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ISSN 1471-0471

THE MAGAZINE FOR THE INSTITUTE OF LICENSED TRADE STOCK AUDITORS www.iltsa.co.uk

Issue 44 - January 2003

What a way to start the New Year

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pub owner drove a bulldozer into his own premises in a fit of rage after his staff refused to serve him a drink after New Year’s eve celebrations. Robert Tyrell, 45, struck the 16th-century inn three or four times with his digger, bringing down part of its roof and sections of the walls. His antics forced a group of 15 drinkers who had been celebrating at the North Star pub in Steventon, Oxfordshire, to flee the building at 3:30am on January 1.

Customers said Mr Tyrell had barged his way into the pub, demanded a drink and “went bananas” when staff refused, saying they were closing for the night. Reports of the destruction of the pub, which had been in the hands of the same family for 177 years until it was sold to Mr Tyrell, brought outrage from the Campaign for Real Ale. The North Star is over 200 years old and has remained remarkably unchanged with no bar - beer was served from casks and through hatches to the customers.n

In this issue Page Page Page Page

3 4 5 6

Secretary’s Corner News Round Up Leicester Police Success Record breaking malt

Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 12

AGM Agenda A Celebration The Family Way The Next Generation

The Institute of Licensed Trade Stock Auditors January 2003

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Editor’s View

The Magazine of:

Trevor Perrott

The Institute of Licensed Trade Stock Auditors 7 Comely Bank Place Edinburgh EH4 1DT Tel: 0131 315 2600 Fax: 0131 315 4346 Website: www.iltsa.co.uk E-mail address: info@iltsa.co.uk PRESIDENT Norman Clements FILSA MHCIMA 105 St. Andrew’s Road Henley on Thames Oxon RG9 1PN Tel: 01491 628660 (Business) Tel: 01491 575451 (Home) Council of Management CHAIRMAN Steve Berry FILSA 15 Deanburn Walk Bo’ness West Lothian EH51 0NB Tel: 0131 477 2895 (Business) Tel: 01506 825227 (Home)

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appy New Year to you all. Now it is all over and we are all back to work time just seems to fly by. I thought that last year flew by fast but when you start talking to your client about the next quarter audit date in April it is frightening. With the problems of flooding around our area and now with the snow and heavy ice in the early morning, driving needs a lot more travelling time allowed. This also applies travelling from client to client. It is interesting when you make that extra time allowance for your travelling, just look at the other drivers and their driving styles and speed. Your will have a smoother safer journey with less stress. Do not forget to clean your side windows and mirrors as they often get caked with the wash off from the windscreen washers and wipers. Your lights need to be checked that they are all working and more than likely need to be cleaned. I am sorry if I am talking to the converted but for the rest of you, please just take time out to check your car. In our business it is very important that our vehicles are in full working order. Looking at the front page of this issue, there is nothing like going to work in a bulldozer. A bit drastic just because the stocktaker was due in at 8.00 am for the year end audit. Joking apart, it would be interesting to find out just how much his anger cost him in the end. It is good to have Bruce well enough again to be able to write his Secretary’s Corner this month. This month’s issue is good but just make sure you read the issue in February. More about this year’s AGM to be held at the Crieff Hydro Hotel in Perthshire, Scotland can be found on pages 8 and 9. The legend of Bonnie Price Charlie will be on page 10. To have Trevor Knight’s ‘The New Generation’ on Scotland’s Western Isles is very well timed. I for one will be looking forward to tasting the local brews.n

Special thanks to the contributors to this issue Norman Clements Trevor Knight Poppleston Allen Bruce Thompson Brenda Perrott

VICE CHAIRMAN George Giles FILSA 16 Mere Drive Fallowfield Pity Me Durham DH1 5DD Tel: 0191 386 7699 Secretary & Treasurer Bruce Thompson FILSA MHCIMA BII 7 Comely Bank Place Edinburgh EH4 1DT Tel: 0131 315 2600 Fax: 0131 315 4346 ADMINISTRATION Gina Pugalis

Chris Swift FILSA 13 Moor Top Road Norton Tower Halifax HX2 0NP Tel: 01422 363034 Trevor Perrott FILSA Stockwell House Kingfield Road Kingfield Woking GU22 9AB Tel: 01483 770102 Ron Foster FILSA 2 The Close Lydiard Millicent Swindon SN5 3NJ Tel: 01793 771959 David Downard MILSA 5 Heathtolt Cottages Park Lane Maplehurst Horsham Tel: 07973 206914 Neil Johnson FILSA 26 Rayner Road Brighouse West Yorks HD6 4AT Tel: 01484 384060 David Ganney MILSA 42 Manor Drive Ewell Court Epsom Surrey KT19 0ET Tel: 02083 938361

Editor: Trevor Perrott Tel/Fax: 01483 770102 E-mail STOCKWELLSERVICE@aol.com Mobile: 07802 709459 Advertising and Production: Alec Crighton Tel/Fax: 01227 794714 E-mail alec@stockauditor.org.uk Mobile: 07754 123043 Accounts: Bruce Thompson Tel: 0131 315 2600 Fax: 0131 315 4346 E-mail: StockAudit@aol.com Printed by:

White Horse Press Ltd 65-67 John Wilson Business Park Chestfield Whitstable Kent CT5 3QT

STOP PRESS The Institute of Licensed Trade Stock Auditors is now a Corporate Member of the British Institute of Innkeeping. This will have huge benefits for every ILTSA member. Do not miss February’s issue of your magazine.

All Subscriptions payable in advance. Published 12 times per year post free: Annual subscription £24 ISSN 1471-0471 © Institute of Licensed Trade Stock Auditors, 2002

This magazine is published by the Institute of Licensed Trade Stock Auditors. Whilst welcoming any contributions, the editor reserves the right to alter or amend them if necessary. Any opinions expressed are not necessarily those of the Council and are accepted only on that understanding. No part of this magazine may be reproduced or transmitted without written permission of the publishers.

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The Institute of Licensed Trade Stock Auditors January 2003


SECRETARY’S CORNER

by Bruce Thompson

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nother Christmas and another New Year over, and no regrets for saying thank goodness. It is always a difficult time both job wise and socially. Everyone seems to stock up to the hilt and then purchase nothing in January making life a bit easier at the beginning of the year. Due to an enforced break from work, I have had the whole of December off and am not permitted to think about stocktaking until March. Quite a formidable problem for the self employed – not only financially, but also ensuring that there is work to come back to. In this respect being a member of the Institute has been invaluable and I have to thank those three or four members who are filling the gap so as to ensure that my clients are properly serviced. I might take this opportunity too, to say how much I appreciated the many letters and phone calls I received from members. Spending ten days in hospital quite seriously ill, and having to cope with a long period of recuperation is not easy and it is nice to know that so many are thinking of you. There was a very productive Council meeting at the end of November, held in Uttoxeter, and it would seem that much of the hard work put in by Council members is beginning to reap its rewards. It commenced with tributes to John Tandy who had recently died and being heavily involved with the Institute and a good friend to all the Council, it was unanimously agreed that his strengths be recognised and that his views be taken into account when considering ongoing issues. Amongst his many responsibilities was training, and the Chairman was able to say how successful these seminars had been and that the standards now set would be difficult to improve on within current financial restraints. The current membership is 389 made up of 122 Fellows, 163 Members, 66 Associates, 8 Honorary Members, 18 Retired members, 1 Corporate Member, 3 Honorary Corporate Members and 8 Subscribers. During the year 3 members had been expelled and 6 Associates had had their names removed from the register. Another 5 were to suffer

the same fate due to their not having taken the examination within the prescribed time. During 2003, examinations are to be held in both Ilkley and in the South. The standard of examinee was high during the current year and Linda Mutch who works for a Stockcheck Franchisee is to be congratulated on winning the much coveted George Webber Award. From North Wales, Linda achieved the incredible mark of 86.2% and will receive her personal trophy and a contribution towards the cost of the A.G.M., where we hope she will take the main plaque from last year’s winner, Ian Telford. Sales of merchandise continue to increase and a sharp eye is to be kept on costs to see if any savings can be made. With this in mind the Institute is to change banks and as from 1s t January will be dealing with The Royal Bank of Scotland rather than the Clydesdale. Much discussion evolved round marketing with Chris Swift giving the Council an update. Adverts continue in the Morning Advertiser and Publican. The group advert has been extremely successful and several one off features have appeared in the Trade Press. The web site has been very well received and is considered to be the way forward despite its ongoing cost. It is value for money and has had almost 7,000 visitors since its launch in June. The Search Engine placement is working well and the name of the Institute has leapt above many established companies and organisations using it. The members forum is under used and Chris is looking at ways to increase its popularity. Discussions were going ahead with the BII and David Ganney was convinced that there was vast scope for contact and mutual benefit. The members would of course be advised of progress as soon as appropriate, once further meetings had been held. Neil Johnson was in discussion with Enterprise Inns and Pubmaster and hoped that benefits to members would materialise from these sources. Norman Clements has on behalf of the Institute joined the British Association of Hospitality Accountants (B.A.H.A.) with a view to promoting our activities.

Options regarding Professional Indemnity Insurance are being looked at and David Downard is preparing a leaflet detailing benefits and incentives available to members. The problems with Viking Direct have now been eradicated and the Council hope that all members will use the scheme so that bigger discounts can be negotiated at the 12 month review. Corporate sponsorship has been considered, but was for the time being put on the back boiler. Membership cards are considered important and are likely to be introduced, free to members, within the very near future. A Code of Practice and Letter of Engagement are both under review as is some system of ongoing training. Norman Clements, on behalf of the Institute, had been involved in two arbitration cases, both ongoing. Each was caused by bad stocktaking – not Institute members – and in one case a claim of £36K has been made against the Stocktaking Company involved. He has also been consulted re the valuation of two stocktaking businesses, both for sale. It is nice that the ILTSA is being used by lawyers and National Breweries where an arbitration service is required. A revised and updated Code of Conduct is now ready, and subject to approval by solicitors, will soon be distributed throughout the membership. Further discussions have been had with Inland Revenue and Customs & Excise and Steve Berry hopes the Institute will gain considerable credibility through this liaison. Arrangements for the 50th A.G.M. to be held at Crieff Hydro in Scotland are progressing well. A good turnout is anticipated to what is expected to be a fantastic weekend with great excursions held in one of Scotland’s top hotels. The all day excursion on Friday is now planned and will include a tour through the delightful Trossachs charting the footsteps of Rob Roy – one of Scotland’s greatest characters. The next meeting is scheduled for 11th April 2003.n

The Institute of Licensed Trade Stock Auditors January 2003

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NEWS ROUND UP Carling targets Scotland

CAMRA aims to unite brewers

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arling has emphatically launched a fullblooded assault north of the border, signing shirt sponsorship deals with Scotland’s two biggest football clubs. Fierce Glaswegian rivals Celtic and Rangers, known as the Old Firm, have signed a £12m three-year shirt sponsorship deal that will start at the beginning of July. Carling is Britain’s biggest selling lager but has virtually no presence in Scotland, where rival Tennent’s dominates. Coors, which owns the Carling brand, is looking to become a major player in the Scottish lager market and is using the deal to raise the profile of the brand. “We are excited about working with the Old Firm in Scotland,” said Mark Hunter, Coors’ marketing and international development director. “Both Rangers and Celtic are known the world over so, with Carling’s heritage in football and its availability in over 20 countries this is a great chance for three major names to work together to the benefit of Scottish football.” Carling replaces NTL as the main sponsor of both clubs.n

he Campaign for Real Ale (CAMRA), is urging all brewers to unite behind an industry-wide generic campaign aimed at promoting beer and stemming its long-term decline. CAMRA is keen to be involved in a conference of key players to discuss the success of campaigns such as “Ask if it’s Cask” initiative, which it claims is recognised by more than 12 million people, Real Beer Week and Beer Naturally. Mike Benner, head of campaigns and communications, said: “It’s great to see top names in the industry calling for a more united approach and we now need to see some action by bringing brewers and trade associations together to thrash out the issues and make concrete plans for a co-ordinated generic campaign for beer.” The move by CAMRA follows similar calls from industry chiefs. A number of national brewers are in advanced discussions with the 33 members of the Independent Family Brewers of Britain about a similar campaign headed by the British Beer and Pub Association (BBPA). “We need to act collectively or the public will soon get confused about the message from too

