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Stock Auditor THE MAGAZINE FOR THE INSTITUTE OF LICENSED TRADE STOCKAUDITORS

Strong ILTSA Presence at BII Luncheon

ISSUE 53

ISSN 1471 - 0471

JUNE 2004

Heartbeat Tour ! Yet another AGM over – personally I would rate it as one of the best. Friday dawned and with it a not altogether promising weather forecast but we stocktakers are a hardy breed. We departed from the Crown through the Vale of Pickering before boarding the steam railway for the short trip to Goathland AKA Aidensfield of Heartbeat fame. Apologies to the young mother who’s offspring were startled by a gentle giant waving insanely as the trains passed. Anton also got confused on seeing a deer thinking it was a hare. A quick rendition of a popular song from the ‘Sound of Music ‘ quickly put him right although his calling out ‘mint sauce’ to the many sheep running around caused many raised eyebrows in this quiet village.

The annual luncheon of the

Steve Berry and Ron Foster entertain our guests !

British Institute of Innkeeping was held on Tuesday 11th May 2004 at the Grosvenor House, Park Lane, London. For the 2nd year running Council hosted a table at this prestigeous event Our guests of the day were: Ian Gauld – MD - Tricon IPA : Stephen Grantham – MD – Stocktake UK Ltd. :John McAleer – HM Customs and Excise trade consultant for Alcohol and Tobacco : Martin Game – Business Development Executive. – Reads World of Wine The table was hosted by:-George Giles, Steve Berry, Bruce Thompson , Ron Foster and David Ganney The event was sponsored this year by

SKY (The Pub Channel) with the assistance of Fullers of Chiswick, Heineken, Constellation Wines and Highland Spring. The principal guest speaker was Digby Jones, Director General of the CBI.

We then re-embarked on the coach for the short trip to Hawsker where a superb buffet had been laid on. On from there to the picturesque port of Whitby, famous for its Abbey, Captain Cook, Dracula, as well as my home for the first eighteen years of my life. Sorry Adrian and Jackie but the planned Lifeboat trip did not happen – hopefully it has not sunk. A quick trip around the lifeboat Museum, where it was noted that some boats were regular users of the service. On a serious note the RNLI does a sterling job of keeping our coastal waters safe and I am pleased to say that this year we raised almost £ 500 for their coffers – Well done to all concerned.

Days such as these are seen to be an essential link to business world in which we all operate and allows the opportunity for council members to meet new and old contacts alike, with the view of forging stronger links for the Institute for the overall long term benefit of the membership.

www.iltsa.co.uk 01422 366633

The Chairman Relaxing !

In this Issue: Whisky Challenge, Thameside Taverns , Vat Progress, Ivor Deficit and much,much more !


From The Editor

Chris Swift Tel:- 01422 366633 chrisswift@iltsa.co.uk

Nice to be back ! I never thought I would be sitting down to write another Editorial for the Stock Auditor. I am however excited by the challenge of my new role and along with Di, I am looking forward to meeting that challenge and dealing with whatever is thrown our way. Thanks are due to Trevor for keeping the seat warm, I know he has enjoyed his time in the ‘hot seat’ – but it has never been an easy task to balance deadlines with one’s own business. We are going to attempt to carry out far more of the production ‘In House’ with the pages set and designed in our own offices. I am indebted to Adam Berry who has given me important guidelines and help in setting up this first magazine – I do hope you like what you see. What I lack in professionalism I hope that I will more than make up for in my determination to make the ‘Stock Auditor’ a Magazine that we can all be proud off. I have always felt that the magazine was an important lynchpin in holding the Institute together but that it does need the support of the membership. I am pleased to say that many members have submitted articles and I do urge each and everyone of you to contribute to YOUR magazine. Our magazine would not be the same without an article from Trevor Knight, it would be like Roast Beef without Yorkshire puddings or even Ant without Dec . This issue he takes us back to where it all started - the start of his Thameside walk. I am pleased to say that Ivor Deficit makes a welcome return to these pages after his travels 'down under', his comments although liberally laced with humour often penetrate to the heart of the matter. Bruce Thompson has again supplied much needed copy, not only his popular crossword but many of the titbits and comments that make our magazine unique to our profession. Goulden and Clarke eat your heart out, we have the inimitable Mike Murdoch to tell us about wines - if any members come across some oddities or have any questions relating to wine please do submit them. To prove there is no North South divide in this magazine David Rutter from Hove has submitted an interesting article on his fifty years in the Industry - a compelling read for mere whipper snappers like me. I could go on and on, but a sincere thank you to all our contributors, read them for yourselves and then you too have a go. I want to carry a 'Nice to Meet You' from one or two of our new members each issue so if you fall into this category ( or even a long

standing member who escaped ) please send me a brief biography and a recent photograph. I know that these were very popular in the past and lets us get to know each other a little better. To the many self employed stock auditors out there I know it can get quite lonely so if you have anything you want to get off your chest drop me a line. I have already had enquiries about the Data Protection Act and the many Companies who are attempting to dupe unsuspecting businesses. I will get some facts together and draw up some conclusions in the next issue along with a report on the new Flat Rate Vat Scheme which I have already subscribed to.

I know that you have heard it all before but please do support YOUR magazine, with your help it can be made both interesting and entertaining. If you have any suggestions for articles but are not very good at writing them give me a call ! If you know of any company that would like to advertise - get in touch. Remember personal advertisements for members are free. I hope you enjoy this issue of the ' Stock Auditor ' and I look forward to hearing from you. The AGM has been a tremendous success , as always, and reports from Scarborough can be found within these pages. Please do watch out for details of Next Year’s Event in the August edition.

This magazine is published by the Institute of Licensed Trade Stock Auditors. Whilst welcoming any contributions, the editor reserves the right to alter or amend them if necessary. Any opinions expressed are not necessarily those of the Council and are accepted only on that understanding. No part of this magazine may be reproduced or transmitted without written permission of the publishers. Printed by :- Pickles Printers, Halifax, West Yorkshire 01422 353239 All Subsciptions payable in advance. Published 6 times per year post free Annual Subscription £24.00 © Institute of Licensed Trade Stock Auditors 2004

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Norman Clements F.I.L.S.A. 01491 575451 President normanclements@iltsa.co.uk Nickname at School ‘ Clem ‘ Steve Berry F.I.L.S.A. 0131 01968 670600 Chair Exam & Training steveberry@iltsa.co.uk Nickname at School ‘ Chuck ’ Trevor Perrott F.I.L.S.A. 01483 829437 Treasurer trevorperrott@iltsa.co.uk Nickname at School ‘ Double Dutch ’ Bruce Thompson F.I.L.S.A. 0131 332 0875 brucethompson@iltsa.co.uk Nickname at School Won’t say Ron Foster F.I.L.S.A. 01793 771959 Regional Reps ronfoster@iltsa.co.uk Nickname at School ‘ Fossie ‘ David Downard M.I.L.S.A. 01403 865309 Member’s Benefits daviddownard@iltsa.co.uk Nickname at School ‘ Wob ‘ David Ganney M.I.L.S.A. 0208 3938361 B.I.I. Liason davidganney@iltsa.co.uk Nickname at School ‘ Greavsie ‘ Mike Murdoch F.I.L.S.A. 01254 247496 mikemurdoch@iltsa.co.uk Nickname at School ‘ mick the mod ‘ Rita Broadbent F.I.L.S.A. 01274 870989 ritabroadbent@iltsa.co.uk Nickname at School ‘Broady’


View From The Chair

George Giles Tel:- 0191 386 7699 george giles@iltsa.co.uk

51st AGM a Success ! Another A.G.M. has passed , they do seem to come round so fast these days . Having had our 50th A.G.M. at Crieff Hydro last year it was always going to be difficult to match it . I believe that Scarborough came very close to doing that, the weather was marvellous, the hotel excellent, the day trip on Friday was very successful and the company enjoyable . Having said that we also had the added bonus of meeting two of our older members when Gordon Staveley from Cottingham came on Saturday for the Meeting ,and John Sutton came along with his son Rob for the weekend . It was lovely to see both of them ! Two resignations forced widespread changes to the structure of Council. As you already know Di Swift, wife of council member Chris is to become secretary and I have appointed Trevor Perrott to the post of treasurer. have always thought that these two posts should be separate. Chris Swift is also to become editor of the magazine This enables the magazine and all official paperwork to be sent out to our members from one office, thus saving us a great amount of time and money. To further strengthen Council Rita Broadbent from West Yorkshire was ratified at the AGM whilst Mike Murdoch from Lancashire and Bruce Thompson are both set to return to Council.

NEW OFFICE DETAILS Tel :- 01422 366633 dianeswift@iltsa.co.uk 13 Moor Top Road Norton Tower HALIFAX HX2 ONP

ILTSA CALENDAR 2004 August

Stock Auditor Published

October

Stock Auditor Published

October

Examinations

October

Training Course

November Council Meeting December Xmas Stock Auditor

I have to thank all the members of council who in the last twelve months have been very supportive in my first year as chairman, in particular the president Norman Clements whose great depth and knowledge of our institute is always there to be tapped into. The state of our industry is always in the news. Thirty two years ago when I started at Vaux Breweries , all the competition was from other breweries. With the advent of the�Beer Orders� in 1989 the Monopolies and Mergers commission seems, in my opinion, to ruin the Licensed Trade . We now have pub companies who seem to have little control, people used to complain about the brewers but at least there was a modicum of respect. With the present setup all we get are high rents, fully repairing leases , and whingeing from the pub companies that their tenants are buying out of their tie. I do not condone this, my belief is if you sign a contract you should stick to it . However , it makes you wonder where it is all going to end ,it makes you wonder with all the stringent measures put upon the tenants and leaseholders whether it is worth going into a public house .I can see that if we are not careful our industry will go to the wall ,we see boarded up units in every town we go to . What is the answer ? We are constantly striving not only to maintain standards in our profession but to increase our membership . We are embracing the larger stocktaking companies and bringing a lot of their franchisees into our fold. We had twenty taking our exam in March and we intend to make approaches to other companies . We are looking at modernising our exams ,especially the practical and also drawing from some of our more experienced members by asking them to help us create a bank of questions we can refer to when setting future examinations. The amount of work involved to keep our organisation at the forefront of the trade is never ending . We are always happy to accept help from any of our members who think they can help to make our Institute the Institute to join. We ask all of our membership to be aware of who they are working with on changeovers ,if they are not a member ask them why not ? We will send them a starter pack and application form .We want all good stock auditors to be aware that we are the only professional body for stock auditors in the Licensed Trade.

AVAILABLE FROM THE SECRETARY Taking Stock Books Goods Received Books Bar Requisition Books Flexible Dipsticks Sectional Dipsticks Hydrometers Institute Ties Membership Lists

MEMBERSHIP If you qualified more than seven years ago contact the Secretary about becoming a fellow

George Giles STOCKAUDITOR

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VAT Update

SLOW BUT SURE PROGRESS..... Council members have put a tremendous amount of work in with HMCE and have had some input into a new initiative by Customs to explain some of the quirks of the system and its relation in particular with the Hospitality sector. This is to take the format of a question and answer forum and will be accessed through their website www.hmce.gov.uk . The questions were set after consultation with interested trade bodies of which we were one. Whilst some of the questions appear extremely basic, for example, what is the Vat Rate applied to my business the answers are extremely detailed and contain hyperlinks to other documents if necessary. Not only were we asked to contribute in the compilation of the text but we have been asked to help promote it and also monitor the response of our members. In a separate development Norman Clements approached his MP , Boris Johnson, for help in getting official recognition for the Institute. The eventual answer, although not strictly what we wanted shows that we are at last being recognised. Our argument is still that we are not asking for our individual members

LETTERS

to be recommended but rather that Institute members are rightly perceived to be experts in their field.

Stocktake UK

This with the development mentioned above gives cause for optimism that we are at last making progress.

Accrington Lancashire Dear David I just wanted to write and thank you for your kind invitation to the BII Luncheon on Tuesday. The Luncheon again provided an excellent opportunity to meet the members of the Council and other trade related guests. As you know Stocktake UK has continued to develop its links with the Institute over the past 12 months, and I look forward to this continuing in the future. As I mentioned to you, If I can help the Institute in any way please do not hesitate to call. Once again thank you for the invitation, and I look forward to seeing you next Saturday at the A.G.M. Regards Stephen Grantham M.I.L.S.A. ( Hons ) Claygate Surrey Dear David Very many thanks for your kind invitation to the Annual BII Luncheon. The event, lunch and more especially the company were all splendid. I am keen to develop our mutual business objectives and I mentioned to George that I would like to run a promotion to our Independent licensed members. Ian Gauld MD Tricon IPA

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Nice To Meet You ...

...DIANE SWIFT To anyone who is a regular AGM attendee, I suppose I am pretty famous. I am the nicer looking, more sensible and usually the most sober of the Swift family. Well that’s the silly bit over with now the serious stuff for anyone who doesn’t know me. I have been married to Chris Swift, council member, marketing executive and training course lecturer for over twenty five years. We began working together in 1981 running a public house in Berkshire. Both of us are from the North of England and we gradually worked our way back to Yorkshire running various pubs and hotels for a whole string of breweries. In 1989 Chris passed the ILTSA examination and won the George Webber Prize and we decided to form our own stocktaking company, CFS Associates. I generally work from home, processing all the jobs which Chris has done the day before, but recently more and more clients want a result on site so I go along and attempt to work in sometimes less than salubrious surroundings.

We have three children. Adam is nineteen and works as an IT Technician at his old school. He has designed the ILTSA web site along with others for clubs and firms in Halifax. Amy is fifteen, clever, good humoured and beautiful – so she tells us! Seriously, she is probably all of these and is at present studying for eleven GCSE’s. I don’t know where all these subjects come from; we only had the three R’s when I was at school. Our youngest, William is thirteen and is seriously into loud music, football, Boy’s Brigade and Jordan (the model not the country). I spend any spare time I have on the children’s school PTFA. I enjoy running Anchor Boys, which is the youngest section of The Boy’s Brigade. I am also an active member of our church pantomime and played the Fairy Godmother last year along side our daughter as Prince Charming.

As secretary of your Institute, I hope to get to know a lot more members. Sitting in on the actual AGM was quite an eye opener but once I have settled in I look forward to playing my part in pushing the Institute forward. I have obviously heard some of the ideas that are being bandied about and some are really exciting, but a lot do rely on support from you, the members. One of the first tasks that we are tackling is updating the membership database and to that end we will be circulating with the August ‘ Stock Auditor’ a questionnaire so that you can tell us exactly what you want from YOUR INSTITUTE.

Beer Quotes

“A woman drove me to drink and I didn’t even have the decency to thank her.” W.C. Fields “You can’t be a real country unless you have a beer and an airline - it helps if you have some kind of a football team, or some nuclear weapons, but at the very least you need a beer.” Frank Zappa

“Sir, if you were my husband, I would poison your drink.” “Madam”, he replied, “if you were my wife, I would drink it.” Lady Astor to Winston Churchill “He is a wise man who invented beer.” Plato

“Always do sober what you said you’d do drunk. That will teach you to keep your mouth shut.” Ernest Hemingway “Without question, the greatest invention in the history of mankind is beer. Oh, I grant you that the wheel was also a fine invention, but the wheel does not go nearly as well with pizza.” Dave Barry “Work is the curse of the drinking class.” Oscar Wilde “If God had intended us to drink beer, He would have given us stomachs.” David Daye

STOCKAUDITOR

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AGM Reports

as presented at the A.G.M.

PRESIDENT’S ADDRESS The year 2003 has been another turbulent time for the Licensed Trade and although there has been a great deal of Tenancy changes, these have not been for the best of reasons. Far too many Pubs are closing, which may be good news for those that are in close proximity, but in the long term this will not help us grow as an Institute. For this reason I do appeal to all members to see if they can recruit a new member or two or our numbers will not grow as we would wish. There are many good men and women out there who are too busy to take the exam, or just do not realise the benefit our institute has to offer. Finally, may I pay tribute to Bruce Thompson our Secretary of the last seven years and a Council member for a lot longer — and who has worked tirelessly for our Institute. We wish him well both in health and good fortune. We know we will be seeing him at Council meetings for some time to come. N.J.C. May 2004

SECRETARY & TREASURER’s REPORT Two thousand and three was a good year for the Institute and indeed it showed a profit of £6,667 compared to a loss last year of half that amount. I have to say that this was not due to ‘luck’ but to a very stringent control over expenditure. It was quite clear at the beginning of the year that profits were not possible if we pursued the route planned on the annual budget. Because we knew of a pending problem early, the Council was able to amend budgets so as to change a projected loss into a reasonable profit. It is particularly gratifying to me that this Profitability came through in my last year as Secretary. It has always been difficult to make ends meet and financial restraints have always prevented us doing everything that we wanted. but somewhere along the line, we as a committee try to give the membership as much as we can with the limited amount of funds available, So much happens in the background about which the membership is unaware - its not a secret and everything doesn’t come to fruition, but permanently people strive to develop more member benefits, for better liaison with Customs & Excise / Inland Revenue, for relationships with other bodies, for a better magazine and not least to developing the training seminars and examinations Over the year we have looked at the possibility of acquiring Charitable Status. We have investigated ‘ Investors in People ‘ and have developed quite a formidable website. The regional representatives scheme is working well and plans are already afoot for an updated version of the book ‘ Taking Stock ‘. All these projects are ongoing and each consumes considerable time, but as a direct result of perseverance, the Institute of Licensed Trade Stock Auditors now receives recognition from many companies, associations and corporate bodies who had never even heard of us a couple of years ago. Our discussions with Customs & Excise are proving very beneficial and a report should be available at this A.G.M. The current year brings us mixed fortunes. the training course in March had to be abandoned due to lack of numbers, but Stocktake UK put fifteen of their franchisees through the examination. They obviously all became members and each attended a two - day refresher course arranged by the Institute, in all twenty - three candidates took the recent examination, so not a bad turnout there. The numbers at this AGM. are a little disappointing, but its nice to see so many well known faces here and to the new ones a very big welcome. We do unfortunately continue to get resignations from the Institute — not I might add due to dissatisfaction, but because people retire, change career or even emigrate. There have however been 29 new recruits so far this year. It is not for me to chart the way forward, but I know big plans are afoot. The recent Council Meeting was very progressive with plenty of new ideas surfacing. With this in mind I am very confident of the future and wish my successors every success. I hope to join the Council and meet my many friends and colleagues regularly. B.S.T. May 2004

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CHAIRMANS REPORT It is twelve months since our 50th AGM at Crieff and since I took the Chairman’s mantle from Steve Berry. Doesn’t time fly, I must be getting old. The first few months as Chairman passed by without any great problems. I had meetings with Bruce Thompson, our Secretary / Treasurer and the Institute was running well, The October training course arrived on the scene and again went off quite well, with a good group of delegates; the exams were also well attended. The licensed trade of course still has its problems; the pub companies tend to he putting the onus more and more onto their tenants and leaseholders with the advent of fully repairing leases and high rents, not to mention the tremendous hike in cost prices; in my opinion they seem to he driving people out of pubs instead of putting them into the good solid business environment that it used to be. This of course affects us as stock auditors; with the many changes coming off we do hopefully get the work, retaining it is another problem we will all have to face. At this moment in time, just as the 51st AGM arrives on the scene, I have to announce that there are now big changes about to take place within the Institute. Bruce Thompson, the Secretary / Treasurer is resigning on health grounds, although he is to come back on Council and will continue to work closely with other council members. Trevor Perrott is to become Treasurer, a post I feel should always be separate from the Secretary. Our new Secretary is to be Di Swift, wife of council member Chris, who is to become Magazine Editor, Marketing Manager and remain a council member. This enables us to quantify the workload, which is great, into one very efficient office. We welcome on the Council Rita Broadbent from West Yorkshire and also a new / old face, Mike Murdoch. In the past three years Mike has been Treasurer of the Association of Wine Educators, the post he leaves this May. I have long admired the qualities that Mike Murdoch can give this Institute and look forward to his return. These two appointments to Council do have to be ratified by the floor at the Scarborough A.G.M. I believe that these changes bring about some exciting times for the Institute, we have I believe appointed the right people to give us a strong input to the licensed trade that we all in our own way give a professional service second to none. I look forward to seeing you at the A.G.M. at Scarborough. G.G. May 2004


AGM Reports

NEW MEMBERS

A View From The Floor - My Experiences in Scarborough ! Friday afternoon saw our arrival in sundrenched Scarborough (honestly) for our fourth A.G.M. weekend. Although relative newcomers to the A.G.M. scene, we were made so welcome from the outset and quickly felt part of ‘the family’. Friday evening was an opportunity to catch up with those present (and ask after those not) over dinner and drinks.

weekend. Another great meal, even better company. News from Rita and the Perrotts (not a 70’s Punk band !) that the charity raffle

View from the Hotel

View from the floor ! Saturday morning-A.G.M. for me, free morning for my wife, Di and Mum and Dad. So, the A.G.M.- a chance to see who does what on our behalf. As the conference progressed I called to mind the famous Monty Python sketch , “What did the Romans do for us?” and thought “What do I.L.T.S.A. do for me?”. Well, apart from the Promotion and Marketing, striving for new members, looking after existing ones, running training courses , raising our profile with Trade and Government organisations, keeping the institute profitable, members benefits, regional reps. to support us all, arranging this and future A.G.M.’s- I think you get my drift ! At close of conference Trevor Knight’s heartfelt testimony and vote of thanks said so eloquently what we on the floor felt. Lunchtime’s presentation of the prestigious ‘George Webber Award’ was followed by one of a more personal nature - our Chairman, George Giles, with customary warmth, presented a certificate to my father, John, commemorating thirty years in business. A very proud moment indeed. Saturday night’s Gala Dinner, the culmination of a fantastic

had once again raised a huge amount for this year’s chosen charity, the R.N.L.I. Proceedings over, time to relax and test one’s drinking skills with the irrepressible Anton Ellender (not likely!). Several Theakstons and red wines (not a cocktail) later,yours truly, normally a shrinking-violet, responded to the D.J.’s request for volunteers and was joined by our new Secretary, Di Swift. Afer a brief session of rather “Dirty Dancing” and fuelled with confidence after Di’s ‘hands-on’ approach and quantities of alcohol, I thought I would go for broke and try the same gambit with our outgoing Secretary, Bruce Thompson. Apparently, he was last seen hiding in the depths of the Hotel cellar!(allegedly). Sunday after breakfast saw the traditional gathering ‘front of house’ for fond farewells and “ See you all next year in the Midlands”.Having taken two decades to become involved by attending a first A.G.M. four years ago, I would not wish to miss another. I am still amazed by how much is on offer in both a business and social sense. Please don’t make my mistake - get involved now. Attend a regional meeting, maybe submit an article for the Magazine/Newsletter (as you can see, you don’t have to be articulate, just keen!) and make time for A.G.M. 2005 - you will be well rewarded. Thanks one and all for a superb weekend. Must sign off now - I’m aiming to queue overnight for the release of the latest Gary Cox tuition DVD/CD entitled “I taught Fred & Ginger - Now it’s your turn”. Hope to see you all next year.

Award to John Sutton

p.s. No apologies if some of the names, events (and probably content) make little or no sense - turn up next year and it will all fall into place ! Rob Sutton F.I.L.S.A.

A warm welcome is extended to the following new members :Christopher Crellen Frederick Leatherbarrow Stephen Harris Roger Bell Mark Lonsdale Darryl Creed Mark Hind Paul Beech Joseph Lynch Gareth Richards Michael Sanderson Michael Murdoch Anthony Darbyshire Ian Furner Robert Fitzsimmons Russell Proctor Sallie Farrell David Gould John Andrew Graham Bailey Raymond O’Brien John Ingram David Ball Michael Byrne Ralph Miller Ashley Ayre

Cleveland Manchester Maidstone Skipton Derbyshire Sheffield Warwickshire Derby Co.Cork Eire Staffordshire Cornwall Merseyside West Yorkshire Hampshire East Sussex Stratford Hampshire Doncaster West Yorkshire Monmouthshire Devon West Midlands Northants Worcestershire Berwickshire Derby

Retirements We wish the following members a long, happy and peaceful retirement Kenneth Hoyle A. Randall George Abel

Bradford Reading Leicestershire

Resignations The following members have resigned from the Institute Richard Wise Pio Fenech Peter Underdown Gwyn Parkhouse

Derbyshire Co. Durham Nottingham Bridgend

Would members please note that within the terms of our “Articles of Memorandum”, they must give a minimum of three months’ notice in writing if they wish to resign from the Institute.

I would just like to acknowledge all the kind notes and messages of support, which have come from the membership. These are too many to respond to individually, but thank you everybody - it has been a pleasure working with the Institute and I wish you all every success in the future. Bruce Thompson F.I.L.S.A. STOCKAUDITOR

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Thameside Taverns

London’s Thames-side Taverns Remembered Ten years on, Trevor Knight recalls the start of his pub walk along the River Thames.......... As my brewery journey across Britain reaches the beautiful river valleys of the Severn and the Wye, the importance of our great rivers has reminded me of perhaps the greatest of them all, the River Thames.

