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Japan “Unlike the U.S. and other countries, there is no religion-based discrimination or hatred of sexual minorities in Japan. However, there is insufficient knowledge and awareness,” said Patrick Linehan, U.S. Consul General in Osaka. The sponsor of the first parade, Teishiro Minami, remembers that he had received several late-night phone calls before the event in 1994. “There were fewer than 50 of us in the beginning, but by the finishing point, there were more than 300 people who had joined us. While the community has certainly come a long way, obstacles remain. In 2014 First Lady Akie Abe showed up on a float, waving to the crowds. “I want to build a society where everyone can live a happy, enriched life without discrimination,” Abe wrote on her Facebook page shortly after the parade. “I enjoyed spending the time filled with smiles. Twenty years after the first “Tokyo Lesbian Gay Parade,” the event now attracts positive attention and has a more cheerful vibe.

Iceland The 2014 Reykjavík Pride Parade took place August 9th. Almost 30% of the Icelandic population was expected to have participated in the festivities - 90 thousand people. Reykjavik was full of excitement when the 2014 Gay Pride Parade was celebrated in the city. The Pride Parade has grown to be one of the most popular events in Iceland, even bigger than The National Day, the Independence day of Iceland, which is celebrated on June 17th. The parade started at 2 PM and took about two hours to finish, followed by a series of concerts by some of Iceland’s most famous musicians.

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savoirflairmagazine 7

2015 Pride Savoir Flair Magazine  

LGBT Magazine for New England featuring Prides around the World, Book Review Frank by Barney Frank, Interior Ideas, Lesbian and Gay wedding...

2015 Pride Savoir Flair Magazine  

LGBT Magazine for New England featuring Prides around the World, Book Review Frank by Barney Frank, Interior Ideas, Lesbian and Gay wedding...

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