New Products New look for Boddingtons

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nterbrew has launched a glamorous new font, incorporating a cylinder-less beer engine, for its Boddingtons keg brand as part of a £14m marketing programme. The company has unveiled a new illuminated countermount complete with an updated pull handle and Boddingtons badge. New “Cool-to-tap” technology, designed to ensure the beer is dispensed at exactly the right temperature (10-12 degrees) is also being trialled exclusively in the Granada region.

many different campaigns and we can all benefit from a more co-ordinated approach,” added Mr Benner. “I think it is important that a generic campaign is not led by a particular brewer or trade association. A start-up conference should be driven by an independent facilitator, so that all parties can come to the table as equals.” John Roberts, beer and brands director at Fuller’s, welcomed CAMRA’s efforts but argued that any campaign should fall under the control of the BBPA. He said: “It needs to be centrally controlled through a trade body and the BBPA seems the obvious choice as that’s what it was set up to do. CAMRA has ruffled lots of feathers in the past and I don’t think national brewers would be comfortable with it representing the industry.” Mr Roberts also called for a marketing code of conduct that will ensure companies promote beer constructively and bring an end to advertising featuring “lager louts with beer bellies”. He added: “Fuller’s would support a fighting fund for a generic campaign financed by the entire industry. Fuller’s is committed to contributing its proportional weight for the good of the industry. If people choose not to invest then the whole thing will fall down and we might as well pack up and go home.” When asked about a possible generic marketing campaign, Greene King’s brewing and brands managing director Rooney Anand was quoted on thePublican.com last month as saying: “We should continue to work together to improve quality through bodies such as Cask Marque but the future is going to rely on individual companies building strong brands and promoting them in innovative ways. “Our success with, and the continued growth of IPA, Abbot Ale, Old Speckled Hen and Ruddles County will do more for the cask beer category than any generic campaign we could be part of.”n

Allan Tudor, on-trade sales director at Interbrew, said: “We are increasing the visibility of Boddingtons and communicating a more contemporary brand image to ensure it is relevant and appealing to our core drinkers as well as a new generation of emerging drinkers and to help stockists of Boddingtons develop their draught ale business. “The use of cylinder-less beer engine and coolto-tap technology will improve the quality of the drinking experience and help attract new drinkers to the brand”.n

Merchandise

FELLOWSHIP

The following are available through the Institute

All members can apply, after seven years of having qualified, for elevation to Fellowship. In return we give you:

Goods Received Pads - £7.00 Bar Requisition Books - £5.50 Dipsticks - £18.50 “Taking Stock” books - £18.00 Hydrometers - £83.43*

All prices include VAT (where applicable) and postage 10% discount to Associates and Members 15% discount to Fellows Discount only applies to merchandise i.e. no discount on ties or Taking Stock. *Direct from Stevenson Reeves N.B. The hydrometer price includes VAT, T 0131 667 9225 F 0131 662 4908 delivery and10% discount

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15% off all merchandise purchased through the Institute; Members brochure - asterisk beside your name; Highlighted entry in Licensee advertisement; Certificate of Fellowship; Status within the profession; Use of the designation FILSA A quick note or ‘phone call to the Secretary starts the ball rolling, so if you qualify do it today.

The Institute of Licensed Trade Stock Auditors January 2003


Success for Leicester Police News from Poppleston Allen

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ou may recall an article by Jeremy in January of last year after Leicester Police objected to a new licence in the entertainment centre of Leicester; that licence was granted, but Leicester Constabulary took on board criticism of their approach to the objection and have now succeeded in stopping a new licence on the High Street in the centre of Leicester His Honour Judge Wide sitting with 4 Justices at the Leicester Crown Court on Thursday 19th December upheld the decision made in September of this year by the Leicester Licensing Committee to refuse a new licence in the High Street. The Police had objected to the application for a new Justices on Licence and Special Hours Certificate until 2:00am the following morning on the basis that the location would increase the likelihood of violence and disorder in the city centre. There had been no objection by the police to the applicant for the premises, or even the proposals for the premises themselves. This followed publicity about their concerns over rising levels of drink related disorder. The appellant decided to appeal to the Crown Court, who gave a long judgement in support of the police. The issue for the court was whether the grant of this licence and certificate would significantly make worst crime and disorder in the centre of Leicester. The police objected on the basis that the High Street was part of a beat within the crime hotspot of Leicester. Statistics for assault and disorder have climbed over the last 5 years, and the police have noted that the majority of these assaults are alcohol related, and occur between 10:00pm and 3:00am the following morning. The rising statistics reflect the rise in the number of

licensed premises within the centre of Leicester. Inspector Damon Tilly began his responsibility for policing the city centre 4 years ago. He spearheaded a plan to create a safer and more welcoming city centre. Policing disorder became his top priority and he wanted to deal with the lack of respect shown to the police, the abuse, the incidents which decent people find so distressing, and foulmouthed and antisocial behaviour. By juggling funds, Leicester Police have invested a great deal of money and manpower into Leicester City Centre, particularly on Friday and Saturday nights. The policy has had an impact, and the situation has improved, but the problems have by no means disappeared. Inspector Tilly and PC Pigullem are hands on, active Police Officers, regularly patrolling the streets. Their evidence of disorder and assaults in the city centre led the Judge and the Magistrates to accept their opposition. In the detailed and careful judgement, the Judge felt that to isolate what is at the moment a quiet part of the High Street and treat it differently from the city centre would be artificial and fly in the face of common sense . It is regarded by the police as an integral part of the city centre which needed policing as part of the hotspot. Policing those areas continues to be a huge drain on resources which are not limitless. It is not reasonable to expect unlimited funds to be available to flood the area with police to maintain order. Accordingly the court were convinced that to grant this licence would make the

situation worse. This was a very significant judgement for licence applications in the centre of Leicester, and possibly elsewhere. Damon Tilly made it clear he does not wish to oppose all applications. Each one will be looked at on its merits and if the premises are in a less sensitive location the Police may well not object. In representing the police in this case, I felt that the situation in Leicester closely reflected that in other city and town centres around the country. The explosion of new licensed premises around the country in the last few years is now giving cause for concern. Operators feel that the competition is becoming too fierce. A number of major players have halted their development programmes, and one only has to look at the sort of drink offers and promotions available on high streets to see that the battle for customers has been joined. Nottingham Police have already registered their concerns in the centre of their city, and two applications for substantial nightclubs await the decision of the Nottingham Crown Court on their appeals, to be heard in March 2003. In my view it is essential that anyone looking to acquire new premises in central positions within the main circuit areas needs to have a detailed discussion with the police before committing themselves to any expense in relation to the premises. The Police in partnership with other authorities can give a clear indication to potential operators of the concerns in the area over disorder, and it will be a foolish operator who challenges the Police before the Committees without very careful consideration and supporting evidence.n

The Institute of Licensed Trade Stock Auditors January 2003

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BEWARE! Do Not Be Misled Says - Brenda Perrot

Data Protection Act Registration Service Data Protection Agency Services Ltd Data Collection Enforcement Agency DPA Registration Agency Data Protection Act Registration Agency Data Protection Registration Agency Data Registration Agency It has come to our attention that members have been receiving correspondence from any one of the listed agency’s requesting them to register with them under the Data Protection Act 1984 for a fee of £95. This request comes in an official looking printed envelope which contains a form headed Final Notice and informs you that a failure to register is a criminal offence which has a fine of anything up to £5,000. Elizabeth France the Information Commissioner has made it clear that there is no connection between her office and any of these businesses and she advises you to ignore any approach made by any of these agency’s. Under certain circumstances if you need to register there is a fee of £35. If any one receives one of these requests or is unsure whether they should be registered please contact your local Trading Standards Office who have all the answers. Look up www.dataprotection.gov.uk for more information.

ACCOUNT MANAGER SELLS THE SPITFIRE SHIRT OFF HIS BACK! Demand for all things Spitfire was so high at the recent BBC Good Food Show at the NEC Birmingham that the Spitfire sales team literally had to sell the shirts off their backs! Gary Wells, take-home general manager at Shepherd Neame and his team – account managers Steve Walmsley, Karl

Young and new executive Jo Edens were extremely busy on the Spitfire stand. By the end of the show they had sold over 2000 bottles of Spitfire Premium Ale and dispensed in excess of 10,000 bottles. Says Gary, “I couldn’t believe it when I saw Steve stripping his Spitfire t-shirt off

to sell to a customer on the last day of the show - we’d completely exhausted our supply of branded t-shirts. “ It’s proof of both the cult following that Spitfire has built up and that the Spitfire take-home team are always hungry to make a sale!” n

Membership Corner Exam passes October 2002 Mike Smith - North Allerton - North Yorkshire Karl Lenden-Hitchcock - Hampton Hill - Middlesex Oliver Foss - Allestree - Derby Mike Sargent - Weston Super Mare - North Somerset

Discount for Members at Viking Direct A discount agreement for members has been arranged with Viking Direct – the UK’s leading mail order supplier of office products. In addition to Viking’s standard terms of trade the agreement includes:10% extra discount on Viking prices Free delivery on any order of £20 (exc. VAT) or more Overnight delivery in most areas – same day delivery is available in areas around Greater Manchester, Liverpool, the Midlands and within the M25. (Full details are available in Viking’s catalogues) The offer does not include the Viking Price Buster catalogue and the Machine Sales catalogues In order to qualify for the discounts members who are existing customers of Viking Direct will need to notify the call centre representatives that they are members of ILTSA and wish to be registered into the scheme at the time an order is placed. New customers would also need to notify Viking in the same way. You can contact Viking Direct as follows:Order line 0800 424444 free fax line 0800 622211 Web site www.viking-direct.co.uk

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The Institute of Licensed Trade Stock Auditors January 2003


A letter from the President re. BAHA You may not have heard of BAHA - I certainly had not until the summer of last year. It stands for The British Association of Hospitality Accountants and I first saw a mention of this in the Hospitality Magazine when the Chief Executive, David Wood retired to become the new CE of BAHA. Sorry about all the initials but as I am a member of the Hotels and Catering Institute (HCIMA) I rang David to find out more and he sent me the Annual Report together with other details. The BAHA was formed in 1969 with the aim of bringing together those professionals who were involved in Financial Management in the Hotel Industry. At present it has 711 members made up of Finance Directors, Food & Beverage Controllers, Hotel Valuers and Internal Auditors - to mention just a few. At our Council Meeting in July I suggested that we ought to pursue an affiliation of our two bodies and your Council gave me the go ahead to join BAHA on behalf of ourselves and I am pleased to say I am now an Associate Member. On reading through its Journal I can see they have a very varied programme for 2003 not to mention some interesting subjects at such places as the Savoy in London and to NFC in Birmingham! I am sure that we will benefit a great deal from this ‘link’ and I look forward to giving you more information in the near future.