Thameside were named after famous vessels of the time. I was reminded of this theme recently when Britain’s latest and biggest warship H.M.S. Ark Royal visited Greenwich. To the best of my knowledge there isn’t a pub named after the aircraft carrier, but

I am taking a break from my brewery journey in this magazine to recall a personal event of ten years ago, when I had just begun another journey – the 170 mile walk along the Thames Path from Greenwich to the source in Gloucestershire. My aim was to walk as much of the newly designated national trail and visit as many of the famous riverside inns as possible. “Old Father Thames” has played an important part in the development of London as our capital city since Roman times. The journey along the Thames Path is one of unique contrasts but the predominant theme from the estuary in the North Sea and into the Pool of London is that of a working river. The great docks have all but gone now but where there is a river, there have always been boats. The influence of working boats and sea-going craft of all types meant many of the pubs along London’s

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Although it is located in a dry dock alongside the Thames, Cutty Sark’s complex structure of wood and metal has been deteriorating for many years, but a volunteer team of scientists and engineers are working around the clock in an attempt to save the grade one listed structure. On the arrival of The Cutty Sark at Ballast Quay in 1954, the nearby Green Man public house was renamed Cutty Sark in honour of the famous ship.

another famous ship from years gone by certainly has – The Cutty Sark. The world’s most famous clipper ship has been in the news recently as attempts are made to save the 134 year old vessel from rot and rust. For the past fifty years, the fastest clipper of its time has dominated the Greenwich skyline. It forms part of the World Heritage Site which includes the National Maritime Museum, the old Royal Naval College and Park and the Royal Observatory.

Reputedly built in 1805 and tucked away amongst the period setting cobbled streets and terraced houses, the pub is difficult to find, but the name is spelled out in large letters painted on the large Georgian bow windows with curved sashes. Doors lead directly onto the pavement and the grand harbour master’s office built in 1840. The interior of the pub is a step back in time. There are flagstone floors, tables and chairs made from old barrels and a grand fireplace. The regal staircase rises to the first floor gallery with a multitude of rooms in all directions. The magnificent view from the riverside terrace of the pub is westward towards the old industrialised part of the River


Thameside Taverns Back in the seventeenth century, the Mayflower Inn known then as The Shippe was the centre of social life in the village.

Thames leading to the Pool of London and the historic capital. In large measure, the wealth of London was founded on coal shipped from the coalfields of the north-east of England. With the coal came characters such as Captain James Cook from Whitby, on wooden build collier ships.

It was from a riverside jetty near here that Captain Christopher Jones set sail in The Mayflower carrying the Pilgrim Fathers to America. In 1611 Captain Jones sailed The Mayflower from his native Harwich to a mooring near to the inn. Excitement grew as plans were announced that Captain Jones and his crew of local Rotherhithe men were to set sail for the New World in 1620, therefore writing the first pages in the history of America. The renovated jetty is still in use today.

In December 1993, I started my walk along the Thames Path at London’s oldest riverside pub. The Prospect of Whitby at Wapping was named after one of the old collier ships which were registered at Whitby. Captain Cook’s ship The Endeavour, in which he explored the Pacific, was a converted collier. Back in 1543, The Prospect of Whitby originated as a timber-framed country house and was known as the Devil’s Tavern. It became the meeting place for sailors bound for adventure overseas. One of the best known was Sir Hugh Willoughby who, in 1553 sailed from here in a disastrous attempt to discover the North East Passage to China. Towards the end of the sixteenth century, the Devils Tavern became the place of public execution of criminals and pirates and crowds would flock to the area on these occasions. The infamous Judge Jeffreys lived locally and used The Prospect of Whitby on his way to and from Execution Dock. Other notables who frequented the pub over the years included Charles Dickens, Doctor Johnson, the diarist Samuel Pepys and the artist Turner.

Since these historic days, the pub has suffered many adversities, not the least of which was The Blitz of 1940 when the whole of the upper floor was blown away. Restoration work was expertly carried out, the low beamed ceiling being saved. short distance under the river. The tunnel was completed by Marc Brunel in 1843. The eighteen years of construction was a major achievement being the first tunnel ever built under a navigable waterway. Rotherhithe is in Bermondsey, a part of London that does not often appeal to the tourist. Rotherhithe has long been famous for its docks, the first constructed on the Thames. One of Turner’s finest paintings shows the fighting ship Temeraine being towed to her final berth in Rotherhithe by a steam tug.

The appropriate nautical atmosphere of this wonderful seventeenth century Thameside inn has been maintained reflecting the history of the ship from which the inn is named and the adventurous spirit of those who sailed in her.

SELF-INKING STAMPS Includes : Institute Logo Date (Up to 4 years) Trading Name For further information please contact the Secretary. Allow up to 6 weeks for delivery Price Inclusive of VAT & Postage £35 .00

Although the surrounding area has changed much over the years, the interior of the pub is a monument to the past. Worn flagstones pave the bar and old barrels support the counter. Wooden furniture is much in evidence and gas lamps complete the atmosphere. A wooden veranda overlooks the Thames completing the riverside location. The association with London’s riverside pubs and famous ships of the past continues on the opposite bank of the river to Wapping, at Rotherhithe. No bridge or ferry here however, but the East London underground line will take us the

STOCKAUDITOR

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Wine Cellar When New World wines emulate Old World wine Mike Murdoch F.I.L.S.A. High up in the Northern Rhone region of France, this majestic river has created deep gorges, now planted with vines on perilously steep vineyards, around the towns of Cote Roti. Southwards towards the towns of Hermitage the river takes a lazy bend around the granite outcrop which is Tain l’Hermitage itself. Onwards

towards the Mediterranean the river takes in the massive area of Cote de Rhone starting near Montelimar and on to Avignon where the vineyards of Chateauneuf du Pape take over. In this Northern section the mighty Syrah grape dominates the red wines. Wines like Cote Roti, Cornas, St Joseph, Hermitage and Crozes Hermitage are all made using this grape variety, although Cote Roti can use up to 20% of a white grape called Viognier to soften the sometimes high tannic structure.. Move to the Southern Rhone and there is an eclectic blend of Grenache, Syrah, Mourvedre (the Aussies call this Mataro) and Cinsault. There can be any

combination of these wines which means that if you like a Cote de Rhone then you might not like another producers because he or she will be using a different blend ratio of these grapes. Then there are several villages within the Cote de Rhone appellation that have their own appellation, like Gigondas or Vacqueyras. Then there are others that take on the better classification than Cote de Rhone, that of Cote de Rhone Villages. Sixteen top villages that are allowed to include their village name on the label as well, Cote de Rhone Village “Sablet” for example. But go to the South African section in your supermarket or independent wine merchant and check out a cheeky take on one of these famous names.

dollop of Pinotage as well as the Shiraz, Carignan, Grenache & Mourvedre. To say it was an outstanding success is an understatement. The first vintage was in 1999 and 165,000 cases were produced and sold, 100,00 were red the rest was rose & white.

I am not a great lover of irrelevant, flippant sounding wine names, like Old Git or Fat Bastard Chardonnay or Orang-Utan Chardonnay (although there is 50p from each bottle sold to be given to the Rainforest Foundation) but I am sure that there will be a lot of OLD GIT red sold over the Father’s day period. One wine that does capture my imagination has got to be the “tongue in cheek” South African red Goats do Roam. A pure pun, which falls flat in conservative South Africa, on the Cote de Rhone wine from France, is one of its best selling wine overseas.

The FAIRVIEW Estate, owned by Charles Back, situated in the Paarl district of South Africa produces this wine and on the estate they have a herd of Goats from which they produce a range of Cheeses, all of which are available from their shop. It is the story of the Goats, that live in a tower on the estate that gave rise to this wine. The story goes that Charles Back’s son Jason left the gate open at the bottom of the tower one night and in the morning the goats were seen to be eating the best of the grapes. On closer inspection they had chosen different grapes to eat and so a blend was made from the goats selection. A good story or a first class marketing tool, who knows but it makes

The wine shares the principal grape varieties of its French counterpart with a

Goat Tower

Panoramic View of the The Fairview Estate

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STOCKAUDITOR


Wine Cellar for good reading and the wine is excellent too. Hard on the heals of the Goats do Roam are two relatively new wines. Goats do Roam in Villages, a pun on the Cote de Rhone Village appellation, being a better selection of grapes for a more serious wine. The last of the wines to be added to the stable is Goat Roti, an intended pun on the renowned Cote Roti again from the Northern Rhone.

Goats do Roam Wine Label

This is the most serious of them all, made from selected Shiraz, Grenache, Carignan & Viognier, a white aromatic grape which softens the wine out a little. The bunches were sorted for under & over ripe grapes which were removed, then gently pressed and fermented in open topped fermentation vessels prior to going into French oak casks. This is a big wine in all respects, being 15% abv but with ripe, chunky fruit and a spicy persistent finish with silky tannins. Goats do Roam is widely available from supermarkets like Booths & Tesco for around £4.99, the Goats do Roam in Villages around £6.89 and Goat Roti at £8.99 both from Majestic Wine Warehouse. This is a touch of the magic of South African wines, pure sunshine in a glass.

Mike Murdoch F.I.L.S.A.

Wanted ! Stock auditors with 1st hand experience of clients converting from 25ml to 35ml measures and who would be willing to assist in a small project by providing facts and figures on the effects that conversion has had on that clients business. The results will be independently analysed and a fee is being negotiated. The project is designed to be no threat to client confidentiality. For more information about what will be required please register your interest by sending your contact details to:David Ganney MILSA, FBII by e-mail broadview@btinternet.com

Whisky Galore Single Malts - How to appreciate them ! Single malts are the aristocrats of whisky. Their ancestry traces back to a time when farmers used illicit stills to avoid punitive excise duty. These single malts are distilled today by the same traditional pot still process. They are known as single malts because each is unblended, the product of a uniquely different distillery. As these tasting notes, and more importantly, your palate will reveal, they are also the product of their geography. Taste is influenced greatly by origin. The Islands, Highlands and Lowlands have contrasting climates and characters. This is imparted into the ingredients. Subtle differences emerge as the result of the barley, peat and fine spring water being combined with local skills, types of cask and distillery methods. Malts share one distinction. Unlike vintage wines they reach maturity in the cask. Once bottled their character remains unaltered.

tasting. Begin by selecting a tulip shaped glass. The wide waist and narrow rim will capture and concentrate the aroma far better than a conventional whisky tumbler. Next pour a measure of your chosen malt, warm the glass for a moment in your hand and then swirl and inhale the ‘nose’.

character. Only then allow yourself the pleasure of sipping ‘uisge beatha’. Enjoy the initial thrill of the spirit, the smooth feel as it rolls over the tongue and the lingering finish.

There are those who prefer to sip a malt on its own like a cognac. However the more general custom in Scotland is to add a little water before tasting – preferably from a Scottish Spring, and never sparkling. Then nose again to see how the water unlocks a more complex

When time allows I enjoy researching a strange malt when I come across it on a count. How about a challenge ? Send me details of any malts that you come across and I will endeavor to find a little about them. All I ask is that they are commercially available. If I cannot find any information about them I will buy you a drink at the next AGM.

By this ceremony you will appreciate the many subtleties of each malt.

Whichever malt you first decide to sample there is a certain ceremony in the STOCKAUDITOR

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Ivor Deficit Having only just made it back from the last A.G.M. in Perth - I WISH SOMEONE HAD TOLD ME THAT IT WAS IN SCOTLAND NOT BLOODY AUSTRALIA – I have been fulminating over life in general and the licensed trade in particular and have decided that I cannot pretend to be nice anymore. It seems to me that we need a special section of our august body for those of us who are truly grumpy. I shall be sidling up to Gorgeous George the Geordie Gruppenfuhrer at the Seaview Boarding House in Scarborough (Cruet 6d extra) and whilst he is in his usual post-council meeting stupor I will suggest we form the SOGS or Society of Grumpy Stocktakers.

SOGS OR SOCIETY OF GRUMPY STOCKTAKERS To see if you qualify, I append the top 10 things that seem to ring my bell and await your further suggestions: Recyclable Packaging. What a con this is. I have just checked up on the continent and in my small survey (sitting outside a bar in France and watching a delivery) they seem to have returnable everything including large mineral water bottles. The crafty people from you know where have stopped using returnable bottles which can be washed and used many times – this does seem ecologically sound to me – and left our poor clients to bear the cost of disposal. This is a way of putting up the price of products and pretending to care for the environment but actually doing no such thing. We should encourage licensees to use any supplier who has returnable bottles and sentence the people who made this decision to spend the rest of their lives with a skip full of non-returnables looking for an empty bottle bank on a wet Monday morning.

At a recent meeting with George Dubya Bush, I explain to him, how big a 35ml measure actually is. The person who rings at nine o’clock at night to cancel a stocktake the next day.

Anyone who knows nothing about the licensed trade but has taken a pub “Just to give it a go”

Anybody who strolls up behind you just as you’ve started the paperwork and says: “How’s it looking then?”

People who call themselves stock auditors but can’t be bothered to take an exam and prove a minimum of competence.

Pretty much anything to do with computers.

There are, of course, compensations to our job and any Grumpy Stocktaker can always have the day lightened by those little moments that can even cause the scowl to twist into a strange expression that is known as a smile. Here are my top 10:

Chest Freezers with that layer of glacial scum at the bottom. Solicitors/Accountants who think arranging changeovers for the 1st of the month is a great idea. Gordon Brown – I don’t care what party he’s in, he’s a smug git who wants to take all my money.

Now those are the things that can set me off without due provocation. Here are the top 10 things that just make me roll my eyes and mutter to myself: Clients that are stupid - for example the one who said he didn’t need stocktakes any more as the brewery had installed Brulines. No amount of telling him the truth got through and I just hope he goes bust quickly so as to lessen the agony for him. The new person in a pub you’ve already changed 3 times this year who tells you all about their plans to introduce food. Any Club committee member who tells you that selling beer for 50p a pint will bring in trade and solve all their problems. Area managers that are 12 years old (or so it seems). Breweries putting up the price of beer. The client who brightly announces: “I’ve decided to buy a computer”

Anybody who sits and eats breakfast in front of you without offering at least a bacon sandwich.

Just as you think the deficit can’t get any worse, someone finds another delivery note.

STOCKAUDITOR

Nice cleaners who ask before they turn on the hoover.

Speed Cameras.

Anybody who doesn’t offer you a cup of tea or coffee first thing in the morning.

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Clients that ask you to their wedding/christening/party of any sort.

JUST AS YOU THINK THE DEFICIT CAN’T GET ANY WORSE, SOMEONE FINDS ANOTHER DELIVERY NOTE ! Anybody who makes you a cup of tea or coffee first thing in the morning. Anybody who makes you a full English breakfast. People who keep delivery notes in order and give them to you with the relevant invoices, sales sheets and wastage books. Anyone who pays on the day, especially in cash. Licensees who ring up and ask you to book in a stocktake without even bothering to ask what the fee will be. The client who recommended you to that person. Anybody who says “come when you want, I’ll be up” and is. And finally (of course): Other qualified stocktakers who make changeovers a real pleasure. So there you are – my top 10’s. I’ll see you in Scarborough and we’ll decide a few more things that make us all go

ooooooh.

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In 1987 Joe Cocker had a big hit with what? What is the system of weights used to weigh precious metals? What term is applied to exploring the Internet? Who played the lead role in the 1996 release 'Daylight'? Whose autobiography is 'Peacework'? What is the name of the English inventor of the shorthand system? Who was the first mother in law of Henry VIII? What was Benny Hill’s job before he became famous? Who is married to Lenny Henry? Who was the U.K.’s first female Prime Minister? The first league of professional footballers was formed in what year? What is the American word for an undertaker? What is the collective name for a group of lions? What is the capital of Haiti? What European country won the world cup in 1998? Lady Chatterley's lover was the gamekeeper - what was his name? Who was the Goddess of Love and mother of Eros? By what name was Lesley Hornby better known? What does the Latin word 'bona fida' mean? Who sang 'Like a Prayer' in 1989?

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Affording reasonable ground for belief (11) Insects (4) Widespread (4) Sweetener (5) Long period of time (U.S.) (3) Nought (3) Take in written matter (4) Waterfowl (4) Mouthful or so of liquid (3) _ _ _ _ esteem (4) Covet (4)

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Low temperature (4) Shine with ray of light (4) _ _ _ Grande (Mexican river) (3) Large 21 across (4) Against (4) Before the euro (3) Adult female (slang) (3) First Greek letter (5) Sharp wood fastener (4)

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Classic (3) Hot-tasting capsicum (6) Radius (3) Turkish bath (5) Tight (4) Contemptible person (slang) (3) Little Alison (3) Top (anag) (1.1.1) For instance (2) Auditor (1.1)

Congratulations to Dorothy Clements who was the first succesful entrant from Issue 52 and wins a gift voucher. Other correctly completed answers were received from Mrs Melanie Dive of Dorset and Richard Grafton also from Dorset.

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Letters

MOUNT KILIMANJARO 19,340 ft HIKE AWAY FOR SCOPE

CUSTOMERS RESPONSIBILITY OR NOT?? Lock up licensed premises are not rare and are most commonly off licenses or sports clubs. During the regular monthly visit to a cricket club I had reason to call Courage’s to chase up a credit for a short delivery of a case of cans of Coca Cola. I had found the short delivery myself on the day of the previous stocktake. Having rung Courage at the time they said they would look into it and send the relevant credit note. The credit note had not arrived at the time of this current stocktake so I called them again, I managed to speak to the same operative at Courage’s. The reply I received astounded me. I was told “As you are a lock up job we (Courage’s) take no responsibility for short deliveries, the responsibility is yours”.

Roger Corti, Institute member, from Eastcote, is taking up the biggest challenge of his life! On June 17th 2004, he will be travelling to Tanzania to take part in the Mt Kilimanjaro Hike Away for Scope, the charity for people with cerebal palsy. He will be joining 50 other people gathered from all walks of life from around the UK. They will be trekking five days to reach the summit of Africa’s highest mountain, which despite it’s position on the equator, is permanently covered with snow. They will be trekking through jungle, moorland and barren “lunar” landscapes to reach the summit, and temperatures will range from tropical to sub-zero. Roger Corti, who is 60, is taking this challenge seriously. He has already given up smoking and has taken up an exercise regime including swimming and cycling to reach his goal.

I have never heard of this in over 30 years of stocktaking. Should this statement be true, the draymen could short deliver a keg of beer every delivery and according to Courage’s there is nothing the customer can do about it, other than to no longer be a lock up job but make sure somebody is there to take delivery. Surely this cannot be right? Has anybody else come across this problem with suppliers at lock up jobs? Should we give Courage’s the right of reply to this statement?

THE PUBLICAN LOSES OUT AGAIN! Roger is the Group Scout Leader of the 4th Ruislip Scouts in Ruislip, and has been a leader there for 25 years. He is setting an example to his scouts of helping others, and proving he is not yet over the hill!

Going through the paper work for a client this month I came across a letter from Interbrew, with reference to a returned 22gallon keg of beer.

In his work as a Stocktaker and Valuer, he counts and values beer and whisky. At the end of this trek, he’ll pay anything for a cold beer!

They were stating that no credit was being given. This is not unusual in some circumstances, out of date, adulterated product or too little in the container.

He has pledged to raise £5000 each for Scope, and says he does not want to let the charity down. Training is hard with lots of hill walking. Roger celebrated his 60th birthday in April by climbing Ben Nevis up in Scotland, but the whisky made it worthwhile.. If you can help Roger, reach his target, please contact them on 01895 638198 or visit the online donation website www.justgiving.com/go4th

Roger Corti 24 Wentworth Drive Eastcote, Pinner Middx HA5 2PU

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They have yet again moved the goal posts and I for one have not seen any communication revising the amount that had been previously quoted, ie: 16gallon in a 22 and 6gallon in an 11gallon keg. So along with the larger and larger increases in the cost prices of the products publicans are now expected to lose out when returning beer.

Answers to Quiz 1. Unchain my heart. 2. Troy weights. 3. Surfing. 4. Bruce Willis. 5. Spike Milligan. 6. Isaac Pitman. 7. Isabella I of Castile and Aragon 8. Milkman. 9. Dawn French. 10. Margaret Thatcher. 11. 1920. 12. Mortician. 13. A pride. 14. Port-au-Prince. 15. France. 16. Oliver Mellows. 17. Aphrodite. 18. Twiggy. 19. In good faith 20. Madonna.

If you want more information about the events run by Scope, please ring 0800 0191200

The reason given in this letter was because more than 3 gallons had been taken out of it.

In some circumstances there may be good reason, but what if the spear is short or there is a fault in the keg, which does not come to light until the keg is half used. Will they be expected to suffer the loss in these circumstances also? Ron Foster FILSA


Members Corner

REFLECTIONS OF A BOTTLE COUNTER In parallel with the association’s name changing from Licensed Trade Stocktakers to Licensed Trade Stock Auditors, perhaps I too, have progressed from humble bottle counter to stocktaker and now stock auditor.

nestled under the A4 flyover, and what was the first stock item my father called out? Why, Chat d’Yquem! At the time I did not think stocktaking involved learning a foreign language!

This month I celebrated 50 years as a member of our profession and held a party with family and friends at one of my regular jobs, The Oak Barn Restaurant, Burgess Hill, West Sussex. I joined our association on the recommendation of a close friend of 40 years, Ashley Denman. Ashley was on the A.L.T.S. committee in the days of John Watts as Secretary and Norman Clements doing his valuable foundation work for the association he has graced so superbly for so many decades.

I think all stocktakers need one firm of brokers with whom they can exchange reciprocal work. The Rutter family were most fortunate in those early years to have established a most profitable and happy relationship with Mr J.F. (Rex) Marsden King of Fleuret, Haxell, King and Shoard. I do not go back quite so far as Fleuret, Haxell, Marks and Barley, a name familiar to the older members of the association. Fleurets had J.Lyons as clients and, through that, I worked at changeovers at London Heathrow Airport and Gatwick Airport when J.Lyons were taking over a concession on the wet and dry stocks, and this entailed working right through the night. We also did regular stocktaking for many J.Lyons hotels, which entailed much travelling.

Down my five decades how things have changed! From my association entry test which was merely verbal, to the theory and practical more stringent tests of today. From the drinks on display such as Stingo, Cream Label, Red Barrel and Double Diamond when I started, to the Alcopops today. Changeovers too. Forty years ago they were ‘big’ days with many professionals represented, brokers, stocktakers, insurance reps, trade reps, brewery directors etc., and often conducted alongside a generous spread prepared by the new owners. I readily recall my first stocktaking day. My parents already were stocktakers and on Spring Bank Holiday Monday 1954 we went to take stock at The Duke of Cambridge, Shannon’s Corner, Rayne’s Park, London. I gather it is still there

On one changeover down in Cornwall I recall a young Barry Gillham assisting Mr King by checking the inventory. That Barry Gillham is now chairman of Fleurets. Monthly stocktaking at hotels has always been my favourite work, as I love to see the various departments helping to make up and represent the whole picture and image of the particular hotel. I have been most fortunate in being the stocktaker for many years at the Stafford Hotel, St.James, London, The

Howard Hotel on the Embankment, The Kensington Palace Hotel and a most privileged and prestigious association of about twenty years with the top quality outside caterers, Searcys who run concessions at the Royal Opera House, Twickenham Rugby Ground, The Stock Exchange and at one time we were conducting monthly stocks on twenty four Imperial Wine Stores around London and The Home Counties, I.W.S. being an off-shoot of Searcys. For a while at Searcys office in Battersea, I would see the Countess of Wessex (formerly Sophie Rhys Jones) working on some public relations work for the company. After fifty years of stocktaking, I am now semi-retired and with just a few local jobs creating a lifestyle which is ideal, although one very interesting big job last year was counting and checking the wine stocks at London City Bond at Tilbury owned by an international film director. My greatest delight these days is to know that my two children, Alison and Jonathan are both stock auditors with Jonathan qualifying as a M.I.L.S.A. in December 2001, and with an ever-increasing job ledger, I am proud that they are the third generation of Rutters to our trade, a trade that so many of us cling to for a large number of years unable, not perhaps wanting to escape the varied and interesting work, the growth of strong personal relationships with the proprietors and the satisfaction of providing an important service to many who do not understand figures and percentages too easily. Bottle counter to stock auditor, alongside ready reckoner, calculator to computer, it has been a fascinating journey, never dull, meeting a few rascals along the way, but mainly privileged to have enjoyed such variety and shared so much of our clients lives. It is all covered in my trade scrapbook, which, incidentally, contains a hand written, extended stock sheet from the well-known firm of E.H.Huxley and it covers a trading month in 1934. I must hand it over for the archives of our association.

Jonathon Rutter M.I.L.S.A. , David Rutter and Beth Rutter DAVID RUTTER STOCKAUDITOR

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Training I.L.T.S.A. TRAINING SEMINARS ARE THEY WORTH GOING ON? Bruce Thompson F.I.L.S.A. Other than the most experienced Stock Auditors, everybody needs to charge their batteries, bring themselves up to date and get rid of any bad habits once in a while. Our courses are not designed for that, but they are

planned in such a way that anyone with limited or little experience of the profession will come into it properly taught. The lecturers have over 100 years of stocktaking experience behind them and all have been involved for several years with these seminars. They are comprehensive, thorough and interesting – no one is allowed to drop behind and everybody comes out knowing more than when they went in.

w w w.iltsa.co .u k

Looking at critiques we see comments like ‘fantastic’, ‘excellent course’, ‘well experienced tutors’, ‘been a total eye opener’, ‘never knew there was so much to it’ and many, many more – all complimentary. Right from the start when delegates are shown how to use a calculator, they work long hours with plenty of personal tuition when required. Participants take their own stock counts, later proving these results – they hear extensive lectures on post-mixes, changeover valuations, food stocktaking, bookkeeping, miscellaneous counts and many more subjects. Seminars are deliberately kept very

interactive and those on them are encouraged to participate as much as possible. Going back to my opening sentence – we all develop our own way of doing things, either as a short cut or “I always do it this way” and furthermore we often haven’t the time to train others properly. We give them some basic education and then let them get on with it – hardly a proper apprenticeship! It is important to the individual that he or she is properly trained and that is where the I.L.T.S.A. training seminars come in. The lecturers know the job and have wide experience of passing on this knowledge. No one pretends that we can create a Stock Auditor in five days, but we can supply a very good basic grounding which will set people on the right path for the future. Whether it be Hotel Managers, Accountants, Bar supervisors or the trainee Stock Auditor, the I.L.T.S.A. training course is the ideal vehicle for training.

