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Welcome to Croatia


Croatia Croatia

is a Mediterranean country, located in the heart of Europe, lying to the east of Italy, across the adriatic Sea. Towards the north lie the Alps, and to the northeast the country forms the western end of the great Pannonian Plain. Croatia is a country of more than 1,185 islands, inlets and reefs, most uninhabited and preserved, perfect for eco-tourism. In 1999, Croatia won three international awards for the cleanset waters in the Mediterranean. Major cruise lines include Croatia in their itineraries. Croatia has created its own spirit and participates in the European science and culture at full strength. The hospitality, reasonable prices, warm, clean and clear blue sea, lovely towns and idyllic villages are pleasure for everyone. The interior of Croatia has a continental climate, with cold winters and hot summers with enough rain for this to be a major agricultural area. Wine-growing is concentrated in the hilly areas bordering on the Pannonian Plain. The Dalmatian Coast is typically Mediterranean in climate, although the Dinaric Alps mountain range creates pockets of alpine climate at higher altitudes.

The coastline of the Adriatic Sea is ideal for grape cultivation with its hot, humid summers and mild winters. Further down the coast, and on the islands, grapes are grown on the karst hillside, sometimes steep slopes with little rainfall. Some of the best-known wine-production areas are on the Dalmatian islands. Located along hillsides and slopes, wine regions along the coast receive many hours of sunlight, ideal for grape production. Croatia is also home to the Slavonian oak forest, producing the oak casks favoured by many winemakers in Europe for aging their finest wines.

The average inland temperature is between 0 and 2 °C in January, and between 19 and 23 °C in August. Average coastal temperatures range from 6–11 °C in January to 21–27 °C in August. Sea temperature averages 12 °C in winter and 25 °C in summer.

Area Mainland 56,542 km2, territorial waters 31,067 km2

Population 4.437.460

Croatia


Croatian wine

Croatian wine Croatian wine

Wine consumption in Croatia is part of tradition and culture of living. Croatia wine has a history dating back to the Ancient Greek settlers, and their wine production on the southern Dalmatian islands of Vis, Hvar and KorÄ?ula some 2,500 years ago. Like other old world wine producers, many traditional grape varieties still survive in Croatia, perfectly suited to their local wine hills. Modern wine-production methods have taken over in the larger wineries, and EU-style wine regulations have been adopted, guaranteeing the quality of the wine.

There are currently over 300 geographically defined wine regions, and a strict classification system to ensure quality and origin. The majority of Croatian wine is white, with most of the remainder being red, and only a small percentage is rosĂŠ wines. In 2010, Croatia ranked 30th in wine producing countries with an estimated 50,000 tonnes.

Wine is a popular drink in Croatia, and locals traditionally like to drink wine with their meals. Quite often, the wine is diluted with either still or sparkling water producing a drink a combination of white wine and carbonated water, and a combination of red wine and still water. Like the rest of Central Europe and South-Eastern Europe, viticulture in the present-day Croatia existed hundreds of years before the rise of the Roman Empire. Recent research has shown that the Illyrians living in Dalmatia during the Bronze Age and Iron Age may already have grown grapevines. However, the true beginning of grape cultivation and wine production in Croatia is related to the Ancient Greeks settlers, who arrived on the Croatian coast in the 5th century BC. The Greek writer Athenaeus wrote 22 centuries ago about the high quality wine produced on the Dalmatian islands of Vis, Hvar and KorÄ?ula. Coins from the period have motifs related to grape cultivation and wine, demonstrating the importance of wine in the economics of the ancient Greek colonies.

Croatia


Croatian wine

Croatian wine Under the Roman Empire, the production of wine grew, becoming more organized. Wine was exported to other parts of the empire. Artifacts from this time include stone presses from which wine was squeezed, amphoras from sunken Roman galleys, and decorations on numerous religious and household items bear witness to the wine-making culture.

