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Organic Pet Food: Whole and Natural Foods Benefit Pets In recent years, many individuals have switched to all-organic or organic-based food diets in an effort to keep themselves and their families healthy. As the media has exposed farming and meat-raising techniques through a variety of outlets to hundreds of millions of audience members, those people educated about the harmful effects of synthetic pesticides, chemical food additives, toxic fertilizers and other more modern growing techniques of contemporary farming. During the 20th century, farmers introduced a variety of new chemicals into food in an effort to industrialize the food industry. This effort, in turn, spawned the Green Revolution, in which the first organic farming movement was properly defined and outlined during the 1940s.

Today, the term “organic” carries with it many legally binding connotations that are regulated by various governments throughout the world. Producers of organic products must obtain special certifications based on their government’s specific standards required to label food ‘organic.” In the United States, there are grading, certification and verification guidelines each producer must meet in order to secure a United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Organic symbol by the Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) on the packaging of their food. Without this symbol on the packaging of food, producers may be fined or even sued for illegally marketing their food. According to the USDA, grades of organic-ness vary by food, but must meet basic standards of organic quality to meet certification guidelines.

While organic food has become a major staple in American homes, a new trend has taken off in pet health food as a large population has become more aware of the possible detrimental effects of such foods their animals’ diets. Low-grade meats treated with hormones and antibiotics, animal byproducts and high percentages of carbohydrates are all major ingredients in typical pet food brands. These ingredients have are the culprits for many signs of pre-aging, overweight and obesity problems, as well as some more serious signs of deteriorating health like organ failure.

When considering those beloved pets suffering over time simply because of the food they are being fed, their diets should be changed. Organic food rich in protein and fat, rather than carbohydrate fillers and other non-meat foods that have been grown or treated with harmful fertilizers and chemicals is one of the first healthy changes that can be made for animals suffering from insufficient or poor diets.

Natural pet food and organic pet food is sold in pet stores throughout the country. While there are many brands to choose from according to the needs of both owner and pet, one of the main factors to consider is the list of ingredients on the packaging. Seemingly harmless or nonspecific ingredients can be actually quite harmful to pets. BHT, for instance, is a common preservative that has been shown to be possibly carcinogenic in animal experiments. Propylene Glycol is another ingredient used as an additive in kibble to keep it from drying out. Propylene Glycol can be toxic if consumed in large amounts, and should therefore not be an element of a pet’s daily food diet. Some carbohydrate sources that are packed into pet foods contain little to no nutritional value for pets. Grain fermentation solubles, for instance, is an inexpensive byproduct of human food and beverages that adds little to no nutritional


value to pet food.

To offer premium, organic food to pets is to offer them the best nutritional quality in food. Producers like Wellness, Orijen and EVO are brands to consider when choosing which brand is appropriate for a pet. Ingredients and reviews should be valued and considered in comparison to regular pet food brands.

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Organic Pet Food: Whole and Natural Foods Benefit Pets Ancestral Nutrition