Exam Success Congratulations to the following Associate members who recently passed their Institute examinations:Simon Tyer David North Denise McGill Anthony Darbyshire Michael Murdoch John Ingram Ray O’Brien Robert Fitzsimmons Ralph Miller Stephen Harris Jane Eldridge Sallie Farrell Graham Bailey

Isle of Man South Yorks Merseyside West Yorks Merseyside West Midlands Devon Sussex Berwickshire Kent North Yorkshire Hampshire Monmouthshire

Martyn Roslyn has been elevated to a fellow of the Institute

FELLOWSHIP All members can apply, after seven years of having qualified, for elevation to Fellowship. In return we give you:

15% off all merchandise purchased through the Institute, members brochure - asterisk beside your name: Certificate of Fellowship: Status within the profession. Use of the designation F.I.L.S.A. A quick note or phone call to the Secretary starts the ball rolling, so if you qualify do it today.

www.iltsa.co.uk The next course is to be held at Craiglands Hotel, Ilkley between the 14th and 18th October 2004. Copies of the syllabus can be downloaded from our website www.iltsa.co.uk or direct from the Secretary on

01422 366633

Whether you are looking for a change of career or just want to gain a working knowledge of stocktaking

Hea

Residential Training Seminars October 14th to 18th 2004

For further details on all aspects of the Institute contact The Secretary on 01422 366633 or visit out website - www.iltsa.co.uk Always look for the letters F.I.L.S.A. & M.I.L.S.A. “ Over Fifty years of raising stocktaking standards “

Don’t forget our very own website complete with qualified members database, Member’s forum and much much more !


Stock Auditor www.iltsa.co.uk

THE MAGAZINE FOR THE INSTITUTE OF LICENSED TRADE STOCK AUDITORS

ISSUE 54

ISSN 1471 - 0471

AUGUST 2004

Rise in Minimum Wage From October 2004 there will be a further increase to the minimum wage. For the first time teenagers will have a minimum rate set at a minimum of £ 3.00 for 16 and 17 year olds. The National Minimum wage will increase to £ 4.85 for those aged over 21 whilst 18 – 21 year olds can expect a minimum of £ 4.10 an hour. The Department for Trade and Industry said it would benefit 1.6 million low – paid workers.

Red Carpet already out for 2005 AGM

Fantastic Venue for the 52nd A.G.M. Bosworth Hall Hotel offers luxury accommodation and facilities to reflect an era when lavish entertainment in the grand manner was the norm. Guests will discover that it is still the norm today, and can expect to enjoy outstanding hospitality in exceptional comfort. Was this gentleman a founder member ?....... Page 12

Full Story Page 6

The hotel’s bedrooms are all individually designed, and beautifully decorated to create surroundings of unparalleled elegance. The rooms are sumptuously furnished in period style, some with four poster beds. All have private en-suite bathrooms, some with cast iron freestanding baths with claw feet, and Victorian style washstands with brass fittings, adding that extra touch of period charm. All rooms have colour television, hairdryer, radio, direct dial telephone, trouser press and tea and coffee making facilities. The Hall’s principal public rooms have all been renovated and refurbished to a high standard, preserving the original plasterwork ceilings and cornices, carved panels and ornate fireplaces. A good Dining Room is considered by many to be the expression of civilised life, and as befits Bosworth Hall, the highest standards of service and hospitality are maintained. Crompton’s French Restaurant has pleasant views over the terrace and gardens. You can enjoy traditional French or English cuisine, carefully prepared and immaculately presented. Compliment your choice of food from a selection of fine wines to please a discerning palate. There are also a selection of private dining rooms available.

In this Issue: Tipping, Data Protection , The New Generation, Ivor Deficit and regular features !


From The Editor

Chris Swift Tel:- 01422 366633 chrisswift@iltsa.co.uk

Welcome to this, my second attempt at the magazine. I hope that you enjoy it. A great deal of time and effort is being expended on the magazine and I really would welcome more input from members to make it more appealing not just for our membership but perhaps for a wider audience ! I know that we are all extremely busy people but I am amazed that out of a circulation of over 500 we had only three entries for the competition, one query about malt whisky and not one person was moved to write to the editor about any of the articles in the June issue. Even Ivor Deficit did not receive any fan mail. I was asked how we, as stock auditors, stood with regard to data protection. I have contacted the Data Protection Agency and have attempted to answer that query. The good news is that individual members should be OK and do not need to register. However you are still expected to comply with the spirit of the law. The Institute, as a matter of interest ,are registered and, to the best of my knowledge, are complying with the act. Rita Broadbent and Alan Brown join old stalwarts, Trevor Knight and Mike Murdoch in this issue. If you have never done a ‘nice to meet you’, don’t be shy, please submit a brief synopsis of your career along with a recent photograph. Let the rest of the membership know about you. Ivor has found a long lost relative and gives us an insight into some of the problems of the day - talk about history repeating itself ! The planning for the 2005 AGM is now well under way. We believe we have an excellent venue in Bosworth Hall at Market Bosworth. For our older members they may vaguely remember the Battle of Bosworth field, which finally decided the war of the Roses – we now, play cricket to resolve the issue. Seriously though, the picturesque village is only five minutes walk away with an admirable selection of pubs serving traditional English ales.

Norman Clements F.I.L.S.A. 01491 575451 President normanclements@iltsa.co.uk Favourite T.V. Programme ‘ A Touch of Frost ‘ Steve Berry F.I.L.S.A. 0131 01968 670600 Chair Exam & Training steveberry@iltsa.co.uk Favourite T.V. Programme ‘ Black Adder ’ Trevor Perrott F.I.L.S.A. 01483 829437 Treasurer trevorperrott@iltsa.co.uk Favourite T.V. Programme ‘ Goodnight Sweetheart ’ Bruce Thompson F.I.L.S.A. 0131 332 0875 brucethompson@iltsa.co.uk Favourite T.V. Programme Won’t say Ron Foster F.I.L.S.A. 01793 771959 Regional Reps ronfoster@iltsa.co.uk Favourite T.V. Programme ‘ A Touch of Frost ‘ David Downard M.I.L.S.A. 01403 865309 Member’s Benefits daviddownard@iltsa.co.uk Favourite T.V. Programme ‘ Eastenders ‘

In the next issue there will be a report about the new Flat Rate VAT scheme, which I believe, should be of interest to many of our members. By that time I will have submitted two VAT returns. My first impression is that it is a good scheme made much simpler for the small business. I hear through the grapevine that our ‘Flying Stocktaker’ has had his wings clipped and is recovering from an operation - I do hope that you are feeling better David and hopefully will be fighting fit soon.

David Ganney M.I.L.S.A. 0208 3938361 B.I.I. Liason davidganney@iltsa.co.uk

Di has settled into her new role very well and hopefully she will write some sort of article for the next issue. My sincere thanks to Trevor Knight, Mike Murdoch, Rita Broadbent, Ivor Deficit,Alan Brown, Les Kerr and all Council members for assistance in the preparation of this magazine.

Mike Murdoch F.I.L.S.A. 01254 247496

Deadline for the October issue is the 16th September so please get writing. This magazine is published by the Institute of Licensed Trade Stock Auditors. Whilst welcoming any contributions, the editor reserves the right to alter or amend them if necessary. Any opinions expressed are not necessarily those of the Council and are accepted only on that understanding. No part of this magazine may be reproduced or transmitted without written permission of the publishers. Printed by :- Pickles Printers, Halifax, West Yorkshire 01422 353239 All Subsciptions payable in advance. Published 6 times per year post free Annual Subscription £24.00 © Institute of Licensed Trade Stock Auditors 2004

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STOCKAUDITOR

Favourite T.V. Programme ‘ Dinner Ladies ‘

mikemurdoch@iltsa.co.uk Favourite T.V. Programme ‘ Fawlty Towers ‘ Rita Broadbent F.I.L.S.A. 01274 870989 ritabroadbent@iltsa.co.uk Favourite T.V .Programme ‘Dalziel & Pascoe’


View From The Chair

George Giles Tel:- 0191 386 7699 george giles@iltsa.co.uk

“ We are always interested in any ideas from anyone within

our Institute that will keep I.L.T.S.A. at the forefront of the trade that we all work in. “ The state of our trade seems to be in the news more and more of late I have noticed lately in the daily press that the FSB (Federation of Small Businesses) have told a committee of MP’s that pub company profits were soaring while publicans often worked more than 90 hours a week for less than £200. The trade and Industry Select Committee is carrying out an investigation into the treatment of tenants by pub companies . When the beer orders were introduced by Lord Young in 1989 it was never envisaged that the brewers would merely give way to the pub companies of today. A licensee who is a multiple operator ,running two tenancies/leaseholds and a free house using the same beers was charged £ 117.50 less for a barrel of beer in his free house compared to the price he paid for the same in one of his other outlets . The investigation is ongoing and it will be interesting to see who comes out with what. This has a knock on effect on our profession as in many cases the standard is reducing as the Pub companies struggle to recruit professional licensees. Under the brewers regular cellar checks were the norm and most breweries ran very good training courses. We are still in the early stages of the recent changes to our institute , and one of my main aims is to involve more of our membership. I recently wrote to several members asking them to help us build up a bank of questions we can use in our twice yearly examinations. Enclosed with this magazine is a questionnaire for all members to fill in. Please do take the time to tell us what you want and any ideas that may help us move forward, we are always interested in any ideas from anyone within our Institute that will keep I.L.T.S.A. at the forefront of the trade that we all work in. We are a relatively small organisation but our aim is to become bigger and stronger through pushing our presence and our professionalism within the Licensed trade.

NEW OFFICE DETAILS Tel :- 01422 366633 dianeswift@iltsa.co.uk 13 Moor Top Road Norton Tower HALIFAX HX2 ONP

ILTSA CALENDAR 2004 October

Stock Auditor Published

October

Examinations

October

Training Course

November Council Meeting December Xmas Stock Auditor May 2005 12th - 14th 52nd A.G.M.

AVAILABLE FROM THE SECRETARY Taking Stock Books Goods Received Books Bar Requisition Books Flexible Dipsticks Sectional Dipsticks Hydrometers Institute Ties Membership Lists

MEMBERSHIP If you qualified more than seven years ago contact the Secretary about becoming a fellow

Geoorge Giiles

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Data Protection

Do you need to register ? provisions of the 1998 Act even if they are exempt from notification

Under the Data Protection Act 1998 , Notification of data processing is a statutory requirement replacing the former requirement for registration under the Data Protection Act 1984. Statutory requirement means that non-compliance of the Act is a criminal offence. The good news is that most self employed stock auditors are exempt from notification but they are still required to comply with the principles of the Act. Whilst accounts and records are exempt from the act the stock auditor would still be liable if for example personal details of clients are passed on to a third party or used for such purposes as credit references. Notification is the process by which a data controller informs the Commissioner of certain details about the processing of personal data. Those details are then used to compile a register that is open to the public for inspection. The principal purpose of notification and the public register is transparency or openness. It is not intended, nor would it be practical, for the register to keep detailed records but it does enable the public to see what sort of records are being kept. Each register entry includes the name and address of the data controller and a general description of the type of data processed. A copy of the register can be found at www.dpr.gov.uk If you do decide to play safe and notify the data commissioner there are three ways that you can do it :4

STOCKAUDITOR

By the internet – at the moment an application form can be downloaded from www.dpr.gov.uk but at the moment it still has to be posted back. Request To Notify Form – obtainable from many differing sources. By Telephone. 01625 545740 All that you need to provide are your name and address , contact details and the nature of your business. A partially filled in form will be sent to you which usually more than covers the areas that you need. Information line 01625 545745 The notification fee is a standard £ 35.00 payable annually. Please be aware that there are numerous companies that will offer to handle this for a substantially larger sum. They are not actually breaking the law but the Information Commissioner takes a very dim view of this and their website ‘ names and shames’ the relevant companies. Basically you should not have to pay more than the standard fee. Data Controllers ( that’s you the minute you turn that little monster on ) must comply with the

There are eight Data Protection Principles. In summary they require that data shall be • Fairly and lawfully processed • Processed for limited purposes • Adequate, relevant and not excessive • Accurate • Not kept longer than necessary • Processed in accordance with the data subjects’ rights • Secure • Not transferred to countries outside the EEA without adequate protection. An extremely informative booklet is available from the Information Commisioner Wycliffe House Water Lane Wilmslow Cheshire SK9 5AF


Nice To Meet You ...

...Rita Broadbent ! I am aware that we do it differently. Our attitude is perhaps less confrontational but we nag more. ............. In April of this year I finally retired from the KAS partnership after 16years, all of which were very happy mainly due to my good choice of business partner.

as I approached my 40th year, this prospect did not appeal to me. “Why don’t you start your own business?” someone said. “Why don’t I, I thought?”

I began working alone in 1985. I prepared my business plan and took it to the Bradford Enterprise Agency. Their advice was on the whole, useful although they were very much against my spending £3500 on a dedicated portable computer system, the Husky Hunter. They were convinced that I could buy something a lot cheaper and get the same results. But they were wrong. The original Husky survived 13 years and never once let me down. It’s framed and hanging on my kitchen wall (just joking ! But maybe it should be)

After a couple of years of very hard work we were ready to find an employee. She was a lady with a clerical background but absolutely no stocktaking experience. She was a good worker, patient, reliable and with a G. S. O. H (she definitely needed that qualification). A year or so later we bought the Secretarial Services Bureau attached to the local authority building in which we had our office. Subsequently we took on two full-time stock takers, both of whom qualified with the Institute. I was working harder at this time than I had ever done, but enjoying all the thrills and spills. I should have done it 10 years earlier and Kate agrees!

From 1987 to this year I worked with Kate Watson who had been a colleague and friend during the 70’s and early 80’s when we both worked for Trust House Forte, she as Area Accountant and I as Internal Auditor. Inevitably, with the head offices in High Holborn and Slough, promotion meant moving South. I’m a Yorkshire lass born and bred, so

I have been taking things a little bit easier for the last four years and now I work ONE DAY per month. The rest of the time is filled with all the things I didn’t have time for before. From our early days in business, the Institute was a necessary part of our personal

progress. The qualification was the key to providing a professional service to our clients and a source of support and help to KAS. I was therefore very pleased to be asked to serve on the Council. I was asked because I’m a woman (that was the easiest qualification I ever acquired) ! I am aware that we do it differently. Our attitude is perhaps less confrontational but we nag more. If anyone has any doubts about women stock auditors, let me put their minds at rest. What we lack in physical strength and presence, we make up for in guile and empathy. I look forward to serving my time and will be pleased to hear from stock auditors of all persuasions.

News Club Fined after spirits failed to measure up! Linked to the article to be found on the back page a top Portsmouth nighclub has been fined £ 50, 000 for selling weak measures of alcohol. A routine inspection found that some bottles of spirit were up to twenty five per cent weaker than they should be. The club had previously been warned sixteen months before. The club admitted to thirty six offences under the Food Safety Act.

Company blamed staff naivety for the problem. They stated that either the alcohol had evaporated after being left open or that they had been diluted due to the use of wet open cocktail pourers. However Trading Standards pointed out that the club had been warned previously about the need to seal and store the bottles with screw tops. Cocktail pourers were used in the seven bars and were cleaned each night, staff arriving for the next shift had put the pourers back into the spirit bottles whilst they were still wet.

A Trading Standards Officer had visited the club and had purchased drinks to the value of £ 449 which were tested at the venue. The 1,900 capacity club had closed early to facilitate the checking of the spirits and Magistrates heard that the

The club was found guilty and could have faced the maximum penalty for each offence of £ 20,000. The magistrates fined them £ 50,000 and £ 2,000 costs – an expensive result of poor working practices.

The percentage of alcohol to volume for some of the drinks tested and, in brackets , the levels trading standards found : Absolut vodka

40

26.3%

Bells whisky

40

35.1%

Beefeater gin

37.5 35.2%

Bombay Sapphire

40

38.5%

Chivas Regal

40

32.8%

Glenfiddich malt

40

32.0%

Gordons Gin

37.5 28.4%

Smirnoff Vodka

40

36.1%

Stolichnaya Vodka

40

35.8%

Tanqueray Export

43.1 35.2% STOCKAUDITOR

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Licensed Trade Yearbook

Why use a qualified stock auditor ? In today's modern commercial world, the small business needs all the help and guidance that it can get. In the licensed trade the stock auditor can often give valuable and vital information for the beleaguered licensee. Not only is there that all-important question - is someone stealing from me? - but also: • How much stock am I carrying - am I overstocked or am I likely to run out of a particular drink? • Am I making the maximum gross profit - am I buying from the best source? • Are my staff using correct prices - are they using the correct measures? • What does a particular 'promotion' cost me? • What do I have to charge for each product after a cost price increase? • Are my allowances reasonable - could I save myself money? • Is the surplus achieved satisfactory - should it in fact be more? Too many times the busy licensee does not know the answer to all the above questions and it is only when there is a major problem that a stock auditor is called in. In many cases this may be far too late. Consider - would you drive your car blindfolded on a busy road. In many ways that is just what you are doing by not employing a qualified stock auditor. You are relying on your staff, suppliers and customers and are blindly expecting a satisfactory profit at the year-end. Hopefully you will reach your destination without too many mishaps. One new client commented to me the other day that he had never costed out any dish or calculated a liquor selling price in his long career. He merely 'estimated' what he thought he should be charging and his pricing policy decisions were being guided by what was going on around him. That particular client, although successful, could have actually substantially increased his net profit by utilising a 'qualified' stock auditor much earlier. I say qualified because as in many professions there are differing levels of competence. By employing an ILTSA qualified member you are ensuring that you are receiving the best interpretation of your trading figures. It is important that your stock auditor can interpret what the actual figures mean to your business. The results should answer some of the following questions: • Is the actual gross profit the maximum that can be obtained - how can it be improved? • Why is it that the actual gross profit differs from the estimated gross profit? • Are your allowances in line with similar businesses? • Could any selling prices be 'tweaked'? Consider the profit on Product A to a similar Product B is the margin better? • What are the implications of using 25ml or 35ml measures? • What was the actual cost of 'Happy Hour' promotions? ILTSA members, distinguished by the letters MILSA and FILSA, are qualified by passing an extensive examination that tests their ability not only to produce a result manually but analyse those results in a variety of ways. Many of our members have many years experience in the licensed or hospitality sector and often use that breadth of experience when advising clients. When you consider that a stock auditor may be on site 12 or more times a year it is obvious that he or she has a very detailed view of your business and can often offer advice on many more matters than the actual counting of the stock

The stock auditor is only as good as the information that he/she is working with and it is therefore imperative that all relevant information is made available. This should ideally be on the audit day to enable a result to be calculated and analysed on site. The professional auditor will require the following: • Delivery notes - this is treated as a source document and should be proof of all goods entering the business. It should be signed for by a responsible person - too often we notice deliveries not signed for or signed for by an inappropriate person such as a cleaner who has not actually checked the delivery. Many stock shortages can be attributed to this simple precaution. Included in this are petty cash purchases for any goods for resale especially purchases from the 'corner shop • Invoices - These are checked to ensure that the business is being charged for goods actually delivered and that the correct price has been used. Again errors are often noticed and the client informed. • Statements - these enable the stock auditor to ensure that all goods inwards have been recorded. As often invoices and statements are not always available the use of a goods inwards system is encouraged, which can range from a simple book to a more complex system necessary for large multi-bar units. • Till readings and income records again the professional stock auditor will carefully reconcile the till or EPOS system readings with the record of business done and advise on any disparities. • Wastage and ullage records - used correctly these can be analysed and controlled. • Promotional activity - this is now a major factor in many audits and it is extremely important that accurate records are kept of any promotions, happy hours or discounting carried out by the business.

The stock auditor is only as good as the information that he/she is working with and it is therefore imperative that all relevant information is made available ! 6

STOCKAUDITOR


Licensed Trade Yearbook The professional qualified stock auditor will give guidance on setting up systems that will be necessary in your business. I encourage my clients to participate in an audit - they can then be sure that everything is counted, all relevant paperwork is available and that the stock is prepared and easy to count. The cost of a stock audit seems to deter some businesses but perhaps the argument should be turned around - can you afford not to have a stock audit on a regular basis? Too many times we are asked to extend the time between visits or to conduct an annual count to tie in with internal stocks. Hopefully, by reading this article, you will see that there is far more to stock auditing than you may at first think. After all how many of you can afford to throw money away? You should consider: • At todays prices a member of bar staff helping himself to just a packet of crisps @ 35p and a pint of lager @ £ 2.20 per day would amount to £ 930 per annum - In many cases this exceeds the cost of our members services but certainly would be a major part of the cost. • A 2% change in gross profit percentage can often relate to many thousands of pounds in the net profit or 'bottom line' profit. Again stock auditors fees are often much less than any potential saving. • In many situations the stocktaking fees are more than covered by ensuring that correct cost prices are being charged by the supplier and that the best possible deals are achieved. • Many of our members have saved clients considerable amounts of money by being able to successfully advise them with relation to Customs and Inland Revenue enquiries. Increasingly these bodies are aware of our members qualifications and are often ready to accept their figures and guidance. The text of the above article although written by Chris Swift appears with the consent of McMillan Scott publishers of the Licensed Trade Yearbook 2004 in which it first appeared.

I don’t belieeeve

it ! Alan Brown opens up an interesting topic for further articles when he asks “ how many times when presented with reasons for wastage, breakages, cancelled transactions and losses do we have a chuckle to ourselves ? “. Here are a few samples that he has been subjected to recently. 1 pint of lager Moth on top 1 btl Budvar Glass smelt like a wet dog 2 pts Miller Jumped off shelf when fridge door opened (Millers have legs then !) 5 pts various Orders placed before fight broke out ( bet they were then poured down sink ) 1 pt Cider Prat had no money 1 Vodka & Tia Maria Customer did not want free fly 2 Ciders & Black Should have been Blackthorn Cider 4 pts Heavy Grant v. Luke ( Luke won) 2 pts lager & 2 vodka and cokes Customer had bigger thirst than wallet. Hospitality drinks Lady’s hair burnt at table two. Apparently the lady at table two had had a similar experience but at table ten ( Not as bad so no freebie drinks then ). She has I am told very long hair and sits too close to the candles ! Wells that’s all for now but I am sure that many other members can recount similar excuses so put pen and paper and let us all have a chuckle

The Gauntlet has been thrown down - But who will pick it up ?

Licensed Trade Yearbook 2005 A suggestion was made at the 2004 AGM that individual members appear in this publication. It would be far more cost effective if we grouped together and perhaps took a page insertion along the lines of the Publican and MA advertisements. This is the subject of one of the questions in the enclosed questionaire !

SELF-INKING STAMPS Includes : Institute Logo Date (Up to 4 years) Trading Name For further information please contact the Secretary. Allow up to 6 weeks for delivery Price Inclusive of VAT & Postage £35 .00

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The New Generation Trevor Knight continues his journey across the country in search of the new breed of Britain’s brewers.

Part Eleven :- Worcestershire, Herefordshire and Brecon The now tranquil English shires alongside the Welsh border have witnessed many centuries of bloody conflict with their neighbours in the principality. Now, in more peaceful times, many of the communities from Shropshire in the north to the Wye Valley in the south, retain much Welsh character.

lupulus, the modern version of which has been developed from a plant as ancient as history itself. The hop first attracted attention not as an ingredient in beer but as a medicinal herb in early Egypt. It was later used in Europe to treat liver disease and general digestive complaints.

Our journey south takes in the beautiful counties of Worcestershire and Herefordshire, following the river valleys of the Severn, the Teme and the Wye. Worcester’s beautiful cathedral, standing on high ground on the eastern bank of the Severn, dominates the city. It was founded in 983 A.D. as a Saxon monastery by St.Oswald. Worcester is set amid rich farmland of meadows, apple and cherry orchards and hop fields. Sauce and fine china have carried Worcester’s name around the world. Glove making, a local craft since the 13th century, is still carried on alongside such modern industries as printing and engineering. Sir Edward Elgar, the composer (1857-1934) was born at Broadheath, four miles north west of Worcester. A few miles west of Worcester, in the village of Knightwick, is the home of the first brewery which we are visiting on this part of our journey. The TEME VALLEY BREWERY was opened in 1997 at the Talbot Hotel. Until the end of 2000 this brewery was the only one in Britain growing and using its own hops in brewing, but after hop picking that year the Lulsley Court Estate was sold. The Clift family had

Hops add bitterness to beer to balance the sweetness of the malt. They also add flavour and aroma. When the green cone like blossom clusters of hop vines take on a yellow tinge and rustle like paper flowers, hop growers rush to pick them. The value of a harvest is dependent upon gathering the flower-fruit at just the right time – usually in August. The aromatic resins and oils in the fruit give hops their commercial value. Chris Gooch is the brewer at Teme Valley. His original job was to manage the livestock on the Lulsley farm but he took an interest in the brewery shortly after it was opened – as might be expected from a trained biochemist and keen home brewer! When the livestock was eventually moved out, Chris’s part-time interest became a full time job and he has been working hard to expand the free trade, supplying The Talbot and thirty additional pubs. Chris uses a full barley mash in production and ferments in traditional open topped fermenting vessels. The brewery’s standard range of ales runs into four beers – This, That, T’other and Wotever Next ? The hop harvest selection adds a little extra colour at this time of the year. T’OTHER (Abv.3.5%)

been growing hops since the 19th century and had been much involved in the history of hop growing in this area. They were among the first growers to change to mechanical hop picking in 1947. Hops are the flower of a vine, humulus

8

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Easy drinking tawny best bitter beginning with a powerful smack of hops and sustained balancing fruit and malt. THIS (Abv 3.7%) Gold quaffing bitter with enjoyable hops and subtle malt balance in the mouth, ending with a strong bittersweet finale.