Norman

D a l m o r e Distillery Breaks Record with Sale Of Rarest Ever Highland Malt Master distiller Richard Paterson

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ne of the oldest and most exclusive bottles of single malt whisky – The Dalmore 62 years old - was sold on, 4th December 2002, at McTear’s auction in Glasgow for £25,877.50. The Dalmore 62 years old went under the hammer to an anonymous bidder, beating the previous record achieved by The Macallan of £20,000 earlier last year. Three people bid over £20,000 which in itself beat the previous highest bid for a single malt whisky. The rare spirit, of which there are only 12 bottles, is derived from rackings of 1868, 1878, 1926 and 1939 Dalmore. Over the years it has been racked several times eventually finishing in an Oloroso Matusalem Sherry butt from Gonzalez Byass, Spain. The spirit has been distilled and matured at The Dalmore distillery, Alness, Ross-shire, and bottled at natural cask strength of 40.5% volume. The 163-year old distillery at Dalmore will retain one bottle and the remaining 10 are expected to be purchased by investors from around the world. Commenting on this historic release, Richard Paterson, Master Distiller for The Dalmore, said,

“The release of such a limited quantity of The Dalmore 62 Years Old will become ingrained in the history of The Dalmore distillery and further strengthen the Malt’s credentials across the globe. This exceptional malt is without doubt one of the finest and oldest in the world and as such we are anticipating significant interest from the whisky fraternity worldwide. Whisky collecting has become a fashionable investment, with the market growing in value over the past decade, faster than many of the world’s leading stock exchanges.” Each of the 12 bottles is individually named after famous characters and events in the distillery’s history. The twelve bottles are named: The Matheson; The Ardross Estate; The Kildermorie; The Alexander III; The Cromarty; The Sinclair; The Mackenzie; The Alness; The 12 Pointer; The Barnard; The 1839 and The Black Knight. The exclusive malt is presented in specially commissioned, hand blown bottles with unique illustrations representing the characters from the distillery’s history and signed by award winning Master Distiller, Richard Paterson.n

Regional Reps SCOTLAND SOUTH Alan Brown 01968 676008 NORTH Andrew Wardrope 01540 661625 EIRE Martin Kirwin 00353 419843734 IRELAND - NORTH Martin Dinsmore 028 703 56957 CHANNEL ISLANDS Fiona Sturreck 01534 605065 WALES NORTH Dave Barnett 01654 710228 ENGLAND Bedfordshire Barry Ross 01234 344663 Buckinghamshire Norman Clements 01491 575451 Cambridgeshire John Glaysher 01206 211564 Cornwall & Devon Paul Gilder 01726 843366 Derbyshire Leslie Kerr 01332 292233 Devon & Berkshire Norman Clements 01491 575451 Dorset Richard Grafton 01305 813225 Gloucester & Hereford Danny Knight 01452 521080 Hampshire Jeff Batchelor 01329 314816 Hertfordshire Martin Roslyn 0121 744 4896 Kent & Essex Anton Ellender 01303 277382

Lancashire & Cumbria Les Graham 01253 899880 Leicestershire George Abel 01664 850120 Lincolnshire Chris Machin 01777 817821 London & Middlesex John Walden 0208 318 7172 Midlands & Warwickshire Martin Roslyn 0121 744 4896 Northamptonshire Stuart Chapman 01327 830159 Nottinghamshire David Scott 01283 224732 Oxfordshire Norman Clements 01491 575451 Somerset David Mills 01373 300035 South Humberside Graham Potter 01482 815411 Staffordshire Brian Daykin 0121 4226421 Suffolk & Norfolk Pat Simmons 01508 489628 Surrey Roy Smith 01932 570900 Sussex John Fincham 01273 304344 Tyne & Wear Charles Robinson 01670 783427 Wiltshire Mike Farley 01793 615731 Worcestershire Bill Spry 01684 298583 Yorkshire - North Kate Watson 01924 366068 Yorkshire - West & South Rita Broadbent 01274 870989

The Institute of Licensed Trade Stock Auditors January 2003

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ILTSA GOLDEN ANNIVERSARY PROVISIONAL AGENDA – AGM 14TH MAY – 18TH MAY 2003

GOLDEN PACKAGE

SUPER PACKAGE

(4 nights of fun touring and celebration)

(3 nights of fun and celebration)

Wednesday

Thursday

10.00 am - collection at Edinburgh Airport or arrangements will be

Afternoon trip to Scotland’s oldest distillery and

made to leave cars in Edinburgh Transfer to city centre – luggage storage

‘THE GROUSE EXPERIENCE’ Friday

Visit to the famous

CALEDONIAN BREWERY Depart Edinburgh – 75 minute journey to

CRIEFF HYDRO

All day excursion incl coach, lunch and drink

ROB ROY COUNTRY Scottish dinner and ceilidh

Saturday

Thursday Free morning – use hotel activities * Tour or visit local Visitor Centre * Afternoon trip to Scotland’s oldest distillery and

‘THE GROUSE EXPERIENCE’

AGM, buffet lunch and free afternoon – friends, partners and children morning visit to

SCONE PALACE Private dinner with disco (1.00 am) Includes three nights dinner, bed and breakfast Thursday-Friday-Saturday

Friday All day excursion incl coach, lunch and drink

ROB ROY COUNTRY Scottish dinner and ceilidh

Saturday

STANDARD PACKAGE

AGM, buffet lunch and free afternoon – friends, partners and children morning visit to

(for those with little time to spare)

SCONE PALACE

Saturday

Private dinner with disco (1.00 am)

AGM, buffet lunch and free afternoon – friends, partners and children morning visit to

Sunday

SCONE PALACE

Morning transport to Edinburgh Airport arriving approx 1.00 pm

Private dinner with disco (1.00 am)

Includes four nights dinner, bed and breakfast Wednesday-Thursday-Friday-Saturday

Includes two nights dinner, bed and breakfast Friday-Saturday with Scottish dinner and Ceilidh on the first night

COST Golden Package Super Package Standard Package Extra nights DBB

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* not included in cost £399 per person £280 per person £170 per person £75 per person

All meals offer wine and choice of menu (no pre booking) except Friday when dinner will be set and on a Scottish theme Other than Thursday morning, each package is inclusive of excursions and all other mentioned activities, also VAT and service

The Institute of Licensed Trade Stock Auditors January 2003


50 YEARS OF RAISING STOCKTAKING STANDARDS “A CELEBRATION”

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he Golden package includes four nights of fun, sightseeing and massive celebrations. A shorter stay will not mar the experience – whilst missing out on a few activities you will still participate in the extravaganza to be held in one of Scotland’s finest hotels, and see your Institute roll into its second half century. For those able to afford the time, the anniversary experience commences at 10.00 am on Wednesday 14th May when we will meet you at Edinburgh airport, or if you drive arrange for free parking in the city. Enjoy an hour or two in Scotland’s Capital and make your way to the Caledonian Brewery winner of several awards for its excellent beer, from where you will be transferred to Crieff Hydro; a fabulous hotel in fabulous surroundings. Voted best Independent Hotel of the year in 1998; this venue has 222 bedrooms, all en-suite and boasts the best leisure and sporting facilities available today. This really is the best hotel we have ever visited for an AGM and is ideal for celebrating our fiftieth anniversary.

Ó Ó Ó After an excellent dinner, a good nights sleep and full Scottish breakfast, we leave you to do your own thing on Thursday morning. Whether it be golf, off road driving, swimming or just relaxing its entirely up to you, but if you wish to wander from the hotel complex there are many attractions nearby including a local visitor centre. Early afternoon we will take a 20 minute woodland walk (transport available if required) to Scotland’s oldest distillery ‘Glenturret’. A buffet lunch will be served prior to our viewing the whisky process and then visiting ‘The Famous Grouse Experience’, an attraction only opened in June 2002. You will hear the full story of Scotland’s favourite whisky traditionally distilled in this beautiful Scottish countryside. You can join the famous Grouse in his world, and experience the sites and sounds of Scotland whilst flying with him. This charismatic game bird inspired Matthew Gloag to create the perfect dram in 1800. Over 200

years later the famous Grouse continues to stretch its wings with new exciting products and has settled in its nest in rural Perthshire. You will be able to sample these famous brands so what a good way to spend an afternoon.

100 miles of travel – a fabulous day – a brilliant tour and beautiful countryside – what better? All this followed by a truly Scottish dinner and ceilidh (Scottish country dancing).

Ó Ó Ó

Saturday, with everybody by now well refreshed, sees the serious bit for members. The actual A.G.M. but for partners, children and friends we have arranged a visit to Scone Palace outside Perth. This is a fantastic venue – home of The Earls of Mansfield and crowning site of Kings of Scots. The Palace is full of history with The Old Pretender having spent three weeks here during the 15 Rebellion and his son Bonnie Prince Charlie having visited in 1745. Queen Victoria and Prince Albert were there in 1842 with visits by Royalty having been made ever since. The gardens provide an abundance of activity for children and adults alike. They boast Perthshire’s only maze, designed by world renowned maze designer, Adrian Fisher. There is a children’s adventure playground for which the Palace was awarded the much coveted Sandford Education Award in 2001. Other attractions are the Sanctuary of the Pinctum and the David Douglas exhibition, which outlines the significance of this “Son of Scone” as a botanist and explorer – detailing the story of his life. After visiting this fantastic venue – only a few miles from the hotel, we will return there when all will join together for a buffet lunch and refreshments. The afternoon is free so again do your own thing before dinner and a private disco.

Friday offers what must be one of the most wonderful tours in Scotland. Our route takes us through the haunts and homeland of the legendary Rob Roy. Robert Roy MacGregor was born nearly 200 years ago. He was an outlaw and probably Scotland’s most notorious, but his daring exploits made him a hero to his own people. He was a clan leader, cattle trader, cattle reever and blackmailer. It was the Duke of Montrose who had him outlawed over an unpaid debt and the Duke of Argyll who saved him because of his personal feud with Montrose. Rob Roy scoured The Trossachs, one of Scotland’s most beautiful areas and it is through here that we will travel – following in his footsteps and allowing you some time to visit Callander, a lovely tourist town and gateway to the Trossachs where you can shop, drink, visit the famous Rob Roy Centre or one of the many other tourist attractions.

Ó Ó Ó Our tour will start at the hotel from where we will travel via Dunblane and the ancient castle at Doune to Blair Drummond where we will turn left to Aberfoyle. Having driven past Port of Menteith and the famous Inchmahome Abbey set on Scotland’s only lake, and the once hiding place of Mary Queen of Scots, we will stop at The Covenants Inn in Aberfoyle where the Stone of Destiny was hidden after being stolen from London by Scottish fanatics. Coffee, biscuits or stronger will be available prior to proceeding through the Achray Forest and Pass of Leny to Callander. An appropriate stop will have been made for lunch and refreshments. After a stop in Callander we will return to Crieff via Balquhidder and the Grave of Rob Roy. Loch Earn will be on our right and the whole day will have included only about

Ó Ó Ó

Ó Ó Ó Sunday brings its tears, as we all depart after what will have been a commemoration never to be forgotten. The Institute’s fiftieth anniversary celebrated in style. Good excursions, excellent accommodation, fine food and pleasant company all make for a brilliant occasion so lets acknowledge that with a brilliant turnout. We look forward to seeing you there. n Bruce Thompson

The Institute of Licensed Trade Stock Auditors January 2003

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The Legend of Bonnie Prince Charlie

The Family Way

Trevor Knight brings more news from Britain’s family brewers

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ne of the world’s great romantic legends began on a July day in 1745, when Charles Edward Louis Philip Casimir Stuart (Bonnie Prince Charlie) landed on Scottish soil in an attempt to win the throne of Britain for his father, the son of the deposed James II. Just seven men landed with the prince. It was a desparate and foolhardy venture, but in less than a month, more than one thousand Highland clansmen had rallied to his cause at Glenfinnan. Growing all the time, the prince’s undisciplined troops had routed a Government army and was heading south to England. But at Derby, the prince’s army was heavily outnumbered by George II’s forces and the homesick Highlanders beat a hasty retreat to Scotland. Bonnie Prince Charlie won one more battle at Falkirk before his troops were crushed to defeat at Culloden on April 16, 1746, by the King’s son, the Duke of Cumberland. Over the next five months, Cumberland relentlessly hunted the prince all over the Highlands and Islands, There was a huge price on his head but he was never betrayed. Time and time again the loyal men and women of the clans risked their lives to hide or protect him. The most famous of these was Flora Macdonald who concealed the prince for many weeks on the Isle of Skye after their escape from the mainland. But his wanderings and battles had stretched his endurance to breaking point and he left Scotland for France in September 1746. Charles Edward Stuart lived for another forty futile years, a pathetic hanger-on in the courts of Europe.n

St Austell Brewery – Cornwall

T

he ambition of the Cornish family brewery to produce a beer made entirely of local ingredients has been achieved. St Austell has already found sources of Cornish malting barley and now Prima Donna dwarf hops have been added to the list of ingredients after a successful brewing exhibition was held at the Eden Project. Subsequently, St Austell Lernups was brewed for the fourth annual Celtic Beer Festival which was held in the brewery’s old wine cellars in November. The festival featured the regular St Austell range and specials including the 10% ABV Smugglers’ Barley Wine as well as beers from other ‘Celtic’ brewers in Cornwall, Wales, Scotland, Ireland, the Isle of Man and Brittany.n

Fuller’s – Chiswick and Youngs – Wandsworth Head to head in the capital

I

t was the first time ever that a Youngs beer had ever been served in a Fuller’s pub! But that is exactly what happened one day last September when London’s two oldest breweries, who between them have been brewing beer in the capital for nearly 700 years, met at the Star in Belgravia.