As the Croatians arrived and settled the area, they learned from their predecessors, and wine production continued to expand. During the Middle Ages, there was a royal court official called the “royal wine procurer”, whose responsibilities included the production and procurement of wine. Free towns adopted legal standards on winegrowing and protected it accordingly. For example, a statute of the town and island of Korčula in 1214 contains strict rules protecting the vineyards. In the 15th century, the Ottoman Turks arrived in South Eastern Europe, and imposed strict anti-alcohol laws as part of the new Islamic law. Fortunately, the Ottoman Empire was tolerant of Christianity, and Catholic church traditions involving wine are thought to have “saved” European wine production from complete extinction. Priests and monks were permitted to continue producing wine in order to provide for Church services. In the 18th century, much of present-day Croatia came under control of the Habsburg Empire, where wine production flourished through the 19th and 20th centuries. But the history of wine was to change dramatically in 1874, when phylloxera, a hazardous grapevine pest, started to appear in Europe. Wine production dropped, first in France and Germany, as the growers struggled to combat the blight. For a time, Croatian vineyards remained unaffected, and wine exports greatly increased to fill the extra demand. Some French companies even planted vines in Croatia with a view to expanding operations in the safe area. However, by the turn of the 20th century, Croatian vines had also succumbed to phylloxera, leading to the destruction of the

Croatia


Croatian wine

Croatian wine vineyards and the collapse of the local economy in many areas. Large numbers of wine growing families moved to the new world, contributing to the growth of wine production there. Under the communist system of Yugoslavia, wine production was centered in large cooperativec and private ownershio of vineyard was discouraged. Quantity rather than quality became main focus. The Croatia War of Independence in the early 1990s saw many vineyards and wineries once again destroyed. However, with the move bac to small independent producers, Croatia winea are once again competing with the best in the world wine market.

Wine styles

There are two distinct wine-producing regions in Croatia. The continental region in the north-east of the country, produces rich fruity white wines, similar in style to the neighbouring areas of Slovenia, Austria and Hungary. On the north coast, Istrian wines are similar to those produced in neighbouring Italy, while further south production is more towards big Mediterranean-style reds. The majority (67%) of wine produced is white and produced in the interior, while 32% is red and produced mainly along the coast. RosĂŠ is relatively rare. Some special wines, such as sparkling wine and dessert wine are also produced.

Croatia


Croatian wine

Croatian wine Wine Regions

Croatia has two main wine regions: Continental and Coastal, which includes the islands. Each of the main regions is divided into sub-regions which are divided yet further into smaller wine hills and districts. Altogether, there are more than 300 geographically-defined wine-producing areas in Croatia.

Continental Croatia

The inland wine region, stretching from north-west to south-east along the Drava and Sava rivers, has a typical continental climate with cold winters and hot summers. Production is concentrated in white wine varieties.

The best-known area i Continental Croatia I would like to offer you products is the village of Ĺ trigova, located approximately two kilometres south-east of the border crossing with Sloveniawhere vineyards and the production of wine is a major business in the municipality. There are many wine cellars throughout the municipality, most of which are privately owned, but there is also a large communally-owned wine cellar in Ĺ trigova. With over thousand hectares of vineyards they produce wines Sauvignon, Moslavac, Chardonnay, GraĹĄevina, Rhein Riesling, Pinot blanc, Pinot gris, Traminer, Sylvaner Green, Muskadel whiteand red wines Pinot noir, Cabernet sauvignon.

Croatia


Croatian wine

Croatian wine The wine industry today

Today there are around 800 wineries producing wines on a commercial scale from controlled regions of origin. For the top classification the wine must accord to analysis including no chaptalisation, minimum alcohol and extract levels, and passing the judgement of a tasting panel looking for quality and typicity. Styles range from rich, tannic and traditional reds that benefit from considerable cellaring, to much more modern, plush and expressive styles. Whites too run the gamut from very traditional ‘yellow’ wines made with long skin contact and a certain amount of oxidation, to burstingly fresh, fruit-forward styles. Around 65% - 70% of all production is of white wine. Croatia has a young generation of winemakers who have taken over family farms, and like their neighbours in Slovenia, many are embracing organic and biodynamic farming and are making wines that fall into the ‘natural’ category with wild yeasts and no or minimal added sulph.

Croatia


Olive

Olive Olive

As a symbol of the Mediterranean, olive oil has always been much more than an ordinary food ingredient. Olive oil and dried figs are like pure gold valuable natural remedies.

Olive tree is the oldest known planted tree on Earth that has been around some 6,000 years ago. It is a symbol of the Mediterranean countries, warm climates where it has found its home. An olive branch is a symbol of peace while the olive oil, due to its structure, a sign of longevity and overall good health and an inevitable ingredient to any Mediterranean dish. It were the Phoenicians who brought it to the Mediterranean basin, the Greeks considered olives a sacred fruit, while the Romans believed that olive oil and wine will secure them.