THAT (Abv 4.1%) Copper coloured best bitter with a balance of malt and hops and overlying fruitiness. Ending with a light, dry finish. Travellers pausing to refresh themselves at St Ann’s Well in Great Malvern will drink the pure water that is bottled for the Queen as well as customers all over the world. It comes from the streams of the Malvern Hills, which rise to 1394 feet at Worcestershire Beacon. Between the hills and valleys of the Teme and the Severn, the road winds through hop gardens and cider apple orchards, linking drowsy villages, medieval castles and moated Elizabethan mansions. Castles, cattle and cider are the dominant features of the lush Herefordshire countryside adjacent to the Welsh border. Red and white Herefordshire cattle, renowned throughout the world for the quality of their beef, crop the lush grass overlooked by orchards producing the largest crop of cider apples in the world. Throughout this lush countryside runs the River Wye, one of the loveliest rivers in Britain. Gaunt, ruined castles serve as a reminder of a sterner past – this peaceful land was once a battleground for rival rulers of England and Wales. The cathedral city of Hereford – on the banks of the Wye – was founded in A.D. 700. The cathedral contains a world map drawn on vellum in about 1300 A.D. and the world’s largest chained library of nearly 1500 volumes each chained to its bookcase.

Hereford was the home of Bulmers – the world’s largest cider factory – founded in 1887 by a son of the rector of Credenhall, who made cider from the apples in the rectory orchard. The city’s fine old buildings include several inns and a plaque on a house in Gwynne Street marks the birthplace of Nell Gwynne. The WYE VALLEY BREWERY was founded in 1985 in Canon Pyon, Herefordshire. The following year the brewery moved to the stable block of the historic 18th century


The New Generation coaching inn of the Barrels pub in Hereford where it remained for 16 years, when increasing sales and production necessitated a move to new premises. In April 2002 the brewery moved to its present site – the old Symonds cider factory – in Stoke Lacey, with upgraded and redesigned equipment. It is recognized as the leading cask ale brewery in the country, with its commitment to using only the best quality raw materials and traditional methods throughout, remaining central to its philosophy. In September 2003 Peter Amor, managing director of Wye Valley Brewery announced the appointment of Jimmy Swan as head brewer. Jimmy was a former brewing manager at Hall and Woodhouse Brewery in Dorset. Wye Valley beer portfolio includes the following regular beers:

carved out by glacial action in the Ice Age. Below these massive ramparts the mountains slope gently into green valleys. The highest mountains in South Wales, the triple peaks of the Brecon Beacons, rise above Brecon, also known as Brecknock, one of the oldest Welsh towns. It was founded by the Normans at the end of the 11th century and was granted its first Charter in 1246. Another Charter of 1366 gave the town the right to hold a fair and pleasure fairs are still held in the street for three days every May and November. The town centre is an interesting assortment of Medieval, Georgian, Jacobean and Tudor architecture. The Priory Church of St John, dating from the 13th century, was designated a cathedral in 1923.

BRECON COUNTY ALE (Abv 3.7%)

The BRECONSHIRE BREWERY was created by Howard Marlow in 2002 as part of C.H.Marlow, a wholesaler and distributor of ales in the west and south of Wales for more than thirty years, and owns eight pubs. A tenbarrel plant was commissioned in time to produce the first beers for Christmas 2002. Optic malts are blended with a range of English whole hops by Justin Grant, the Head Brewer, to create ‘ales from the heart of Wales’.

An amber brown well hopped beer. A complex malt grist combined with three hops to produce a refreshing moreish beer.

Breconshire’s range of cask conditioned ales include:

WYE VALLEY BITTER (Abv 3.7%) A classic example of an English bitter beer. Chestnut coloured with a rich white head, delicate hop aroma, malty fullness ending with a crisp bitter finish.

GOLDEN VALLEY (Abv 4.2%) A deep, golden coloured beer created using three types of optic malt and only Progress hops, all grown within the U.K. Floral notes but pervasive bitterness making it a very drinkable, thirst quenching beer – already winning awards.

HEREFORD PALE ALE (Abv 4.0%) A delightful pale ale, smooth on the palate with a citrus hop aroma leading to a balanced bitter finish. BUTTY BACH (Abv 4.5%) A burnished gold premium ale. Full bodied, smooth and satisfying. Across the Welsh border from Herefordshire are the distinctive shapes of the Brecon Beacons. The steep north facing scarps were

RED DRAGON (Abv 4.7%) An unusually red coloured beer blending the real ale traditions of the North East and Ireland with a hint of Welsh flair. Vast quantities of Chrystal malt are blended with a selection of hops to provide bite to complement the biscuity malt characteristics of this very smooth, easy drinking beer. RAMBLERS RUIN (Abv 5.0%) Dark amber, malty and well hopped with a beautifully balanced aftertaste. High percentages of Chrystal and Black malts create the malt/biscuit undertones with bitterness and aroma provided by a variety of hops.

Join me next time, when I take a closer look at brewing in Wales before we continue our journey along the Wye Valley and on to Gloucestershire. STOCKAUDITOR

9


Wine Cellar THE DEBATE GOES ON, SCREWTOP (STELVIN) Vs CORK CLOSURES Screw top wines have been around since the early seventies. It is the general public’s perception and the consumers reluctance to accept, without any knowledge, these wines as anything but “cheap”, that is the hardest barrier to overcome . The debate rages in wine circles as to the pros and cons of this type of enclosure. To put this into perspective, the Stelvin industry would claim that up to 10% of all wines are corked. The plastic cork industry puts this figure at 5% - 7% and even the cork industry itself admits to 3% 5% of all bottles are corked. At best if you bought 24 bottles of wine you could expect between 1 and 2 bottles to be corked, depending on who’s figures you take. So what is corked wine and do we have to put up with it? Corked wine is not when there are pieces of the cork floating in a glass, that is a sign of a poor wine waiter or blunt corkscrew. Corked wine is the direct result of a problem within the cork making process. A long process which takes the natural bark of the cork tree, harvested every nine years, turning this into usable corks for stoppering wine bottles. A chemical element known as 2,4,6, TRICHLORANISOLE or TCA for short, may be present in the growing tree, or be present in badly stored raw cork before being processed. Occasionally a reaction can occur with the chlorine used to “cure” the bark and TCA can creep in. The result is a very distinctive nose on the wine, I liken this to a very well 10

STOCKAUDITOR

matured horse manure, seasoned with a little damp, musty mushrooms, which once smelt you will never forget or want to drink the wine. But corked wine can be in various guises, from this, the most obvious to a very gently “contaminated” corked taint that subdues the fresh fruitiness in the wine and the consumers reaction is not to buy another bottle of that particular wine. The wine industry have bottled under Stelvin for the last 16 years. Some trials with Penfolds Bin 2 Shiraz Mataro back in the mid 1990’s asked consumers for their reactions and comments. Bin 2 went back under driven cork, the results were obvious. It took till 2001, when a group of New Zealand wineries lead the way with the New Zealand Screwcap wine Seal Initiative. Amongst those early wineries to put their Sauvignon Blanc under Stelvin was Villa Maria Estate. Villa Maria have just announced that their winery, possibly the

worlds first large scale winery, will bottle all wines across all prices under Stelvin from the 2005 vintage onwards. This includes Esk Valley & Vidal wines. George Fistonich, owner and MD, pictured below has announced his winery a Cork Free Zone The future looks very bright with a large chunk of New Zealand wineries putting not only their white wines but also premium red wines under Stelvin, along with several Australian, Chilean, and Californian wineries. Notably the Rieslings of Jeffrey Grosset, in the Clare valley, his Polish Hills Riesling retails around £17.00 bottle. Long gone are the days of a “Cheap” screwtop wine. Sales of Tesco’s premium range, approx 35 wines under Stelvin, have soared since their launch in April 2003 with around 650,000 to 1.2 million bottles sold every four weeks. This figure equates to approx. 12 million bottles per year or 1% of total UK wine sales. An astounding figure.


Wine Cellar With the reputable wineries of Randall Grahm, in California, George Duboeuf in Beaujolais, Domaine Laroche in Chablis, Torres in Chile and the great Cloudy Bay going under Stelvin (from the 2005 vintage, it has already had the 2003/2004 available direct from the winery under Stelvin), the wine world has to take note. So what is so special about this closure. The Screwcap is formed from an aluminium alloy outer, with a liner of expanded polyethylene covered with a tin foil and PVDC film. The physical seal is created through very firm compression, as much as 160 - 180 kilos of pressure are used, of the liner against the top portion of the bottle. The seal is further secured as the “skirt” of the capsule is formed on the bottles thread. This is tamper proof and a perfect seal, so bottles can be stored or transported upside down without leakage. Bottles can even be cellered upright as there is no leakage of gas or absorption of oxygen to allow wines to deteriorate. Is there a future for corks used to stopper wines ?. The cork industry, under the umbrella of Amorin, has taken great strides over the last 4/5 years to eliminate TCA completely. From a huge audit of all the cork producers to identify the problems to a revolutionary new process, ROSA, a steam distillation

treatment which has so far shown to remove around 77% of releasable TCA. So there will always be a market for corks. The likes of revered wines from traditional producers and traditional areas will, I am sure still like the romance of the cork. Producers like the Domaine de La Romanee Conti, Chateaux like Mouton Rothschild, Latour, Lafite and Margaux will still want to bottle under driven cork. Such is the pull and allure of a sommelier drawing a cork slowly, checking the wines condition and decanting these splendid examples of their kind. I suspect that the romance of a twist of the cap - the click of quality - as it has been called, will not be the same for the sommelier. The world is full of changes and sometimes people are opposed to a change for change sake, but at Villa Maria, there was a risk to turn to Stelvin, but also a bigger risk to do nothing. Embrace the Stelvin enclosure at all price points and you will be satisfied that the last bottle in the case will be just as good as the first. Remember a cork is a natural product and can do a great job, but it is subject to faults, creases or splits which may let air into the wine causing oxidation, another common fault. With so many of our wine writers for the arguement, like Tim Aitkin MW, James Halliday, Hugh Johnson (he of the pocket book fame), and Chris Losch to name but a few, it cannot be many more years before the majority of our wines are under Stelvin, like our spirits. For it was the Spirit industry back in 1926, White Horse Distillers to be precise, that were the first to

embrace this innovation which resulted in a doubling of sales within six months. I leave you with the words of Bob Campbell MW, and a New Zealand wine writer, who said to 190 black tie clad guests at a dinner, “ Just imagine the response, if the whole industry had been using screwtops for generations and some bright spark popped up to tell us there was this great new thing called cork. Of course it means that about 10% of wine will be tainted, there will be duller fruit flavours, musty odour problems and variation in wines as they age. But hey, it makes a great sound when you pull it out of a bottle!” When I talk to wine groups about

the closures, the first response I get is that it is fine for me to buy and drink, but I would not take a Stelvin bottle to a dinner party or a friends house, they might think I had bought the cheapest bottle. Not so anymore, and we as consumers do not have to put up with corked wines. So go and try these wines, you will be tasting what the winemaker put into the bottle, nothing more and nothing less. (Stelvin Screwcap is the registered trademark of Pea-Perchiney, based in France but with factories around the globe.)

Mike Murdoch F.I.L.S.A. Wine Educator STOCKAUDITOR

11


Ivor Deficit During the move of the Institute’s offices from Edinburgh, a large quantity of old documents was discovered. Whilst many were of no significance, we have found a diary that seems to be an early record of a stocktaker at work. We have edited the work and now present extracts from:

The diary of Samuel Deficit 1685 May 14th Arose this morning to attend change at the Spotted Dog. A more damnably filthy hole I have yet to see, but as I was acting for the seller I had to make the best of a bad thing. Payment was in coin of the realm and no receipt required. Day seemed to be getting better. May 19th Demand from authorities for sedan chair licence – two shillings! If this keeps up everyone will walk to work ! May 23rd Letter from a Scottish scallywag named Thompson demanding 2 guineas membership of my Guild – is there no end to the demands on my purse? June 1st Why oh why does everyone want valuations on the first quarter day? Now ‘tis the start of Trinity and my services are required such that I could be in five places at once. June 3rd My mistress Deficit asks me if I know who she is as I do not seem to have spoken with her for several days, I tell her that if she requires new hose she must allow me to work unhindered. Eat dinner alone (cold mutton) June 12th To the Queens Head for a changeover. Master Jenkins, the keeper of said tavern, insists I sell a butt of sherry that is real rank. I forbade him mention of the brand on the cask. “ But ‘tis only best before MCCCXXVII” he said. I told him I was most weary of roman numeral quips. June 15th At the Dun Cow. The Revenue Men had visited the previous day and mine host had to quickly hide some fine Virginia tobaccos imported directly from the colonies. My silence was ensured with a good pipeful! June 16th I grow weary of all the papers before me. I cannot in all conscience make the Excise payment for the Holly bush Tavern – I am sure the dues are more than half a crown. June 17th The new keeper of the Queens Head visited me accompanied by two footpads who treated me most rough. It seems that he had sold some sherry which had made his customers most turgid. When I refused to recompense him he took great offence. June 18th Stayed abed – feeling most disgruntled. June 20th Tried to get to work via the river, but the boatman was most vociferous in his demand for a “congestion charge” . These taxes are all too much. I told him he would have to manage without my custom in future. June 22nd Wrote to the Scottish Knave and told him I was renouncing his Guild. I shall give up this way of life and seek my fortune in the colonies. Surely there will be a welcome in Yorkshire for one such as me?

After this entry the pages fall silent. When we have finished going through all of the papers from the office I’m sure we can bring you some further extracts from the files 12

STOCKAUDITOR


Competition Page 1.

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7. Fruit liqueur flavoured with almonds 8. Coffee substitute 10. Fish rolled in flour, fried in butter & served with garnish. 11. Hot stuff used in curries 12. Garlic mayonnaise 13. Another way of preparing eggs 16. Tarty fruit in marmalade 19. Barbican E lovely weather lass 20. Fruit of a tree edible when cooked 22. Vegetable of the mustard family 24. Seeds, nuts and dried fruit ( two words ) 25. Edible grade of molasses 26. The peel of 16a is in this liqueur

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Food & Drink Crossword Les Kerr F.I.L.S.A.

Down:7. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 9.

Arm Nike Pasta filled and baked in sauce Scrumpy stuff Shampoo in posh circles Wood sorrel’s edible tuber Twist the dough and fry it They go with lamb when jellied

14. Dip stick to find in this room 15. Little & sour but nice with toast and butter 17. A big cactus with edible fruit 18. Vitamin A ( Animal sources ) 21. Nice with chicken cooked this way 23. Bread from India

A Leader Among Men & Women ! 1.

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Thanks to Les Kerr for compiling this topical crossword. Win a fifteen pound voucher by being the first correct entry to reach the editor:-

Chris Swift 13 Moor Top Road Norton Tower HALIFAX HX2 ONP Answers to the Last Crossword ! The winner from issue 53 was Phil Fox from Sheffield. The first result back was from Melanie Dive which must have been by return of post. However one of the answers was wrong in that it was the wrong tense - Sorry ! P

1. Erickson in the middle 2. Sour fruit 3. Liqueur flavoured with orange peel 4. Relief for sprain I suffer 5. ( & 7) We do it everyday 6. ( & 10 ) Tavern 8. It’s foggy in Ireland 9. Coffee with liqueur 11. Fast bird

1st letter of name 2nd letter of word 6th letter of word 5th letter of word 1st & 4th letter of word 3rd & 8th letter of word 1st letter of 1st word 4th letter of name 1st letter of name

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Marketing Bulletin The last few weeks seem to have passed rather quickly largely due to the move of the Institute office from Edinburgh to Halifax. Included in the magazine are one or two marketing items.

Member’s details. These are the details that the Institute carries on each of our members. The database has been updated from Dos to Windows and so perhaps now would be a good time to check that information on it is accurate. If we do not hear from you we will assume that all the details are correct. There are many gaps, however , particularly with regard to Email addresses so please fill in the blanks and return to the office

Member’s questionnaire For the eagle eyes among you, this is very similar to the exercise carried out in 1998. Then, as now, we want to know what you, the members, think about your Institute. We are also striving to qualify for the ‘Investors in People’ marque and many of the answers received will help us formulate our bid for that prestigious award. Please do take the time to fill in the form – have your say. Be honest, be critical if you want, all I ask is that if you identify a weakness tell us how we can improve on the situation. The worst thing that you can do is nothing !

2004/05 Members brochure I have only had a limited number printed as the proof reading of this document was extremely hard – many phone numbers had changed from last year so please carefully check your entry and get back within ten days with any changes. The main print run will be undertaken in mid August and will run until next July/August. They will be sent to potential clients, members and pub operating companies. If any member wants to have a few to carry around and distribute please mark that on the questionnaire.

NP X2 O . X H L.S.A t F.I. HALIFA 2 354 Swif , Chris ton Tower 07768 96 ob:- sa.co.uk Nor , M d 34 oa op R 3630 ift@ilt oor T :- 01422 Chrissw 13 M Tel E-mail

Website The website has had something of a makeover in the past few weeks but unfortunately the members forum appears to have been assigned to the cyber graveyard. The old forum was just not compatible with the new hosting companies software. Consequently we have had to start again. The registration process is less complicated than the previous forum so why not register and join in the discussions on

www.iltsa.co.uk member’s forum

DIY Advertising feature

Membership challenge Finally I would like to issue a challenge. Council are increasingly worried because as fast as we recruit new members our membership numbers are in depletion, naturally and with retirement. At best we appear to be standing still. However if we could increase membership by just 10% each year we could double the size of the Institute within seven years. Now is the time to approach that long standing colleague who has been promising to join for years, join up the opposing stocktaker on a changeover and between us we could double the membership within that short period. 14

STOCKAUDITOR

For details of courses currently run by the beer academy visit their website

www.beeracademy.org A site well worth a visit !

Answers to ‘Leader of Men’ 1.Goran 2. lEmon 3. curacOa 4. aspiRin 5. & 7. GauGe 6.& 10. alEhousE 8. Irish mist 9. kahLua 11. Swift

Among the boxes obtained from Edinburgh were a number of flyers carrying the Edinburgh address. Rather than throw them away, I came upon the ingenious idea of cutting the address off the bottom and substituting it with the Halifax address. One step on from that was to photocopy the original with my own company details below it. This is a ready-made flyer for using in your immediate area – any decent photocopier should produce a reasonable quality - just add your logo and contact details and you are away.


Members Corner Tomatin - Speyside Malt Tomatin, a Speysside malt from Invernessshire, is the largest malt distillery in Scotland with a massive 23 stills. Not only is Tomatin distilled there but the Antiquary and Talsiman brands also have their home here. Founded in 1897 it has a chequered but fascinating history. All good whisky begins in the hills and at Tomatin the hills are older and wilder than most. Here deep in the Monadhliath Mountains the clear waters of Alt – na – frithe or Freeburn rise from the rock and flow towards the distillery through peat and heather. This pure water is the raw material of Tomatin. It is one of the last distilleries to provide housing for its staff. Some 25 families live on the 140 acre estate often with whole families employed by the company in different roles. The area and indeed the distillery are steeped in history. On their website www.tomatin.co.uk there are many interesting stories and legends noted. The area around is steeped in history being less than ten miles from the battlefield of Culloden , Bonnie Prince Charlie sought shelter at nearby Moy before his epic flight across the Highlands and over the water to Skye. Major General Wade built a bridge across the River Findhorn adjacent to the present distillery during his pacification of the Highlands. It is perhaps strange then that such a Scottish tradition has from 1986 been owned by a Japanese firm, Takara Shuzo and Okura, who have kept tradition with the history of this fascinating distillery.

Relief from Cold Callers Cold (telephone) callers beware. From the 25th June 2004 it will be an offence to telephone a BUSINESS that has registered, with the Telephone Preference Service (TPS), its telephone number/s as not wanting unsolicited business to business telephone calls. Once a telephone number has been registered with the TPS, it takes 28 days to become an offence if you use it. Useful web sites: To register your business with TPS www.tpsonline.org.uk/tps/ Government guide www.informationcommissioner.gov.uk To check single telephone numbers (free) www.numbercheck.co.uk

w w w.iltsa.co .u k

Their website www.tomatin.co.uk is well worth a visit.

Whether you are looking for a change of career or just want to gain a working knowledge of stocktaking

Hea

Residential Training Seminars October 14th to 18th 2004

For further details on all aspects of the Institute contact The Secretary on 01422 366633 or visit out website - www.iltsa.co.uk Always look for the letters F.I.L.S.A. & M.I.L.S.A. “ Over Fifty years of raising stocktaking standards “

STOCKAUDITOR

15


Tipping

IT DOESN’T PAY TO TAMPER WITH SPIRITS The practice of substituting cheap, sometimes bootlegged, spirits into branded spirit bottles for resale in pubs, clubs, restaurants and bars is known as ‘tipping’ in the trade. Tipping is illegal. In fact there are three different Acts under which prosecutions can be brought if a licensee is found to be substituting. The Food Safety Act 1990, Trade Descriptions Act 1968 and the Trade Marks Act 1994. The vast majority of licensees in the UK are law-abiding professionals who apply the highest standards possible in the running of their business. However, there are inevitably a few rotten apples seeking to gain an advantage by trading unlawfully and taking advantage of unsuspecting consumers. The spirits being used as substitutes for big name brands are often own-label or “cheapest on display” purchased from local retailers and cash and carries. Increasingly illegal imports, where the excise and UK taxes have not been paid, are being used. Rogue licensees ‘tip’ the cheaper spirit into branded bottles, charge consumers the regular markup and pocket the difference. Some publicans see this as an expected ‘perk of the trade’ not realising that the enforcement of the above Acts is carried out by Trading Standards and Environmental Health Authorities of which there are over 200 throughout the UK. Increasingly Customs and Excise are also getting involved when there is evidence of alcohol trafficking and redistribution for resale through the onlicensed trade. Recently there have been a number of jail sentences for individuals who have illegally imported and resold spirits. Current penalties for substitution are a heavy fine and criminal record. The offence can also be reported to the local Licensing Magistrates. This reporting however will change with the introduction of the new Licensing Act 2003. In section 4 of this new act “relevant offences” it makes particular reference to legislation used to prosecute “tipping” and related offences. Any licensee prosecuted for substituting branded spirits, or any similar or related offences, will have to submit their personal licence to the local authority, which 16

STOCKAUDITOR

will then consider whether or not the offence also merits temporary or permanent suspension. To support the Local Government authorities and to protect the consumer from this practice the main spirit brand owners formed a Trade Association in September 1999 - The International Federation of Spirits Producers UK. – IFSPuK The Association has added another dimension to the work carried out by Trading Standards and Environmental Health and has enabled them to check many more outlets for brand substitution. Statistics bear this out. As a result of increased calling the “substitution rate”, the percentage of outlets caught substituting, has been reduced by half to a national average of 4% and it is likely that the 200 prosecutions per year and the “naming and shaming” in local press will help to continue this trend. “Passing off”is the practice of serving a different brand to the one requested. To comply with consumer protection law, when an alternative product or brand is to be sold to the one requested, the consumer must be notified and given the choice of accepting the alternative offered. If this does not happen and the consumer is served an alternative, without his or her knowledge, then this is known as passing off and is against the law. The act constitutes an actionable misrepresentation under the law of passing off (passing off constitutes a number of common law principals/case law), also potentially the Trade Descrptions Act 1968 section 1 - the application of a false trade description and the Trade Marks Act 1994, section 10 - infringing a registered trademark. It is therefore important that staff are aware of this and are instructed that if the brand ordered is not stocked they must notify the customer before serving an alternative. Spirits fraud is a serious crime and offenders can be sure that all steps will be taken to stamp it out.


Stock Auditor www.iltsa.co.uk

THE MAGAZINE FOR THE INSTITUTE OF LICENSED TRADE STOCK AUDITORS

ISSUE 55

ISSN 1471 - 0471

OCTOBER

2004

Money Laundering Regulations - How they effect the Licensed Trade The 2003 Money Laundering Regulations apply to most businesses in the financial sector, and the Money Laundering Regulation (MLR) regime is designed to help ensure that those businesses which Customs supervise have systems in place to prevent money laundering and to report suspicious transactions.