As to be expected in this Fuller’s pub just off Knightsbridge, pride of place at the bar was London Pride, but next to it a 5.6 per cent ABV beer from rival brewer Youngs, brewed to commemorate the Guide’s anniversary. The brainchild of Good Beer Guide editor, Roger Protz, Brakspear was approached in the summer to produce a strong classic, bottle-fermented English ale. They were chosen because their track-record with bottleconditioned beers. Sadly, the plan came to nothing, for we all know what happened to Brakspears. With precious little time to find an alternative brewer, Roger approached Youngs, which jumped at the chance. Six weeks later, Youngs had combined its usual Maris Otter pale malt with Fuggles and Goldings to produce a fantastically drinkable strong ale. At the Star, Fullers head brewer John Keeling said he had never drunk Youngs beer in a Fuller’s glass before. It was only by passing it off as a Fuller’s beer that Youngs could sell it, he teased. The Good Beer Guide’s anniversary beer is available in bottle-conditioned form, exclusively from Safeway – under the title GBG 30.n

Hall and Woodhouse – Blandford St Mary

T

Flora Macdonald bids farewell to Bonnie Prince Charlie - from a painting by G.W.Joy

Page 10

The occasion was a birthday bash to celebrate 30 years of the ‘Good Beer Guide’. A Grade II listed pub, the Star has appeared in every edition of the Guide.

he 100 year old Dorset brewer has launched a training scheme to teach all its pub staff to look after and serve caskconditioned ale. Courses available at the Badger School of Excellence will include basic cellar skills, product knowledge, ale appreciation and tasting, merchandising and cask ale retailing.n

The Institute of Licensed Trade Stock Auditors January 2003


Continued from page 12 gradually opening up. RED CUILLIN (4.2% ABV) is named after the famous hills of the Isle of Skye. It is a smooth malty premium ale which has won many awards.

YOUNG PRETENDER (4% ABV) named after Bonnie Prince Charlie, the driest of the Skye beers has a refreshing hoppy flavour and is golden in colour.

BLAVEN and HEBRIDEAN GOLD complete the cask ale portfolio but the company brew a wide range of seasonal, occasional and house ales. BLACK CUILLIN (4.5% ABV) is the dark one; uniquely brewed with rolled roast oatmeal and honey.

STOP PRESS Black Cuillin from Skye Brewery was voted the Beer of the Festival at the Aberdeen and North East Scotland Beer Festival last autumn. 2,500 visitors lapped up the real ales of Scotland – almost all of the sixty-one real ales at the event came from Scotland.

CLASSIFIED ADS. Cost 50p per word - maximum 100 words. Members free of charge Call 01227 794714 to place an advertisement

If you are a member and are planning to attend the AGM you will miss the trip to Scone Palace. Only your friends, partner and children will go. Don’t miss out go to www.scone-palace.net/

And don’t forget www.iltsa.co.uk

Ha ve you ra d. h ere For marketing assistance, web site design, advertisement design etc.

Have your Classified ad. here

The Institute of Licensed Trade Stock Auditors January 2003

Page 11


The New Generation

Trevor Knight continues his journey across the country in search of the new breed of Britain’s brewers Part Two – Scotland’s Western Isles

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he Hebrides are the main group of islands off the west coast of Scotland. The Outer Hebrides are a wild, rugged colourful collection of islands stretching 130 miles from the Butt of Lewis in the north, to Barra Head in the South. The islands long, sandy beaches vary in colour from gold to silver-white. The seaboard waters abounding with trout and salmon, are shades of blue and green. Westward, the shores are pounded by the full force of the Atlantic, deeply slashed by sea lochs and studded with pretty inlets. The two largest islands of Lewis and Harris are rich with places of historical and archaeological interest. These include the 5,000 year old Standing Stones of Calanais, and, also on the west coast of Lewis, the 2,000 year old Carloway Broch, a drystone fortified tower, dating back to the Iron Age. On Harris, which is joined to Lewis, the landscape changes to bare hills and grand dramatic peaks, some over 2,000 feet high. Among the numerous small lakes are a wealth of prehistoric remains. North Uist, Benbecula, South Uist and Barra make up the remaining islands in the chain. The Vikings knew the value of these unique islands claiming them as their own in the ninth century and only handing them over to Scotland in 1280. Today, the ancient Gaelic tongue is still alive and well, spoken by the majority of the islanders; an important historical thread throughout every aspect of island life and culture. The largest island of Lewis is thirty miles long and twenty-eight miles wide. Away from the rugged sea cliffs, countless small lochs dot the rolling, inland peat moors where trees are rare. The small but important town of Stornaway is the unofficial capital of Lewis and the centre of the Harris Tweed industry. The weaving of the world famous cloth is still carried out in the gaily-painted cottages in the numerous villages all over the island. But the spinning and finishing of the cloth is completed in the mills in Stornaway The town is also an important port and the twomile long natural harbour has made it the centre of the Hebridean fishing industry. Stornaway is also the home of the only brewery in the Outer Hebrides. The HEBRIDEAN BREWING COMPANY was set up in 2001 by Andrew Ribbens whose family originated from Lewis.

Page 12

CELTIC BLACK ALE (3.9% ABV) has been

Andrew spent much of his early life staying at his grandfather’s croft. A few years ago he travelled to Lewis with some friends for a holiday and whilst sitting in a pub, the subject of real ale and the lack of it on the island was discussed, and the idea of a local brewery was born. The opportunity for Andrew to fulfil his dream arose when he took redundancy from the pharmaceutical company where he worked, preferring not to relocate. But his Stornaway dream had been set and he embarked on a period of study and research into the brewing business. With the experience gained at two independent breweries (Freeminer in Gloucestershire and Flagship at Chatham in Kent), he moved to Stornaway and started the Hebridean Brewing Company in 2001. After initial delays Andrew began brewing in January 2002. Two cask ales are produced regularly and plans for bottling production are under way.

CLANSMAN is a 3.9% ABV golden Hebridean

bitter, brewed with Scottish malts. It is a light, session beer with plenty of hop and malt character.

ISLANDER is a strong premium ale which is

4.8% ABV. Brewed with special coloured Scots malt, it is deep ruby in colour and predominantly malty flavoured with robust hoppiness.

recently developed as a porter style ale. Regular vehicle ferries link all the islands of the Hebrides, so from Stornaway’s harbour we head east on our island journey to Skye, the largest of the Inner Hebridean islands. Numerous small islands to the south of Skye make up the group. The Gaelic name for Skye means ‘The Isle of Mist’ and clouds often cover the peaks of its Cuillin Hills. The 4,000 year history of the island is misty too, with colourful fact and mystic legend mingled together. There is, for example, the legend of the ‘Fairy Flag’ which brings victory to the Clan Macleod in battle. The flag is still preserved in the clan’s stronghold of Dunvegan Castle where it has been for more than 600 years. No other castle in Scotland can boast a longer record of continuous occupation by the same family. There is, too, the true story of Bonnie Prince Charlie. On the run following his defeat at Culloden, Flora Macdonald took the fugitive prince ‘over the sea to Skye’, disguised as her maid. It was to Monkratadt House, near the village of Uig, that Flora brought the prince, hiding him for many weeks. Uig, on Trotternish, the largest Skye peninsular,

is also the ferry port for the outer Hebrides. It was here, in 1995, that the ISLE OF SKYE BREWERY was established. Two teachers from the island’s main village of Portree set up a partnership in purpose-built premises on the pier at Uig. Beer production began in December 1995, but 12 months later, one of the partners withdrew leaving the remaining founder, Angus MacRuary to take on the sole ownership. In 1998 the brewery became incorporated and expanded into bottling. Angus then resigned from his teaching post to concentrate full-time on the brewery. Skye Brewery continues to expand and now supplies cask ales to eleven hotels on the island with many others stocking the bottle range. Wholesalers also supply outlets throughout mainland Britain and the overseas market is

The Institute of Licensed Trade Stock Auditors January 2003

Continued on page 11


ISSN 1471-0471

THE MAGAZINE FOR THE INSTITUTE OF LICENSED TRADE STOCK AUDITORS www.iltsa.co.uk

Issue 45 - February 2003

NORTH SOUTH DRINK DIVIDE N

ortherners are the country’s heaviest drinkers – with around half the men and a quarter of women drinking above medically recommended safe levels – and with young people following in their parents’ footsteps. Yet, despite this predominance of heavy drinking in the north, the majority of help-giving alcohol agencies remain in the south. These are among the key messages contained in Alcohol Concern’s latest State of the Nation report - launched at the charity’s annual conference. The conference forms part of Alcohol Concern’s contribution to the government’s recently announced consultation on a new national alcohol harm reduction strategy. It will bring together alcohol workers and campaigners from across the country to discuss the need to coordinate national and local alcohol misuse strategies. In terms of regional differences, the report reveals that 46% of men and 28% of women living on Merseyside are drinking above medically recommended safe levels. Also drinking above these levels are 45% of men and 27% of women in other parts of the north-west. The north-east is close behind, with 44% of men and 26% of women drinking over the limits. Figures for Yorkshire and Humber are 42% for men and 23% for women. Respective figures in other areas are: East Midlands (43% men/ 23% women), West Midlands (35% men/19%women), London (31% men/19% women) South West (35% men/21% women), South East (39% men/23% women), East England (31% men/20% women). The latest figures also indicate that young people in the north are following in their parents’ footsteps. The numbers of 11-15 year olds admitting that they drink alcohol at least once a week are: Region % that drank at least once a week: North East 26% Yorkshire and Humber 21% North West 20% West Midlands 20% South West 19% East Midlands 19% South East East Wales London In spite of these regional figures,

