farms

seagrass farms

plant and fish farms

fish farms

rainwater collectors

solar panels

vertical gardens

seashell tiles

pandanus/coconut glulam structure

solar power

vertical gardens

seaweed roof panels

coconut fiber panels

seaweed panels

pandanus panels

seaweed cushion

weaved panel 1

weaved panel 2

weaved panel 3

weaved panel 4

seaweed

pandanus wood

pandanus leaves

coconut leaves

oysters

coconuts

recycled materials

palm wood

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floating fish farms

fish traps

floating mangrove nursery

slides and swings

built-up islands

floating farms

oyster reefs

sea grass and seaweed farms

fish traps and built-up islands

floating nets to lure and raise fish for sustainable farming. Floating farms can be set up on top for a more cyclical way of transferring nutrients

walls built up with sediment and dead coral that captures fish within it at low tide

floating beds of soil to nurse young mangrove trees for planting in soil. Mangroves are used for retaining soil and breaking waves

play equipment attached to elevated walkways to give children a place to play near the kindergarten

man-made islands built up with sediment, organic material, and trash. Used to give people land to live on while the original island is used for farming

floating beds of soil to grow food. Fish farms below the floating beds feed on plant roots and fertilize at the same time

oyster reefs created with an infrastructure of nets and wood framework. Reefs are use to break waves and protect the main land

seaweed and sea grass is farmed and used for food, farming, and building materials. Also helps filter water of any pollutants

fish traps naturally build up sediment as the ocean pushes and pulls it with each tide. Over time, it is built up quicker with human input to claim new land

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a

mwaneaba a collective gathering place that reinterprets the traditional mwaneaba for an environment subject to rising waters. Structure is made with glulaminated wood. Roofing is made with a combination of seaweed, sea grass, and weaved pandanus panels.

b

classrooms stationary teaching spaces on stilts with vertical gardens, seaweed roofs, and weaved wall panels. The inclusion of these local materials educate the children on local economies and how to be productive with available resources.

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teachers’ offices offices and gathering spaces on stilts for teachers. provides a space for connection between teachers, parents, and students. Structure made with glulaminated wood. Building clad in seaweed, sea grass, and weaved pandanus panels.

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living lab / floating classroom floating classroom for kindergarten students and the population at large to learn about their island, the environmental system set up, and preservation techniques.

e

latrines / drop toilets

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trash fill

coconut trees

elevated walkways

permeable dams

oyster reefs

fish traps

mangrove

pandanus

fish farms

floating farms

seaweed

te bwabwai

cisterns

a man made island isolated from the ocean by an oyster reef and fish trap. Mangrove trees remediate organic material for use in fertilization and island building


2025 - south tarawa atoll , kiribati

2120 - south tarawa atoll , kiribati

waterways

high passages

reclaimed land

new structures

fish farms

seaweed farms

oyster reefs

coconut & pandanus

permeable dams

mangrove trees

fish traps

floating farms

10 50 100

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five-head figures began spring 2017

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vaporwave city m. arch i began spring 2017 professor hilary sample - mos architects

New York City has made great efforts to build affordable housing. However, according to laws in place when this project was designed in 2017, after 15 years the affordable units become market rate. This project attempts to design housing that remains affordable even after it becomes market rate. To do this, privacy is defined as the differentiating factor. Privacy within the units range from a person owning an entire floor to cooperative style living arrangements. The more private units fluctuate in cost with the market, while the embedded community, happenstance, and closeness brought about by a lack of privacy in the co-op units drive a lower cost once the affordability laws expire. The premiums from the private units and the higher number of people being charged rent per square foot in the co-op units keep the project more feasible from the landlord’s point of view. The units all sit atop a plinth that provides dance studios, a black-box theatre, and music practice rooms for the local Harlem School of the Arts. With an infrastructure of acoustical curtains, the school can be either one large practice space or

separated into many smaller ones for flexibility in scheduling. A large open space that extends from the street, through the building, and out to a rear garden is also provided in a similar vein. This space is ambiguous in its definition so that it can be leveraged for additional income through reservations and events by outside parties.  A regular occurrence would be a farmer’s market as the area is considered a food desert. My hope is that this project - with the help of a benevolent landlord - could be seen as a new model for attainable living, working, learning, and playing. So why is it called Vaporwave City? Vaporwave is a is a genre of music, visuals, and a concept for communality that I personally find appealing. As you can see from the graphics, it was a big influence. Also, one of the comments on my review was that the scale of the project, in addition to spanning a New York City block, was a like a miniature city. A combination of this personal inspiration and third party perception brought me to the name Vaporwave City.

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600’

600’

100’ 55’

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200’

2. context the harlem site superimposed on the typical new york city block illustrates the scale and intensity of the project intervention.

30’

1. typical new york city block 900’x250’ block with 25’x125’ subdivisions 40’ setback from rear and 55’ setback from avenues

80’

25’

30’

3. site set-back establishes typical buildable zone. rear area becomes zone for outdoor markets and practice spaces

4. typical dance room reorganize structural grid to the dimensions of a dance room. acoustical curtains modulate room sizes depending on the class.

5. roof garden new rear yards create a boundary for a roof plane and garden above. roof plane becomes infrastructural piece for the entire project.

6. large practice rooms and black box theatre significant programs adjust structural spans in specific locations. black box theatre makes use of large span truss.

7. tower volumes towers puncture the roof plane and set up a hierarchy for more private. programs and compressed spaces.

8. structural system towers incorporated into the overall structure of the facility. design allows for double volume or atrium spaces between floor plates.

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existing harlem school of the arts private practice rooms open practice spaces classrooms small practice spaces outdoor practice spaces exterior performance area dressing rooms storage and green room lobby black box theatre

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residential offices and leasing outdoor lighting tower and proscenium central vestibule shops green room dressing and lockers wide ramp between shops and event spaces event spaces mezzanine event spaces and seating cistern outdoor event space

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mezzanine floor plan

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residential lobbies double volume space to practice rooms below day care outdoor lighting tower and proscenium roof garden cistern public access and bridge from hamilton terrace

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roof garden floor plan

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other

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Profile for Krishnan Lal Mistry

Krishnan Lal Mistry Comprehensive Portfolio  

Krishnan Lal Mistry Comprehensive Portfolio  

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