Chris & Di Swift handing over a cheque to members of Scarborough Lifeboat Crew. Full story on back page

Read how one of our members helped raise raise over £ 200,000! for Scope - the charity for Cerebal Palsy ....... Full story Page 6

Money laundering is exchanging criminally obtained money or other assets for “clean” money or other assets with no obvious link to their criminal origins. It also covers money, however come by, which is used to fund terrorism.Many of us are familiar with the terms and the broad workings of the Act but how many of us fully appreciate their relevance within the licensed trade. In the past many businesses have assisted their customers by cashing third party cheques (ie one issued by an employer to an employee or by social services) because there is no bank or post office in the area. BEWARE - if they want to continue this service they will have to register with Customs and Excise or face a penalty of up to £5000. To receive a registration pack ring 0845 010 9000. The current cost of the license is an annual fee of £ 100. Many of our clients may need to be informed of these regulations.

In this Issue: Flat Rate VAT Scheme; KIilmanjaro; Price Marking regulations and much, much more!


From The Editor

Chris Swift Tel:- 01422 366633 chrisswift@iltsa.co.uk

As this is the ‘Stock Auditor’ the magazine for stock auditors I am trying to make it as interesting as I can for you all in your daily grinds. After nearly twenty years of membership I have to confess that there are many members who I know by name but I have not a clue what their interests are or what they look like. That is improving steadily – at least I am now speaking to many of you when I answer the ‘Institute’ telephone but I do think it is important to be able to put a face to a name. . For the self employed amongst us it can often seem to be a lonely profession and anything that brings us together and feel that we are not battling away alone has to be an advantage. Consequently I have asked our two newest members to do a short introduction to themselves. The dubious distinction of being the first goes to George Hook of Kent and Tina Wood of Yorkshire. It is interesting to note that Tina works in the same County as myself but I do not think we have ever met before. As you see both George and Tina are attending our training seminar later this month, which I am sure they will both find of benefit. Questionnaires have come in thick and fast but there are still many of you out there who have not returned their forms. Because we want to get as full a picture as possible please do take a few minutes and let us know you views. I intend to correlate them prior to the Council meeting in November and publish the findings in the next edition of the magazine. From the hundred or so that we have had returned I am pleased to see that most of you are pleased with YOUR Institute but there are one or two comments that will be fully discussed and acted upon. This is your opportunity to tell your Council what you think – please do not waste that opportunity. On scanning quickly through the section on the magazine I note that there appears to be two areas that you wish to be included – more information on up to date legislation and more feedback from members. The first is easy to provide as witnessed by the articles on the flat rate VAT scheme and the latest guide lines on resolving grievances. The second point is down to yourselves – every editor for the last ten years has pleaded with you for articles. We are conducting an experiment in this issue. One or two members have voiced disquiet on the move to the RAC. To return to the AA will involve a substantial rise of at least ten pounds per car. Email the secretary@iltsa.co.uk , telephone 01422 366633, or post to the office with your views. If this is successful we hope to use this method of decision making in the future to let you have more of a say in the running of YOUR Institute.

Norman Clements F.I.L.S.A. 01491 575451 President normanclements@iltsa.co.uk Favourite holiday destination ‘ Canada ‘ Steve Berry F.I.L.S.A. 0131 01968 670600 Chair Exam & Training steveberry@iltsa.co.uk Favourite holiday destination ‘ Algarve ‘ Trevor Perrott F.I.L.S.A. 01483 829437 Treasurer trevorperrott@iltsa.co.uk Favourite holiday destination ‘ The Maldives ’ Bruce Thompson F.I.L.S.A. 0131 332 0875 brucethompson@iltsa.co.uk Favourite holiday destination ‘ Ilkley ‘ Ron Foster F.I.L.S.A. 01793 771959 Regional Reps ronfoster@iltsa.co.uk Favourite holiday destination ‘ U.S.A. ‘ David Downard M.I.L.S.A. 01403 865309 Member’s Benefits daviddownard@iltsa.co.uk Favourite holiday destination ‘ Skiing in the Alps ‘ David Ganney M.I.L.S.A. 0208 3938361 B.I.I. Liason davidganney@iltsa.co.uk Favourite holiday destination ‘ Cornwall in the Sun ‘ Mike Murdoch F.I.L.S.A. 01254 247496

As ever a sincere thank you to the many people who have in any way contributed to this issue of the magazine. Deadline for the next issue is the 16th November !

mikemurdoch@iltsa.co.uk

This magazine is published by the Institute of Licensed Trade Stock Auditors. Whilst welcoming any contributions, the editor reserves the right to alter or amend them if necessary. Any opinions expressed are not necessarily those of the Council and are accepted only on that understanding. No part of this magazine may be reproduced or transmitted without written permission of the publishers. Printed by :- Pickles Printers, Halifax, West Yorkshire 01422 353239 All Subsciptions payable in advance. Published 6 times per year post free Annual Subscription £24.00 © Institute of Licensed Trade Stock Auditors 2004

Rita Broadbent F.I.L.S.A. 01274 870989

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STOCKAUDITOR

Favourite holiday destination ‘ Cape Town, South Africa ‘

ritabroadbent@iltsa.co.uk Favourite holiday destination ‘Prague’


View From The Chair

George Giles Tel:- 0191 386 7699 george giles@iltsa.co.uk

Summertime Blues ! Here we are, through another summer already, well what we call Summer. Now into the first week of September and the autumn is with us again . I hope that you have had a break in a rather wet and windy holiday period.

OFFICE DETAILS Tel :- 01422 366633 dianeswift@iltsa.co.uk 13 Moor Top Road Norton Tower HALIFAX HX2 ONP

ILTSA CALENDAR 2004

I thought it might be the right time to mention the New Licensing Act which will be with us in a very short space of time. Starting in 2005 it was planned that a transition period would take place from June 2004 for six months . The responsibility for issuing and renewing licences moves from the licensing justices to the local authority (council). There will be two types of licence instead of the original one and next year, you will be asked to use your current justices licence to apply for (1) a personal licence - which you can use anywhere and (2) a premises licence which covers the pub itself and the way it operates . The personal licence and the premises licence will not be directly linked and you will be asked to appoint a Designated Premises Supervisor on the premises licence, who must be the holder of a personal licence . If you run your own outlet that will be you, but if you employ a manager it should be him or her. It is I believe another facet of our trade which we should all have some knowledge of, as we often get asked by our clients what they should do about certain things. It always looks good when you can answer any queries put to you. A client of mine just last week said he had been to his local council offices and asked how they were coping , the answer he got was, “we are monitoring other councils to see what they are doing ” Nuff said ! I notice in the press that some “Barracuda Inns” units are to ban people wearing fashionable Burberry clothing? Their reason being that these people are the trouble makers in a certain number of their Units. Leave your Burberry handbags in the car boys ! What a load of old codswallop. Apparently you can now hire or buy your own public house which can be inflated in 20 minutes , €25.000 , no rent to pay , buy your beer from wherever you want, sounds good to me. I am not sure the pubcos will be too happy about it.

October

Stock Auditor Published

October

Examinations

October

Training Course

November Council Meeting December Xmas Stock Auditor May 2005 12th - 14th 52nd A.G.M.

AVAILABLE FROM THE SECRETARY Taking Stock Books Goods Received Books Bar Requisition Books Flexible Dipsticks Sectional Dipsticks Hydrometers Institute Ties Membership Lists

FELLOWSHIP If you qualified more than seven years ago contact the Secretary about becoming a fellow

Geoorge Giiles STOCKAUDITOR

3


Vat Matters

Flat Rate Scheme ...

simplfying V.A.T. for the small business

Every now and again someone comes up with an idea that should have been implemented long ago. Just such a scheme is the new Flat Rate Scheme from HM Customs & Excise. Perhaps in an effort to cut their own workload as well, many small businesses now have the opportunity of simply calculating the V.A.T. due as a percentage of turnover instead of having to work out the V.A.T. on sales and purchases. As well as a slight cash saving the scheme is designed to ease the pressure and worry of preparing V.A.T. returns. When the brochure came through with my V.A.T. return I must admit that I merely glanced at it and put it to one side. My accountant, at first, was dismissive of the scheme and there the matter may have ended. However on clearing my desk one day I came across the brochure and as an exercise compared my actual V.A.T. returns with the proposed scheme. To my surprise not only was there a clear saving but the scheme was obviously much simpler. The scheme can help in a number of ways :> Easier record keeping – no need to separate out the gross, V.A.T. and net in your accounts. > More Time for You – less work doing the books so you can get on with running your business. > Fewer rules to follow – no more problems about what ‘ input tax’ you can and cannot reclaim. > Peace of mind – less chance of mistakes, so fewer worries. > Certainty - you will always know how much of your takings have to paid to HM Customs. You can apply to join the scheme if you expect that your taxable turnover ( not including V.A.T.) in the next 12 months will not be more than £ 150,000. This should include most of our self employed members. With the information that HM Customs & Excise have on existing businesses they have set a percentage rate for each category of business. When you apply , and providing that your choice of category is reasonable, your category will not be changed. Pubs for instance have to apply a percentage of 5.5% of total inclusive turnover whilst accountants have to apply 13 %. At 13 % it would be extremely borderline whether the scheme would be beneficial to stocktakers. As we have to travel a great deal I applied for the ‘catch – all ‘ category of ‘ business services that are not listed elsewhere ‘ which carries a rate of 11%. The full list of categories is widely available on literature or on their website. www.hmce.gov.uk. Once you have decided

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what category you want to use applying,could not be simpler. There are few exclusions and provided you have not been guilty of a V.A.T. offence or dishonesty within the last twelve months you will be accepted. Hopefully that will not exclude any of our membership. One small point, once you have applied you must wait for written confirmation before you can proceed to use the scheme.Once you have been approved you work out the V.A.T. you pay by multiplying your V.A.T. inclusive turnover for the accounting period by your flat rate percentage. Example :- If your inclusive turnover in the period is £ 20,627 and your flat rate percentage is 11% the tax that you would pay would be £ 2,268.97. At the moment the figures are entered onto the standard V.A.T. return form Box 1 Enter the V.A.T. you owe ie £ 2,268.97 from the example above. The V.A.T. charged is at the prevailing rate and not the flat rate Box 4 Normally left blank although you can claim back V.A.T on a single capital asset costing more than £ 2,000. Under the flat rate scheme you do not normally claim back V.A,T. as the scheme accounts for it automatically. Box 6 Enter the whole V.A.T. inclusive turnover figure i.e. £ 20,627 from the above example. Box 7 Normally leave it blank unless you have claimed tax in box 4 when you will enter the tax exclusive figure. For the other boxes, use the notes on the return form and fill them in as usual You may leave the scheme at any time but you must let the V.A.T. office know in writing. If you leave the scheme, you cannot rejoin for 12 months. The percentage rates may of course alter if the V.A.T. Rates are ever changed but such rates would be notified to you. I have now completed two returns using the Flat Rate Scheme and have to say that I am very happy with it. I have also calculated the V.A.T. payments using the old system and can

confirm that not only are savings to be made but the main saving is in time and effort. Adjustment has to be made on your accounts in that you show your total sales inclusive of V.A.T. with your flat rate percentage applied. For instance 100 plus 17.5 less 12.92 would mean your turnver being shown as 104.58. The expenses and purchases would be shown inclusive of V.A.T.. This would have to be born in mind when dealing with clients who are Flat rate based ! To those members who are not yet registered for V.A.T. there is an added incentive. From January 1st 2004, in your first year of V.A.T. registration, you can take a further 1% of the flat rate until the first anniversary of becoming registered. I can well remember the dilemma of whether to register for V.A.T. My only comment would be that I wish I had done it years earlier – most of our clients are themselves V.A.T. registered and our expenses can often be reduced. If you have any further queries please see the list of contacts to the side, your accountant or even contact the Secretary.


In The News New Laws for resolving disputes It’s as simple as ...

1. 2. 3.

Put it in writing You must put the reasons for your grievance in writing to your employer. Similarly, your employer must put the reasons for disciplinary action or dismissal in writing to you.

Meet and discuss A face to face meeting between you and your employer. Both parties must be given time to consider the other’s complaint prior to the meeting, your employer must inform you of their decision and your right to appeal .

Appeal An appeal meeting - if required. After the meeting your employer must give you their final decision. Full details on www.dti.gov.uk/resolvingdisputes

A new law is coming into effect on 1st October 2004 which will give you new rights and responsibilities. If you have a grievance at work or are involved in a dismissal or disciplinary situation, there is a minimum 3 - step procedure that you and your employer MUST follow before resorting to a tribunal . Reproduced by permission of Crown Copyright DTi Pub 7396

Flat Rate V.A.T Scheme How do I apply ? BY POST There is an application form inside the front cover of the notice. This is all the information needed to approve you for the scheme. Post the filled-in form to the Registration Unit for your postcode. These addresses are on their website at: www.hmce.gov.uk/business/vat/sendregnderegvars.htm If you are registering for VAT, you can enclose the form with your VAT 1, Application for Registration.

By e-mail Download the scheme application form from: www.hmce.gov. uk/business/services/vat-flat-rate.htm Fill it in on your computer and send it to the e-mail address for flat rate scheme applications: frsapplications@hmce.gov.uk Please send questions or correspondence to their National Advice Service.

By phone Call our National Advice Service on the 0845 010 9000 . They can take your application over the phone.

Further help or advice The short leaflet ( see page 4 ) can only explain the main elements of the scheme. For full details of how the scheme works see Notice 733 ‘Flat rate scheme for small businesses’, which is available online at:

DART PLAYERS WANTED ! Following on from our Chairman’s comments one enterprising company has created an inflatable pub. Airquee is also responsible for the first blow up church . The structure is 40ft long, 19 ft wide and 22 ft high and can accomodate thirty customers as well as the all important bar. It can be erected in just ten minutes with two small blowers and can be situated on any firm, level surface. An internal aluminium frame can be used to support additional lighting, sound systems as well as acting as a safety barrier. The pub, which can be hired, was originally built to show the versatility of inflatable buildings. Although it has been said that you can do everything that you would in a real public house, smokers and dart players are in danger of letting the whole pub down. One definite advantage is that it is ‘free from tie’ surely a great advantage in today’s licensed trade.

Merger that Adds Up Plans are being floated to create a single influential body for accountants by merging three organisations. The idea is to bring together the Chartered Institute of Management Accountants, The Chartered Institute of Public Finance and Accountancy and The Institute of Chartered Accountants of England and Wales. The new body with 200,000 members could be formed next year if approved by the governing Councils. A new Royal Charter would be sought. Is this a case of Deja Vu !

SELF-INKING STA M P S Includes : Institute Logo Date (Up to 4 years) Trading Name For further information please contact the Secretary. Allow up to 6 weeks for delivery Price Inclusive of VAT & Postage £35 .00

www.hmce.gov.uk/forms/graphics/733.pdf STOCKAUDITOR

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Trip Of ALifetime ! .

Definitely not a Sunday Afternoon Stroll ! Roger Corti M.I.L.S.A. , F.T.V.I. I am writing to let you know that I am safely back from my attempt at trekking up Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania. I returned home on Saturday 26th after a full day’s travelling by minibus & plane — a very tiring journey! On top of the fatigue of the climb, you would think I would have been totally exhausted, but the thrill and excitement of the trek for the charity, Scope, left me in a peculiar state of mind. To explain - I now have over 50 new friends - with whom I have shared a lifetime’s experience. I have lived in rather primitive conditions, and achieved a personal summit of about 5250 metres (17000ft) — higher than Mt Blanc! We have lived high above the clouds, literally, for many days, seen sights that few are lucky to see, battled against the intense cold and the exhaustion that comes with low levels of oxygen at height. The rarefied air makes sleeping difficult. The food was simple, toilets basic (hole in ground) or non-existent. To see the glory of the stars at night as we stood above the clouds, took away what breath we had left. Childhood memories of star filled skies at home were dimmed by the brightness of Africa’s sky at night. Millions of stars swarmed against the background of the swirling wraithlike Milky Way.

I have walked muddy, rocky paths through rain forest, scrublands and on lunar looking landscapes, paths full of rocks, alongside giant heather trees and giant lobelias that look like huge cactii. Weeping mosses hung from trees, making eerie and magical forests, sparkling black crystals lay scattered on rusty clay paths. Strange animals were seen from monkeys to rare and colourful birds, giraffes, bright painted lizards and striped chipmunk looking mice. My new friends and I have shared our thoughts, our life’s problems, and encouraged each other through the days we shared. We also shared food, medicine, toilet paper, equipment and advice. Our mutual ambition to go as high as we could — together. Meals were taken together - simple fare but sufficient - like one big familiar family coming together for a special occasion. No one stopped chatting - like long lost cousins. Served and cooked by our porters, nothing ever tasted better. Fruits with real flavour - sweeter than any prepared and packaged desserts from Tesco’s - a royal finish to a peasant’s meal. Sleeping on bunks in small huts or concrete shed allowed no inhibitions or privacy. Washing was seldom more than a splash of ice-cold water, more likely a rub with a wet wipe. Because of the basic untreated water, even teeth were not cleaned too often.

A Welcome rest - still a long way to go !

The early wake up calls, the long slow uphill climbs, the ever changing heat of the sun after icy start and subsequent addition or removal of layers of clothes to remain comfortable meant frequent small stops that were welcomed for the relief of the lungs; straining to gather enough succour from the thin air. The final day and midnight start to the summit of the volcano from Kibo huts at 4750m challenged everyone to their limits. Diarrhoea took it’s toll, altitude sickness felled the fit and strong, weariness and lack of energy made others turn back down the slippery ash slopes, trudging heavy shouldered like zombies to the shelter and cold comfort of the Kibo huts. Met by fellow sufferers of that emotional fatigue, doing their best to lift very dampened spirits. Strong men and ladies sobbed as their chance to achieve the summit was meanly taken from them. Those that by their determination and weary plodding made it to Gilman’s point over rough rocky paths cried just as much as they that reached the top, the pain of getting there almost too great to bear. Fewer still of the strongest and competitive went on further to see the volcano crater, at Uhuru, returning, lonely in their achievement, down that zigzag scree slope — sliding through the grey volcanic ash as fast as they could to reach their friends below. The next two days spent trudging those long - now downhill - paths and anticipating the long journey home. Hearts lifted by the porters singing as we left Horombo, then down jungle paths to Marangu Gate, hearts saddened passing several urchins begging for sweets or pencils. Signing out at Marangu felt that the worthwhile achievement was now part of history. Collecting the baggage from expectant porters and tipping them well made us feel good too. An interlude back at Kibo Hotel for a Gala celebration improved the mood, a chance for a shower, to use a normal toilet, have a couple of drinks, buy some souvenirs and then to see local orphans dancing and showing acrobatic prowess, all to exciting drum rhythms, lifted us all.

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Trek To Kilmanjaro The defeat of England’s football team soon bought us down to earth, and took us eventually to bed. Ahead in the morning, a journey across the plains of Africa, seeing all the poverty and ramshackle mud huts and shed-like buildings with rusty corrugated iron roofs, home to the local peoples; small children sharing tasks of herding goats and carrying heavy burdens, many dressed in bright red patterned Masai traditional cloaks. Besieged within the hot buses by eager smiling tribesmen selling small carvings, beaded fancies and such, and bartering through closed windows gave all a fresh view of the way we shop at home! The nightmare of bureaucracy crossing the borders from Tanzania to Kenya left us all excited and amazed at the differences between African nations and us. With one of the three small buses, needing to stop to repair the cooling system, our journey across the Serengeti was delayed. The roads unlike at home are full of huge holes, crumbling at the edges, edged by numerous small herds of goats, cattle and donkeys, all guarded by young children, and old men, all carrying long thin sticks to prod and cajole the hungry animals who strayed as close to the road’s edge as possible to find enough to eat. In addition, traffic along the roads weaved from side to side, unpredictably, to avoid potholes and uneven dips that strained the little effective suspension that remained. Huge old lorries pulling large trailers, all seemingly held together with wire and string — and luck. Cyclists interspersed the traffic with large wide

There was even a wheeled stretcher for the unlucky ones

loads of hay and such perched precariously, swaying slowly along the broken crumbled road edge.

Our drivers , experienced as they were in these conditions , left us in panic as they overtook laborious trundling lorries up hills, and then braking sharply to avoid “sleeping policemen” , rough lumps laid across the road to protect pedestrians near every small or larger village or group of mud huts. If this meant driving one wheel off the road, than so be it. For some, in the last bus, delayed in addition by filling up with fuel, the race to Nairobi in time to connect was a greater nightmare. Racing through the unlit roads, avoiding just in time the holes, swerving through armed police roadblocks with heavy sharp metaltoothed tyre stingers, gave us all concern. Through the outskirts of Nairobi, one could have imagined being in a warzone as fires smouldered at the sides of the dust filled road and ancient looking lorries, at all angles across the road. Our drivers pushing through, horns repeatedly pressed to warn others out of our way, taking calculated chances on a clear passage by the time we reached the obstruction. People moving out of the way, just in time, like crows on roads at home. The airport at Nairobi , something else! Queues, card filling, long waits, poor food and facilities, contributed to our weariness. Last minute toilet calls before boarding the luxury of upholstered airplane seats and the promise of home at the end of another eight hours.

Sunrise for those on the starboard side was spectacular, deep reds, golden rays and cloud shadows over soft puffy white morning clouds locking us into uncomfortable gazing positions, unable to miss a moment, reminding us of the similar moments at Horombo overlooking a sea of clouds hundreds of feet below us, again with spectacular reds and oranges of sunrise and sunsets. Flying into London early morning alongside the River Thames was equally enthralling , seeing the Dome below us, Docklands, and all the bridges, busily trying to pinpoint locations as we flew over , recognising the new magnificent metal arch at Wembley, to be followed by Windsor Castle before we made our last turn and sharp descent to Heathrow and home. Goodbyes sadly said, long held knowing looks into new friend’s eyes, clutching hugs, promises to meet again hopefully made, we all turned around to the reality of loved ones meeting us, & travelling finally to the comfort of our homes in England to explain, as if we could properly , where we had been and the sights we had seen. Those friendships built in the previous ten days , confidently held but with an underlying sense of reality opposing their future, seemingly cast in iron for life, would give us strength when challenged in the future. Never to be forgotten memories choking us whilst we told of our travels and apparent hardships, knowing that we would never feel the same again.

Until the next time... STOCKAUDITOR

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The New Generation Trevor Knight continues his journey across the country in search of the new breed of Britain’s brewers.

Part Twelve – Wales and Gloucestershire was set up in 1999 by Will and Sandra Hopton. Based in the cellar of the Wern Fawr Inn brewing was started by Will and pub regular Robert Scott. Will is a huge Buddy Holly fan and all the ales brewed have a Buddy Holly theme – even the brewery’s name is linked as Bryncelyn is Welsh for Holly Hill!

In the last part of my journey I crossed the English border for a quick taste of Welsh beer at the Breconshire brewery – but there is more to come from the principality as I take a brief look at Welsh brewing. With the exception of two long established breweries in the south, most of the interest has revolved around the emergence of the small micros in the last twenty odd years. The ‘old generation’ of Welsh brewers began perfecting their skills back in the early 19th century. Various monastic orders had been offering hospitality to the thirsty traveller since the Middle Ages, but it wasn’t until 1830 that commercial brewing began when Felinfoel started brewing near Llanelly. Family owned and still working from the original grade two listed buildings, * FELINFOEL is the oldest brewery in Wales. Coal from mines in the area saw the rapid growth of heavy industry in South Wales and as a result many breweries sprang up in the region to supply the needs of the workforce. Of the many breweries that existed in the later part of the 19th S.A.BRAINS (founded in 1882) is century, *S still successfully operating as a family concern in Cardiff. With the exception of the area around Wrexham in the north east of Wales, beer was supplied from breweries in the Midlands and north west of England. Over the past 150 years some small breweries have operated, but the difficulties of supply and demand over a sparsely populated area resulted in many closures. The big national breweries supplied the local need from their plants in England but the ‘Beer Orders’ of the 1980’s changed all that! So it was then, that we saw the birth of the ‘new generation’ of small brewers. Let us travel across the principality to look briefly at some of them. In 1985, Ian Dale and Tony Brookshaw set up PLASSEY BREWERY, taking on the mantle of traditional brewing in Wrexham and the north east of Wales. Situated on the Plassey complex, the brewery supplies ales to 32 trade outlets. 8

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The north west of Wales was, until recently, a ‘dry’ area mainly on religious grounds, so breweries are sparse. However, tucked away on the edge of Snowdonia National Park in Waunfawr, is the SNOWDONIA BREWERY, which was opened in 1998. The tiny two-barrel plant is located in the pub – the house of the station master for the Welsh Highland Railway! A second outlet for the brewery’s beers, bought by the brewery’s owners, is the Prince of Wales in Caernarfon. The historic town of Caernarfon leads to the Menai Bridge, the crossing to the Isle of Anglesey. Situated in a converted outbuilding of a farmhouse, the BRAGDY YNYS MON BREWERY, in the village of Talwrn was started by Martyn Lewis in 1999. A former stable now houses a bottling plant. Organic Sosban Fach and all bottled beers are made without finings and are suitable for vegetarians and vegans. I return to the mainland where my mini journey across Wales continues south along the wide sweep of Cardigan Bay to Pentregat. BRAGDY CEREDIGION is a ‘small craft brewery’ located in a converted barn on Wervil Grange Farm. Opened in 1997 by Brian and Julia Tilby, the full-mash, five barrel plant uses Maris Otter floor malted barley with Challenger, First Gold and Fuggles hops. A range of bottled conditioned ales, which are also suitable for vegans, is available in the adjoining brewery shop. I head back now towards South Wales passing through the old County town of Carmarthen and on to Llanelli, home of the famous old brewery at Felin Foel mentioned at the start of my journey. From here it is just a short distance eastwards to Swansea – Wales’ second largest city. North of Swansea, at Ystalyfera, the BRYNCELYN BREWERY

My ‘whistle stop’ tour of Welsh micros is now complete, with apologies to Welsh readers for its brevity. Perhaps I will return one day for an in-depth discovery tour! * Featured in my series Breweries of Britain Returning to England I continue my journey south through the shire counties along the Welsh border. Before 1966, travelling between the old Welsh county of Monmouthshire, Bristol and the south west of England required a long journey along the Severn Valley to a crossing at Gloucester, but in that year the magnificent suspension bridge was opened. The road and footway hang from cables high above the river giving wonderful views of the estuary to the south and the Cotswolds and foothills along the Welsh border to the north. The ancient Royal Forest of Dean lies in the Western part of Gloucestershire between the rivers Wye and Severn. Designated the first National Forest Park in 1938, the 27,000 acre forest retains many ancient rights and privileges from its unique heritage as a royal hunting forest in Norman times. Both iron and coal have been mined in the forest by freeminers who were awarded this privilege by Edward I in gratitude for service to the Crown. Freeminers have to be born within the Hundred of St Briavels, be over 21 and have worked for a year and a day in a mine. They have a monopoly of the right to mine in the Forest in return for a royalty payment to the Crown. These rights still exist and are regulated by a Crown official called the Deputy Gaveller. Reflecting the old mining traditions of the Forest of Dean, FREEMINER BREWERY was formed in 1992 in Sling near Coleford, site of the New Dunn Iron Ore Mine. In December 2000 the brewery moved to its new home in Cinderford


The New Generation near the site of the last deep shaft mine in the Forest which closed in 1965. The 40 barrel plant produces cask and bottled ales for markets at home and abroad. Brewery boss Don Burgess is a much travelled man, promoting his ales in many countries. All the ingredients he uses in brewing though are produced within 30 miles of the brewery – Don himself visiting the hop gardens to check for quality. The beers produced by Freeminer are given names which reflect the rich mining heritage of the area from which the brewery derives its name. SPECULATION ALE (4.8% Abv) An aromatic chestnut brown, full bodied beer with a smooth, well balanced mix of malt and hops with a predominantly hoppy after taste.