19% 18% 17% 12% a disproportionate number of the

country’s 507 alcohol counselling and treatment services – 28.5% - are in London and the south-east. Just 8.8% are in the Lancashire and Greater Manchester areas, 3.9% in Tyne and Wear and 3.1% in the West Midlands. The remaining 50%-plus are scattered over 65 other parts of the country. This mismatch between drinking consumption and support is one of the many reasons why effective national and local alcohol strategies are needed urgently – says Alcohol Concern’s Chief Executive, Eric Appleby. He explains: “We have a history in this country of dealing with the symptoms of alcohol misuse rather than the root causes – and this means that we have generally been on the back foot, trying to respond to problems as best we can. The Government’s welcome consultation on an alcohol harm reduction strategy gives us an unprecedented opportunity to move on to the front foot – to place much more emphasis on issues such as prevention and education – and to coordinate what we do at national government and local levels.” He adds: “Currently several different government departments have responsibility for different aspects of alcohol problems – while at a local level alcohol services often don’t know where next year’s funding is coming from. Only when we have an effective strategy in place will issues such as this be properly addressed. Our State of the Nation report and annual conference are ways of bringing the main issues to the fore – and bringing together people at the coalface to suggest solutions to the government.” Other figures in State of the Nation show: 1 person in 13 is dependent on alcohol – twice as many as are hooked on all other drugs, including prescription drugs 40% of people perpetrating violent crimes were under the influence of alcohol, according to their victims 60% of employers say they experience problems with employees’ drinking Almost 1,000,000 children are living with parents who misuse alcohol 1 in 6 of all people killed on the roads are victims of drink-drive accidents Death rates from chronic liver disease have soared since the 1970s – with an eight-fold increase among men aged 35-44 and a seven-fold rise among women in the same age group.n

In this issue Secretary’s Corner News Round UP Opportunities for Stock Auditors

Page 3 Page 4 Page 6

CAMRA National Pubs Week AA Cover for ILTSA Members The New Generation

Page 7 Page 9 Page 10

The Institute of Licensed Trade Stock Auditors February 2003

Page 1


Editor’s View

Trevor Perrott

The Magazine of: The Institute of Licensed Trade Stock Auditors 7 Comely Bank Place Edinburgh EH4 1DT Tel: 0131 315 2600 Fax: 0131 315 4346 Website: www.iltsa.co.uk E-mail address: info@iltsa.co.uk PRESIDENT Norman Clements FILSA MHCIMA 105 St. Andrew’s Road Henley on Thames Oxon RG9 1PN Tel: 01491 628660 (Business) Tel: 01491 575451 (Home) Council of Management CHAIRMAN Steve Berry FILSA 15 Deanburn Walk Bo’ness West Lothian EH51 0NB Tel: 0131 477 2895 (Business) Tel: 01506 825227 (Home) VICE CHAIRMAN George Giles FILSA 16 Mere Drive Fallowfield Pity Me Durham DH1 5DD Tel: 0191 386 7699 Secretary & Treasurer Bruce Thompson FILSA MHCIMA BII 7 Comely Bank Place Edinburgh EH4 1DT Tel: 0131 315 2600 Fax: 0131 315 4346

I

hope no one suffered too much over the last few weeks with the bad weather. On the Thursday of the severe cold snap when the M11 came to a stand still, it took me seven hours to drive down the M1 which was only six junctions to get home that evening. Going there that morning was only fifty-five minutes. The amount of black ice stretching right across the M1 south bound was horrific. You always know when you are driving on ice because you can not hear any tyre noise at all. This month our office has been plagued with the computer virus called W32.Klez.gen@mm, which I would not like any one to have. The different ways it effects the computer is frightening. Symantec – Norton virus programme was the only way we could get rid of it. In today’s world of bugs and viruses (it all sounds like a human health problem) you dare not to log on to the Internet without a virus checker. There is a good simple but effective way to protect your email address and your contact lists so the virus stops with you and is not passed on to all your contacts. When one of these nasty viruses gets into your computer the first thing it starts to do is go to your email address book and sent itself to all address listed. This will infect all your friends and contacts. Please note this will not stop a virus getting into your computer, but it will stop the invader from using your address book to spread further havoc. This will alert you that you have a worm in your computer system. Go to your email address book and click on “New Contact” or “New Person”. In the window section where you would type your New Contact’s First Name- Type in !000 (that’s an exclamation mark followed by 3 zeros). Then type in the word WormAlert in the window section called New Email Address. Then finish by saving it. What you have done is that the “name” !000 will automatically be placed on top of your address book as the first entry. As the first on your contact list it tries to send itself to !000. As it can not find itself, undeliverable because of the phoney email address (i.e. WormAlert) that you set-up it will then show up as undeliverable not sent. Next month there will be a section on the BII telling you all what is happening and when. In this months issue on page 6 there are good opportunities at Fleurets, well worth reading. On page 8 there is again the provisional agenda of our AGM in May and I for one am looking forward to it George Giles has laid out the deal between the AA and the ILTSA. Trevor Knight’s “The New Generation” about the new breed of Britain’s brewers can be found on page 10. This is Trevor’s third part of this series and very appropriate as the AGM is in Scotland this year. Happy reading.

ADMINISTRATION Gina Pugalis

Chris Swift FILSA 13 Moor Top Road Norton Tower Halifax HX2 0NP Tel: 01422 363034 Trevor Perrott FILSA Stockwell House Kingfield Road Kingfield Woking GU22 9AB Tel: 01483 770102 Ron Foster FILSA 2 The Close Lydiard Millicent Swindon SN5 3NJ Tel: 01793 771959 David Downard MILSA 5 Heathtolt Cottages Park Lane Maplehurst Horsham Tel: 07973 206914 Neil Johnson FILSA 26 Rayner Road Brighouse West Yorks HD6 4AT Tel: 01484 384060 David Ganney MILSA 42 Manor Drive Ewell Court Epsom Surrey KT19 0ET Tel: 02083 938361

Editor: Trevor Perrott Tel/Fax: 01483 770102 E-mail STOCKWELLSERVICE@aol.com Mobile: 07802 709459 Advertising and Production: Alec Crighton Tel/Fax: 01227 794714 E-mail alec@stockauditor.org.uk Mobile: 07754 123043 Accounts: Bruce Thompson Tel: 0131 315 2600 Fax: 0131 315 4346 E-mail: StockAudit@aol.com Printed by:

65-67 John Wilson Business Park Chestfield Whitstable Kent CT5 3QT

Special thanks to the contributors to this issue George Giles

Trevor Knight Yaser Martini

White Horse Press Ltd

All Subscriptions payable in advance. Published 12 times per year post free: Annual subscription £24 ISSN 1471-0471 © Institute of Licensed Trade Stock Auditors, 2002

This magazine is published by the Institute of Licensed Trade Stock Auditors. Whilst welcoming any contributions, the editor reserves the right to alter or amend them if necessary. Any opinions expressed are not necessarily those of the Council and are accepted only on that understanding. No part of this magazine may be reproduced or transmitted without written permission of the publishers.

Page 2

The Institute of Licensed Trade Stock Auditors February 2003


SECRETARY’S CORNER

by Bruce Thompson

SURPLUSES – HOW AND WHY W

hat surplus should you expect? This topic has recently come up on the members forum on our web site and I thought it might be appropriate to discuss it in these columns as it is something about which we will all have our own ideas, and it might be that members are looking for some type of guidance. Before the advent of the metric measure, a landlord in Scotland aimed at achieving a yield of 26q out of each 75 cl bottle with the stocktaker only charging 26 while in England with a yield of 32 a tolerance of one measure was usually given. This gave him a free measure per bottle and a base on which to build a surplus. CAMRA and other such organisations were not as prevalent, allowing the publican to get away with big heads on every pint. Bottle beers, wine and alcopops were not as popular and ‘fiddling’ was more rife. Post mixes were not the norm and generally controls in bars were much less than those of today. Post mixes are always a problem for stocktakers as they can influence results either way. The ratio can be upset very easily by changes in water pressure, traffic movement, repairs or bad maintenance. Too weak a solution will generate a surplus, whilst a stronger one will have the opposite effect. In nightclubs or busy pubs where sales of draught coke, orange, lemonade, tonic etc can be very substantial, any variation from the norm can have a devastating effect on results. The stocktaker too might experience difficulty in calculating a selling price, particularly if the price per dash does not equate with that of a half pint. In the example on the right four half pints at 30p (2½ oz measures) comes to £1.20 so no problem, but what if dashes were 50p for a 2½ oz measure? He or she would have to calculate the ratio of half pints to dashes based on that. For the benefit of this example I have assumed a dilution rate (i.e. Schweppes lemonade) of 7.5:1. Pre set tills can be a distinct advantage here as they will probably be able to help the stocktaker calculate a reasonably accurate selling price. By comparing future readings he or she will be able to identify fluctuations and any variation in the mix. If a customer complains that his mineral is too sweet this is a clear indicator that the mix

is over strong. Coming back to the subject ‘What surplus should you expect’ taking into account the content of paragraph two and remembering that this was the situation several years ago I would have been then anticipating, assuming allowances to have been accurate, at least 1.5%. Everything was in favour of an overage and breakevens or shortages really did give rise for concern. Allowances too can be used to manipulate a result and it is up to the stocktaker to verify

these as much as possible. If pipe cleaning is done fortnightly, but claimed on a weekly basis, there should be a big surplus unless the relevant money is being withdrawn from the takings. Is this figure inflated anyway? – hard for the stocktaker to know unless he has watched the process take place and drawn his own conclusions as to the loss. It is worth noting that draught beer sales, relevant wastage claimed and pipe cleaning should in theory equate to sales shown on the stock report. Failure to clean pipes on a regular basis can result in considerable fobbing which will show as increased wastage allowance. I have never been a believer in the system adopted by some breweries of allowing 2% or whatever of beer sales to cover wastage and pipe cleaning. Every premise has its own particular peculiarities and it is fair to say, the lower the beer sales the higher the proportionate wastage. The length of pipe is very relevant when calculating a pipe clean figure and if using a pre agreed percentage a pub with its kegs adjacent to the bar has a distinct advantage over its neighbour which has a considerable pull. It is my opinion that any pipe cleaning allowance should be personal to a pub and should be agreed by the stocktaker. Wastage should never be

allowed to get out of hand and claims where possible should be proved. If the stocktaker thinks any allowances claimed are either excessive or too little, he should make comment on the stock report or to the client directly. If any type of bonus is paid on results then it is imperative that allowances are rigidly controlled. This similarly applies if accurate results are to be produced. How can a publican today produce a surplus? Every premise will be different and it very much depends on sales mix as to how much this will be. Spirits are tightly controlled and the metric yield gives no leeway, also modern computer programmes can accommodate decimal places where and as needed. The considerable sales of bottled beer and alcopops are not conducive to producing overages, soft drinks are in the main bottled and shandies or ‘tops’ are rare. Post mixes can work either way and are frequently seen as a perk for staff. Few licensees control the size of measure or charge accordingly so more than often these have an adverse effect on results. Wines if sold by the bottle demand their exact money and when sold by the glass it is unlikely that any benefit will occur. The only area left is through draught beer sales and then only by excellent housekeeping. Wastage must as far as possible be eliminated and all pints served with a ‘respectable’ head. If we assume that to be 2 ounces then one pint in every eleven will provide a surplus of the selling price of that product. Many would say that this is ‘conning’ the customer and they are quite right, but many beer drinkers do like a head and it is for this reason that C.A.M.R.A. are campaigning for the full pint and lined glasses. In conclusion then, allowances are inextricably tied up with the surplus/deficit figure and in today’s world I am happy with a breakeven particularly for the reason already given, in premises where draught beer sales are small. If substantial there might, at the expense of the customer, be some surplus generated, but this is unlikely to be more than .5 or 1%. If lined glasses are currently used or if this becomes a legal requirement, then I see very little opportunity for anyone legitimately to produce a surplus – in fact I can see the trade accepting small losses.n