Olive oil today is synonymous with a healthy diet and modern living. There is a proliferation of scientific research pointing to the benefits of high quality extra virgin olive oil so that even an average consumer today is aware of the incredible health and fitness benefits. 95% of all olive oil production in the world comes from the Mediterranean. Croatia is one of those producers. Sure, the heavy hitters seem to be Spain, Italy and Greece; mainly because of their better positioning on the world market and because they’ve been cultivating it for centuries. However, Croatia is that little secret that hasn’t really been discovered yet. For instance, the EU has a law, which says that you can claim an oil to be Italian even though it has only 0.2% of actual Italian olive oil in it. Croatia, make 100% hardcore virgin olive oil. In fact, our olive oil is so innocent it only goes through puberty after you taste it.

Croatia


Olive

Olive Extra-virgin olive oil is exclusively retrieved from the production of virgin oil. There arecertain restraints this particular grade of oil has to adhere by. For instance, over 0.8% acidity is a big no-no in extra virgin country, but superior taste has been approved by many head nods in the Mediterranean area. Generally speaking, extra virgin olive oil accounts for about an average of 50% in top producing countries. Its usually appropriate as a fantastic replacement for salad dressings, soups, dipping purposes and stews. It’s a spice that extends life, that what the kids are calling it anyway.

Virgin olive oil derives its name, purpose and vitality from the production of virgin oil. Essentially, its self explanatory yet the acidity level must not exceed 2% and is considered to be excellent in taste. Pure olive oil – the name can be a bit misleading as “pure” is basically only a step down from virgin olive oil. Relatively speaking, its difficult enough to top something that has virgin in its description. Obviously, its even harder to downgrade that type of oil and still give it a decent grade. Therefore, pure olive oil is a blend of virgin and refined olive oil.

Croatia


Olive

Olive I would like to offer you some special products Extra virgin olive oil with lemon

Manually picked olives are pressed together with fresh lemons creating a unique flavor of olive oil. Extra virgin olive oil with lemon is excellent match with fish dishes and salads.

Extra virgin olive oil with orange

Manually picked olives are pressed together with fresh oranges creating a unique flavor of olive oil. Extra virgin olive oil with orange is excellent match with salads, meat dishes and desserts.

Extra virgin olive oil with basil and rosemary Olive oil represents the culmination of quality and is the basis of the traditional Dalmatian cuisine, a few drops of aromatic oil added is enough for a great delight food on the palate of every gourmand. Extra virgin olive oil flavored with dry basil and rosemary from organic production. It is an excellent match with our salty olive biscuits flavored also with rosemary and basil!

Extra virgin olive oil Mature in karst Dalmatian round valleys bordered by stone walls where olives are picked by hand and processed by cold pressing immediately after picking in a premium olive oil. This oil contains a minimum percentage of unsaturated fatty acids and is characterized by its healthiness and unique flavor.

Croatia


Fig

Fig Fig

The edible fig is believed to be indigenous to western Asia, but was distributed by humans throughout the Mediterranean so long ago that it could almost be regarded as native here. Evidence of fig cultivation has been found in excavations of Neolithic sites as early as 5,000 BC. The typical fig-producing regions have mild winters and hot dry summers. The nutritional value of fresh figs is comparable to that of many other fruits. They are high in calcium. Dried figs, with only 20% water are nutritious relative to other fresh fruits. Products I offer to you a fruit dessert made of dried figs and almonds.

Locally known as the dried figs salami, in Dalmatia, is traditionally served as a sign of welcome, usually accompanied by a glass of homemade brandy or liqueur. Prepared exclusively of dried fruit is nutritive valuable delicacy.

Fig cake

A fruit dessert made of dried figs, almonds and walnuts.

Traditional Dalmatian dried figs cake with almonds and walnuts. In past it was used by fishermen and farmers as well as tasty and nutritious snack after a hard work in the field or at sea. In special occasions is served with a glass of homemade brandy. Today it is valued as a unique Dalmatian delicacies, as well as nutritious and healthy dessert!

Dried fig jam and dried fig and orange jam

Handmade according to traditional recipes with more than 85% of fruit in its content, this jam is a unique treat! A refreshing combination of dried figs and oranges reveals the true flavors of the Mediterranean.

Croatia

Welcome to Croatia  

Croatian wine Olive Fig