Freeminer’ s active policy on bottled conditioned ale persuaded the Co-op to take Goldminer, a version of a cask beer called Gold Standard, as its first own label, bottle conditioned offering.

Midway between Gloucester and Bristol the interesting Saxon town of Wottonunder-Edge lies in a fold in the Cotswold hills. The 13th century market town has some fine old buildings including a 14th century school and a 14th/15th century A short distance to the south, the medieval village of Wickwar is the home of our last brewery. The village lies on the Old Salt Way from Droitwich to Sodbury and was developed by the De La Warre family in the late 13th century. The

The bench mark of Freeminer style brewing. Golding and Fuggles hops, locally grown at Ledbury, abound in the classic beer. Light

COOPERS (3.5% Abv)

Cradled in the picturesque Cotswold hills, the city of Gloucester has a rich historic past – here you will find Roman foundations, Victorian docklands and a magnificent Norman cathedral within the bustling city centre. Unfortunately, we must press on with our journey southwards to visit the second of our breweries.

church.

BITTER (4.0% Abv)

ingredients and Cotswold water. There are eight award winning beers produced, among which are the following:

A yellow gold, well balanced, light refreshing brew with hops, citrus fruit and a delicate sweet maltiness turning to a bitter dry finish.

OLD ARNOLD (4.6% Abv) Named after the founder of the original 1800 brewery. This ale is brewed to a similar recipe used by Mr Arnold in his ‘Strong Old Beer’. It is a ruby red ale sweetish with malt bittering overtones and Challenger hops providing rich fruitiness.

MR PERRETTS (5.9% Abv)

original settlement was located around the church with the main street, the present High Street, laid out around the market place with uniform burgage plots and rear access lanes. The High Street has a fine collection of mostly 18th

A powerful stout with liquorice and chocolate bursting throughout and a long finish. Dedicated to Arnold Perrett and Co who brewed on the same site circa 1860 – 1954.

century fronted rendered or stuccoed houses. Master brewer Ray Penny took the brave step of opening his own brewery on the site of the Old Coopers shop in Wickwar in 1990 and the WICKWAR BREWERY Company was born.

biscuit brown in colour with a hoppy finish.

Other beers in the range include: TRAFALGAR IPA (6.0% Abv) Brewed in the traditional style of this historic beer from the days when ‘ the sun never set on the British Empire’. Historically this beer was made around 9.0% Abv and heavily dry hopped so that it would survive the long shipment to the Indian colonies.

DEEP SHAFT STOUT (6.2% Abv) Not for whimps!! Packed solid with hops, malt and oats and possibly the darkest stout of all time.

Such was the success of the venture larger premises were soon needed, The building that will house the new brewery dates back to 1860 and had been purpose built to house ‘The Arnold, Perrett and Co Brewery” whose brewing activities in the village were brought to a halt because of the large gauge railway that had been laid by one Isambard Kingdom Brunel! In its heyday the original brewery waterwheel not only supplied power for the brewery but also electricity for the street lights in Wickwar making it the first village in the country to have electric street lighting. Wickwar produces traditional hand crafted beer from locally sourced

I.K.B. (4.5% Abv) Strong in multi malt flavours and very well balanced to produce rich fruit flavours of cherry and plum. I.K.B. – Isombard Kingdom Brunel – is the latest member of the Wickwar family, introduced to help celebrate the opening of the brewery’s new home at the Old Brewery and engineered to perfection!

Join me next time when we visit a ‘ship shape’ brewery with a lot to ‘smile’ about, taste some ales the Romans would have been proud of and have a day out at the seaside! STOCKAUDITOR

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Business Page

After a meeting with Chief Executive , Tony Payne, I am pleased to announce a scheme for recruiting F.L.V.A. members . Basic membership of the F.L.V.A. includes a comprehensive starter pack covering such diverse subjects as - Money laundering Regulations - Advice from the Department of - Health with regard to the risk of salmonella in eggs. - Employment law - Gas appliances

- Landlord and Tenant Act - Guidelines on contractors working on licensed premises - Staff training and responsibilities - Employment protection - Health and Safety Issues - Removal of asbestos - Maternity Leave - Disability discrimination - The role of the Stocktaker – (as supplied by the ILTSA ) - Ready to use Legal Notices - Risk assessment. Tony has always recommended using qualified stocktakers and has proved a good friend of the Institute through the years. Membership of F.L.V.A. gives our clients access to a great range of free help and advice which has

saved many members a considerable amount of money. Annual membership is £120.00 plus V.A.T. - tremendous value costing less than the cost of a pint. For every member that you recruit and sign up you will be paid a bonus of £ 50.00. George Giles and myself will be attending their Annual Banquet in Scarborough on 16th and 17th November. There is a host of speakers and it will give us a chance of promoting the Institute and what our members can offer their membership. Any members who want to join us are more than welcome. Please contact the Secretary for details.

52nd A.G.M. 13th & 14th May 2005

Full details in next issue but make a note in your diaries now ! 10

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New Members REVOLUTIONARY BEER LIST FOR MICHELIN-STARRED RESTAURANT The world of wine has been shaken to its core by the news that one of London’s Michelin starred restaurants has introduced an extensive beer list to its menu.

include Worthington White Shield, Fullers Golden Pride and Meantime White and

Thierry Tomasin, general manager of Aubergine Restaurant in Chelsea, now has nine beers on his list ranging from British classics such as Worthington White Shield and John Willy Lees Harvest Ale, to more exotic brews such as Gulpener’s Dutch witbier, Korenwolf; New York Brooklyn Brewery’s Chocolate Stout and Belgium’s dark red cherry beer, Liefmans Kriek.

“These inspired new beer lists show that both gastronomically and commercially it is important for Britain’s restaurants to

Thierry and his head sommelier (wine waiter), Jerome Merdrignac, already have 420 wines on their list, with prices ranging from £20- £ 5,3O0 (Château Pétrus 1982) a bottle and with a strong French bias. Says Thierry: “ As a Frenchman and a former sommelier, I am passionate about wine; but I have become converted to the idea that I would be failing my customers’ if I didn’t offer them a well thought-out selection of beers as well. “ “I looked in particular to find beers, which would be good partners for our starters, cheeses and puddings. The response has been excellent and we are enjoying the opportunity to offer our customers something which they are not expecting and which they are not often receiving in other restaurants.” Thierry’s comments are mirrored by James Cornewall-Walker, manager of Searcy’s Barbican restaurant, which brought in its first beer menu this Spring: “My own interest in beer has stimulated me to make a beer list available to Barbican patrons. We have started small just nine different beers - and we are focusing on being British brewed, to accompany our modern British dining experience, nearly all offered in 33cl bottles, so that our guests can try something new to accompany one of the courses within their meal. Those who have taken the plunge have all been pleasantly surprised about how well the beer choice has matched the dish. Beers

Dr Paul Hegarty of Coors Brewers ‘Beer Naturally’ campaign comments:

understand the potential of beer. There are beer styles now available in Britain to complement even the most demanding food, including dishes like artichokes, chocolate or sushi, which are the historic enemies of wine. The age of beer lists on every good menu is fast approaching.”

Nice to meet you ....... Tina Wood Allow me to introduce myself. I must be one of the newest members of the ILTSA, having only joined in July this year. My name is Tina Wood, I am a 34 year old stock auditor of 11 years, in October. I will be attending the ILTSA training course in Ilkley next month, where I will meet some of you. There are probably a lot of you wondering why I have only recently become a member of the institute, when I have been in the business for 11 years. The answer is simple, my previous employer of 10 ½ years didn’t require it. In May I joined Kingsley Accounting Services, in Batley, where becoming a member was a requirement for the position. I am looking forward to the training course, no matter how long you have been in a job you can always learn something new, that is what I aim to do. It is always interesting to see different ways/views of doing the same job. I am also looking forward to having some involvement with the

ILTSA, I can’t deny a certain amount of curiosity, due to previously having no connections with it. What have I been missing? I hope some of you will be able to answer this question for me in Ilkley. The course is local to me, having grown up in a pub in Otley, (only a few miles from Ilkley) now I don’t live much further away. I am not staying at the Craiglands, I’m too close to home to do that. The downside of this is that I won’t be able to have too many “social” drinks before heading off home, don’t want to loose my license. That sums up how I have become a member of the ILTSA. Looking forward to seeing you in Ilkley. STOCKAUDITOR

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Members Questions TRANSFER OF GOING CONCERN VAT TREATMENT OF ROOM DEPOSITS I will shortly be conducting valuations of stock and other items associated with the transfer of business of two separate hotels. Because of the time of year, both businesses will have taken substantial payments in advance for deposits on rooms destined to be filled with shooting parties. While I am happy that VAT should not be charged on any items of the valuation, there will be two balances appearing on my statement relating to room accounts, namely OUTSTANDING ROOM ACCOUNTS, which will be charged to the purchaser net of VAT, and ROOM DEPOSITS TAKEN IN ADVANCE by the vendor, which will be credited to the purchaser (since the latter will be providing the taxable supply of goods and services in due course) / but I am not absolutely sure of the VAT treatment in this case. Since a taxable supply has not taken place at the time of the business transfer, should these room deposits be credited as a gross sum? - I will contact the VAT Office before the day of transfer, but in the meantime hope that the ILTSA can provide a definite answer.

This is not as simple as it first appears. The problem was circulated around Council and the following points were raised. Extreme care must be taken in this situation. It is one thing to value stock that you can physically see and quite another to value book values of deposits and outstanding accounts. It was felt that solicitors or accountants are in a better position to handle this. However if you had specifically been asked to act in this matter great care must be taken to accurately record each individual account and have both parties agree to your methods of working. It was felt that the deposits should not have VAT applied as until the service was provided VAT would not actually be charged. However Customs and Excise have intimated that they feel VAT should be paid as soon as the money is received. If the money has already been included in income, VAT would have been applied. It should be born in mind that the customer will be looking at receiving the full reduction of his deposit off the final bill. Consequently the full amount of the deposit should be passed on to the purchaser with a note about whether the VAT had already being applied. With regard to the outstanding accounts the gross amount should be transferred to the purchaser, which will in effect be an opening ledger figure. It should be made clear that VAT has already been accounted for by the vendor. If treated as income VAT would in effect have been paid twice.

A call to the local VAT office to clarify the position will strengthen your position and any rulings made must be made clear to both parties. 12

STOCKAUDITOR

NewMembers Rather than merely listing new members I though it would be rather nice to ask them to provide a small introduction to themselves. The dubious pleasure of being the first goes to George Hook. Two more new members are awaiting references and hopefully will be included in the next edition

George Hook - Kent

I have been involved in the leisure industry in excess of 30 years and have gained valuable experience on the way. 6 years in the Middle East and 3 years in Germany, the rest in good old UK, managing a diversity of facilities ranging from large multi purpose public leisure centres, through private members clubs to company sports & social clubs, all of which had bars and or restaurants. This experience coupled with my thirst for solving problems seemed ideal qualifications to take over a small stock auditing business from Hazel Norris based in Kent. Hazel has moved to Austria with her Partner and young son to start a small guest house and to lead a healthier and less pressured lifestyle. It is my intention to couple the stock auditing business with Management and Health & Safety consultancy, which seems to be working nicely. I am looking forwarding to attending the ILTSA course in October.


Competition Page Across:3. 5. 7. 11. 13. 14. 16. 18. 20. 22. 23. 26. 27. 28. 30. 31. 32. 33. 36. 38. 40. 41. 42.

Cricket match Pancake mixture Too long for Spode ( anagram ) German shepherd dog Poisonous fungus Agitation in prison C D Earl remixed in bed Amphibian lived in hall Fizzy water in carton I confiscated A flying cigar Solemn confirmation Lord Chancellor’s seat It’s on the cake Light purple shrub James Stewart was in it There are twelve of them Flowers in the - - - - - ( trilogy ) Erects ( Anagram ) Shock, horror a good result Is this month regal Time of celebration Press tears into unwanted visitor

Les Kerr F.I.L.S.A.

Down:1. 2. 4. 6. 8. 9. 10. 12. 15.

R M A

C T T

Scotsmen toss it Stock auditor to be Cream of the crop Writer of computer instructions Made in Holland ( Anagram ) Japanese wine Active volcano Forbidden Liquid from fruit

R C C A T A F I A M N D R E U N I E R E K E R D I O L I S C N L C U S O U R O R S N A R A R I B B E A G A N U R N. I P T A A P S R E A C L E O N E

C C H A M P R A G A N E N C R A J C U N

17. Place where wheels could be good for you. 19. Old Nottingham pub ( 3 words ) 21. He took longer to write it 24. Prominent object in the North East 25. He did it in 80 days 29. Fairy Tale girl 34. He chopped up larches ( anagram ) 37. Hundred eyed monster 39. Stiff felt hat or cricketer

0 C I C O R Y A U A S A L A L M B L E D E R G E S R R A C K E E E T I L M I X L N R A C O A R L

Thanks to Les Kerr for compiling this topical crossword. Win a twenty five pound voucher by being the first correct entry to reach the editor:-

Chris Swift 13 Moor Top Road Norton Tower HALIFAX HX2 ONP

No correct entries for the crossword were received for the last issue - I do not think it was that hard ! The good news is that the prize fund for this issue has increased to £ 25

International Appeal How to pour the perfect Guinness - in Japanese STOCKAUDITOR

13


Vehicle Recovery

V You Decide ! Harry Whitehead F.I.L.S.A. asks “ Did we make the right decision in changing to the RAC last year ? ” It was a beautiful end to the day. We had had a wonderfully relaxing week in the caravan, just outside Brixham.The weather was the best for some time resulting in most of our eating being Bar-B-Q alfresco style. I hitched up the caravan at about 9.15 a.m. to make a return journey of some 230 miles back to our base in London. It was a Tuesday morning but the traffic was quite heavy and after about 2 hours and 30 miles later we were approaching Exeter services on the M5 when I noticed a swift rise in the temperature of the engine and the warning light was flashing ‘STOP’. I cruised gently into a parking bay and phoned the RAC. “Hello, how can I help you” came the polite reply (very encouraging start). After a few preliminaries he asked me for the Reg No of the car. “W511 ….)” I replied . “Ah yes sir it’s a Laguna isn’t it?” “yes” I replied. Well its not registered with us you had better get on to whoever was supposed to register the car. Fuming I was just about to ring the Society HQ when I had an inspirational thought. How did the guy from the RAC know my car was a Laguna as he was probably sitting on top of a mountain outside Bombay. ”What’s the car number Doreen?” “W551….” Came back the reply. “For Gods sake,” I replied, “That’s all I need, to find out after all these years that I am a dyslexic Stocktaker.” Armed with the correct Reg No and my membership card I re contacted my man at the RAC. “We will have a patrolman with you within the hour sir”. Quite on time at 58 minutes and after two calls assuring me he was on the way the Patrolman duly arrived. After a cursory examination he said, “I think we have a hose-pipe gone Sir!” “Oh good” I said, “ At least its not a burst radiator then”. Then it came ‘ The plumbers hiss’. That sharp intake of breath that lets you know that this job is nothing that has ever been known to man before, and that it will take forever to fix and the cost will be astronomical. “I’m sorry Sir but it appears that the radiator is leaking badly and I am not able to repair it. You will need to go to a garage to get this fixed”. Now my caravan is kept in South London and 14

STOCKAUDITOR

I am based in Rugby in the Midlands. Decision time has arrived, do I get the van back to London or the car to Rugby? Since they are attached then they both go to the same place. Inspiration came from the RAC patrolman when he suggested that I have the radiator fixed in Exeter. Numerous phone calls and no little effort later, we discovered that it would be impossible to find a spare radiator within 2 days therefore we decided to go to Rugby where all spares were obtainable next day and I knew the garages. A suitable breakdown wagon was summoned, which duly arrived within the hour at 2.30pm. The car was loaded onto the back of the wagon, the caravan secured behind and happy with the world and fully satisfied that my fifty quid investment with the institute for breakdown cover had been well spent we set off for Rugby. As we were passing Bristol in that stretch of motorway, which is elevated, and where there are beautiful views over the Severn estuary, there was an almighty bang. “I know what that is”. Said our driver, “my fan belt has broken. We will go to the next service station and assess the situation”. ( This is great, the breakdown truck has now broken down, but we know what it is )! We arrived at Michaels Wood service station at about 4.30pm. The decision was made that we would be handed over to another company for further travel home. About 20 minutes later we contacted by a breakdown company who although they could not get us back that day would lend us a car to get home and if we left the car and caravan at the service station they would pick it up later when a truck became available and get them home to us tomorrow. I explained that under no circumstances was I leaving my pride and joy on the parking lot nor was I interested in their offer. About 40 minutes later we were contacted by our RAC man and informed that another company was on the way to us. About 30 minutes later I was contacted by a man who informed that he would be with me in 15 minutes, and was I in a gold coloured Renault. I told him that I was and he could easily recognise me as I was the car on the lorry park with the caravan behind

Our chairman, George Giles, has always strived to get the best possible deal, resulting in our switch to the RAC last year. The service should have been comparable but as at least one of our members has experienced an inferior service . However to return to the AA will mean a probable increase of £ 10 per car. What should we Do ? Email, phone or post your reply to secretary@iltsa.co.uk

01422 366633 it. “What caravan?” came the instant reply. “The one I started out towing at 9.30am this morning” I replied, “ it’s now 5.30pm and my patience is beginning to wear thin”. The man assured me that everything was under control and that we would soon be on our way. He duly arrived on the lorry park. He loaded the car onto the truck in no time at all and things finally seemed to be on the way at last. That was until he tried to attach the caravan to the tow truck. “I’ve not seen one of these modern hitches before it won’t go onto the hitch”. Without boring the pants off you, suffice it to say that another truck was summoned and the whole outfit was loaded and ready to go at about 7.30pm. Then came the ‘piece de resistance’ of the whole day. “I didn’t realise that you had a dog with you, I can’t take that with us, its against the rules”. Now my dog has been part of our lives for more than 21 years. She is a cross between a Border Collie and a Labrador called Lucy. There is not a bad bone in her body, and I was not going to abandon her on the side of the motorway for anyone. A heated discussion followed where I established that it was a good job I hadn’t got the kids or, god forbid, the Mother-in-Law with us. The dog was loaded into the back of the breakdown truck with us and we continued on our way home. We arrived without further incident at 10.45 pm. The humour of the situation had passed me by this time and we were now ready for our beds. On reflection I wonder if we were wise to change from the AA to the RAC ? Admittedly it was some time ago when I had used the AA but I found their in-house services both professional and well organised arriving home with caravan from Swansea in 5 hours from breaking down. It seems to me that the RAC policy of using contractors for all recovery work leads to a pot luck situation when you break down after the patrol man has left. Whilst no doubt my experiences are unique my confidence in the RAC is not high.


Code of Conduct

Secretary’s Corner We have three telephones now in our office. The first one is the home phone, which rings if the children need a taxi, a late dinner, no dinner at all or my mother just wants a chat. The second one is our business phone sometimes informing me a clients dog is dead so please cancel the stocktake tomorrow, will it make a difference to the stock if the client lent 36 gallons of Stella to the working men’s club next door and didn’t tell Chris or could he do a valuation on a lap dancing club next week – NO! The third and most recently acquired telephone is the Institute line with the diddly diddly ring tone. For the first two weeks when the diddly diddly phone rang, I developed the shakes and came out in a cold sweat. What were these mostly faceless stocktakers from all over the United Kingdom going to ask me? Would I be able to answer all their questions? Would they be able to understand my very broad West Yorkshire accent? Anyway after this initial or should I say initiation period, I now get quite excited (sad don’t you think!) when the diddly diddly phone rings and feel that I have friends all over the country and most do seem to understand my Yorkshire brogue. Now, to the serious part. Since I took over as Secretary we have had numerous enquiries for membership of the Institute of which four are now associate members. The training course next month

Examinations and Training Course There are still one or two places available for the forthcoming course to be held in Ilkley from the 13th October contact me for details if you would like to attend.

Member’s Brochures We now have the updated lists of Qualified Members available. Please give me a ring if you require any copies.

is filling up nicely and ten members are taking part in the refresher day and exam in October. Next years’ AGM has been booked at The Bosworth Hall Hotel in Market Bosworth, Warwickshire and Chris and I, along with Trevor and Brenda Perrott had a very enjoyable Sunday lunch there last week so we know the food will be excellent for May 2005. And finally, I would also like to thank everyone who returned the questionnaire, which you received in the August edition of “The Stock Auditor”. We found your answers very informative, mostly pleasing and will be using your suggestions to benefit the Institute in the future. However, there are still a lot of you out there who have not responded consequently we have decided to leave them open for a further month so that we can collate them, analyse them for the next Council meeting in November and give you a full report in the December issue of the Stock Auditor. Please do take the opportunity to have a say in the future of YOUR Institute.

FELLOWSHIP Any members wanting to be considered for Fellowship at the November Council meeting should contact the office now.

Contributors Many thanks to the members and others that have made this issue possible:Trevor Knight, Roger Corti, Mike Murdoch, George Giles, Les Kerr, Diane Swift, Norman Clements, Harry Whitehead, Chris Walden, George Hook, F.L.V.A., R.N.L.I., Greyeye, Stocktake U.K. & H.M.C.E.

Deadline for the December issue is 19th November

We have had two verbal complaints from members concerning perceived breaches of our code of conduct. Each and every member should have a copy of our Code of Conduct – extra copies are available on request from the office. The disagreements seem to centre around when a potential client can be approached. I have therefore reproduced the relevant paragraph below. A Member requested to carry out a stocktake, whether on a regular basis or on a single occasion, must take all reasonable steps to ascertain whether another Institute Member is currently employed. If he finds, or suspects, this to be the case, he should only accept an instruction to continue when all the following conditions are satisfied:i. written instructions have been obtained from the client confirming that the Member is to carry out a stock check for another member’s client; ii. failing this the Member must put in writing confirmation of instructions he has received from the said client. iii. the other Member has been contacted for permission to proceed, either verbally or by letter, suggested wording is as follows:“We have been instructed by the above client, whom we understand you have been working for to date, to provide a stocktaking service, and we trust that you have no objections. Please forward to us any relevant information which will enable us to provide a continuous service, indicating any items in your closing figures representing returns to suppliers for which credit is awaited, any items borrowed or on loan”; iv. the member previously employed has been given the opportunity to be present at a stock check (unless specific instructions to the contrary have been given in writing by the client).

The Code of Conduct is there for every member’s benefit and I would strongly recommend everyone to refresh their memories as to its content.