The Institute of Licensed Trade Stock Auditors February 2003

Page 3


NEWS ROUND UP XXXX scores with sponsorship deal for ‘socceroos’ UK tour Castlemaine XXXX is celebrating its Australian heritage and roots through sponsorship of the nation’s famous “Socceroos” as they embark on a tour of the UK, which features an historic clash against England. The brand, which is brewed and marketed by Interbrew UK, has signed up as Official Tour Sponsor for the Australian soccer team as it prepares to play an international game on English soil for the first-time ever. Matthew King, Marketing Controller for Castlemaine XXXX at Interbrew UK, says: “This game is eagerly-awaited and will attract a lot of publicity, including TV and newspaper coverage – so it represents the perfect opportunity to communicate the brand’s Australian credentials. “This high-profile sponsorship will generate brand awareness among a key audience of standard lager drinkers and promote the brand’s association with the ‘Socceroos’ to consumers as we start to build its presence through heavyweight support in the year ahead.” The sponsorship incorporates branding around

Unique donates £11,000 to Macmillan Staff at Unique Pub Company have raised a massive £11,000 for Macmillan Cancer Relief. Everything from clay pigeon shooting to quizzes have been held over the past year to help raise funds to help people suffering from Cancer. “It’s been a fantastic effort by everyone at Unique and a real pleasure to work with everyone,” says Emily Dodson, Corporate Fundraising Manager for Macmillan Cancer Relief. “£11,000 makes a terrific difference to Macmillan in many ways. For example it could help 40 people to obtain a patient grant and help to set financial worries aside at a critical time for patients and their families. Without the support of individuals and companies like Unique we simply couldn’t make that difference.”

the Socceroos’ training base including branding of the players’ training kit and visibility at the team’s press conferences. In addition, the Castlemaine XXXX logo will appear on promotional literature connected with the Socceroos UK tour. Interbrew UK will also be providing hospitality for customers at the match which takes place at Upton Park, east London, on February 12. The sponsorship is part of Interbrew UK’s £9 million package of marketing support during 2003 which includes TV advertising set to commence in the spring.

Training for success Angie Hutchinson has joined Unique as training manager for the north and west, supporting Beccie Varney, training manager for the south and east. The pair have been working together to develop the programme of training and support that Unique provides to help licensees improve professionalism, standards and competitiveness. Prior to Angie’s arrival at Unique, Beccie worked with specialist training providers and with experienced pub operators to ensure the availability of up to date, cost effective training material, events and workshops in all areas of

Employees at Unique’s Oxfordshire office gathered to see Unique managing director, Graham Turner, present Emily with the £11,000 cheque. He said: “Everyone has really got behind Macmillan and put lots of energy and enthusiasm into raising money through many different activities. It has touched a nerve with many members of staff so we’ve decided to continue our support in 2003.”

PROVE IT! IN THE RUNNING FOR NATIONAL ACCREDITATION The Portman Group’s Proof of Age scheme, Prove It!, is up for acceptance into the new PASS (Proof of Age Standards Scheme) system, which is being launched today (Wednesday 22 January 2003) by the British Retail Consortium. The Prove It! scheme was launched by The Portman Group in May 1990. It is the oldest established proof of age card in the UK and is widely recognised by the licensed trade. In a re-

the country. Beccie says: “We have carried out a full assessment of the training needs of the pub estate, listening to the views of a wide selection of licensees, from the new and inexperienced to the highly experienced. Their feedback was invaluable and has allowed us to prioritise training requirements and develop a range of courses to suit their needs.” “We now hold all our courses in Unique pubs,” says Angie. ”By doing this we are supporting our licensees businesses, at the same time as putting the course delegates right in the heart of the environment that they are learning about.” Lisa and Ian Wing, licensees at the Fleece Inn, Bradford, were completely new to the pub trade and took the ‘Opening Your Doors’ course that Unique offers to all of its new licensees. Lisa says: “This course has given us the best possible start to our new business. The way it was taught was stimulating, fun and informative. It certainly gave us the enthusiasm and confidence to begin our new pub business.” Steve Marsh, licensee at the Elwes Arms, Northampton, attended one of Unique’s catering workshops. Steve says: “I’ve been in the trade for 16 years and thought it was about time I took a refresher. I was amazed by how much things have changed. The course was brilliant because it gave me the right information to run my kitchen and restaurant effectively and safely, with the right balance of practical and legal information, without dwelling too much on the science behind it all.”

cent survey in leading trade journal, The Publican, 65% of licensees taking part confirmed the Prove It! card was the most recognised identity card. The Prove It! card is one of only three in line for acceptance into the PASS system. Jean Coussins, Chief Executive of The Portman Group, commented: “Half a million Prove It! cards have been issued since its launch in 1990. We know that almost three-quarters of a million young people will be turning 18 in 2003. Together with changes to the licensing laws, this new scheme will encourage many more of them to carry the card and also convince licensees to ask for proof of age much more routinely.“ The Portman Group’s proof of age scheme, Prove It!, was introduced in 1990 and over half a million cards have been issued. It’s the longest running proof of age scheme in the UK.

Merchandise

FELLOWSHIP

The following are available through the Institute

All members can apply, after seven years of having qualified, for elevation to Fellowship. In return we give you:

Goods Received Pads - £7.00 Bar Requisition Books - £5.50 Dipsticks - £18.50 “Taking Stock” books - £18.00 Hydrometers - £83.43*

All prices include VAT (where applicable) and postage 10% discount to Associates and Members 15% discount to Fellows Discount only applies to merchandise i.e. no discount on ties or Taking Stock. *Direct from Stevenson Reeves N.B. The hydrometer price includes VAT, T 0131 667 9225 F 0131 662 4908 delivery and10% discount

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15% off all merchandise purchased through the Institute; Members brochure - asterisk beside your name; Highlighted entry in Licensee advertisement; Certificate of Fellowship; Status within the profession; Use of the designation FILSA A quick note or ‘phone call to the Secretary starts the ball rolling, so if you qualify do it today.

The Institute of Licensed Trade Stock Auditors February 2003


Strange But True On October 17 of 1814, a rupture in a brewery tank containing 3,500 barrels of beer caused a flood of fatal proportions in the London parish of St. Giles. The wave of beer swept victims off their feet, dashed them against walls, and buried them under debris. Two houses were demolished in the sea of beer suddenly loosed upon town, and nine people lost their lives in the flood of suds.

Membership Corner

Discount for Members at Viking Direct A discount agreement for members has been arranged with Viking Direct – the UK’s leading mail order supplier of office products. In addition to Viking’s standard terms of trade the agreement includes:10% extra discount on Viking prices Free delivery on any order of £20 (exc. VAT) or more Overnight delivery in most areas – same day delivery is available in areas around Greater Manchester, Liverpool, the Midlands and within the M25. (Full details are available in Viking’s catalogues) The offer does not include the Viking Price Buster catalogue and the Machine Sales catalogues In order to qualify for the discounts members who are existing customers of Viking Direct will need to notify the call centre representatives that they are members of ILTSA and wish to be registered into the scheme at the time an order is placed. New customers would also need to notify Viking in the same way. You can contact Viking Direct as follows:Order line 0800 424444 free fax line 0800 622211 Web site www.viking-direct.co.uk Note: If you are calling Viking Direct for the first time and they ask for a membership number give any four digit number and this will access their database.

Regional Reps SCOTLAND SOUTH Alan Brown 01968 676008 NORTH Andrew Wardrope 01540 661625 EIRE Martin Kirwin 00353 419843734 IRELAND - NORTH Martin Dinsmore 028 703 56957 CHANNEL ISLANDS Fiona Sturreck 01534 605065 WALES NORTH Dave Barnett 01654 710228 ENGLAND Bedfordshire Barry Ross 01234 344663 Buckinghamshire Norman Clements 01491 575451 Cambridgeshire John Glaysher 01206 211564 Cornwall & Devon Paul Gilder 01726 843366 Derbyshire Leslie Kerr 01332 292233 Devon & Berkshire Norman Clements 01491 575451 Dorset Richard Grafton 01305 813225 Gloucester & Hereford Danny Knight 01452 521080 Hampshire Jeff Batchelor 01329 314816 Hertfordshire Martin Roslyn 0121 744 4896 Kent & Essex Anton Ellender 01303 277382

Lancashire & Cumbria Les Graham 01253 899880 Leicestershire George Abel 01664 850120 Lincolnshire Chris Machin 01777 817821 London & Middlesex John Walden 0208 318 7172 Midlands & Warwickshire Martin Roslyn 0121 744 4896 Northamptonshire Stuart Chapman 01327 830159 Nottinghamshire David Scott 01283 224732 Oxfordshire Norman Clements 01491 575451 Somerset David Mills 01373 300035 South Humberside Graham Potter 01482 815411 Staffordshire Brian Daykin 0121 4226421 Suffolk & Norfolk Pat Simmons 01508 489628 Surrey Roy Smith 01932 570900 Sussex John Fincham 01273 304344 Tyne & Wear Charles Robinson 01670 783427 Wiltshire Mike Farley 01793 615731 Worcestershire Bill Spry 01684 298583 Yorkshire - North Kate Watson 01924 366068 Yorkshire - West & South Rita Broadbent 01274 870989

The Institute of Licensed Trade Stock Auditors February 2003

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Yaser Martini spells out the opportunities at Fleurets

“Listen, I need your help with something. We have decided to move on...”

Licencees sell their businesses for all sorts of reasons. Sometimes their decision to move is planned in advance when their business is performing well and other times the decision is forced upon them by circumstances outside their control and at the worst possible moment. Whatever the scenario, sooner or later, everybody considers a sale and at the very least, they will be curious as to what their business is worth in the market today. HOW YOU CAN HELP Your clients will want some advice. Some will need it, others will simply be grateful for your input. Seldom, if ever, will they ignore what you have to say. Irrespective of whether the property is freehold, leasehold or an assignable tenancy, the chances are that the sale of your client’s business, how it is dealt with and of course the ultimate outcome will be one of the most important decisions that they ever make. What are we asking you to do? You need only point them in the right direction - Fleurets will take care of the rest. WHY YOU SHOULD HELP Of course, you needn’t do anything at all. But taking a back seat could well mean that you lose your existing client (who may be leaving the trade) and fail to replace him when the new Landlord arrives. Far better to give your clients some “added value” and sound advise by pointing them in the right direction. Surely they deserve that much! Besides, they needn’t actually follow your advice, however if they do and Fleurets are instructed to sell their property then you can be guaranteed two things:1 Advance warning of the scheduled completion date (so that you can act on the day of the change, ideally acting between parties). 2

Introduce yourself to the new owner and in doing so increase your chances of the continuity of business. Oh, and after Fleurets have been paid you will also share in 10% of Fleurets sale commission, subject to a minimum of £500 (+VAT).

WHY YOU SHOULD RECOMMEND FLEURETS Fleurets are the largest firm of Chartered Surveyors to specialise nationally and exclusively in the sale and valuation of hotels, restaurants, pubs & bars. We also deal with nightclubs! Here are just some of Fleurets key features and the benefits to your clients.

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FLEURETS KEY FEATURES

BENEFITS TO YOUR CLIENT

We want to SELL your clients property.

It may sound obvious, but Fleurets are here primarily to sell your client’s property. We do not confuse our job with arranging mortgages and insurance policies. We are simply here to sell your client’s property, for the best price, in the optimum time frame. Our experienced negotiators know your client’s market and understand their business. We do not get involved with the sale of nursing homes, sub-post offices and the like and are therefore best placed to advise on how to achieve the most from a sale.

We SPECIALISE in the sale of licensed property only and our marketing advice is built on solid experience of selling lots of hotels, restaurants, pubs, clubs and restaurants.

FLEURETS NEWS generates 25% more sale enquiries than all the recognised trade media combined, from a readership of approximately 10,000 per issue. We believe Fleurets News is the best hard copy medium for selling licensed property in the country.