One final point on this matter – we will never act on a verbal complaint, all complaints have to be in writing so that they can be fully discussed by Council. Thank you for your attention in this matter. STOCKAUDITOR

15


R.N.L.I. - Supported Entirely by Voluntary Contributions Di and I recently made the trip to Scarborough to hand over a cheque for the £ 476 raised at this years AGM. Because it was out of season I suggested that Di phoned the day before to make sure that the station would be open. It was perhaps fitting that RNLI was chosen as our Charity this year. Preliminary figures for June, July and August show that RNLI lifeboats were launched a total of 3,335 times despite the wettest August on record. On arrival we were greeted by four members of the lifeboat crew. We then were taken on a very informative tour of the station. As with most lifeboats, both the Inshore lifeboat and the All Weather lifeboat are both named after benefactors. Everything is kept ‘shipshape’ so that launching can be achieved with the minimum delay. Scarborough Lifeboat station founded in 1801 is the 3rd oldest in the country. Lifeboats based at Scarborough have been launched over 1100 times and have saved nearly 600 lives. It is worth noting that it costs £ 500 each time the AWL is launched. The Mersey class AWL based at Scarborough, the Fanny Victoria Wilkinson & Frank Stubbs ( rather a

mouthful ) has been on station since 1991. It has been launched 85 times and has saved 26 lives. It carries a crew of 6, has a range of 142 nautical miles and a top speed of 16 knots. From the time that the crew members personal pagers are activated it takes ten minutes to launch. The boat is kept in the station on a carriage that is pushed into the sea by a purpose built tractor that is able to operate underwater for limited periods. The boat is kept in a state of constant readiness for the next ‘shout’. The cabin is packed with the very latest in satellite navigation, communications and state of the art technology. The boat is powered by two engines each of which are capable of bringing the boat back safely. The D – Class Inshore Lifeboat, The John Wesley Hillard, has a crew of three and is used as it name implies where the larger boat cannot operate. It is launched with the aid of a powerful quad bike. Safety is paramount and even if one compartment is holed the boat can still continue. It can be righted manually by the crew after a capsize. Its 40 BHP outboard motor gives it a top speed of 20 knots.

w w w.iltsa.co .u k

Every day it costs £ 274,000 to run the lifeboat service, none of which comes from the Government, it is all from voluntary contributions. For every £ 1 that RNLI receives 80 pence is spent on equipment and a mere 3p in administration. It costs over £ 400 to kit out each lifeboatman.

16

Whether you are looking for a change of career or just want to gain a working knowledge of stocktaking

Hea

Residential Training Seminars October 14th to 18th 2004

For further details on all aspects of the Institute contact The Secretary on 01422 366633 or visit out website - www.iltsa.co.uk Always look for the letters F.I.L.S.A. & M.I.L.S.A. “ Over Fifty years of raising stocktaking standards “

STOCKAUDITOR

Our donation was gratefully received , every penny is put to good use and will be used at Scarborough, but as the figures above show we left wishing it had been more. If you want to know more there is an excellent site www.rnli.org.uk with links to your local station – it is well worth a visit.

Stocktake UK Advert


www.iltsa.co.uk THE MAGAZINE FOR THE INSTITUTE OF LICENSED TRADE STOCK AUDITORS

ISSUE 56

ISSN 1471 - 0471

DECEMBER 2004

LARGER AND STARKER HEALTH WARNINGS ON TOBACCO PRODUCTS The space devoted to health warnings has been extended to 30% /40% of the front and back of the packet and these warnings are now printed in black on a white background. Many of the new warnings refer to the damage smoking causes to health and to specific diseases caused by smoking. Others offer sources of support and information for those smokers who wish to quit. From 31st December 2002, manufacturers have been required to produce new packaging with these larger labelling requirements, and no stock with old warnings can be sold from 30th September 2003 (30th September 2004 for tobacco products other than cigarettes).

52ND ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING Bosworth Hall, Market Bosworth, Warwickshire - 12th to 14th May 2005 Relax in a Grade II listed William and Mary Mansion, set in landscaped gardens in the heart of England. Friday excursion to Cadbury World followed by a leisurely lunch with fun and games in the Gardens.

I.L.T.S.A. Presence at F.L.V.A. Seminar and Banquet George Giles and Chris Swift attended the FLVA seminar and banquet held in Scarborough on the 17th November. Many interesting speakers attended a seminar covering such subjects as the smoking ban in Southern Ireland ( very topical in view of the announcement the previous day ), the Disability Act, Wine marketing, Responsible drinks promotions and last but not least the Licensing Act of 2003.

A limited number of Microsoft Service Pack 2 updates on a CD are available free of charge from the secretary. If you would like a copy, simply email dianeswift@iltsa.co.uk or telephone ( 01422 ) 366633

Although primarily aimed at the licensee members of the FLVA it was very informative to anyone involved in the trade. Flyers and member’s lists were handed out.

Find out how to link to the power of YELL.COM for a very modest outgoing!

Chairman George Giles at the FLVA Banquet

Details in the flyer !

In this Issue: Exam successes, Ivor Deficit, New Generation and much, much more !


From The Editor

Chris Swift Tel:- 01422 366633 chrisswift@iltsa.co.uk

As we move rapidly towards the festive season and the New Year, I have to say that I look back on a year that has brought mixed blessings to the trade and this profession in particular. Whilst 2004 has been a year of change for the Institute, with consolidation in the latter part of the year, 2005 is shaping up to see great progress for our members. One advantage of combining the magazine with marketing and the secretarial office means that we can make economies by forward planning and an integrated approach. You will see that your 2005 subscription notices are included with the magazine. You will also see that subscriptions have been frozen for all grades. In order that your Institute can operate efficiently please do settle these with the minimum of delay. As in previous years they can be paid by cheque, standing order or by credit card. On receipt of payment a full VAT invoice will be issued. Whilst many of our members seem to be kept very busy I am aware that it can be ‘a famine or feast’ situation and that other members are not so fortunate and are struggling for work. Whatever your situation , please do consider the Yell.com scheme. This is by far the largest marketing exercise that we have ever undertaken but offers, for a very modest outlay, the opportunity to put your details before a large number of potential clients. Full details are on the flyer. Whatever your feelings are towards the internet it is definitely here to stay and we do need to use it to it’s maximum potential. Please do support our Institute ! For those potential skiers amongst you there is a short report on progress with TUI (or maybe lack of it). Whilst it does seem to have been a long drawn out process the potential for long term work for our members is huge and is drawing ever nearer. The questionnaire conducted in August has been analysed and a full report appears later in the magazine. Whilst most of you were very positive in your comments the few ‘ niggles ‘ or queries have also been addressed and hopefully resolved in the near future. Some very good ideas were expressed in those sheets so watch this space. Many of you asked for more input from the membership in the magazine – that is very much up to all of you. My aim is to make the ‘ Stock Auditor’ something that you want to read and be meaningful for you all, but to paraphrase our disclaimer ‘ The magazine will only be as good as the articles submitted by you ‘. I would like once again to sincerely thank all the contributors to the magazine. It is particularly encouraging to see new faces ( quite literally ) in this issue but the old stalwarts are also present Trevor Knight ( Who I believe has been in every issue for the last twelve years ) Mike Murdoch , Les Kerr and not forgetting our very own Ivor Deficit. In addition our advertisers, who help keep the costs to a minimum, are certainly worthy of your support. Finally , I could have gone on much longer but it just remains to wish you all the best for the coming season, have a good break and lets hope that 2005 brings us what we all wish for and plenty of it.

WANTED! – Experienced Stock Auditor

Norman Clements F.I.L.S.A. 01491 575451 President normanclements@iltsa.co.uk Worst Christmas present :‘ Belly button brush - for the man who has everything ‘ Steve Berry F.I.L.S.A. 0131 01968 670600 Chair Exam & Training steveberry@iltsa.co.uk Worst Christmas present :‘ Soap on a rope ‘ Trevor Perrott F.I.L.S.A. 01483 829437 Treasurer trevorperrott@iltsa.co.uk Worst Christmas present :‘Miniature remote controlled car ’ Bruce Thompson F.I.L.S.A. 0131 332 0875 brucethompson@iltsa.co.uk Worst Christmas present :-

Ron Foster F.I.L.S.A. 01793 771959 Regional Reps ronfoster@iltsa.co.uk Worst Christmas present :‘ Bic biro ‘ David Ganney M.I.L.S.A. 0208 3938361 B.I.I. Liason davidganney@iltsa.co.uk Worst Christmas present :‘ Nothing - not even a card ‘ Mike Murdoch F.I.L.S.A. 01254 247496 mikemurdoch@iltsa.co.uk Worst Christmas present :‘ Pair of Argyll socks ‘ Rita Broadbent F.I.L.S.A. 01274 870989 ritabroadbent@iltsa.co.uk Worst Christmas present :‘Grommit chair tidy’

Looking for an experienced Stock Auditor to cover Derbyshire area. Contact Less Kerr on 01332 833500 or 07976 884542 This magazine is published by the Institute of Licensed Trade Stock Auditors. Whilst welcoming any contributions, the editor reserves the right to alter or amend them if necessary. Any opinions expressed are not necessarily those of the Council and are accepted only on that understanding. No part of this magazine may be reproduced or transmitted without written permission of the publishers. Printed by :- Pickles Printers, Halifax, West Yorkshire 01422 353239 All Subsciptions payable in advance. Published 6 times per year post free Annual Subscription £24.00 © Institute of Licensed Trade Stock Auditors 2004

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View From The Chair

George Giles Tel:- 0191 386 7699 george giles@iltsa.co.uk

Holiday Memories Every so often when you go on holiday you may come across a place or something that is quite unique. Sometimes that could be a place or a object which is quite new to you. On the other hand it may well be a famous building that you have always wanted to visit . I have recently had the Burj Al Arab “ the pleasure of visiting “B only 7 star hotel in the world , which is in the Jumeira district of Dubai in the United Arab Emirates . Situated on a small man made island connected by a causeway - the hotel stands proudly next to it’s sister hotel ,TThe Jumeira Beach, otherwise known as the “The Wave”. Both ooze the wealth they were built for. The most expensive room in “Burj” is £4,450.00/ 28,000 dirhams per night for a suite of rooms and the least expensive £880.00/5544 dirhams per night. Both have several restaurants of the highest quality , the fish restaurant in the wave is especially nice to dine in. Shopping malls where the rich and famous shop every day are always busy . Afternoon tea is 165 dirhams ( £26.00) and believe me you are treated as well as any millionaire or film star . Kassim the concierge is a man who watches his staff with a discipline long gone and sadly missed in most hotels in our own country . They have been building in Dubai for 25 years and from what we are told they intend to build for another 25 years. The latest project is the Dubai tower , this will be higher than Kuala Lumpa’s Petronas tower ,when they finish it in 2007 and will stand some 1800ft high . Coming back down to ground level, I have recently visited several of my outlets where the leaseholders are complaining that they have had stock delivered which is out of date. This is an old moan, but when you have five or six complaining it is worth noting. Reef seems to be the main culprit , especially the lime version, the pub company involved have washed their hands of it saying ‘ it is not their problem, and you should not accept out of date stock’. My answer to this is to thoroughly check everything coming into the outlet by a designated person and if needs be, open every box. When the pub companies start getting complaints from the draymen they may take notice, but do not hold your breath. We are now well into the Autumn of the year and I feel that so far the Institute has done well with all the recent changes that have been made . We have recently finished the training course and exams at the Craiglands Hotel, Ilkley. While the course was not as full as we would like it to have been, I believe Steve Berry and his team were very happy with the quality of delegates we are now getting.

OFFICE DETAILS Tel :- 01422 366633 dianeswift@iltsa.co.uk 13 Moor Top Road Norton Tower HALIFAX HX2 ONP

ILTSA CALENDAR 2005 February

Issue 57 ‘Stock Auditor ‘

March 17th - 21st Examinations and training Course April

Issue 58 ‘ Stock Auditor ‘

April

Council meeting

May 13th & 14th 52nd AGM Bosworth Hall, Warwickshire

AVAILABLE FROM THE SECRETARY Taking Stock Books Goods Received Books Bar Requisition Books Flexible Dipsticks Sectional Dipsticks Hydrometers Institute Ties Membership Lists

FELLOWSHIP If you qualified more than seven years ago contact the Secretary about becoming a fellow

I am now looking forward to the Seasonal Festivities which are fast approaching.

Geoorge Giiles STOCKAUDITOR

3


2004 Questionnaire Analysis First of all a very big thank you to the 115 members who took the time to return their completed questionnaires. Fifty three fellows, fifty four members but only eight associates took part in the survey. It is six years since the last survey and the Institute has moved on a lot since then. The lack of response from Associate members is perhaps a little disappointing as they are the members of the future. 77 % of you thought that being a qualified stocktaker helped you obtain work whilst 68 % of the membership did liase with other members. However 98% of the qualified members made use of their qualifications on their stationery and to market themselves. Whilst 54 % of you use the membership services such as the A.A. only 28% of you answered yes to using the specialist services. Many of you marked this question with a question mark and so obviously we need to advertise the services that we offer much better. When we come to the quantitive questions a simple point score system was used to obtain a percentage which can be used to measure progress. To the question ‘ Do you feel the Institute offers Value for Money, 23 thought it was great value 50 good value, 39 it was O.K. but three members thought not really. Thankfully no-one thought it offered poor value. The maximum point score would have been 575, we scored a credible 438 0r 76 %. On a similar question, Do you feel the Institute is well run ? 58 members thought very well, 35 thought quiet well, 15 satisfactorily but 4 thought that it could be run better. Using the same point score system with a maximum score of 560 the Institute scored 483 or 86 %. 33.3 % of the membership attend A.G.M.s As regards the magazine 29 thought it was excellent, 51 thought it good, 30 found it interesting but 2 members found it uninteresting. The point score was 443 or 79%. It was felt that there should be more articles and information from members – something that has been asked for by successive magazine editors. Other requests were for current updates on legislation, useful websites, question and answers on stock auditing and of course more from the ever popular Ivor Deficit. Hopefully some if not all of those requests will be dealt with in the coming issues. Questions 11 and 12 were fairly similar and not surprisingly the answers were very similar as well. You expect the 4

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Institute to give you status, support, information and security. Several Associate members felt that we could do more in the way of support for newly qualified members. This will be discussed in some depth but the provision of a ‘buddy’ service will be examined possibly using the Regional reps that we have in place. One or two of you asked that ‘Taking Stock’ be updated – this hopefully will be started in the coming months in the format of a CD. You were happy with the range of merchandise that is currently offered but you do feel that the range should be extended to include badged fleeces and polo shirts, allowance books and stock report binders. We are also aware of the need of providing something for the ladies. The clothing issues have already been looked into and hopefully details will be in the February issue of the ‘Stock Auditor’. 86 % of you wanted your name to be included in the member’s brochure and 89 % wanted your name to be included on the website database. With your subscription notices will be a tick box if you do NOT want to be included in the above. Just over half of you ( 50.9% ) would take part in a larger trade advertisement. Whilst 73 % thought that the Institute should do more marketing on behalf of its members, 79 % would be willing to contribute to the cost. One scheme that we have looked at is to take national coverage on Yell.com which should address some of the issues raised. This is dealt with in this issue. Diaries, Calendars and Year Planners seem to be a non starter with about 23 % of members expressing an interest. It is back to the drawing board on this but perhaps some form of sponsorship can be achieved. Other methods of marketing were explored, many of you favouring the Internet and programs such as Bar Box in particular. 44 members stated that they would like to have a starter pack. When the new packs come out for 2005 they will be sent out to you.

98 % of members would encourage nonmembers to join but surprisingly two would not. No reason was stated for not doing so. 73 % thought that Emails should be used more but one or two members were against it becoming compulsory. Again rather surprisingly only 32 members or 29.3 % of the respondents felt that they benefited from Corporate Membership of the B.I.I. with only 26 members expressing an interest in B.I.I. short courses. Whilst nearly everyone offered extended stock results it was noted that a large percentage of the membership offered other services - Management Services ( 30 ) Profit & Loss Accounts ( 30 ) Payroll ( 28 ) and VAT and bookkeeping ( 45 ) . Only 45 carried out retail stock valuations. 99.2 of the membership are now fully computerised but again a large number of programmes are in use. 28 use bespoke programs, 16 use Stockmaster, 12 Mandata, 9 PS Stock Auditor , 8 Microstock, 6 for both Stockchek and Stocktake UK, 5 Innkeeper and 2 members use Sage. 91.5 % of respondents are self employed with 71 % being VAT registered.

As I said at the beginning many thanks to the members who responded – your answers will hopefully be used by Council to further improve the services that we offer our membership. Your comments are important to us. Chris Swift F.I.L.S.A. Marketing Co-ordinator


Exam Successes In the recent examinations seven associates passed their exams and are now full members. I am sure that we can all remember our own examinations and thought it would be nice to introduce one or two of the succesful candidates to you - very well done to all concerned.

‘ Double R Day ‘ As you know I recently attended a Refresher day and Examination at Craiglands on the 13th and 14th October.

David Gould M.I.L.S.A. I started my hotel career with TrustHouse Forte spending nearly 20 years as a general manager, ranging from small country inns to busy town centre conference hotels. With all the changes within the industry, I decided that it was time that I worked for myself. So nearly three years ago I bought a francise, and became a Stock Auditor with Stocktake UK Ltd, and have never looked back. Having been at the sharp end for so long, I find it very rewarding when I am able to help a client with a problem I have experienced many times during my working life.

If you are looking for a slogan for the day, instead of Refresher Day, I would call it the ‘ Double R Day ‘ because to me it was a Relaxing Revision Day, by this I mean delegates are under no pressure, they are invited to input their own thoughts and ideas, pick up a few tips from experienced lecturers, all done in a relaxed atmosphere with the aim of passing the entrance examinations. In conclusion if I am asked in the future by stock auditors ‘ is it worth attending ‘ I will have no hesitation in recommending what to me was the ‘ Double R Day ‘ ….. Mike Byrne Stocktake UK West Midlands South

* I am pleased to report that Mike was a succesful candidate in the recent examination !

Paul Beech Paul Buckley Michael Byrne David Corrigan David Gould Gareth Richards Colin Scargill

Derby Cambridge Evesham Wolverhampton Doncaster Lichfield Bedford

NEW MEMBERS A warm welcome is extended to the following new members ... John Davison

Northumberland

Philip Johnson

London

Alan Youngman Sunderland Russell McKie

Edinburgh

Geoffrey Turner

Merseyside

David Corrigan M.I.L.S.A. I started working for Wolverhampton & Dudley Breweries in November 1975. In January 1989 I became a stocktaker for the company and left 10 years later in January 1999 to become an independent stocktaker, after some 23 years service with W&DB. I joined the ILTSA as an associate in November 2003, an opportunity I felt to further enhance my career as a stocktaker.

Now I am able to enjoy a fuller social life - the first time in many years - and take an active part in my local Rotary Club, an association which I have been a member of for 20 years.

In my spare time I am a football referee, something I’ve being doing for 17 years and I am currently Chairman of Wolverhampton Referees Association.

STOCK AUDITOR REQUIRED

SELF-INKING STAMPS

Qualified or newly qualified Nationwide - Salary negotiable Immediate start Telephone 01709 721705 THE STOCKTAKING COMPANY LTD

Congratulations to the seven successful candidates in the October Examinations

Includes : Institute Logo Date (Up to 4 years) Trading Name

Mike Byrne M.I.L.S.A.

For further information please contact the Secretary. Allow up to 6 weeks for delivery Price Inclusive of VAT & Postage £35 .00

STOCKAUDITOR

5


Marketing ! One of Our Members has a Makeover! I was recently impressed by the ‘rebranding’ carried out by one of our members, Richard Macdonald.. I asked if we could feature it in ‘Stock Auditor’ to promote best practice. Aoife Reilly and David Brookbanks of Karol Marketing take up the story .........

As a company that spends all of its time advising other companies how to add value to their business Richard Macdonald Stocktaking has taken some of its own advice by undergoing an extensive re-branding campaign recently. The campaign has been initiated in order to breath new life into the existing organisation, which was about to become a limited company. It was seen as a new start and is intended to work in conjunction with a widespread marketing and PR campaign. The first step in this process was to give the company a totally new identity, by creating a fresh new name. A large number of ideas were brainstormed amongst Richard and his marketing team, with the chosen name being the firm favourite from the outset. It is felt this name sums up very clearly what the company does and is punchy and memorable. Now trading under the name RCM Stocktaking Solutions Ltd, the next step was to create a logo to support the new name. A corporate designer was consulted at this point, who created a choice of logos, with the selected one picked for a number of reasons. It is felt this logo is sharp, eye catching and very modern. The huge benefit with the choice has to be the fact that the blue circular logo 6

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can be used in isolation of the company name, meaning it can be used in a wide variety of ways. A strapline has then been attached to this logo, adding to the whole corporate identity. ‘Creating Wealth through Effective Advice’, has been chosen since it explains how the company adds value to businesses. The team want people to take a key message away from this strapline not only does RCM Stocktaking Solutions count your stock, but they also give you professional advice above and beyond this call of duty. These recommendation can then in turn, save companies a great deal of money.

Richard Macdonald celebrates the expansion of his business

“We have gone to great lengths to review our corporate identity ensuring it was formed from our core values of integrity, collaboration and openness”, said Richard Macdonald, managing director of RCM Stocktaking Solutions. “The main aim has been to ensure our key message of added value is of paramount prominence, re-enforcing the quality, honesty and expertise our customers have come to expect from us”, commented Richard Macdonaldthe driving force behind the whole re-branding campaign.

Keith Holman and Richard Macdonald count up the money they save their clients!


Press Release Richard Macdonald is looking forward to a bright future with the new look. “We have had very positive responses to our new image and we are delighted with the final result”, added Richard. In the business for 7 years and with over 25 years cumulative experience, the team members of RCM Stocktaking Solutions service some of the North East’s largest leisure and

sporting companies such as Ultimate Leisure. RCM Stocktaking Solutions provides stock auditing services to a range of leisure- based clients. Strong emphasis is given to offering additional advice, which contributes greatly to the overall success of the client’s organisation. With this re-branding complete, RCM Stocktaking Solutions is set for a bright and prosperous future for itself and its clients.

Thanks to Aoife Reilly and David Brookbanks of Karol Marketing for their help with this article and the Press Release below!

FOR SALE A retired Institute member has the following for sale: 1 Keg Check 1 Flexible Dipstick 1 Reeves Hydrometer 1 Institute manual Would suit a member starting up or could even be used for spares. £ 35.00 the lot! Contact Ian on 01704 563508 or 07890 414532

RCM’s NEW CONSULTANCY SERVICE WILL SAVE REGION’S BUSINESSES £1MILLION NORTH EAST entrepreneur Richard Macdonald has expanded his already thriving business, RCM Stocktaking Solutions, to provide an innovative consultancy service to the region’s businesses. Richard’s expert stocktaking advice has already saved tens of thousands of pounds for clients such as Ultimate Leisure and Springs Health Clubs. He is confident this new business venture will deliver the same financial gain to many other companies in the North East. Richard has big plans for the future of his business. “Within the next two years we will have saved the region’s business up to £1million. We look closely at areas such as staffing, purchasing, the sales mix, pricing and operations to provide some major cost-saving advice. We saved one client £30,000 per year in one hour of visiting his company.” To celebrate the expansion, RCM has undergone an extensive rebranding campaign introducing a vibrant new corporate logo. RCM Stocktaking Solutions is aiming to position itself as the leading license trade and business consultancy service in the region. The company’s new corporate identity signals a new direction and future for the business. “We have gone to great lengths to review our corporate identity ensuring it was formed from our core values of integrity, collaboration and openness,” said Richard. “It re-enforces the quality, honesty and expertise our customers have come to expect from us. We have had very positive responses to our new image and we are delighted with the final result.” With this re-branding complete, RCM Stocktaking Solutions is set for a bright and prosperous future for itself and its clients.

Stockcheck Limited has vacancies for two experienced stocktakers. One position being with our Chester based franchise, and a second with our Head Office covering the Manchester area. Successful applicants would ideally have previous licensed trade stocktaking experience, and preferably I.L.T.S.A. qualifications. The position requires a degree of flexible working times, and a general knowledge of I.T. skills would be an advantage. A competitive salary, with travelling expenses, and 20 days holiday, is available to the successful applicant. Applications in writing to :

Stephen Grantham M.I.L.S.A. (Hons ) Stockcheck Limited 3 – 4 Slaid Hill Court Wike Ridge Lane LEEDS LS17 8TJ Tel:- 0113 236 9975 www.stockcheck.co.uk

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7


The New Generation Trevor Knight continues his journey across the country in search of the new breed of Britain’s brewers.

Part Thirteen – Avon & North Somerset On this part of my journey we visit two of the country’s most famous towns and a popular resort at the mouth of the Avon. Bristol, the largest city in the south-west, has played a unique and important role in England’s history. Once England’s second city, the prestige of Bristol is reflected in splendid architecture, a rich maritime heritage and a wealth of attractions, beautiful estates and parklands. The city’s unique heritage spans many centuries and in 1497 John Cabot the explorer sailed from here and discovered Newfoundland. Bristol’s ideal location at the head of the Bristol Channel enabled the expansion of world trade including, at one time, a major part in slave trade. However, by the 18th century silting up of the docks became a major problem and trade through the port began to decline. The great Victorian engineer Isambard Kingdom Brunel is responsible for some of Bristol’s best-loved features including the Clifton Suspension Bridge, the iron ship S.S. Great Britain and Temple Meads old station, terminus for the Great Western Railway. Today Bristol is a large commercial centre, one of the most popular cities for business relocation and a major focus for media industries. The first of my featured breweries, Smiles, is located in a Victorian terrace in the heart of historic Bristol. Built on the classic tower principle, Smiles brewery uses traditional methods and only the finest ingredients to brew fresh, natural, hand crafted beers. Smiles started full-scale brewing in 1978 and has grown into a successful independent brewery which celebrated its Silver Jubilee in 2003. One pub is owned and 300 outlets are supplied throughout the UK. A few miles to the east of Bristol, Bath is the most complete and best preserved Georgian city in Britain. It is also one of Britain’s oldest cities, famous since Roman times for its warm mineral springs. The creation of Bath as a showpiece of Georgian architecture was the work of architect John Wood who designed Queen’s Square and the Circus 8

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and his son, also an architect named John, who designed Royal Crescent. Pulteney Bridge designed by Robert Adam spans the river Avon.