The more prospective buyers we speak to, the greater the chances of us finding a buyer for your client’s property. Fleurets News is a major marketing tool for our Clients, an advantage available only to people selling through Fleurets.

HOTELS REVIEW Our dedicated hotels brochure is designed to ensure your property receives the specialist attention it deserves.

Our Hotels Review is regularly received by a target audience purely interested in similar hotels and inns. Your client benefits from a dedicated and specific database.

FLEURETS TECHNOLOGY Our bespoke database systems: i) record up to the minute comparable information.

i) Your client receives sound marketing advice, based upon the very latest market knowledge, to help them achieve the best sale price.

ii) hold the details of thousands of potential purchasers and their property requirements.

ii) Details of your client’s property are circulated directly to large numbers of prospective buyers with requirements matching those of their business, to ensure that the right buyers are quickly informed of the availability of their property.

OUR WEB PAGE www.fleurets.com contains a “live” version of Fleurets News and our Hotels Review, providing an instantly accessible and continuous advertising media, world-wide. Visitors can also view sale particulars on-line and receive alert messages by e-mail when suitable properties come to the market.

Our “Virtual Fleurets News” ensures that your clients enjoy the same benefits of Fleurets News instantly, with both national and global exposure on the internet. Internet usage continues to grow and, increasingly, both foreign and domestic buyers are accessing information on the World Wide Web and via e-mail. This dramatically improves the information exchange between sellers and buyers, which can speed up the time it takes to achieve a sale.

The Institute of Licensed Trade Stock Auditors February 2003


Our famous NO SALE NO FEE policy.

COMPETITIVE FEES

There are no up front charges for your clients to pay. Our marketing assessment is at no charge and we are willing to include all the costs of marketing, because we expect to sell your client’s property for them. This proves that we are confident in our ability to sell your client’s property. We get paid only when the sale is completed. Others may get you to pay at the start, regardless of whether they sell or not. Your client gets value for money and the right result. No other competent agent can offer the same level of service: National advertising, local knowledge, experienced and well trained staff and sophisticated database systems which give the best opportunity to optimise the sales potential of your clients property.

PROFESSIONALISM We sell licensed property.... Professionally!

Your client benefits from sound professional guidance ranging from straight sales and lettings advice, to ‘sale and leasebacks’ and investment sales. They also gain from our extensive network of professional contacts, which help us achieve the best result for them.

CONFIDENTIALITY

We respect the fact that your clients often require confidentiality. If necessary, we can advise them on the best way to achieve a sale with a minimum of publicity and exposure. Your client enjoys the best of both worlds. Nationwide coverage and local expertise. We also have the facility for marketing from more than one of Fleurets offices, if this would facilitate the sale of your client’s property.

FLEURETS - A National firm with local offices.

These are some of Fleurets unique selling points.

We set them out for you so that you can judge the quality of what is available to your clients. CONTACT YOUR LOCAL FLEURETS OFFICE NOW At Fleurets, we would like to foster and develop our relationship with the members of the Institute of Licensed Trade Stock Auditors, for mutual benefit. Many of you will have recently received a letter from Fleurets regarding introductory commissions that Fleurets will pay for successful sale introductions. How does it work? Quite simply - a phone call to Fleurets could earn you a minimum of £500 (per recommendation). This is not a new offer - Fleurets have paid introductory commissions to many stocktakers over the years, but sadly, we aren’t doing it enough! If you have not received a copy and would like to do so, please telephone Yaser Martini at Fleurets London office on 020 7636 8992 or alternatively telephone any Fleurets office - we will be pleased to hear from you. UK Office Telephone Numbers Fleurets London 020 7636 8992 Fleurets Manchester 0161 683 5445 Fleurets Leeds 0113 234 0304 Fleurets Birmingham 0121 236 5252 Fleurets Bristol 01179 238 090 Fleurets Brighton 01273 606 033 Fleurets Sudbury 01787 378 050

CAMRA launch first National Pubs Week National Pubs Week will be launched on Saturday 22nd February 2003 CAMRA, the Campaign for Real Ale, will be launching their first ever ‘National Pubs Week’ on Saturday 22nd February 2003. The aim of National Pubs Week is to encourage more people to visit pubs more often. New research compiled by CAMRA shows an astonishing 20 pubs close every month and over a quarter of adults (27%) NEVER visit a pub. If this trend continues then Britain’s unique pubs will disappear very quickly! Mike Benner, CAMRA’s Head of Campaigns said “The aim of National Pubs Week is simple – to encourage people to visit pubs more regularly. Its slogan is ‘There’s a pub for everyone’ and we seek to highlight the enormous variety of pubs in the UK. We are not only supporting the quaint country pubs but also community and town centre pubs as we want all of the pub industry to benefit from this initiative.” Pub Participation CAMRA, and a number of industry partners, are currently encouraging as many pubs throughout Britain to take part in National Pubs Week and organise a variety of events throughout the week to encourage more people to attend pubs more regularly. Two different poster designs and beer mats have been produced for pubs to display and advertise National Pubs Week. These are FREE and can be ordered through CAMRA’s web site -www.camra.org.uk/ pubsweek or by calling Head Office on 01727 867201. Media Stories To support the launch of National Pubs Week, CAMRA will be issuing a number of interesting pub press releases. These will include: · Announcement of the ‘National Pub of the Year’ winner – the ‘Best Pub in Britain’ New research findings into people’s pub going habits – what age groups, sexes and regions are visiting pubs the most / least, what pub promotions will attract more pub custom and the main reasons why people choose a particular pub. · The Pub is the Hub – A year on since the launch of this exciting initiative by the Countryside Agency and the British Beer and Pub Association, CAMRA takes a look at how the pubs market has changed. · Announcement of Britain’s top ten Pub names – Has the ‘Rat and Parrot’ taken over from the ‘Red Lion’? CAMRA looks at pub names through time and how they have changed. National Pubs Week Competition Do you think you have a good promotional idea that pubs could use for National Pubs Week? CAMRA are offering 10 Good Beer Guides as prizes and all you have to do is visit CAMRA’s web site at www.camra.org.uk/pubsweek and state what events or promotions you think will help National Pubs Week fulfil it’s objective of encouraging more people to attend pubs more regularly. ·

The best ten ideas, judged by CAMRA’s National Pubs Week marketing team, will each be sent a FREE 2003 Good Beer Guide. The ideas will also appear on the web site.

The Institute of Licensed Trade Stock Auditors February 2003

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ILTSA GOLDEN ANNIVERSARY PROVISIONAL AGENDA – AGM 14TH MAY – 18TH MAY 2003

GOLDEN PACKAGE

SUPER PACKAGE

(4 nights of fun touring and celebration)

(3 nights of fun and celebration)

Wednesday

Thursday

10.00 am - collection at Edinburgh Airport or arrangements will be

Afternoon trip to Scotland’s oldest distillery and

made to leave cars in Edinburgh Transfer to city centre – luggage storage

‘THE GROUSE EXPERIENCE’ Friday

Visit to the famous

CALEDONIAN BREWERY Depart Edinburgh – 75 minute journey to

CRIEFF HYDRO

All day excursion incl coach, lunch and drink

ROB ROY COUNTRY Scottish dinner and ceilidh

Saturday

Thursday Free morning – use hotel activities * Tour or visit local Visitor Centre * Afternoon trip to Scotland’s oldest distillery and

‘THE GROUSE EXPERIENCE’

AGM, buffet lunch and free afternoon – friends, partners and children morning visit to

SCONE PALACE Private dinner with disco (until 1.00 am) Includes three nights dinner, bed and breakfast Thursday-Friday-Saturday

Friday All day excursion incl coach, lunch and drink

ROB ROY COUNTRY Scottish dinner and ceilidh

Saturday

STANDARD PACKAGE

AGM, buffet lunch and free afternoon – friends, partners and children morning visit to

(for those with little time to spare)

SCONE PALACE

Saturday

Private dinner with disco (until 1.00 am)

AGM, buffet lunch and free afternoon – friends, partners and children morning visit to

Sunday

SCONE PALACE

Morning transport to Edinburgh Airport arriving approx 1.00 pm

Private dinner with disco (until 1.00 am)

Includes four nights dinner, bed and breakfast Wednesday-Thursday-Friday-Saturday

Includes two nights dinner, bed and breakfast Friday-Saturday with Scottish dinner and Ceilidh on the first night

COST Golden Package Super Package Standard Package Extra nights DBB

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* not included in cost £399 per person £280 per person £170 per person £75 per person

All meals offer wine and choice of menu (no pre booking) except Friday when dinner will be set and on a Scottish theme Other than Thursday morning, each package is inclusive of excursions and all other mentioned activities, also VAT and service

The Institute of Licensed Trade Stock Auditors February 2003


The AA and ILTSA By George Giles We have been running the AA Fleetwide 3 operation for over ten years. Started by Bruce Thompson in the late 1980’s it is the longest and most successful money saving scheme for our members. To be honest I am amazed that only 150 of our members use it, the savings are an incredible 61% of your membership fees. A private membership of AA would cost £144 for the service we receive for £56. On Fleetwide 3 the car registration is the member not the person, we are covered for the following. Roadside Assistance, Home Start, Relay and Relay Plus, there is an optional cover for Europe which must be taken out individually. So what are you covered for? Roadside. The AA will assist your drivers when they are stranded on a highway at least ¼ mile away from home, following a breakdown or accident. All covered vehicles have access to this service. lf a patrol or agent cannot fix the covered vehicle within a reasonable time, it will be taken to the AA’s choice of appropriate local repairer. Alternatively, we can arrange removal of the vehicle to another destination of your choice, provided it is not farther away. Roadside assistance does not cover any additional transport or other costs that you may incur, whether as a result of the vehicle being towed or otherwise.

HOME START Assistance when a covered vehicle breaks down at the drivers home.

What is covered? This service provides assistance at or within ¼ mile of the drivers home address. If a patrol or agent cannot fix the vehicle within a reasonable time, it will be taken to the AA’s choice of appropriate local repairer. Alternatively we can arrange removal of the vehicle to another destination of your choice, provided it is not farther away. The Relay service is not available following Home Start attendance.

RELAY Relay applies to Fleetwide and specialist vehicles. Relay takes the covered vehicle, driver and up to seven passengers to any single destination on the U.K. mainland. Relay is only available to covered vehicles for which the additional fees have been paid at least 24 hours before the relevant breakdown or accident occurred.

What is covered? Relay is available immediately following roadside assistance when we cannot arrange a prompt local repair within a reasonable time of the accident or breakdown. It provides recovery of an immobilised vehicle (including a trailer or caravan on tow at the time),together with the driver and up to seven passengers, to any single U.K. mainland destination. The AA will not provide RELAY (a) when we are able to arrange a prompt local repair (b) following a home start attendance (c) in the Republic of Ireland (d) where it could be dangerous or illegal for the AA to transport the vehicle. If there are more than eight people in the vehicle at the time of the breakdown or accident the AA will seek to arrange onward travel for the extra passengers, but will not pay for it. Relay cannot be provided after an accident by the emergency services unless they have been given clearance for the vehicle to be removed. If the police or emergency service concerned insist on immediate recovery by a third party this cost must subsequently be met by you. The AA can help in arranging, but will not pay for, the following; overnight accommodation, transportation for passengers not accompanying the vehicle. the recovery of vehicles which would be dangerous or illegal for us to transport. In addition to the weight limit set out in point 2 under relay the AA will

only transport motor vehicles with a maximum length of 6.4 m (21ft) and a maximum width of 2.3m (7ft 6in). A caravan or trailer which is capable of being towed safely will be towed, provided it does not exceed a maximum length of 8m (26ft). The AA will seek to arrange, but will not pay for, recovery of any vehicle, caravan or trailer that exceeds these limits. Please note that RELAY does not cover the recovery of horses or livestock.

RELAY PLUS This service extends Relay as it provides alternative travel arrangements for the driver and passengers. Relay Plus is only available to covered vehicles for which the additional fees has been paid at least 24 hours before the relevant breakdown, accident or theft occurred. Relay Plus is not available to Specialist Vehicle or Minibus Rescue Members. What is covered? You can only purchase Relay Plus as an addition to Relay cover. Relay Plus is only available where Relay has been authorised in relation to the breakdown or accident in question, or where the covered vehicle has been stolen or where Relay Plus is claimed in conjunction with the provision of Relay service, it must be claimed immediately following the breakdown or accident concerned. In the case of a stolen vehicle, Relay Plus must be claimed as soon as you know that the theft has occurred and you must produce the relevant crime number when you make your claim. When claiming Relay Plus, you can choose from one of three options. The AA will issue a voucher indicating which option has been chosen. We will not consider any subsequent requests. The Options are:

Replacement Vehicle

The insurer will pay the vehicle hire charges (including comprehensive insurance cover, collision, damage waiver and VAT, but excluding any insurance excess which may become payable) for up to 48 hours from when you collect the vehicle. The choice of vehicle supplier shall be at the AA’s discretion. The entitlement is a mid range family saloon or hatch back of up to 1600cc from a supplier of the AA’s choice. We will try, although we are not obliged, to arrange the supply of a vehicle similar to your incapacitated vehicle or one that suits your immediate needs. The supply of all vehicles is subject to availability. You are responsible for any extra hire charges from the supply of a vehicle in excess of normal entitlement.

Overnight Accommodation

The insurer will arrange and pay for one night’s hotel accommodation and breakfast, at a hotel of its choice on the day of the breakdown, accident or theft, for the driver and up to seven passengers (1) The driver must present the voucher issued by the AA upon arrival at the hotel. (2) Any passengers must have been travelling with the driver at the time of the relevant breakdown ,accident or theft. (3) The AA will not pay for any additional costs incurred by the driver or passengers.

Public Transport Costs

The Insurer will refund reasonable transport costs to a single mainland destination, up to the prevailing limit in force at the time of the breakdown, accident or theft. at any time the prevailing limit for such refunds is available by contacting the AA

The Institute of Licensed Trade Stock Auditors February 2003

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The New Generation

Trevor Knight continues his journey across the country in search of the new breed of Britain’s brewers

Part Three – Scotland’s Central Lowlands

O

ur island-hopping is behind us now and we return to the mainland of Scotland. The Central Lowlands stretch from Glasgow and the Clyde Valley in the west to the great estuary of the Firth of Forth and the capital city of Edinburgh in the east. The dramatic grandeur of the central Highlands mellows as we approach the ‘fair city of Perth’ from the north. The great system of rivers which flows towards Perth makes this south-eastern corner of the Highlands a region of particular beauty and history, for this was a front line in the bitter wars against the English. Sir Walter Scott’s praise of this area in his 19th century novel The Fair Maid of Perth is fully justified. There are mountains and moors, hills and woods, lush farmlands, lochs and glens and rivers and streams in profusion. The small ancient city of Perth was the meeting place of the Scottish parliament during the Middle Ages. It was the home of Scotland’s kings until 1437 when James I was murdered by rivals and the royal family moved to the greater security of Stirling and Edinburgh. The ravages of war and the destructive followers of the fiery 16 th century reformer John Knox have left few of its ancient buildings intact and today’s ‘fair city’ is largely a creation of the 18th and 19th centuries. One mile north of Perth is Scone Abbey, originally the home of the Stone of Destiny on which the early Scots kings were crowned (see the photograph opposite of Scone Palace built on the site of the Abbey). The stone itself, linked by legend to the Old Testament of Jacob, had been captured by the English King Edward I in 1297 and taken to London, where it remained under the Coronation Chair in Westminster Abbey. The stone was returned to Scotland in 1996 and now rests in Edinburgh Castle. Many believe the stone never left Scotland and the real Lia Fail, which is Gaelic for Stone of Destiny, is in a secret hiding place somewhere in Scotland. Appropriately, Lia Fail is the brand name of one of the ales produced by a local brewery. Near to Scone Abbey and Perth, INVERALMOND BREWERY was opened in 1997 and was the first brewery in Perth for over thirty years. LIA Fail at 4.7% ABV is a dark, robust, fullbodied beer with a deep malty taste, smooth texture and balanced finish. Inveralmond Brewery was founded in 1997 by Fergus Clark who graduated from the famous Scottish university of Herriot Watt with a degree in brewing and microbiology. He gained over ten years experience with major national breweries including Ruddles in Rutland, the Stag Brewery in London and the Tyne Brewery in Newcastle. In addition to Lia Fail, the company produces three other interesting cask-conditioned ales:OSSIAN’S ALE (ABV 4.1%) is a pale, golden coloured brew with a full-bodied fruity flavour

Page 10

and hoppy aroma. It was the Champion Beer of Scotland in 2001. Ossian, son of Fingal, was a legendary warrior from the 3rd century. His exploits came to prominence in the 1700’s through the much disputed translations of his poems by James MacPherson. There are many references to Ossian in the countryside around Inveralmond brewery. INDEPENDENCE ALE is a classic session ale with well balanced malt and hop flavours. Hints of fruit and spices give a fuller body than expected from a 3.8% beer. As an independent Scottish brewery competing for a very limited market, Independence can be interpreted several ways; not the least of which is the quote from the Declaration of Arbroath:“It is in truth, not for glory, nor riches, nor honours that we are fighting, but for freedom, for that alone, which no honest man gives up but with life itself.” THRAPPLEDOUSER ALE (ABV 4.3%) is a refreshing amber beer with reddish hues. The crisp, hoppy aroma is finely balanced with the tangy but quenching taste. Thrapple is Scots for throat, so an appropriate verse might be:- “Guid to wet yor whistle wi.” We head south now on our journey from Perth. Scotland’s smallest county of Clackmannanshire is situated on the north bank of the Forth estuary. The main town of Alloa has been a seaport and industrial area since the Middle Ages. From the latter part of the 18th century, along with coal mining, Alloa came into prominence as a manufacturing town with woollen mills, iron foundries, shipyards and glass, brick and tile works. Along with these industries came brewing and distilling. The spread of industrialisation and the growth of the economy created a demand for ale to an unprecedented scale. By the end of the 19t h century there were many breweries in the area producing reputable Scotch ales. All of those old breweries have now gone and the skill of the brewer is now in the hands of a few microbrewers. But have no fear, a break in our journey will discover something rather special. HARVIESTOUN BREWERY operates from a 200-year-old building that was once a dairy at the foot of the Ochill Hills. This little brewery is difficult to find down a farm track – no signs, no visitors. But owner Ken Brooker is quite happy to be hard to find. Most of the local pubs in the nearby village of Dollar, Clackmannanshire, stock his award winning beers. Residents in the area know where he is but passers-by are not encouraged to call. Ken and his small band of workers are too busy producing beer that is now selling nation-wide. A self-taught master-brewer, Ken Brooker is an Essex boy, where he worked at the Ford Motor Company plant at Dagenham for 24 years. He

moved north to Scotland as an area manager for the company. Ken’s passion for making beer began as a hobby thirty years ago and he started the brewery here in 1985 with his childhood friend and fellow home-brewing, enthusiast, Eric Harris. A lot of beer has flowed since these early days and now the brewery is winning awards on a regular basis. The 3.8% ABV BITTER AND TWISTED has recently won the Champion Beer of Scotland award for the second time. CAMRA’s ‘Good Beer Guide’ describes Bitter and Twisted as a refreshingly hoppy golden session beer with fruit throughout. A bitter sweet taste with a long, dry, bitter finish. PTARMIGAN (ABV 4.5%) is named after various birds of the grouse family that frequents the Scottish Highlands. A well-balance bittersweet beer in which malt and hops dominate. SCHIEHALLION (ABV 4.8%) is a Scottish cask lager which takes its name from the misty mountain near Pitlochry. The distinctive hop character of the beer comes from the aromatic Heisbrucken and the fresh grape fruity Challenger varieties. It has won numerous awards including three times gold winner at the Great British Beer Festival. Harriestoun brews five ales all-year-round serving seventy outlets in central Scotland as well as wholesalers throughout Britain. We have one more brewery stop on our journey through central Scotland. But before we arrive at our destination we pass through some of the most symbolic sites in Scotland’s history. Heading west, we soon come to Stirling, a warscarred city at the crossroads of Scotland. Perched high on a crag commanding the crossings of the upper Forth, where the Highlands meet the Lowlands, Stirling has played a vital role in its country’s tumultuous history. For at least 800 years a castle has topped the great crag that overlooks the city. The castle figured prominently in the wars of Scottish succession during the 13th and 14th centuries passing back and forth between Scots and English.

The Institute of Licensed Trade Stock Auditors February 2003

Continued on page 11


Continued from page 10 William Wallace rallied the Scots to defeat the English at the Battle of Stirling Bridge in 1297 and became ruler of Scotland. A few miles south of the city is the site of the Battle of Bannockburn where Robert the Bruce routed an English army three times larger than his own. Just north of Stirling is the burgh and holiday resort of Bridge of Allan. It became a spa at the beginning of the 19th century and Robert Louis Stevenson was among those who took the waters. Water of another kind is used to brew the beer of the local brewery. BRIDGE OF ALLAN BREWERY is situated at the rear of the Queens Hotel just off the main street in this leafy Victorian spa town. The five-barrel custom-built brewery was founded in 1997 and is run by Douglas Ross. The opening coincided with the 700th anniversary of the Battle of Stirling Bridge. A pinnacled tower overlooks the battlefield and stands as a monument to Sir William Wallace. STIRLING BRIG (ABV 4.1%), commemorating the great battle, is a full bodied, malty and slightly sweet ale. This classic, rich, dark ruby red brew with a creamy head is typical of a traditional Scottish 80/-. STIRLING BITTER (ABV 3.7%) is brewed as a good session ale. A full flavoured beer with a nutty, fruity taste offering a relatively dry after taste. Bittered with Bramley Cross and Fuggles hops this bitter has quickly become an established favourite with the hoppy drinker. BANNOCKBURN (ABV 4.2%) and two organic beers, GLENCOE WILD CAT STOUT (ABV 4.5%) and LOMOND GOLD (ABV 5%) complete the main cask ale portfolio. Bridge of Allan Brewery, with its entry-free visitor centre (and free tasting!) also operates two local village pubs. It also sells to more than 75 pubs in Scotland and through wholesalers south of the border.n

Scone Palace

CLASSIFIED ADS. Cost 50p per word - maximum 100 words. Members free of charge Call 01227 794714 to place an advertisement

LICENSED TRADE STOCKTAKER REQUIRED Successful Stocktaking Business requires additional Personal to assist in carrying out regular Stocktake visits to both Private and National accounts. Applicants should reside in West London /M4 Ring 0793 25057 or email Kerbypeterr@yahoo.co.uk

STOCK AUDITOR REQUIRED ON A SUB-CONTRACT BASIS For 2/3 days per month which would be flexible. Would suit somebody starting up in business or just to fill in gaps in their work schedule. Own transport essential. Rates to be arranged between both parties. Must be in the Blackburn/Chorley/Preston/ Burnley catchment area. No on site results. Applicants must be able to demonstrate suitability and experience. Contact Mioke Murdoch on 07971 060793

For marketing assistance, web site design, advertisement design etc. Call 01227 794714 Fax 01227 794714 email info@acmarketing.org

Have your Classified ad. here The Institute of Licensed Trade Stock Auditors February 2003

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Page 12

The Institute of Licensed Trade Stock Auditors February 2003


Stock Auditor 2003 Annual