Smiles interesting beer profile includes:

SMILES ORIGINAL (ABV 3.8%) A traditional West Country brew created around the time of the introduction of hops to the beer process. A pale amber hue with a faint aroma of Fuggles hops, this clear, balanced and rounded ale leaves a subtle dry finish and a thirst for more.

SMILES BEST (ABV 4.1%)

The City’s history began in AD44 when it became an important Roman settlement called Aquae Sulis or the Waters of Sulis. The springs originate in the southern Mendips, collecting mineral salts on the way and reach the surface again at Bath. Early in the 18th century Dr William Oliver built a bath house here for the treatment of gout and his name is preserved in Bath Oliver biscuits. The Roman baths stand in the centre of the town adjoining the 18th century pump room. The Bath of today is a modern residential town attracting visitors from around the world.

BATH ALES

Traditionally brewed bitter using the best malt and Smiles pure cultured yeast, results in an amber colour with a malty taste and a slight fruity finish, cut by the gentle bitterness of Fuggles hops.

BRISTOL IPA (ABV 4.5%) This fusion of selected malts and hops, Challenger and Styrian Golding creates an ale of the first quality. The addition of Fuggles hops late in the brewing results in a delicate aroma sensation on the tongue as befits a beer fermented for the elite of the British Empire.

HERITAGE (ABV 5.2%) With an aroma of malt, chocolate and hops, this is a medium to full bodied fruity ale, red brown in colour with a lasting bitter sweet finish.

Despite its name this small micro is situated on the fringes of Bristol. Two former Smiles brewers, Richard Dempster and Roger Spickett-Jones began brewing in 1995 by sharing brewing equipment at Henstridge Brewery at Wincanton on the DorsetSomerset border. The two hoped to set up their business in Bath but unfortunately suitable premises never became available- hence the Bristol relocation. As with most micros the premises were tiny and a 15 barrel plant was squeezed into a small barn. Now the brewery has a purpose built plant on a site on the eastern side of Bristol with an increased capacity of 50 barrels. More impressively the brewery has a small chain of pubs which started in Kingsdown, Bristol with the purchase of the Hare on The Hill. This was followed by the Hop Pole – the brewery’s first pub in Bath. Four more have since been added.


The New Generation Bath Ales Logo – a running hare – is based on the traditional hill carvings found in the West Country. Bath brew three regular caskconditioned ales. BATH SPA (ABV3.7%)

This is a golden yellow ale brewed using pale lager malt complemented by a dwarf variety of hop which imparts a prominent citrus aroma. It is dry without harshness, crisp and full flavoured with some fruit and slight sweetness.

GEM BITTER (ABV 4.1%)

Well balanced and complex, this medium- bodied bitter is malty, fruity and hoppy throughout with a hint of chocolate. Amber coloured, it is drier and more bitter at the end. BARNSTORMER (ABV 4.5%)

Rich in fruit with hints of chocolate, this full bodied dark ale derives its character from deeply roasted malts. It is a complex but deeply satisfying beer with a dry finish.

Our last visit is to a popular coastal resort a few miles south of Bristol. Originally a small fishing village, Weston-super-Mare is one of the principle seaside resorts of the West Coast. In the middle of the 18th century doctors began extolling the virtues of bathing in sea water - King George III tried it in Weymouth in 1789 so setting the fashion. The town has little of historic interest but all the traditional features of a seaside town – piers, Winter Gardens, a marine parade extending for two miles, several parks and a wide sandy beach. Good views can be had across the Bristol Channel from the Iron Age fort at Worlebury Hill.

HEWISH I.P.A. (ABV 3.6%) This beer was named after the local village. A lightly-hopped bitter, pale brown in colour with a subtle sweetness and fruity taste. Floral citrus hop aromas last through to the finish. P.G.STEAM (ABV 3.9%)

R.C.H. Brewery was started in the early 1980’s at the Royal Clarence Hotel at Burnham-on-Sea and purchased by the Davey family in 1984. In 1993 Graham Dunbavan was employed as a brewer and new beers were developed by him and Paul Davey. Production quickly grew from five barrels a fortnight to fifteen barrels a week which was the maximum capacity of the brew house.

The first beer brewed on the new site with the new plant. The name comes from Paul Davey M.D. and Graham Dunbavan, brewer, and the Steam as there was now a steam boiler to heat the copper. This complex multi-layered ale has a floral hop aroma with some fruit.

New premises were found at a former cider mill in a hamlet called West Hewish near Weston-super-Mare and a thirty barrel plant was installed in 2000.

PITCHFORK (ABV 4.3%)

R.C.H. now supplies 75 outlets and the award winning beers are available through its own wholesaling company which also distributes for other small independent breweries.

The name comes from the Pitchfork Rebellion of 1685 – the last Civil War battle to be fought on English soil. Yellowgold in colour, hops predominate in a full bodied taste which is slightly sweet and fruity. A class act!

I’m sure the editor would like to hear from readers with personal experiences of some of the breweries and beers that I have featured on my travels over the last few months.

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9


World of Wine One day in the schedule of a wine educational visit -

Portugal It was Thursday 9th September 2004, our intrepid team had already toured around three of Portugal’s southerly wine regions and our first visit today was to Casa Santos Lima, Quinta da Boavista, in the Estramadura region which was our destination for the days tastings.

include the Quinta des Setencostas and Quinta da Espiga, available widely. On a sad note the vineyards own Labrador, called Ali after the grape Alicante Bouchet, died suddenly in the afternoon from a heart attack.

On a warm & sunny day we arrived in the Estremadura region of Portugal and the sub region of Alenquer. To the estate of Quinta da Boavista. owned by Jose Luis Oliveira da Silva and his charming wife Christine, a porcelain restorer by trade. The Quinta has 280 ha, sited on a hillside, some 150 metres, above the gentle slopes of the vineyards of which 160 hectares (ha) are in production, including 45 - 50 ha of vines up to 50 years old. Existing traditional varietals like Touriga Nacional, Trincadeira, Touriga Franca, Castelao are grown with international varietals such as Pinot Noir, Syrah & Merlot. About 50 different varietals are grown here with some still on an experimental basis. Wines are produced following a “sustainable agricultural” practice which involves the use of non toxic products, limited fertilisation and the encouragement of a green carpet between the vines - similar to that of organic production. Each variety harvested separately, some by hand others are trained for mechanical harvesting. Interesting to note that the newer plantings are in an increased density and narrower spacing, not for increased quantity but for better or improved quality wine. Managing the canopy and clonal selection has lead to the biggest quality difference, whilst reducing the bunches of grapes - a green harvest leads to better quality of fruit. We tasted some “must” samples of the 2004, notably the Fernao Pires - a touch of peardrops on a crisp 10

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background, and the Pinot Noir - a touch reductive but quite natural at this stage, good colour and focused fruit. The star wine, tasted at the winery, as we had the opportunity before dinner to taste the full range of wines, had to be the TOURIZ 2002, available at Oddbins. This was a blend of Touriga Nacional, Touriga Franca & Tinta Roriz, lovely dark ruby, very high vanilla nose and hints of autumnal berries gently enveloped with creamy coconut and caramel finish that was silky soft and long. Other wines produced from the Casa Santos Lima

Next visit was to QUINTA de CHOCAPALHA whose wines are available from Corney & Barrow. The estate as purchased in 1987 and is planted with 45ha of vines, most of which were newly planted and their first vintage was 2001. Here we tasted 5 wines including a Chardonnay of immense concentration and complexity from the new French and American lightly toasted casks used. Along with a Tinta Roriz 2003 which was almost opaque and had that lovely mouth feel of very ripe fruit. The estate also has pears and apples, both are untreated with pesticides, and are harvested over a three week period, being sold to the supermarkets. On to the next winery - QUINTA de PANCAS where we met one of Portugal’s top wine makers Jose Neiva up in the vineyards. The intense

Partly fermented chardonnay with yeast on the top


World Of Wine heat of the midday sun was cooled down by the prevailing wind that blows through the vineyards from the nearby Atlantic. Here we tasted another 5 wines including the odd Vital grape variety, a new grape variety to this region and one of high acidity, like Sauvignon Blanc but not as aromatic. We were all escorted on our coach through the vineyards to see some new plantings of a grape called Alvarinho, to the dismay of the driver who caught the underside on a rut and we all had to disembark and walk back through the vines. Most enjoyable picking and tasting the different ripeness within the bunches of grapes. Here the white grapes had been harvested and the reds were about to be harvested within the next week or so.

Taking a Cask Sample

Next was lunch the sort that started at 1.30 with a selection of the local cold meats and cheeses prior to the 1st course and finished several courses later at 4.00pm after a parade of home made sweets - five in total all presented and served at the table - but we only had another 2 visits in the afternoon!!

but the estate rolled out their best wines and the most memorable was the CASCO 2001, made from Castelao, Tinta Roriz, Carignan & Tinta Miuda this was the biggest wine of the day. Spending 13 months in oak casks this was an incredible wine balancing power with complexity perfect acidity and very long finish.

The next visit to QUINTA de PORTO FRANCO where the Pinot Noir grape is grown at around 200 metres high and next year will be the first harvest from Syrah grapes. The emphasis here was more on international grapes although a little Alfrocheiro Preto, a grape from the Dao region was also grown with great success.

We were next taken to the medieval wall city of Obidos to taste their speciality of a cherry liqueur, flavoured with a range of herbs and spices. Tasted along with a traditional smoked sausage that is barbecued at your table in a dish that contains neat spirit. I tried the cherry liqueur flavoured with ginger, a unique combination and one that is hard to try to imagine what went through the mind of its creator !. I did not finish that drink.

The last visit sounded to be a dull cooperative COMPANHIA AGRICOLA do SANGUINHAL, but this was to be another highlight of the day. Walking amongst the vines, tasting from the same bunch both ripe and unripe grapes seeing grapes sprayed with copper sulphate, which leaves a blue residue on the leaves but protects against disease. For it was in these vineyards that a member of our group received a phone call from home to say she had passed her Master of Wine exam, after several years of studying. No suitable fizz was to hand

On to the Marriott Golf & Beach resort for a quick wash & freshen up before trying the full range of wines. Each of the Quintas we visited today had on offer over 40 wines before dinner. Each accompanied by the owner or wine maker we had met earlier in the day. We were allowed to have any wine from any producer with each of the 4 courses on offer. The first course was a White Tomato soup,

garnished with girdled scallops and finished with basil oil - fantastic combination and great with an oaked Alvarinho. We finally arrived back at the hotel just before 2.00 am, and were due out again at 9.00 am the following day to visit the vineyards and Quintas of the Ribatejo region, but tomorrow we only have four vineyards to visit plus a gala dinner, it can be tough but very, very interesting and rewarding. Mike Murdoch F.I.L.S.A. Wine Educator

Hambushed ! Alan Brown reports on a strange situation that he came across recently. On checking through a food stock he was staggered to find that a kilogram pack of sliced ham had cost his client £ 3,237.30 . When he phoned to query this charge he was amazed to be told that ‘ it must be right because that is what the computer says it is ‘ Doh !!

Thankfully the matter was soon resolved and the client reimbursed but be warned do not take anything for granted. STOCKAUDITOR

11


Ivor Deficit Deficit Global Stocktaking p.l.c

Tui Update

STOCK AUDIT REPORT

Progress has been very slow but I am happy to say that at last we have something to report. To maintain consistency Trevor Perrott and Linda Arthur had a further meeting with the Operations Director and the Finance Director to explain what we would need and indeed what we have to offer. The Operations Director has had some experience with Stock Auditors and accepts that they have a need for our services. They have very basic control systems in place and so the first step is to implement a full stock control system. To this end Trevor Perrott, who ultimately will coordinate the scheme, and Ron Foster will be traveling to Europe between Christmas and the New Year to carry out the first audits. Ron is going because of his experience of working on the continent. Between them Trevor and Ron hope to carry out three or four audits and report back to TUI on potential problems and improvements.

For: North Pole Workshops December

For period:

Dear Mr Claus Following this months stocktake there are several items that need your attention as a matter of urgency: WASTAGE: Not all waste is being recorded. We found teddy bears, dolls and stuffed zebras, all with missing limbs that had not been recorded in the wastage book. This represents a considerable amount of money at retail and should be addressed. The practice of attaching spare limbs at random to any quadraped is not to be encouraged as it leads to confusion amongst the customers. STAFF CONSUMPTION: The variance report shows a large deficiency in oranges and stripy candy walking sticks. We would recommend that staff are told that anyone caught eating on duty will be subject to disciplinary action. It might be a good idea to purchase food specifically for the staff to eat but we would recommend that you avoid any reindeer based items. HYGIENE: The practice of allowing pets to wander freely around the premises is not to be encouraged. Even though they may have saved the day with their nose so bright, teeth marks in the bars of chocolate will eventually attract the attention of the Environmental Health Officer. The wearing of hats with bells on should be halted forthwith and all beards should be covered up or shaved off. WORKPLACE SAFETY: Most of the staff are vertically disadvantaged and as such should be given a proper working environment. Balancing on each other’s shoulders to attach the star on top of the tree is an accident waiting to happen. We would recommend that all sections of the workforce are sent on a liason course to learn to interact with each other. Elves and Pixies can get along together, they just need to accept each other for the small people they are. SALES MIX: Analysis of the products sold reveals a bias on favour of the 0 – 12 year old market. Whilst this section has in the past shown a keen interest in train sets and dolls, we would recommend stocking more alcopops and altering the food offering to include chicken nuggets. It may also be worth considering replacing musical boxes with a garage jungle drum’n’bass rap CD. Mobile phones are very popular with the under 5’s nowadays and most pushchairs have a built-in DVD player. OVERALL TURNOVER: There seems to be a concentration on the Christmas sales market to the exclusion of all other opportunities. Perhaps a happy hour or 2 for 1 promo in June and a tie in with the next world cup would expand the marketing opportunities. SECURITY: We noticed that the business proprietor was absent for what is probably the busiest trading night of the year. Whilst this is a holiday time, surely someone else could oversee external deliveries and not leave the premises unattended. We strongly suspect that as soon as you were absent, a party was held and consumption of nettle wine and simnel cake was proceeding unabated. This is probably responsible for the large deficit this month. We regret to say that the wife of the proprietor was equally responsible in her encouragement of the staff by such announcements as “Now that grumpy old git has gone out we can get the sherry out”! and even worse. The installation of a CCTV system may well prevent this in the future. SUMMARY: Not a good result this month. By taking on board our suggestions we would hope you could reduce the deficit next time and improve the profitability of the business. In the meantime, all of us here at Deficit Global wish you a happy Christmas & prosperous New Year and may all of your shortages be little ones.

P.S. Dear Santa – can I have a cheque please? 12

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The next audits will probably be into February , depending on the number required, but will be in teams of at least two. The main problem is that the client does not appear to know exactly what he wants and what he can expect from us. Hopefully after the first audits they will see what we can offer and we will get the full green light.


Competition Page Christmas Crossword !

Down 1. 3. 6. 7. 8. 10. 12. 13. 15. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 23. 24. 31. 33. 34. 37. 40. 41. 42. 43. 45. 47. 51.

Across

2. 4. 5. 9. 11.

Transform Caths apricot White animal at jumble sale Half a shilling in pudding Greetings from the committee To plain, left to the individual

13. Honey wine 14. Ups sticks at gig 16. Looks around for paperwork 22. Line on mighty river 25. With batman at Christmas? 26. Tree decoration

27. 28. 29. 30. 32. 35. 36. 38. 39. 40. 44. 46. 48. 49. 50. 52. 53.

Usually nine points of the law Isolated Nationality and gender of steam train Vanity in big cats Goddess of love He did it while Rome burned Record made out of wood Lovely in shortcrust Goes on top Strongest commercial beer (16.9%) Run away – in antelope A football legend Fawlty Blackpools are lovely Santa’s cave Buddy at Christmas! –LTSA Waddling chocolate biscuit Reindeer 1 As a frappe With Donner & !!! Reindeer 3 A sip makes you lean Time of celebration Haley had one named after him 7% of the Irish barley crop makes this Not an original, in song only

Ebenezer A wedding for one Tradesmen's qualification Indian Instrument Under the hat from the N E Reindeer 7 'Sometimes' sold with a business Brighton is one Female fox Firework to go with mash Fred Astaire was one Lingerie on bed post Christmas stage show Soaked before cooking Festive bird - alas Oatmeal breakfast Mixture used as money

Thanks to Les Kerr for compiling this topical crossword. No correct answers again so win a forty pound voucher by being the first correct entry to reach the editor:-

Chris Swift 13 Moor Top Road Norton Tower HALIFAX HX2 ONP STOCKAUDITOR

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Regional Reps Who are they ? What do they do ? How can they Help ? In the first of a series of articles the Editor starts to find out about the members behind the titles ! It was one of those nice pubs where the sane people were safely locked up in the asylum and all the lunatics were drinking in my pub. Although it was a good grounding for me as regards to stocktaking, it was company policy for the manager to do a weekly interim stock take, and I realized that I quite enjoyed doing the stocktake.

Hello,my name is Martin Kirwan, I am the regional rep for the Republic of Ireland, and I have been a member of the I.L.T.S.A for ten years now. Having worked in the licensed and catering trade for over 26 years, starting as an apprentice bar person,”that’s right folks it was classed as a trade back in the early seventies” when you entered the trade you had to do a 3 year apprenticeship. I won’t go into my work history in Ireland as none of you will be familiar with the establishments I worked in. In 1989 I moved across the water to England and I got my first position through an agency to work with Ansells Brewery in Birmingham.

Our second representative needs little or no introduction - Anton Ellender from Kent I joined the Institute in late 1987 and passed the exam in March 1988 (first attempt I hasten to add). My experience up to then was joining Whitbread Fremlins in Maidstone in the mid seventies on the tied trade side - sort of a ‘gofor’ for the tenanted and managed house area managers based in the office. A job came up in the managed house stocktaking dept. which I applied for and got. This was the start of what is likely to keep me going till I die! In my opinion managed houses are the best grounding to have in our business the job is the same wherever you go as far as paperwork is concerned allowing you to hone your skills on the ‘count’ 14

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Although I wasn’t very fond of the company stocktaker, he was a company man through and through, as I thought then, but in hindsight he was being professional in his position, although he didn’t have a very nice personality about him.

I returned home in 1994 and it took me nearly 12 months to get my first client, I am very well known in Drogheda having played semi professional soccer and captaining my home town in the league of Ireland, and I felt that this went against me with a lot of the publicans at the time. Being so well known they wouldn’t have liked me knowing their weaknesses in their managerial skills, also being a former manager myself that’s how they would have looked at me. I used to get asked how I could do stocktaking, as I was only a manager. This is where being a member of the ILTSA helped me, as when I qualified there were no doubts about my ability to do a professional job.

I then moved to Manchester and took a position with Hyde’s Anvil Brewery in one of their flagship houses, it was a high volume outlet and it demanded monitoring stock levels and controls, after 2 years there I noticed I didn’t have the enthusiasm for the day to day demands of pub management anymore after 26 years, so I concentrated on pursuing a career as a stocktaker, I started stocktaking every other day in the pub to sharpen up on my counting skills, and at that time I was doing the results manually on a calculator which was good for getting a better understanding of the basics of the stocktake.” So I suppose you could say I am self taught”

I joined the I.L.T.S.A the same year, and I passed the exam in October 1997, today I have a nice little practice of 26 clients, I work 6 days a week averaging 2 stocks daily mostly on site, and I am probably like a lot of fellow colleagues in that I am a one man band, doing all the necessary deeds that are needed to keep the business going on my own. I lead a very serene lifestyle today with my wife and best friend Pauline, we have 4 adult children, and 7 grandchildren whom we love and adore very much. And by the way I agree with you all I don’t look old enough to be a grandfather, both my wife and I are only 47 years young, we have been married since we were 17, “BE JAYSUS THAT’S SOME SENTENCE “!

the most vital part of all.

March 1995 and was surprised to find it bestowed upon me having upset Bruce at many an AGM.

After a few years (1982) with Whitbreads I joined a small firm of Brokers, Stocktakers & Accountants in Canterbury where I broadened my horizons and learnt about the rest of licensed trade stocktaking, being involved in Pubs, Clubs, Hotels etc. During this time I met my first & current wife Jane as she worked in the accounts department upstairs. In November 1987 ( by this time heavily married and with the first nipper on the way) I joined a previous colleague in partnership on a self employed basis. This lasted until April 1993 when we parted company and I was then on my own trading as Premier Stocktaking to this day. I applied for the honour of ‘Fellow’ in

There have been several occasions when I have employed people and attempted to train them to do the job as I do, but it would appear I have always been unlucky and got the wrong ‘muppet’. I pride myself on being a specialist licensed trade stock auditor and will not entertain any other type of stocktaking i.e. Retail.

This may sound very sad, but my greatest claim to fame and a fact that I am unbelievably proud of is that since my very first AGM at Waltham Abbey, I have never missed an AGM weekend ( and fully intend never to miss one! )


Regional Reps Alan Brown F.I.L.S.A.

Regional Rep - Scotland ( South )

I have been an Institute member for over 20 years 12 of which, I am proud to say , have been as a fellow. I also spent 5 years on the council. My career started as a trainee stock-taker at Usher Vaux Breweries in Edinburgh 1975. 1980-82 spent 2 years with Victoria Wine as a stock auditor covering Scotland and Northern England. In 1983 I joined Adstock Services in Edinburgh where I first came across Bruce Thompson and Steve Berry who jointly ran the business. In 1985 Venners took over Adstock where I spent five years as Assistant Business Manager to Steve Berry for their Scottish Operation. 1992 to the present I have been a partner with Steve Berry at Calscot Stocktaking. I now mainly undertake liquor and food stocktaking but have had plenty of experience on the retail side, and carried out some inventory work while with Venners. I am married to Pamela who takes care of all Calscot’s administration on Alan with Chelsea ( 8 ) and Gary ( 6 ) a full time basis. I have three children Alan 18, Chelsea 8, and Gary 6. I am an avid supporter of Heart of Midlothian Football Club and attend most games, Golf- I play with my son Alan — no contest though as he is an 8 handicap and I play off 14. One reason I have spent most of my career in stocktaking (other than the huge salary it attracts) is the fact that each day is totally different in relation to surroundings and people that we deal with. There are lots of real characters and I enjoy dealing with each and every one that comes along. I have had some great laughs over the years and recall one awful job near the Mull of Kintyre where I was suffering from an awful hangover. Bruce Thompson and Steve Berry had been too hospitable in the hotel bar the night before and the thought of counting small parts in a cold store room at the back of a garage filled me with horror. I offered my resignation later that day out loud at least three times to Bruce who was working in the row behind me. Unknown to the rest of us Bruce had gone down to the harbour for some fresh air without letting on and never heard me. However when he started from where he had left off within a few minutes it became apparent that he had spent a couple of hours that morning counting pigeon holes full of nuts, bolts and electrical parts that he had already counted the night before. I have a lot to thank both Bruce and Steve for in helping me throughout my career and although Bruce and I have not always seen eye to eye, apart from The Wife he is probably one of the best bosses I have worked for.

Examinations Bookings are now being taken for the March 2005 Examinations and Training Course. Held at the Craiglands Hotel, Ilkley, West Yorkshire between the 17th and 21st March 2005

Member’s Brochures

Anton doing his renowned ‘Ken Dodd’ impersonation at an A.G,M

We now have the updated lists of Qualified Members available. Please give me a ring or Email if you require any copies.

Contributors Many thanks to the members and others who have made this issue possible:Trevor Knight, Mike Murdoch, George Giles, Les Kerr, Diane Swift, David Gould, Martin Kirwan, Anton Ellender Alan Brown, Mike Byrne, Greyeye, Colin Scargill, Stockcheck,Stocktake U.K. & Ivor Deficit

Deadline for the February issue is

19th January 2005 STOCKAUDITOR

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Members Page Exam Success

Colin Scargill M.I.L.S.A.

I came to stock auditing at a late stage in my career after redundancy. I now wish it had been much earlier. I work for Bedford Borough Council doing stocktakes at five leisure sites. Catering stock takes are done at two of the sites and there are various vending machines also included around the units. I have been married for thirty five years and have three grown up children. My hobbies include walking, cycling, gardening and beekeeping.

Do not miss out on this exciting oportunity - see flyer enclosed with the magazine !

w w w.iltsa.co .u k

The Council of Management of the ILTSA wish all our members a very peaceful Christmas and a happy and prosperous New Year !

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Whether you are looking for a change of career or just want to gain a working knowledge of stocktaking

Hea

Residential Training Seminars October March 14th 17th tto o 218th 1st 22004 005

For further details on all aspects of the Institute contact The Secretary on 01422 366633 or visit out website - www.iltsa.co.uk Always look for the letters F.I.L.S.A. & M.I.L.S.A. “ Over Fifty years of raising stocktaking standards “

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Kent Area Stocktaking business for sale in the Kent area 23 K T/o operated on 3 to 4 days at present. Would suit member wishing to enlarge their own practice or for starter. Good varied mix of clients ! Change of career forces sale Phone Diane Gaiger for further details on

01795 539142 or 07989 749782

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Stock Auditor 2004 Annual